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J, A11 the News 
“hat’s Fit to Print’ 



LATE CITY EDITION 

Weather: Cloudy and cooler today; 
chance of rain tonight, tomorrow. 
Tempera tore range: today 58-69; 
Tuesday 67*89. Details on page 73. 


CXXV ....No. 43,187 


O 1B7G Su Ki* York Time* Company 


NEW YORK, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1976 


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NEW YORK SCHOOLS Morgent/mu Acts to Give 


FLAN GRADE SHIFT 
IN ECONOMY JOVE 


5th and 6th Would Return 
to. Elementary System, 
Ending ‘Middle’ Setup 


By LEONARD BUDER 
The Board of Education is 
considering a major change in 
the organization of the school 
system that would return alt 
fifth-grade and sixth-grade 
classes to the elementary 
schools, possibly saving the 
hard-pressed system nearly 
SSJ2 million a year. 

The change would put a halt 
to 10 years of movement to- 
ward the development here of 
a new type of middle school — 
now known as the intermediate 


Aides More Responsibility 


Assistant Prosecutors to 
Handle Cases From 
Beginning to End 


By TOM GOLDSTEIN 
In a major restructuring of 
his office. District Attorney 
Robert M. Morgenthau of Man- 
hattan said yesterday that, 
starting May 3. one lawyer 
would be responsible for a case 
from the complaint room to 
the defendant’s final day in 
court." 

At present, as many as seven 
or eight assistant district attor- 
neys may handle a criminal 
prosecution, an approach that 
Mr. Morgenthau sees as a "con- 
veyor bek system of justice." 

“Lawyers responsible for a 
case from the beginning to end 
is re going to do better than 



JUSTICES UPHOLD 
MINORITY HOUSING 
INWHF 


Rule, 8-0. Courts Can Act 
to Ease Segregation Even 
if Law Is Not Broken. 


U.S. AGENCY INVOLVED 


Thft Vh York Hutu 

Robert M. Morgenthau 


[Tribunal Says H.U.D. Can 
Be Ordered to Build if It 
Has Aided Discrimination 


school — that was intended tola lawyer handling a .single 
cover the fifth through the) piece of a case," Mr. Morgen- 
eighth grade of instruction andlthau said. "Now the prosecutor 
|replace the traditional junior h s iik e the guy on the assembly 


J ...... ... .... Ttw Mew Yorif Tlmof/inNhon uwman 

nmunist Party posters attract a passer-by in downtown Lisbon as Portugal’s national elections draw near 


tugaljs Hectic as Vote Nears F 



IRVINE HOWE 

0 T6» New York Time* 

April 20 — -After two 
wlitical convulsion, 

1 again caught up 
zy of rallies and 
otorcades and inter- 
nee, with the ag- 
itational legislative 

25, the second an- 
of the revolution 
old right-wing dic- 
e Portuguese will 
ir first freely elect- 
■nt in half a century, 
ome of the election 
ine who is to govern 
y for the next four 
its overwhelming 
id sociaJ problems, 
parties are compet- 
»eats in the Assem- - 
Republic. Most of 
ire running merely 


for propaganda purposes and 
are given little chance .to win 
any seats. 

Only four parties are expect- 
ed to obtain a significant vote. 
They were the froRt-runners 
In last year’s election for the 
National Constituent Assembly: 
the Socialist Party, the Popular 
Democratic Party, the Commu- 
nist Party and the Social Demo- 
cratic Center. 

The last public opinion poll, 
taken at the end of March 
with 47 percent undecided or 
unknown, showed that last 
year’s; big winners, the Social- 
ists, were the country's first 
party; Thpre was only a_ narrow 
margin between the Socialist 
vote and the combined vote of 



IN 1M TAXES 


Communists kept their position 
as a strong minority party. 

As the race dosed in, political 
analysts, questioned with con-, 
ceni whether a solid governing jLookS to Reagan as Well 
majority was possible in this 
deeply divided society. 

Mario Soares, the optimistic 
leader of the Socialists, insists 
that his party will win a larger 
vote than last year’s 37.8 per- 
cent. 

"The people understand that 
we have to win and govern, 


high school. 

The return of fifth-grade and 
sixth-grade classes to elementa- 
ry - School jurisdiction would 


line doing one task, but not 
responsible for the whole car. 

The office . reorganization, 
which Mr. Morgenthau advo- 


as Other Candidates to 
Give Their Data 


.By JAMES Ml NAUGHTON 

8WU1 U> Tb« X«* Ynrk Tim** 

WASHINGTON. April 20— 
The White House announced! 
alone without concessions io j t0 ^ay that President Ford paid 

— r- r„*_ __ mnro than ' $04 000 in P^a-faroT 


mean the "bumping” — audited when he was running 

probable layoff — of 1,300 andj f or District Attorney, is consid- 
1,700 teachers now serving in. er ed to be the most significant 
the intermediate and junior admmistrative 

move he has la- 

high schools, according to thel^g,, since he took office Jan. 
board’s calculations. ! 1 . 1975. It is also 'the first 

It would also require theiiQ a j 0r change in nearly 40 
elementary schools to add 950jye3rs in the way cases are 
to 1.250 teachers to their staffs| processed in Man hattan. 
to accommodate the returnedj other prosecutors in the city 

•said yesterday that they were 


pupils. : 

Differing Licenses 
Because different teaching] 
licenses are required for differ - 1 
ent school levels and for sped-! 
fic subject areas, and because, 
iof various current personnel 
policies covering layoffs and; 
seniority, intermediate and ju- [ 
nior high school teachers can-. 


moving in the direction of con- 
tinuity of representation, an 
approach now used by most 
Federal prosecutors and in 
some county prosecutors’ of- 
fices across the country. 

This system has also been 
adopted by the Legal Aid Socie- 
ty in New York, which repre- 
sents people who are too poor 
to pay private lawyers. Accord- 
ing to officials of Legal Aid, 
"vertical continuity" has not 
been as effective as hoped for] 
because of an unexpected high 
rate of turnover among ex- 
perienced lawyers. 

Under the reorganization in 
the Manhattan District Attor- 
ney’s office, inexperienced and 
experienced prosecutors will 
work together in six groups 


Continued on Page 74, Column 4 



or- right. ’ - ! In making the announcement. 

He adds that if the Socialists : Ron Hessen. Oie White House 


grade pupils— a * • third 


Beame Considers Lifting 
Of Some Controls on Rent 


By JOSEPH P. FRIED 
The Beame administration is;nie! W. Joy. the city’s Commis- 
sioner of Rents and Housing 
Maintenance, .took, the position 
yesterday that his agency had 
the power- -tb remove aparf- 
Thcre are about 15,000 rent- : men ts from rent control if cer- 


5 . tuiiiug nuuaci ■ ,» erraripr^ m fhp pm ----- — — — - — j — — 

the liberal Popular Democrat*: poll the same vole as l, s i year. | i”*» aocretary, suggested ttalff f” er jcohtro'lei d apanntents in that.laio conditions eaisted. but it 
and conservative Central he-idtey will to f ono a minority ~ Z ET* 


cause ot the sharp rise of the 
Social Democratic Center. The! Continued on Page 14, Column I 


ird Hughes at the End : 
•adictions in Accounts 


contenders^for the Presidency I 10 ?* 131 * _ ® T,a ^°" ,or . ^f^lthey do not know how many! remove apartments from rent 
match the scope- of Mr. ****** * ^[stabilization, 

financial disclosures. °f/ ^ t f* _ 8 rade Pupfe--2.200, orj c0ntr0 L move that might result! Only the 

"The President hones thhJ 3 ^ 1 * 3 p ? reent of the ^^'Ifrom the study. 

Democrats Found b» «* . *H5* m 5* 

One of the possibilities is[f ort t0 compel the cijt'ncb con- 
that the fifth-grade and sixth- ! sider the remova i 0 f tens of! 


towing article was written by Nicholas M. Hor- 
based on reporting by him and Lawrence K. 
n M. Orewdson and James P. Sterba. 


iry accounts. about 
; ays fand illness 
R. Hughes have 
n interviews and 
bents about the 
onaire’s death on 

dence, including 
»y doctors who 
70-year-old Mr. 
by present and 
itesi suggests that 
ir refused treat- 
id have prolonged 

i that, - the ac- 
hy two of Mr. 
>rs, and the state- 
to the Mexican 
-by his aides, ccn- 


vs Offers 
i Walters 
lion a Year 


3 BROWN 
has offered Bar- 
a five-year con- 
11 .million a year 
; *hdior of "Ti|e 
s With Harry 


s said- yesterd: 
decide this w 


flict in several instances about 
his condition in his final days. 

The possible significance of 
these conflicts- is not clear. But 
the question of whether Mr. 
Hughes was competent to man- 
age his affairs during the last, 
stages of his life, or was un- 
der the influence of others, 
could become important if a 
court battle develops over the 
disposition of Mr. Hughes’s 
SI. 5 billion estate. 

The following are the incon- 
sistencies in the accounts of the 
last days of Mr. Hughes: 

! «sDr. Victor Emanuel Monte- 
mayor, a Mexican physician 
summoned to examine Mr. 
Hughes in Acapulco early on 
the morning of. April 5, said 
that one of Mr. Hughes’s doc- 
tors told him that Mr. Hughes 
had a “convulsion? on Friday, 
April 2, and that he had been 
in a coma since that time! “I 
have the impression that it was 
a brain hemorrhage that started 
off the . entire problem,” Dr. 
Montemayor said in an inter- 
view. "the coroi was very deep 
and there was no explanation 
because the kidney analysis was 
practically normal On Friday 
tie had a violent and sudden 
shock, which I imagine was- the 
stroke probably through a brairt 
hemorrhage. Immediately he en- 
tered into a coma.” 

Chaffin, a 


ts attained her 
rdora In the last 

m will make her] 
d news person- 
ion history, be- 
ounterofTer ap- 
t of- ABC in its 
While NBC has 
flie opportunity 
- 1 John Chancel- 
y News,” it did 
other options, 
ance that she 


■ Lawrence 

act with NBC, 


(Hughes- doctor who was m at- 
tendance when the industrialist 
died, said that when he saw 
Mr. Hughes on April 4 the pa- 

Con tinned on Page 16, Column 4 


NEWS INDEX 

.... .raw | . 

About New Yort ..3* Mwc- . 90S 

391 Note* on People. J9 

Bridge ...-. .. . : J 4 1 Ofikiarffa 
Bosiiws Mr' Op-Ed : 37 


Cmword ... 
Editorial* . . 
EdKKiwt .-. 
Fanaily/Stjle 
iFl-unsiol 


.36 

. 

.32-33 
. .M-3I 


Jirai Estate.. .... B 

S0Kf,i ......... 4S.-H 

Th eaten .. .... 1 S -23 

.Tramporutlon ....73 


. 49-62 1 TV and Radio. .74-75 

y be relieved Ofiijolng Out Guide -, aj u.f. Proceedings... 3 
1_ jsw« 19-23 1 Weak" 73 


ge75, column li 


Naws Summary and ladtf, Pag* 39 


ritEE VPMBE* FW|»H » 

IP THE NEW YORK SncWs. Spwa LMBS*. 32 

371-1900 Ert, 24t-Aavt 


a lor detail on tax information 

More Conservative [ : 0181 aJI candidates should. issue 

jto voters whom they' are ask- 

Than4 Years to elwate ^ 

* j Presidency,” Mr. Nessen said. 

j Tax Rate at 42% 

By ROBERT REINHOLD j Senior White House officials 
In the absence of such a said later that the remarks were 
galvanizing political issue as] aimed primarily at Mr. Reagan, 
the war in Vietnam, Dcmo^ the former California Governor 
cratic voters this year, at least: W ho is Mr. Ford’s rival for 
insofar as they are typified by:the Republican nomination. Mr. 
the small minority of voters 'Reagan’s financial disclosures 
who have turned out in the;jj ave jjgg,, detailed than 
early primaries, appear to have president’s, particularly on 

*). IT10 !u J COn ^I! aVe hue specific taxes paid each year, 
t ey did in 19 j Accord j n g t0 the data re- 

A series of six New York leased late today by the White 
Times /CBS News surveys of j House, Mr. Ford's gross income 
primary voters suggests, more- i ast year consisted of his 
over, that the muddled Demo- .$250,000 Government salary 
cratic Presidential race seems and expenses plus S1.99IJ24 in 
to have been shaped largely ^savings interest, stock dividends 
economic and other domes rental Income from three 

issues and .by an ill-defined properties be owns, 
yearning for new faces. j ^ sU tement emphasized 
The surveys confirm that thethat the President paid 42 per 
kind of divisive foreign issues ] ce nt of bis gross income in 
that created the McGovern can- J Federal, state and local tavpg 
didacy four years ago have^^ year, a percentage roughly 
largely evaporated. So, too, ic :equ h-alent to what Mr. Ford 
seems, has the appetite paid in taxes for the last 

Democrats — at least of the| | j eca( j e 

small nu mber that v ote in pri-j Mr Ford and his w ife, Betty, 
Continued on Page 18, Column 1 1 Continued on Page 17, Column 8 


City Council can 
act to remove local housing 
from stabilization. Mr. Joy said. 


By LESLEY OELSNER 

Sp*d*l lo Th- Y«rk Tlmw 

WASHINGTON, April 20-^ 
The Supreme Court ruled to- 
day, 8 to 0, that Federal courts 
can order the creation of low- 
cost public housing for minori- 
ties in a city's white suburbs 
to relieve racial segregation in 
housing within the city. 

Courts can do this, under 
the ruling, even when the sub- 
urbs involved have not been 
guilty of racially discriminatory 
housing practices.' 

The Court ruled specifically 
thet the Department cf Housing 
and Urban Development can bs 
ordered to provide such housing 
in the suburbs if tha Govern- 
ment has been found to have 
contributed, through its public 
housing funding programs, to 
tlie segregation in the city. 

City May Be Target 
The ruling also seems to 
mean that when a city govern- 
ment is guilty of racially dis- 
criminatory housing practices, 
and where it has statutory au- 
thority to act outside its 
boundaries, it also can be or- 
dered to provide housing in 
the suburbs for the victims 
of its discrimination. 

The ruling, .in a case involving 
public housing in Chicago, is 
a ‘ landmark victory for civil 
rights groups. It comes at a 
time when many have conclud- 
ed that if the problem of segre- 
gated schools is ultimately to 
be solved, it will be by opening 
up suburban areas fully to mi- 
norities. 

The precise impact of the 


Rent control and rent stabrli-jruling was impossible to meas- 
.'tation are separate programs jure. Jt' did not require desegre- 
for regulating rent rises, eachjgation plans that cross city 


Of the . 179 


schools and junior high schools 
in the system, 84 .new have 
fifth-grade or sixth-grade clas- 
ses. 

The savings envisioned by 
Continued on Page 32, Column I 


whatever rents they could get 
for the apartments. 

The Beame administration is 
not considering removal from 
rent stabilization of apartments 
renting for S300 or more. Da- ! Contoured on Page 31. Column 3 1 Continued on Page 73. Column 2 


require 


grade classes in the middle - thousands of additional apart- (having its own rules and admi-jlines; it merelv permitted them, 
schools would be shifted physi-| ments — also renting for S300 a nistrative systems. The two For Chicago the ruling also 
catty to appropriate elementaryU^^ - or more-from the rent programs evolved because of did not impose a specific plan 
schools that have space for| stab{Iization prograWi which is 
them. If space is lacking, the separate from rent control, 
classes would stay where they Removal of apartments from 
are now but would become rent control from stabilization 
annexes of elementary schools. )wouJd ^ ^ owners 
intermediate, wou | d ^ free to charge 


the piecemeal enactment of va-ior 
rious rent-limiting laws by New 
York City and stale since 
World War 1L Altogether, 
about 600,000 New York City 
apartments are under under 
rent control and about 700.000 
are under rent stabilization. 

Owners of rent-controlled 


a city-suburban 
(remedy. It affirms' a lower 
Federal appeals court decision 
that the Federal District Court 
should consider a metropolitan 
remedy. Thus, the case now 
goes back to the District Court. 

Carla T. Hills, the Secretary 
of Housing and Urban Develqp- 


apartments are limited to maxi- j meat, the defendant in the 


The Forest Hills Co-op, From Anger to Acceptance 


Elizabeth II, 50 T oday, 
Still Symbol of Stability 


By BERNARD WEINRAUB 

SpmUl lo Tb* St w Tot* 11 m 

LONDON, April 20— Queen monarchy that is seeking to 


Elizabeth. H, who celebrates 
her 50th birthday tomorrow, 
remains an enduring symbol 
of stability after the decline 
of Britain as a colonial power 
and the erosion of the na- 
tion's economic strength. 

Although criticism of the 
Queen remains low-keyed, 
her birthday — and next 
year, the 25th anniversary- 
of. her reign — have aroused 
discussion here centering on 
the role and the relevance of 
the royal family. 

The recent breakup of 
Princess Margaret’s mar- 
riage, which stirred more em- 
barrassment for the royal 
famil y than criticism of it, 
underlined, the blurred prob- 
lems of a firmly traditional 


balance the mystique of roy- 
alty with the realities of Brit- 
ain. 1976. 

Supporters of the mon- 
archy, including the bulk of 
the' British press and other 
news ' organizations, insist 
that the royal family remains 
a powerful symbol of nation- 
al unity and that the Queen, 
after a shaky start, spurred 
quiet and sensible changes 
behind an impervious public 
■ facade. 

Critics insist that over the 
last two decadeS the role 
c' Toyrj fami ! y has dimin- 
’ t'rt the institu- 

tion, without making conces- 
sions to the 20 th century 



, The Hew Ytt* Tlnes/Bartm snvtreun 

Residents of the Forest Hills Cooperative at 108th Street and Long Island Expressway sitting and talking yesterday ■ 

By FRANK J. PRIAL 

On the night of Nov. 18, the Long Island Expressway 



M- 


Continued on Page 10, Column 1 j 


Tb* Hem York Tiros* 

In October, 1972, residents of the area went to City Hall 
to show their opposition to the project 


1971. hundreds ‘ of angry,, 
shouting Forest Hills resi- 
dents stormed the site of a 
proposed housing project in 
their Queens neighborhood.* 

Throwing rocks and flam- 
ing- torches at construction 
trailers, they vowed that the 
project — designed to bring 
poor people into a middle- 
class area — would never be 
built. 

But it was. And next 
month Mayor Beame will 
formally open the- three- 
building Forest Hills Coop- 
erative at 108th Street and 


on the site that had come 
to symbolize a struggle be- 
tween New York’s middle 
class, holding to one style 
of life, and the city’s poor, 
most of them black or His- 
panic, seeking to break away 
from another. In the main, 
it was the former who won. 

Some of those who demon- 
strated angrily in 1971 now 
live in the project. One Of 
them. Joseph R. Walderman, 
is on its hoard of directors. 

”1 picketed the site regu- 

Continued on Page 40, Column 1 






1 

"£ 


V 


1 


1 ' 2 - - r 


7ifE NEW YORK TEMES; WEDNESDAY. APRIL 21, 197£ 



I Ej 1VE*W UflUV AltUJU 13, W *** — 1 . m • _ 

7 ' -rs ' ~ 77- alzattir With West Bank Stuc 

Israeli 'Forces Wound 2 m a rsat ue yv — — — 



JERUSALEM. April 20. (Reu- 
ters) — Israeli security forces 
shot and -w bunded two men in 
tfablus today as they fought a 
running battle with stone- 
throw-throwing Arab students 
in the casbah, an Israeli spokes- 
man said.. 

One .of the men was reported, 
to have been seriously injured, 
when • Israeli security forces 
opened fire as Arab students 
pelted them with stones from 
roofs overlooking the narrow” 
streets of the market areal 
The firing occurred in the 
same area where a 35-year-old 
Nablus resident was killed in a 
clash yesterday. 

Earlier, foreign tourists were 
cleared from parts of the old 
city • of 'Jerusalem is' Israeli 
security forces battled with 

rioting students. 

Reinforced troop units also 
broke up demonstrations in the 
towns of Jenin and Tulkarm as 
civil unrest continued through- 
out the occupied West Bank oF 
the Jordan River. 

Arab Schooigixis March 

After two weeks of quiet, in 
Jerusalem, about 200 Arab 
schoolgirls marched from the 
Damascus Gate of the old 
wailed city toward Herod’s Gate 
carrying wreaths with the 
ironic slogan: “Condolences to 
the occupation." 

Policemen broke up the 
march but other youngsters 
then started throwing stones 
at a police patrol. Inside the 
city walls, another group set 
fire to automobile tires. Two 
policemen and a soldier in a 
private, car "were injured by 
stones and about 15 Arab 
youths were detained. 

Ar shopkeepers' strike was 
held in many parts of the West 
Bank, bot -security men forced 
open closed shops by breaking 
the locks, /according to villag- 
ers. The. villagers 




Untied Prtu Intwiwtlonal 


Israeli troops seize an Arab youth in Nablus following disturbance in the Arab city 


said that 


tions this month that : swept 
new radical and • nationalist 
mayors into power. 

A two-day march- • through 


the West Bank last weekend 
by tens of ■ thousands of ex- 
treme nationalist Israelis was 
also blamed for inflaming the 


situation. 

The trade union newspaper 
Davar said that the march" by 
would-be Jewish settlers had 


Rhodesia tightening Security Following Killings 


SALISBURY. Rhodesia, April IMuzorewa, chafed today that 
20.- (Reuters )— Rhodesian Cabi-j Secretary of State Henry. A 


net ministers today pledged 


most shopkeepers hurried back lt j 0 u ter secur jtv measures to 

‘and a vital rail 


to their shops when they' heard j protect tourists 
what was happening. ^ilink with South Africa after 


A tight curfew was clamped: atlacks Sunday by African na- 
on Tulkarm this morning, ..ana I tionalist guerrillas in southeast- 
19 demonstrators and c J^ ew T ern Rhodesia, 
violators were arrested and, Three South African tourists 
brought immediately to tmi| were kjUed bv tj ie guerrillas 
before military courts. The r9j and tbe key Rutenga railway 
were sentence.! to prison terms l Jine south waa cu t in a bomb 1 
of eight or nine months and| anac j t 

fined up to 5720. . | Rutenga railway was 

The new wave of noting this; back j n operation today, but 
week followed two months of | the Beitbridge road — the main 
demonstrations in the Westj highway between Rhodesia and 
Bank earlier this year. The area; south Africa — remained closed 
calmed down during local elec- 1 w hiie the troops hunted for 
— [the guerrillas 


Kissinger’s coming visit to Af- 
rica was designed to strengthen 
"American imperialism” on the 
continent. 


stirred up trouble 
such as Jericho tb- J> 
quiet. •--’’•■£7:- 

The newspaper 
march had cfanjg-. "V- 
repuabpn abroad, 
foe firm aciiot^T 
merit to stopJanti* 
at' settlement,^# - 
meant a ■' 

Naional - Religfog ' 
partner inthex^ 

. Sabin TourtfJbr 
Prime Miniser V 
toured the Jordan: 
and offered reasre 
ish settlers ' few', 
set up there ahtct ; 
rad I war of 198E 5 : 
'These settler® 
to stay for a-lcii7 
Rabin said. “We f ' 
new villages- qqIj 
ddwn latrcf.V lit 
TheFrtrngMiaf. 

-the 'settlers r^prp"-_ 

front- '.Hue .ifeS,--?; 
everything; poss7 
done 'to - 

merits. . 

• Wherever* Mr- • 
he was asked by-.. 1; 
er they shoul : 
long-range planr 
that the Goverr 
made clear its i 
plans for the reg 

One fartner a: 
settlers should p 
which begin to 
after seven 
olives," the Prii 
plied. 

In an inten 
left-wing newsp 
mar, Mr. Rabir. 
_.Govemment w? 
negotiate a s 
Jordan invoM 
compromises in 
Painful decisior 
be made by I* 
peace with its 
but no agreeme 
without the he 
era! election, V 
the. interview. 

Officials act 
I Rabin -said five 



Delivering a bitter attack on 
United States policy at a »s|^*f a 3Sto r » 
conference here. Bishop Muzor-iin the Jordan ' 
ewa said that the African Na-j^^f 
tional Congress had nothing toivrhich have a 
discuss with Mr. Kissinger. of about 900. 


French Unemployment Up 


PARIS, April 20 (Reuters F- j 
Urremployment in France rose 
to 95L.700 in March from 925,- 
000 in February on a season- 
ally adjusted basis, the Minis- 
try of Labor said today. The 
ministry said the seasonal ad- 
justment took into.account ext 
ceptional labor market xondi- 
tions in 1975 when Fraftte, like 
other major industrial coun- 
tries, was badly hit by the re- 
cession. 


Tourism, voiced shock and an 
ger over the killings and said 
“further security measures 
were being introduced." .. 

As he spoke, troops combed 
the southeastern border area 
in a hunt for the guerrillas. 

The transport minister. Roger 
Hawkins, said that extra foot 
patrols’ might be added along 
the 80-mile rail route to the 
South African border. 


THJ! SEW YORK TUTM 
J29 WtB 134 St. Jj.Y. JJW9S 
1 2121 586-1231 


PuNIdwd dailr- Swmd-da* WBi« P*W 
u Ktw Tort. N. Y.. ind at .addltumal; 

mailing omen. > 


Kissinger Visit Criticized 
: LUSAKA, Zambia, April 20 ! 
if Reuters) — A Rhodesian na- 1 
: tionalist leader. Bishop Abel 


mail simsCEirnos O.S. TKRWTOBreS; 

l If. B280S. JSIOftt. 


wwkdav «n«! Sundw. -UJI.OO SSZ.70 30* JB 

WceUu only SIJQ 1I.J1 Jj.j® 

Sunttiy roly 57.00 31.10 li.IS. 

Races 10 other countrM on request. , 


"The Amods ted Press is entlUed esdoslvdy 
to the use lor maibUcnllon of ell new 
tUmuchcs crodlird io It or DOT otherwise 
crtditaa In this paper and local news «l 


■poniucous orltJo puMtahed herein. Rights 

of n — — — 


rrrAibl Lent ion or all other matter herein | 
are also res erred. 


ONLY 


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Bold Steps Urged to Overcome US. ‘ Disarray * in U.N'i 


Vs Public Transport Is Thrown Into Chaos as Rail Strike Begins 

in -TL.i 1_ . . . . .. . . 


By KATHLEEN TELTSCH 

Sptcinl U» Tb» Sew Tot* Tines 

UNITED NATIONS. N.Y„ 
April 2ft— A group of scholars 
and Americans associated with 
the United Nations has con- 
cluded that American policy 
In the world organization is 
in a "state of unprecedented 
disarray** and called for a bold 
corrective strategy.' 

In a report presented today! 
to William W. Scranton, chief. 
United States delegate, tbei 
.group advocated measures to 
restore American influence in 
the world organization. Increas- 
ingly in recent years the Unit- 
ed States has been on the losing 
end of votes in the GeneraJ 
Assembly piled up by a majori- 
ty of Communist and third- 
world countries. 

Tough Diplomatic Line Urged 

Among its specific recom- 
mendations, the group said that 
the United States should boy- 
cott or withold funds from 
“noxious" United Nations pro- 
grams. It advised the United 
States to take a “tough" diplo- 
matic line, demonstrating that 
it will listen to honest economic 
grievances but that "it would 
not be pushed." 

The United States was urged 
also to take the lead in fashion- 
ing a new “world order coali- 
tion" of like-minded states be- 


ginning with Western European! Association for the United Na- 
aUies, Japan and some of the! lions: Jerome Shestack. pres- 
developing countries to consult! Went of the International 
together and frame joint strate- ^^ for WW** of Ajan, 

° 1 and Sidney Liskofsky and Ber- 

tram M. Gold. Tjoui of the 

The group reporting -to Mr. American Jewish Committee. 
Scranton was made up of 16 =„ ,0™ 

participants with Richard N. , 

Gardner, professor of interna- Gardn ? r * a ‘ d that * h . e 

tional law at Columbia Univer- 

sity and a former Deputy Assis- a] Assembly received Yasir Ara- 
tant Secretary of State for In- fat. leader of the Palestine 
temattonal Organizations act- Liberation Organization, with 

ing as spokesman. It included "“Jr ^served for a 

- head of stale, an act that was 

Seymour M. Finger, a former widely attacked in this country 
United States delegate to the and further diminished Ameri- 
United Nations, three former — — . — 

members of the Human Rights 
Commission — Morris B. Abram, S*T 
Rita Hauser and Philip E. Hoff- f. 
man— and John Carey, the al- *r.‘ 
tem ate American representa- 
tive on the commission's sub- * 
commission against discrimina- - 

tioo. 

Also in the group were Prof. 

Thomas M. Franck of New York 
University. Prof. Hans Morgen- 
thau of the City University, 
and Prof. Thomas Buergentha! 
of. the University of Texas. 

Others were Charles William 


can confidence in the United? 
Nations. . 5 

The report, entitled "A New.' 
United States Policy Towarfl 5 
the United Nations.” was 'of-ii 
fered to Mr. Scranton as guid-1 
ance for the State Department;! 
at a time when its policies!* 
are under review. Mr. Gardner 5 
said. _ - ;> 

One of its major criticisrfi 3 
was that the Government tends*, 
to conduct United Nations polg-/- 
cy as if were in a separate] 
box unrelated to direct rela-, 
cions between Washington anpt 
other capitals. This has led,, 
to hajmfu! inconsistencies, tbe r ‘ 
report said. . ] 


H- t _ - . 


allowing Killi, 




vrv. >>•.; 


■ April 20 (Reuters) 
i-J transport was 
: yto chaos through- 
today 1 on the first 
: 'i three-day strike 
J'\d workers. Union 
^ijd that the strike 
extended unless 
■ ‘.demands were met. 
4 ties estimated that 
riders were-affect- 
: e strike of public 
•• •e railroad workers. 


Thousands of workers 
stayed over at hotels, offices 
and factories rather than try 
to struggle home through 
huge traffic jams. Many had 
arrived prepared for the 
three - day strike, carrying 
clean clothes. 

But union leaders warned 
today that new strikes could 
be called when the three-day 
stoppage era^s. They said 
the new walkcpits could last 


one day to a week. The rail 
workers are seeking wage 
increases of 10 percent or 
more. 

Normal activities in Tokyo 
were severely affected by 
the strike. Nearly half the 
schools were closed or sent 
their pupils home at noon. 
Only four department stores 
were open for business. 

Union leaders said little 
progress bad been made in 
talks with railroad manage- 


ments, but fresh negotiations 
were expected to be held 
during the night. 

Workers on the state-run 
Japan National Railways 
were awaiting the outcome 
of talks involving the pri- 
vately operated railways. 
Workers on the private lines 
were reported to have been 
offered an increase of 8 per- 
cent but were said to be 
bolding out for a 10 percent 
settlement. 


?py in Soviet, Jewish Teen-Ager in Dispute Says 


■ -VJD K. SHIPLER swer. according to Jewish 
- The n™ Twit Ttan» ' . dissidents who knew her 

W, April 19 — then. 

-ter rifle shots were Her father, a physicist, 
^the Soviet mission Aleksandr Tiemkin. had de- 
■^ted Nations. in New tided to emigrate* Her moth- 
»pnl 2. an umdenti- er, Maya M. Raiskaya, a psy= 
called several news chiatrist, did not want to 
ons to read a state leave. On this issue her 




utes with Marina before he 
was arrested and taken back 
to Moscow. 

“She succeeded In telling 
me that she was under very 


Many Jewish activists in 
Moscow are baffled that the 
protests, whose violence they 
condemn as counterproduc- 


cided i„ migrate. Her moth- heavy pressure.” haaaid. -Thly '“S^h“ J* 



g as Marina Tiem- 
Id in Russian bon- 
declared. “we shall 
lothing to liberate 
ire prepared to do 
n children in New 
same things being 
ewish children like 


er, Maya M. Raiskaya. a psy= 
chiatrist. did not want to 
leave. On this issue, her 
mother, said, the marriage 
broke up and precipitate) 
a court battle for custody 


were persuading her to be 
anti - Israel. She said she 
would make it look as if 
she really had given in to 


broke up and ^ precipitated this position, that she had 
a court battle for custody fcrgotten Israel — but in fact 

of Manna, then 13, their only she would do it just to stop 


**:=' v 

V-<- 




Tnkin." father’s friends and has also 

he Jewish Defense tried to go to Israel. “She 
plauded the attack studied Hebrew, sbe wore 
ed that the Soviet a Star of David — a large one. 
ice had kidnapped She sang Hebrew songs." 
emkin, a 16-year- In the autumn of 1972. 
girl, because she Soviet authorities informed 
emigrate to Israel Mr. Tienikiii that he and his 
as run prominent- daughter would be issued 
much of the vi- ^.-emigration visas. But before 
■ threats and the the documents were ready, 
ions directed Mr. Gendin said, the courts 
viet diplomats in found in the mother’s favor, 
a. awarding her custody of Ma- 

nf riruL Tbe gW® visa authori- 

of Court Battle zation m withdrawn . 

venlng, Marina , ; In February 1973, accord- 
as quietly doing ing to Mr. Gendin’s account. 
Drk in the Moscow oolicemen entered Mr. Tiem- 
on Smolensky kin’s apartment seized 
where she lives Mariana and took her to the 
rther. Orlyonok Camp for Young 

le girl said. “I pioneers, a Communist youth 
to emigrate any- organization, in the Cau- 
rn happy. I only . casus, 
ay here with my 1 Dr. Raiskaya, Marina’s 
iy school, my . mother, denied any police 
' involvement 

irs ago. she would “Marina went to a pioneer 
a different an- camp as many children do 

in our country," she s*id- 

nir .si 1 - But Mr. Goidin offered a 


child. 

“She wanted to emigrate 
with her father," recalled Lev 
A. Gendin, an automation 
engineer who is one of her 
father’s friends and has also 


§B¥f 


f : * 

\ jf 1 •. . -&•* f ' 






case when many other Jews 
who still want to leave have 
been blocked. 

No Trace of Ambivalence 
Marina, tall and dark-eyed, 
shows no trace of ambi- 
valence about her desire to 
their pressure against her.” stay in the Soviet Union. 

Her father tried to see There is nothing in her clear- 

her at the camp, loo, Mr. voiced answers that hints 

Gendin recalled, and was at uncertainty. She is a di- 

also held by the police. He ligent student, her mother 

finally emigrated alone to says, and a member of the 

Israel where he is living Komsomol, the Communist 

now. But he is believed to organization for youths 14 

still hold the hope that his to 28. 

daughter can join him, and After an American corre- 
some dissidents here specu- spondent had asked to inter- 
late that his appeals have view her daughter, Dr. Rais- 
sparked the protests in New . kaya took 10 days ' to give 


viet diplomats in 

is. 

of Court Battle 

venlng, Marina 
as quietly doing 
Drk in the Moscow 
on Smolensky 
where she lives 
jther. 

le girl said. "I 
to emigrate any- 
ra happy. I only 
ay here with my 
iy school, my 

irs ago. she would 
a different an- 


« i *- 


•1 T V 

• ^ 

M 






mum has 

r*» 

Sunday via 


sThatCnba 
m Informed 
iry on Raids 


?Jl* Hrx Tort Tttoe* 

TON, April .20— 
ouse and the State 
said today that the 
es had informed 
riday- that -it was 
the identity 
io attacked Cuban 
)Js off Florida on 
was taking steps 
her such attacks.” 
..-''rattner, the State 
.,)s^ spokesman, ... «aid 
' .kite d States conr 
. ii 1 flTf.attack fe: which: 
/'MunitrnaatJ lost his Hfe. 
y/Ji5>; e Federal ^Bureau 
iCt P® hzd established 
I f/l*/ 0 Cuban, vessds 
A I 1 * 'an by aii vfeid^nti- 
‘ then rammed 

A f Hulk Ferro Cemenlo 
I fiat’* fTDBa were pidied 
jjflfaft by a Norwe- 
'-Jf Wliip. One died inter 


Mr. Gendin, said, the courts The Proceeding 
found in t£e mother’s favor, AiU? rruLCCUUi S s 
awarding her custody of Ma- in the U. N. TodaV 

rina. Tbe girl's visa autbori- _ 

zation was withdrawn. . .. l07 

. : In February 1973, accord- ApnI 21 ’ 1976 

ing to Mr. Gendin’s account. SECURITY COUNCIL 
oolicemen entered Mr. Tiem- Meets at 10:30 A.M. on 
kin’s apartment. seized question of Timor. 

Mariana and took her to the GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
Orlyonok Camp for Young Commission on Intemation- 
Piooeers, a Communist youth a) Trade Law; committees — 
organization, in the Cau- 10 a.M. and 3 PJkf. 

. casus. . Committee on Financial 

Dr. Raiskaya, Marina’s Emergency of United Nations 
mother, denied any police — 3 PJd. 
involvement. ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL 

Manna went to a moneer COUNCIL 

camp as many children do p m 

in our country;" she s*id MeetS at tlT' 

But Mr. Goidin offered a Tickets may be obtained at 
less innocent picture. He said' the public desk, main lobby, 
be had slipped into the camp United Nations headquarters - 
and talked for about 20 min- Tours: 9 AM. to 4:45 PM . . 


approval, aod then only on 
the condition that Marina, 
who she said had ■ suffered 
trauma and deep unhappi- 
ness over the events of three 
years aao, not he questioned 
about that period or about 
her father. 

“It would be very difficult 
for Marina to dircuss these 
things with you,". her mother 
said. 

As a result the path Mari- 
na has traveled ' in the last 
three years remains in sha- 
dow. The wounds, the con- 
flicts she may still 'feel re- 
mam well below the surface. 

“She was a child then,” 


Giic wad a uuiu wui.u, 

her mqther said, “and she l# 


was not able to decide or 
think about such a compli- 
cated question as leaving her 
homeland. Sbe grew up. She 
became aware that she 
should stay with her mother 
in hex own country.” 





mi * 
m as* 





^Tatther and' Ron 
J White Hoose 
^ :jecte<LaIlegaaons 
llifister Fidel 1 Castro 
BQ yesterday that. 
m United . States 
'.if Sled -to: the at- 






- .. u kr. also took up 
• .'-*■! > warning that fie ‘ 
. ” ■ Uje I973 ; Cuban- 

. ^hijacking agree- 

. > T.' 1 ■’ ‘The unilateral • 

- - ' this agreement 

.yf international ter- 
.-.j'^’^onld. damage the 
.;** .. nations.l* 

- ' .. j.-siie United. States 

" ... our commit- 
memorandum 
ifeg on hijacking ' 
punishable acts 


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,1 rattner declined to! 
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■ skesman said that 
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BERGDORF 

GOODMAN 










».*Y. 







! 


THE NEW YORK TIMES, WEDN ESP A Y, APRIL 21, 1976 



Turn in India’s Foreign Policy 


Mood oi Amity 


News 

Analysis 


China and Pakistan »£? ££) 

Moves Hint a New 

I strains of the kind of ; familial 
[hatred that grows out of having 
r __ _ . ! once, been the same cadatry. 

“For more than a year, India both Pakistan and India, 
had been angling for the re- there are still millions of people 
sumption of relations at the [ ^ biUeriy remember growtng 

ambassadorial level • : Up ^ et her tS* timing of the 

Even after External Affato.^omeUc moves was com- 
A W °few “hundred! MinLster Y B Cliavan disclosed I ddeotai or not, they have 
*i. 0 n .u Dr the agreement last Thursday . created an image of a concilia- 


By WILLIAM BORDERS 

Sctdal to TM :-f»' York Times 

NEW DELHI, April 20— Be- 
hind a high and forbidding 
bright red gate in New Delhi’s! 
elegant diplomatic enclave \ 
stands a squat stone building 
that has for years been a monu- 
ment to a painful 
international es- 
trangement — the 
all - but - deserted 
Embassy of China. 


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yards away, on the other side 
of the embassy row, on a broad 
boulevard named Shantipath 
(Road of Peace), stands another 
reminder of war — the purple- 
domed Embassy of Pakistan, 
which now has the Swiss flag 
flying over it. since no Paki- 
stanis were left in charge. 

The Pakistanis -packed up 
and went home in 1971, as they 
plunged into their third war 
with India. The Chinese had de- 
parted neady 10 years earlier, 
leaving only a skeleton staff, 
as they slid toward a war of 
Gheir own with the Indians. 

But all up and down Shan- 
tipath today, among the diplo- 
matic neighbors of those em- 
bassies, there was speculation 
about the possibility of new 
activity behind the walls of the 
two compounds, as people here 
puzzled over what looked like 
a startling turn in Indian for- 
eign policy. 

Two Major Actions 
Within a period of four days, 
India announced that it was 
exchanging ambassadors with 
China, and that it had offered 
to reopen negotiations toward 
resuming diplomatic relations 
with Pakistan. 

Among diplomats and knowl- 
edgeable Indians, the one-two 
diplomatic offensive raised 
these major questions: 
qWere the two moves related 
any way, or was it just 
chance that placed them only 
a few days apart? 

^Individually or collectively, 
do they represent a sincere 
Indian move toward a new in- 
ternational policy, or are they 
just part of the tide of words 
that seems as regular in South 
Asia as the monsoon? 

qwhat relation, if any, do 
these external overtures have 
to what Prime Minister Indira 
Gandhi calls the domestic 
emergency, in the name of 
which she has suspended civil 
liberties and jailed tens of thou- 
J minds of her opponents? 

'There's really no easy an- 
swer to any of that,” a Eu- 



agreement last Thursday - created an image . _ 

in parliament, the Chinese* tory India and are responsive 

sr the Indian snibsssfiuor is I , . ■ _ hashf 

*i i authoritative voice tor pe^Lc. 

"n one wiStly held .new here. I 
a principal reason for the In- 1 

d,ne SET 


the shadow of the Soviet! 


Union, their closest big-power ‘ especially In the 

cowa bitof independMCv. . • 1^ a vS tem ;new -course- -for. 

The : Russians here have-boj the- democracy that he helped] 
made- -any- public response; to» * nearly '30 y^ars ago? 
the move, and privately tneyi " 1 , 

are playing down its impor-\ ‘Spirit of Nehru 

tance. But it is generally ; Any move toward better reta- 
thought here that the news : tions with India’s Asian neigh- 
of better relations between I Q 0 rs is in what an official 
New Delhi and Peking must | described as "the spirit oF Neh- 
have caused some distress in : ru,” a peaceful man who detest- 
Moscow. | ed the partition of India, which 

Knowledgeable observers, ; created Pakistan, and who once 
however, cautioned against at-! said of China: 
taching too much importance! "The future of which I dream 
to the exchange of ambassa-Jjs inextricably interwoven with 
dors, or expecting too much 'close friendship aipd, something 
from it, in terms oF South Asian I almost approaching union with 
stability. -China.” * 

"There are still a whole lot f Last summer, wfcen^the state 
of problems between these two! of emergency was declared. In 
countries, and putting a couple! in the face of what Prime Mi- 
of new chaps in at the topjaister Gandhi called .‘*a grave 
isnt’ going to solve them right internal threat,” some peopiel 
away," a diplomat said. predicted a military .-offensive! 

The barren Himalayan fron-iby India, to . . deflect criticism 
tier between China and India.! from the harsh new domestic 
the issue over which they went 
to war in 1962, is grift as 


BOGOTA, Colombia, April 20; 
(Reuters) — Colombia's govern- 
ing coalition of Liberal and 
Conservative parties over- 
whelmed Communist factions 
in last Sunday’s local elections, 
according to official figures 
made public today. 

However, the elections were 
marked by voter apathy, with 
only 20 percent of tbe 10 mil-i 
lion registered voters casting 1 
tbeir ballots. 

WithUl-3 percent of the votes 
counted, the Liberal Party, 
senior partner in the coalition 
with the Conservatives, had 
gamed 50.06 percent of the 
votes. 

The Conservatives won 41.5 
percent, with 3.82 percent fori 
the National Popular Alliance 
and 2.75 percent for the Com- 

_ r munist-led National Opposition 

10 months since she embarked Lyniob. The .other votes went 


former Prime Minister Jawa- 


pOSltKW- 

Bot now such, military action 
ensued, and now some of those 
.same people are talking about, 
the possibility of deflecting 
:. ... "^ 1—= — with an 


much in -dispute today as it 
was then. -And the Indians also 
charge the Chinese with aiding 
insurgents in the eastern border [domestic criticism 
territories of Mizoram and "Na - 1 overture of peace, 
gaiand. ' | In the new domestic political 

The two countries are also i order in India, with Mrs. Gand- 
rivals for the allegiance of Bhu- 1 hi’s personal power greatly en- 
tan and Nepal, the independent jhanced. she is now able; to 
states along their border, and . undertake initiatives -— in 
for the friendship of Ban- (foreign policy or other areas 
gladesh, whose violent change! that might, have been mrpos- 
of government last year altered jsible a year ago. hTe overture 
several of the power relation- -toward Pakistan, for example, 
ships in South Asia. (would very likely have attract- 1 

Similarly, the gesture toward l ed a barrage of critidsnr-frorn 
Pakistan, which Prime Minister; the Jan Sangh Party, a militant 
Zulfikar Ali Bhutto promptly ; Hindu group. But now its lead- 

— „ . -- .reciprocated, is many steps ers and many of its middle 

ropean diplomat said, express- away from a conclusive agree- -level workers are m jafl. among j 
ing a common new. "There mpnt. . ,the thousands of political pris-.- 


Ruling Parties Win 
InColombianVote, 
With Turnout Light 


tng 

might be some changes coming, 
or there might not We’ll just 
have to wait and see." 

Indian Government sources 
said that there was no direct 
connection between the two 
overtures, a contention sup- 


Under the Simla accord that oners, and sympathizers who ( 
Prime Ministers Bhutto and (are at liberty are reluctant tO| 
Gandhi reached in 1972. the attack the Gandhi administra-j 
resumption of diplomatic rela-ltion, on, this ot any other point, 
tions would come only after! PartKu.teriy with the - ap- 
agreement on a range of corn- preach of the conference of 

_ plicated subjects including] nonaligned nations scheduled 

ported by the fact that the; avert lights and land comm uni- Tor Sri Lanka in August, India 
timing of the improvement in cations. \ ijs actively seeking a -a^-orid 

the relationship with Peking!.; Those subjects now ap-! leadership role and mending! 
was really more China’s choice! pa rently will at least be dis-|fenc^ at home js a logical 
than India's. ' cussed, at. meetings that are ‘step in that direction. 


to a Maoist group. 

The former Liberal President, 
Carlos Lleras Restreno. who is 
seeking the 1978 presidential 
candidacy to succeed President 
Alfonso Ldpez Michelsen, won 
more than 60 percent of the 
Liberal votes cast in the caoital. 

However, he appeared to 
have lost around in rural areas 
to Julio Cesar Turbay Ayala. 
Colombia's Ambassador to 
Washington, who is also seek- 
ing the 1978 Liberal Party 
nomination for president. 

U.S'. and Nigeria Agree 
to Share Lockheed Oata 

. WASHINGTON. APRIL 20 
(AP) — The United States and 
Nigeria signed an agreement 
today providing for the sharing 
of any irrfomvation uncovered 
in • investigations of allegedly 
illicit payments by the Lock- 
•heed Aircraft Corporation. 

: . .Nigeria's chief purchase from 
Lockheed m recent years was 
six C- 130 aircraft 
In the agreement, the two 
countries pledged their best ef- 
forts to make available to each 
other information concerning 
"die 'sales ; activities -in Nigeria 
of Lockheed and its subsidia- 
ries oc affiliate.”s 
The United States has signed 
similar- agreements recently 
with Jaoan. Italy and the Ne- 
therlands. • - • 

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THE NEW YORK TIMES, WEDNESDA Z APRIL 21, 1976 ' V • * 






j .- 7 - r ' ^ Jed by Congressmen, 

l " * ' ■ 0. 5j'-. 2 lls Envoy of Concern 

: J-f- ■ v ; ' ’ ^ Lawyer’s Ouster 

.1 \v!V'' ' v-st 

1 * . » * • .« » “ron™ rutrm mxmnn 


J ^By DAVID BINDER 

VPKUI to The New York Tima* 




' - - 7 ns in Chile, the State 
— - : raent has called in the 

1 Ambassador "to ex- 
: ; V.' jive concern" about the 

'■ ’*■. and 'deportation of a 
• : . . _ i'- jo civil-rights lawyer, 

' - . 1 ■ ^ stration officials report- 

-Vy- 

- 7 .^ officials said that Assist- 

\iretary of State Wiliam 
• . • “r /’iers told Ambassador 

' Trucco last night. of 

. - 4 . 'vd Administration’s dis- 

over mistreatment of 
— . 5 who had talked with 

* s of a United States 

•' • ./ sional delegation on 

‘ ‘ ■ fights violations in the 

V ■ r (capital last month. 

‘ Congress members 

ecretary of State Henry 
• :•••■■ aiger last week saying 
ay were .upset by ap- 
Teprisals against Jose 
! - : j'and several other 

: to whom three of the „ 

rs had spoken. 

?3S! . founsel Deported 

liaquett, who acted as 
•vwSifjfJJIi - - msel for a Chilean pri- 
— ?fense organization 

" “ — s the Vicarate of Soli- 

*ras arrested April 5 

“ — ortH to France April 

'than, one month after 
\gressional delegation 

-^jgislators who spent 

in Chile last month 

■j resen tive Toby Mof- 
nmecticut, Tom Hark- 
and George Miller 
... all Democrats, 

j^r^they learned 'of the 
gr X Mr. Zalaquett and 

‘ ” ht of others among 

U. J Chileans they inter- 

l.-v^^ae Congressmen wrote 
letter to Mr. Kis- 
? v J ..>f.rip maDding diplomatic 

e*.yl -g^i^that they said, the 

SS feeI com P elied 
w S** *w steps to curb Unit- • 
■a mm* 3 * 5 < 015 . m economic and milita- 
( Sfice. fer Chile. 

r* ^ 6l * r ® ^«tter was followed by 

ritten protests from 
f. Fraser. Democrat 
sota, and Charles 
/, Republican of Ohio. 

ledge Recalled 

mgressmen said they 
artkulariy incensed 
; -reported harassment 
Jeans because Chilean 
5 had told them there 
no retaliation against 
ey interviewed, 
inderstood that .Mr. . 
lphasized this point 
ador Trucco. 
e**n envoy said today 
plied to Mr. Rogers 
* have been no repri- 
st anybody because 
A conversations with 
jiQ essmen.” and that 
« ■ a - case was entire- 

from the Caneres- 
: He said Mr. Zala- 
expelled on 
/apeted against by 

Conp^i^al 

Fraser,- who . 

"^liniCTli^i'tlTW^ ouse fiiter^atidnal 
^^aE^^ ^^SiSjy abcommittee'ob' in- 
p r^^gw^BK^wJbrgahizations, said 

; a "bearing 

HlHP^W n Chilean human- 
^raons In relation to 
^^Idstration’s -military 
4 V r llfeic assistance pro- 
■ 1 1 bide said Mr. Fraser 

^L y * ai- to invite Mr. Za- 


m, 


ca« 






^^fefeoff aides said 
®£e' h^rm'gs woold 
^legations that the 
migration violated 
strictures on assist* 
✓rile. J • 

rted that the 1976 
U Development As- 
ti, Food ' Act called 
tfig df 1 $90 mQlion 
j oUt^r^bout . half 
free, is to' consist of 
paid, 'were indi- 

It the Adminisfration 
fed its nonfood -v aid 

Chile for 1976 by 
31 — in housing-loan 


l V 4 / 

«■* ' Z 


; 

'^^ f ' -- !rge8 Baptists - 

* - .-fe el Bid to Ford 

/iSTELD, m, April 
.; { /^-An editor of a 

j /£%aptist paper has 

: » / iVjt an. invitation 

\ : .^iit Ford to address 

v / 4 Baptist Conven- 

- -folk, Va^ on Jane 
' V th drawn, because 
^ r ■ - . nt in the Presiden- 

, i / n may be a noted 

f ' J ^ r . Baptist, Jimmy 

• ' " - 3 T - -h orgia. 

r •. *-'■■■'• . jei. Hasting, editor 
v ' I • jff r.-tois Baptists, said 
Jn'-ir JJomination^ '.shookl 
s' V?< ' i the embarrassing 
_ / giving Mr. Ford 

^T', \-jr al platform in an 
: Sr while one of 

-ft} l* laymen Southern , 
.TTrtd !?•"= tverpmduwd 


j** . X Jr *1 platform in an 

•*** t . r »r while one of 
* £[1 \A laymen Southern 

a fl Ave ever produced 
— lljflS -<° be his opposi- 

: the r^; ngs. in his request 




ngs, in Iris request 

*' vention’s business 
said that -when 
^ ccepted the luvita- 
' u .!' dicated that other 
../’ ties might force 
^ cline at the" -last 

:-Vve just as. much 
7 -'. ange our minds ” 
. ; s said- 


Who says 

1 y. ■ 

- signature?',-//;'; 

sportswear. 

■/■? has to be ■./ 
'For Adults Only"? 


, f :k' 

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t>S**f ' A / 


fpm 


C. Shorts with elastic 
waist and tie front, 

4 to 6x, 7.00. ■ 

7 to 14, 7.50. 

Bare midriff vest 
to wear with 
or without a shirt 
4 to ox, 7.00. 

7 to 14, 750. 







1 


.’ v ■" " •. 4/' 5 

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f;\yw y f ry% 

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- r Y'rx 

V - t l * 

• ; i / 

r. ’* m 





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nil 


A. Pants with elastic 
waist fie front 
4 to 6x, 1050. 

7 to 14. 12.50. 
Dolman sleeved 
’tie top. 

• 4 to 6x, 1050. 

7 to. 14, 11.00. 


■> / 


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I j Put yourself in your daughter’s place. 

'■ li j You’re seven; and your parents promised ) 

s^k,< | they’d take you to the Children’s Zoo 

j this very Saturday. Your Mom puts on her . .^s. 
pAllll I Calvin Klein pants and tee. Your Dad shows up 

pW | in his Mark of the Lion separates. But when 4 

'§i§jL,' f you say “What shall I wear?’’ they tell you 

pP^ - | “Just pop on some dungarees, dear.” 

f Smacks of downright discrimination, doesn’t it? 
r ;'. iw 1 But, until today, that’s the way it had to be. - v . 

? *;{ f This morning is the dawning of a new era y 

? '? | called “More fashion fun. for kids” and y 

i '■ § Yofey | Altman’s is right up front in the movement. /■) 

' j? i I Starting today, your girl can show off her own 

-7—J | signature separates. Each piece boldly, .. - 

■ .* ?:-1 lf^L i brightly signed with the name of her own r : :. 

f ^ avorite designer, Betsy Daniels. . y- 

i, -&f>\ Unlike most designers, Betsy Daniels has Jl. 

two great interests. First come children. - 

? Second comes fashion. This means she knows 

exactly how to adapt today’s • . • 

fashion looks to little figures. ^ ' 

Everything’s in a carefree, ' 

'J yi 1 crinkly “earth cbth” cotton. And 

aD these coordinates, created ■■■Tm 
•: ft" j for the Doodle Bug company, come | 
in sunny yellow or bright red. .: : f 0 


1 


■ ■ 
. . . 


Now we usually interview the designer when we do adult ads. 
But we feel so strongly that every child should have her say 
that we’ve invited Betsy Daniels to come to Altman’s 
tomorrow from 1 till 3 so your girls can speak to her personally 
and see this new signature sportswear informally modeled. 


i tm 


Fair enough? See you tomorrow on two, then. 






m[ 4 (f 


Shops for Girls, second floor. 

Fifth Avenue, White Plains, Manhas^et, N.Y^ 

Short Hills, Ridgewood/P aram us, N.J^ St Davids, Pa. 





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B. Skirt with elastic 
waist, ruffled hem. 
4 to 6x, 8.00. 

7 to 14, 9.00. 
Shirred tube top 
with bare midriff 
is calico printed 
polyester and 
cotton. 

*“ 4 to 6x, 7.00. 
tv7 to 14,8.00. 





I 


THi* j.'iiVV" 4 Oiwii.| j i ' „OA 'i, APRIL 21. < ^ _ 

1 A Shaky New Cease-Pire Begins in Beirut j 


Hello Celanese ArneF 


jersey dress easy . r ' W 
care. Just step ' t\ 
in, zip up, go. 

By Marcy Lynn in 

navy/white or .ViSt 
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iq to 2o. 30.00. 

Murray Hill Dresses, •V 0 /»\ 0 .J 

Fifth Avenue. AV** V-V* 
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and branches. /V.f \V»V 


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^Fortrel * * poiyester. £ 
f It s as sleek • jJ® 
I as this princess 
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\ 32.00 . By Miss Beege 
\ in navy/white, 

j cherry/vyhite, . j 

\ emerald/white. . 

J 8 to 16. Murray 
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&& _ .. 

^»v. it'*,-* £•; *.< 



fiv JAMES M. MARKHAM 

.«prcM) io Tfce .".Vic Yiift Vnr-*- 

>. BEIRUT. Lebanon. Wednefej 

i day, April 21— Lebanon's 2Sth 

1 ceaw-fire’ in a year started yes- 
; Lerday -- with' sbcliins, sniping 
i and a "few ground attacks re-' 
I ported from the charred port 
1 area and eastern suburbs. 

Tit? ceasr-fire. which 5>.0"1- 
■■ havi?'go.".e into effect at olid- 
night, showed little sign of 
. hc-ldin" and, by evening a resar- 
: rected committee cJ Syrian,. 
- Palast'mian and Lebanese offi- 
cers and factional chiefs was 
unable to deploy a peace-keep-' 

; ins fc.nce cn either side of 
the city’s political divide. 

In 24 hours. ' according to 
, ^sonte accounts, 1 10 people have 
, 'fceen killed in Beirut and »ha 
j nearby mountains, where rival 
sides have been bombarding 

I each other with artillery. 

I... , A meeting of- the .so-called 
j ; Higher Military Committee.; 
formed under Syrian, aegis, in* 

I I January’ and then disbanded 

| last month, was delayed from: 
morning to afternoon- because-' 
of the funeral of- a grandson 
of Rierre Gcmayel. leader of 
the Christian right-wing Pha- 
langist Party,- who was said 


ARRIS SALE TO ARABS 
ASSAILED BY AB7JJG 

Representative Bella S. Abzug 
said yesterday that the United 
States should "scop acting as 
I the major amts seller to, the 
J Persian Gulf nations" and- 
. should "drop its long-range 
plans to sell arms to Egypt."’ 
: Speaking before a group of r 

I. 50 at a luncheon of rhe Over-' 
| : seas Press Club in the Hotel! 

Biltmore, she denounced the 
- Ford Aminiscration for provid- 
ing ' arms to nations “which 
' seek to upset Lhe stability of 
the Middle East." 

"If Israel is expected to fol- 
low up the Sinai pact with 
further concessions, it has a 
right to expect that the U.S. 

. will stop selling arms to its 
present and potential enemies," 
she said, adding that, from 1973 
to '76, military'" sales to Persian 1 
Gulf tT.untries had exceeded 
S 1.2 billion, while such sales 
to Israel were only i'5 blllian. 

Insisting that such a reduc- 
' tion in Middle East arms sales 
should be part of "a reappraisal 
. of foreign- policy," the Con- 
gresswoman said she also be- 
; lieved the’ United States had 

J, ‘ a responsibility to give econom- 

1 ic assistance “to the people) 

’ of Vietnam for the horrors \yc 
inflicted-off them.” ’*■ ’ • 


to have been killed in the fight-) 
ing. : 

i . Rightist representatives .at 
the meeting reportedly, asked 
Palestinian representatives; 

about "secret agreements" i 
..reacted between the -’^Palestine: 
Liberation Organization and 
Damascus Jast week. 

Sal ah Khalaf. the second- 
ranking official in A1 Fatah 
Palestinian . organization, was 
faid lo have, responded that, 
l&.;wo sides had reached, an 
“understanding" that a free 
election : should take place ,to. 
pit& a successor, bo. ..President. 
Suleiman Franjieh, whose ous- 
ter has been widely demanded. ' 
, N Palestinian representatives 
were said to have, issued a 
wam’ing-to the rightists, .saving; 
tharJdSt right would be a test, 
of theft goodwin. , 4 
"Fighting- and shelling' cen-i 
terej on the downtown pon 
area where a huge fire burned 
out of control. Shortly before, 
midnight, the level of. fighting' 
tapered off on some fronts. ; 


Mortar shells were reported ; 
to have struck the buildings 1 
homing the. Bank of America ■ 
arid* 'the. Tfd'd’chrowned Barique ■ 
de rindustne et du ' Travail, ' 
land fires burned in neighboring : 
buildings'. “ ■ ' Well - organized : 
pangs have pillaged a do 2 en 
Beirut banks during the con- 
flict. ' 1 

Armed thugs ; have taken to 
dragging people out of their 
cars in broad daylight on Bei- 
inw'ess streets and making 
off. with : their automobiles. 

Lest night,- a correspondent , 
of The Toronto Star, Gerald 
Utrirg, was reported to have . 
teen dragged away by armed t 
men while on his way to Bei- 
rut's airport. 

The Phalanpist radio accused 1 
partisans of>.thc left-wing “re-, 
lection front," which is backed , 
by Iraq and Libya, of pressing I 
the downtown offensive., but; 
there -was no way of confirming , 
which side had initiated the I 
fighting.'. . 



MOTH ER'S DAY. MAY 9. 



£1lve related basket 

Stlvcr-plaied--.ini nia ture bushel basket with a remov- 
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; On the m.ove in m . : :f 
Wo nd erf eel,’ * Ly 
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Celanese Fortrel* * j | 
polyester. Simulated (.A 
bolero-back shapes as V. 
.. it ties jn front. /V 
Jumpsuit has front 
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get-aways. Navy t 
green or red dots on v. vv 
white. 61o 14. By .sviy 
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Career Dresses, *- */>*;> 
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trademark* of F.bcr Ind . Inc.. 
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Lynn Caine says — "She lakes mpiv 
never-never land and ipto an ‘area, of 
possibilities." - ^ 

Paula Nelson, the author did it.— Snt 
the myth that money is a man's.- world, 
business woman, lecturer, and director 
fornia Corporations. 

The Joy of Money ; $7.9! 



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586 Film A>cnu«. New Vo'k. N. 1 1O1UC 


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iirl: 

fM: 

Jw8Y-»- 
a*5fJ * •' 
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S' »•£ '_•=;-. 
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?%!( B10CKAD1 


■THE NEW YORK TIMES, WEDNESDAY. APRIL 21, 1976 


7 ' - 


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P' 

|p •;•'?' ' 

■ 


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tffcf'f JL. a 


or 


tf! Mone 


£ Military Says Ships 
/ is From Entering 
» 3 of Lebanon 


j’ EW MIDDLETON 
r 3,000 and 4,000 reg- 
J; n troops are .now 
i Lebanon and most 
‘ an fleet of 30 ships 
'in an arms blockade 
« ports, according 
'.tales and West Eu- 
ary sources. 

: gtb of the Palestine 
- Organization’s 
es within Lebanon 
.00. This total, scur- 
scludes the hired 
t ideological or na- 
y working for Leb- 
\ al figures. 

. ately one quarter 
stiiuan forces are 
; » members of Sai- 

. : -- n contingent Ana- 
; ijngton and abroad 
Iqa troops better 
.•believe they have 
weapons than most 
•uerriHas. 

* sr&eU sources esti- 
uraber of Syrian 
l Saiqa forces at 
concede, however, 

- attalions and corn- 
moved back and 

■^the frontier in re- 
velopments in the 

- acquiesced in a 

- Tian intervention 
... as long as it is 

' the center and 
4 tiuntry. The Israeli 
-owever, would 
_ _ rert movement by 

' , -- y+- across the Litani 

- hem Lebanon as 
• -II’ v ary threat. . • 

' ' oiith of the Litatti 
ndar or guerrilla 
- ; produce a new 

•1 on the frontier 
' The border area 

- orested and is 

iviqes providing 
iere are 18 Israeli j 

o the frontier. j 

■ Haifa Seen 2 

nation along the \ 

■ south of Saida -\ 

he Israeli ports 2 

.ere within range 1 

■ "mm and 180-mm 
urface-to-surface 

— **' " 

irces. credit the ■ 

“'■wi* drastically ! 

•supplies to Ka- 
the Druse chief 
1 . .left-wing forces 
".' These sources 
. ..the virtual Syr- 
< Beirut and Tri- 
t have been pos- 
rsraeli navy, su- 
pers and quality, 

n Government. 

— — — — "■‘"ts said, supoorts 
ely to stabilize 
v situation, includ 

_.->*• vention. Egypt’s 

- * ' '• ; * arbi ter of Arab -| 

— . -? .diddle East has Jc 

* \oned. they said, flfe 

■ overall weak- | 

’j mntry’s defense | 

-- ? j tit of the cutoff • | 

. ’ s, ammunition | 


-- 


i ' 


Br- : 


' var el-Sadat re- 
European trip. 
, with promises 

sales. But the 

‘ »t be translated 
-s- stems and oth- 
. until the fi- 
"• sed. 

- ected from the 
procurement Or- 
ned by Saudi 

• -;/ /--and .the United 

. of the -Persian 
ifihe organiza- 
ms said, have 
ranks In London 
: financng arms 

idpolnt of Egyp- 
ie most impor- 
, iven IMr. Sadat 
Y:' : assurance that 
. •■'rench air force 
assault-Breguet 

* nbers ordered, 

. tie to purchase 

" ' ircrafL 

ding to sources 
■ Atlantic Treaty 
l /■- mm and in Bel- 
al of the Amer- 
now in service 
air force but 
natch for the 
rael is buying 
States. 

> discussed the 
)ut 120 Alpha 
advanced trai- 
. -i employed as 
t aircraft. The 
eveloped joint- 
i4t-Breguet in 
>/ljimer in West 


. ales of military 
“’•'as of tension. 

about' half of 
v : in West Ger- 
/ sold by the 

/ er mans, 

"al Market 
^rove Hygiene 

.pril 20 (Agenda^ 
— The pictur-J 


/ tiled to^tart at 
j 1 “Li f£r ,nont h and will 
| ifrtfl , <.v?npletea before 
Si* Offidals said. 

market 


• blaomingcble's draperies 
final clearance sale 


pi 


Srlh^ 


save 50% la 80% 


9 


f 








i* ^ s 

III 

M 


mw: 


iii 






Ml 


in 





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pinch-pleated draperies 
vast assortment of 

fabrics, slyles, colors 

* 

s 7 

/ single width, 

orig. 18.75 to 44.00 per pair 

s i^ 

lv-/ double width,, 

orig. 50.75 to 96.50 per pair 

^ 21 triple widths, 

/ orig. 77.25 to 150.00 per pair 

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sty!es...natural fabrics to drip-dry 
polyester and fibre glass-including 
v open weaves, textures, prints.... 

in a rainbow of colors. Not all sizes 
available in all fabrics, colors. 

CLfiSacf 


great savings on 
rod pocket tiers 

50% to 75% off - 


Our famous maker tiers In styles for every 
decor...prinfs, sheers, solids. Sample savings: 
36" length, regularly 6.25 to 45.00, 

how 2.S0 to 15.00 


save on fancy 
ruffled curtains 

50% to 75% off 


Frame ruffles, criss-crosses, priscilla styles 
in white, champagne, natural. Sample 
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now 1.50 to 10.50. 


more savings on 
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cafe curtains 

50% to 75% off 




save on sorrento 
lush embroidered panels 
1 imported from trance 

Ea.sy to care for. drip-dry no-iron Tergal® 
polyester in white,, champagne, lemon 
or green. 


savings on handsome 
tailored panels 

50% to 70% off 


Select from imported or domestic em- 
broidered designs, tambours, faces, open- 
weaves, many more. Samole savinas: 
90" long, regularly 9.00 to 55-OO per 
panel 

now 450 to 2750. 


LIMITED QUANTITIES * ON SOME 
51YLES..HURRY IN FOR BEST SELECTION. 
SIMILAR SELECTION IN BRANCHES. 


60" wide per panel: 
84"long.reg. 30.00 
90" long. reg. 34.00 
110" long. reg. 37.00. 


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Fresh, Tight sheers for spring... easy-tb-care 
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now 5.00 to 7.00. 


Curtains and Draperies, 4fh floor, New York. Similar selections in aB branches. 

Bioomingdales, 10O0 Third Avenue, New York, N.Y. 3555900. Open late Monday and Thursday evenings. 


■i 




























- ;* uSr 


F 


1 


t? 



rif£ NEW Ycfex TIMES, WEDNESDAY, AP RIL 21, 1976 


Save 25% off regular prices 
on finger tip towels with- 
your favorite single initial. 

By Ames in sheared cotton terry, 
11x18”. Brighten your 
bathroom with champagne 
with brown initial, 
white with gold, or brown 
with white. Reg. 2.75 each, 
now 4 for 8.00. All letters 
“ but 1 AQ,u7V,X,Y,Z. 

Bath Shop, fourth floor, 

. Fifth Avenue, 

(212) MU9-7000 , 
and branches. * 



Sale ends May 22nd. 
Mail and phone 
10.QU or more. ■ 



k . Vi--*. . 

■ 7 • & . .ft ‘ 

*S . ■ 

■ 


Saudis Putting a Billion Into Riyadh U - 

9 [ . I ^ J fAP 


-Talkin- iQ the libra iiv roomjclude reconciling need for 

St !* obsen'ed, educating worne;. w.^the^ 


By ERIC PACE . not a “ problem.” observed educating women ^ wun u c • 

-..uTtes** YamTus* •_ the deouiy dean of the liniver- mands of Ara ^'®". f t j.e : 

DH. Saudi Arabia - ^ ‘ libran- system. Naji (including segregation of the, 

which has had .Nfa’zer. who was interviewed m i sexes. , 

Arabia, wtuen ms uau notab vi Well Auart : 


By ERIC PACE 

SpW= 

RIYADH 

Saudi Arabia, edu-ths AC arabesque, and notablyj Hostels Are Well Apart 

Western-style «meg - J® 1 main university building; ^ ^ M elibar>' reported, 

cation onl> smce 19 ~ ■ ihere. ’ . , * lv the university has already pro- 

. spend well over $1 billion on. one reason for this scholarly a ^st'e, building in 

expanding Riyadh University hush is that, in this con^rva- R . . h . for women students 

between now and late 1980. ac- live Islamic ^iei> fema e dQ nQt Uve their tarn- 
«*« - > university ^n- ; — » " « £ &£“ 

^“Spending all that money is^ougf' ^jSgity^ha? 1 j^dy ^fossome'd ' 
a headache and you have ^trained geologit, a ’ nt |e in of oil reve-i 

worn- about it ail the time, ;thaim »"« *“"* 1 Moire the w| 5. h „ aTe p0 „nng 

the university's secretary gen-. s > stem cnang - ] imo Ulis sparsely '^habited 

eral. Salem A. Melibary. said m; n ^ n read yj" ere . * ^ monarchy at well_over S-0 bil- 

an interview. adding, “this isil.QOO women m the student. ^ vgar 

the biggest educational project .body, which is “ "” D 10 Most' or the students are 

in human history to be ». g his office undergraduates. although a 

cuted at one time." bar> told a n ^“£p masters degree program ,n the 

Saudi Arabia's 1975-80 devel- ^ arts was established two years ! 

opment plan, as drafted last.ofA^ian^ofte.^ ^ for ' ag0iand a ".Mtcr's degree m 

vear, provides for more than.,, Melifcarv the i the sciences is to be awarded 

SI. 2 billion in expenditures on .■ ^ third-rankfng ad- 'before long. w,t ^ oL ^ f ^he 
the university, which na '\, h f. s . m i n i st rator. after the rectoriate programs planned for the 
7.000 students But : Dr. ’ , an d vice rector. Their job s in-lfuture. 
ban.-, a Bntish-tramed chemist.; . 



come in and sm ™ *" r 
qt3 r including boot* */ *»**» and 
ileopmu UJ9*i Smra Drsiani jn- 
pjeks and muefi mo/e for the srnou 



Hiker 

New York: MW. 46U> SI. C212I 541 
Wes Ichesten 3S7 Mam Si. Armonk. N.Y.{9 


Leant to rockclimb with Odyssey Tours l 
weekends from So 5-00 complete lor mslru. 
Sd meals. Call or write for a tree brochure. 


50% OFF 


regular prices. Enjoy 2 for 1 
savings on “Ternpo” bath rugs. 
Thick, luxurious DuPont* nylon 
colored' brightly with a 
handsome geometric design.- Blush, • 
brown, Dresden blue, emerald 
or sun yellow. Non-skid safety back; 
machine washes and dries. 

By Tennessee Tufting. 


LMi J. n "l ’7 . . ; 

said that total spending m the- 
period would be roughly $2 ml- j 

lion. . a I 

The bulk of the money is to 
go to build a whole new_ uni- 1 
versify campus near the village; 

I of Derava. seven miles north-. 

! west of this inland capital. 
'Work has already begun on the 
'college of medicine building and: 
on temporarv sports facilities, , 
land housing construction is to 
'begin soon. 

; In addition.- the campus near 
Derava. which was the capita, 
of the first Saudi state in the. 
ISth century, is 10 have a wide 
variety of facilities ranging 
from a college of pharmacy to a 
private bus line to shuttle stu- 
dents and teachers back ana 
•forth from other university,, 
j buildings in Riyadh proper. ' 

• Many Departments Planned ; 

1 The manv other new univer-j 
sitv departments that are to be. 
founded and housed between, 
now and late 1980 include sta- 
tistical analysis, 1 vocational ecu- 
cation, astronomy. linguistics-: 
and phonetics, experimental 
psychology, agronomy and. i 
among other exotica, modem 
European languages. 

In addition, the Deraya cam- 
pus is to have an elegant library 
building as headquarters for a 
4-miilion-voIume university 
library system that is 10 “® 
built up by the mid-1980s. The 
system has 350.000 volumes, 
already. 


Clx36" Re S . 11. 00 each 

24x42‘* Reg. lt» *X> each 

27>:4S’’ Reg. 20.00 each 

Lid cover Reg. 4.00 each 


now 2 for 11.00 
now 2 for 16.00 
now 2 for 20.00 
now 3.50 each 


* “* - 


£- 


Bath Shop, fourth floor 
Fifth Avenue 
(212) MU9-7000 
and branches. 


• ; *- % V>' 



Saigon Prepares Vote 
SAIGON. South Vietnam.; 
Aoril 20 tAgence Frar.ce-Pressei 
— l*he Government has asked 
religious authorities to change 
.the times of services on Sun- 
day “so that the faithful win 
not be hindered from doing 
, their electoral duties" m the 
• general elections for a unified 
' National Assembly. Churches; 
, and pagodas are to make ar-, 
1 Irangoments so that religious, 
.ceremonies would not clash, 
with voting times, between / 
A.M. and 7 P.M. Sports. arUstic 
and other activities are also 
banned for the period of voting. 


Sale ends May 22nd 
Mail and phone for 
10.00 or more. 


■1 

% 

& 


U 


£ 


‘ J 


\ 


25% OFF 


this season’s prices on our 
bright contrast-bordered shower 
curtain. “Fairfax I” by Ames 
is made of Celanese'* 1 acetate taffeta. 
Forsythia yellow with light 

• and dark orange borders, 

light pink/ white/ ^ 
shocking pink, 
champagne/ sable, 
marina blue/white, sable/ 
champagne. Was 14.00, 
now 10.00 . 

Protect your curtain 
with our Balta magnetized 
clear vinyl liner, reg. priced 
at 3.25 . Bath Shop, 
fourth floor, Fifth Avenue, 

(212) MU9-7000 
and branches. 


RENTA 

NEW 

WURLITZER 

PIANO 



Mail and phone for 
lO.Uriorniore. 







SHOULD MY CHILD 
TAKE PIANO? 

Yes. Few things so 
enrich life as 
understanding and 
appreciating music. 
Piano playing is in 
itself a rewarding 
creative outlet. 

At the sametime.it 
encourages the 
development of a 
well-rounded 
personality;.and 
it promotes 
concentration, 
alertness and 
poise. 


WurliTzer’ 

Tno Music People 


Wurlitzer Music Stores, Inc. 
130 W. 42nd SL 
New York. N.Y. 
212-221-5720. 


PIhm tend mfermaNon about th* 
WuilltZH Pwno BwW Plan. 


him*. 


'■ 1 jfer ’ v ' ' 77 

■ 


Crfy 

Trt Mo_ 


; Steie 


TOKYO? 

w&sinaiM^rj » 


D»(B 


c 


ABRAHJS 



ITS THE BROOKLYN BOTANIC GAE 


-where the largest collection of flowering cherry trees in 
the country is now in bloom! A&S suggests THIS will be a 
sight worth a. trip from anywhere during the next few* 
weeks. The Botanic Garden, next tc the Brooklyn Museum 
cn Eastern- Parkway, is close to 1RT and IND-BMT sub- 
ways. And it's open to the public without charge. 





.A 


iHEBaOOKLYK BOTANIC GARDEN IS ADEPASTKENT Of THE BROOKLYN INSTITUTE OF ARTS ANT* SCIENCES WHICH ALSO INCLUDE 5 10 

ANDmSHOOELYIi CSaDHEN-S MUSEUH 





IEMANBEATEN 
WON BLACKS 


•s Skull Fracture in 
st Racial Incident — 
d Youths Arrested 


ee tof 





v ■ ■ ■?. , . .* *y JOHN KXFNEK 

- , . \ ’ ^ id Tte Nr* Yort Times 

w__ CWON, April 20 — A white 
'* J ' C lay critically injured 
the latest victim in a 
v CctM racial incidents that 
^ *vs city tense and jittery* 
^ as -dragged from his -car 
_ : night in the black 

neighborhood fay a 

- youths who beat him 

• " > l :, -4r*ered his head. 

J ' 1 - • 4 : -:‘-;;riute man, 34-year-old 
I- '*■>. Poleet. was in the in- 

■««^s.care unit of the Boston 
_ — ---'^^yspitaJ, . listed in poor 

* — and on the danger 
N^had a fractured skull, 
its and extensive facial 
the hospital said, 
.'daftemoon, the police 
5 ted two black youths 
iction with the beating 
■ged them with assault 
tent to murder and 
robbery. Mr. Po/eet’s 
7 as stolen during the 
l One of those arrested 

i-year-old juvenile; the 
is identified as Randy 
3. The police said they 
eking other suspects. 
Kevin H. White met 
- . _ ^ advisers and ranking 

T t \ v fficials, then held a, 

\ j J .[Inference in which he 
* *3*0 a We beating “despicable” 

^ftcusabJe.’' 
tack cagne two weeks 
rang black lawyer was 
by white youths on 
3 in front of Boston 
B and badly beaten 
American flag. It was 

of a series of racial 

_ "'\st night and over the 

-intagonisms have been 
i here over the last 
during court-ordered 
*r school desegrega- 
police and city offi- 
re clearly worried 
Iding tensions in the 
*> white neighborhood. 

eet was struck with 
v ; e cinder block, the 

‘t, s d. and when he ar- 
emergency room, 
to police and doc- 
' vSjace was shapeless. 

> *^ ; ^Vacial incidents last ' 


■ V’- " : v ygruded the blockading 

f -■ ^.trak railroad trim by 

iPl^Sr.-jX * > ths who piled debris 

FjjKE&ri*. • ; ; arV ariH thpn threw 


WTTTI • - J V- 





ack and then threw 
^55^- ’ Ite creur. There were 
.^jaddeiits of stonings 
y £\:~ r J ^ -^tWErs by blacks, and 

i l '- 1 ff ftfctared three ribs 
" fefli'otf. a ladder after 
by, rocks thrown 

t transit bus driver 
n in South Boston by 
white youths on Sat- 
Ur workers for- the 
• ) etts Bay Transit Au- 
ie black and three 
| re also beaten when 
. jTipted to aid the 

"* * . Friday night, in thB 

■f‘~. -aiian East Boston 
- u jod, there were two 


->ar°' v> reported of blacks 

t r . ii3n by white youths 

r . ‘ I t- g^av station- 

i feist night was 

' / »e that occurred - in 
__ *“ K ’ v *74 in South Boston, 

. X-a/.' 1 " . -. r : iclave that has fig- 

=■ ^ £?■ ‘ /• Gently in the busing 

/' 1 *• that case, a black 
j| . ragged from his car 

'*r' k V i until the police 


r -V ^S*'**- .. ^ - ■ 




»' • y. 

-r A • ‘ 




W;rr 






r^-4- 


\ ‘ wunissioner Robert 

ssued a statement 

* - - , ’ 'i Pg saying: “What 

1“ - -v: SRoxbury Iast oagfit 

•«. come as a surprise. 

^ eea in' this city ex- 
UL >. Seal - rhetoric from 

^ fs and whites. That 

St' ’’ ‘^d-Vsn ;'atmospber e 

I8r t - ■ %« :- to' ihcM«its like 

bj, 4- “ci. B * " # 

Pt. >" " #■' ' : he hour r -City Court- - 

'*?; -wf * 'if Bay Hicks, ■ a major 

^be city's antibusing . 
m6t~ • • "w - “ 'r; reading a state- 

*. r -*'c ■ ■ vtty Hah ' attacking - . 

. -v : ■ resentaliye' Melvin 
. v ~^^.v c k wtib' has been a 
™L=T* V •' ' ' ^^pokesnum' .for his 

iBfri* -- - * . *i5W9 n tha«*ool issue. 

^ by 

that 

scream 

b ^ihiH rthe streets of his 
a»hy with the spill- 

^ s attributed the at- 

rced busing, which 
this aty . ferflle 
such brutality.” 

. along with Other 
re, denounced the 
■ng: “This kind of 
nnot be tolerated. 

3 st certainly insist 
me approach, that 

m 9 ft tken against white - 

* i taken in this, and 
,r stance of violence." 

; </n oon there was an 
v fighting among in- 

j \~' m ' e city jail on J3eeT 1 

'... Police Superintend- 

i Jordan - and the 

ribed as “racial in • - 
- police were called 
but prison guards 
■ ie incident 

Bureau of In- 
.■■ announced that it 
gating the stoning 
■ - rak train for pos- 

on of the Federal 
c Statute: 
t. a Boston Globe 
:k was set afire by 
.- South Bostcfl. The 
.'s greatly disliked 

ite neighborhood 
is it as liberal and 
Its trucks have 
ed on several oc- . 
jarpet tacks spread 
ay nr front of its 


* * * 


ft 


M 

fi .,i 


k 







gmm 


a faseinatirig exercise in printing — 
black, navy, brown, red or green i 
with white. 22" square, 5.00; 27" 8.00 ^ 






And more, in the first 


Calvin Klein scarf collection 








on the Street Floor, Lord & Taylor, 


Fifth Avenue at 39th Street, 


K' . ;■ 


At all Lord & Taylor stores 


p®#; 

IP®? 


i-:' : v.' -/jSr- 




*vv*. r 


v - «■ •<*» » . • . 












_ m ■*» »i, iSiB 


Elizabeth II, at 50, Is a Symbol of Stability 


Continued From Page I, Col. 4 

seems a source of fantasy 
and irrelevance. 

”1 think the monarch 
means absolutely nothing," 
said’ the social commentator 
Malcolm Muggeridgc. “The 
relevance of an Institution 
is directly related to its pow- 
er. When you have no power 
you wither on the branch, 
and the monarch has no pow- 
er whatsoever. 

“I suppose it does have 
a ceremonial function” he 
added. "After all, it frees the 
Prime Minister from the bor- 
ing business of entertaining 
and meeting obscure poten- 
tates. The American Pres- 
ident seems to spend an in- 
ordinate amount of time 
doing that. Here it’s foisted 
off on the royal family." 

‘Living Actors In a Museum’ 

Willie Hamilton, a Labor 
Party Member of Parliament 
who’ has consistently criti- 
cized the royal family, said 
in an interview: "The atti- 
tude in the country is still 
one of amused indifference 
to them. People feel the mon- 
archy dees no harm — a fairly 
negative assumption — and. 
like the weather, we can't 
do anything about it." 

Mr. Hamilton, the son of 
a coal miner, added: "I be- 
lieve the monarchy and its 
privileges are immoral, and 
buLressed by the British 
people's apathy and love of 
tradition. In my own view 
tho whole institution will die 
of boredom. They're like liv- 
ing actors in a museum, a 
symbol of decadence." 

Perhaps some of the most 
pointed criticism in recent 
years came from Andrew 
Duncan, a 35-year-old writer 
whose book, ‘The Reality 
of Monarchy." was published 
after he spent a year follow- 
ing the royal family and 
speaking to most of its mem- 
bers — a rare opportunity. 

His conclusions, which 
slung the royal family, were 
that the Queen could insist 
on "more reality," with 
short-notice trips to hospitals 
and factories; with a "posi- 
tive lead" on such problems 
as racial discrimination; with 
faster, less ritualized state 
visits: with more television 
appearances, and with duties 
ihat identify her with pres- 
ent-day Britain. 

"The dilemma is, once you 
start to shred away the mys- 
tique, then the fairy tale qual- 
ity disappears and you have 
very little left,” Mr. Duncan 
told a visitor. 'There’s no 
point. The Queen herself has 
a very rigid sense of duty 
and correctness, and what 
is correct is distance and 
formality. Actually, there’s 
so little that she's done or 
said that’s captured anyone’s 
imagination." 

Little Change in Routine 

By all accounts the Queen, 
who is the 63d British mon- 
arch in a line going back 
1.000 years, has endured 
nearly 25 yearh or her reign 
with 'minimal personal criti- 
cism and with her private 
life concealed behind a rou- 
tine that has barely changed 
since her ascension in 1952 
upon the death of her father, 
vi wgc vr. 

A topical week for Eliz- i 
aheth would include a charity 
film premiere, several sLat'e i 
banquets, visits to universi- 
ties amt hospitals, the open- 
ing of an exhibition hall or a 
museum, a visit to an artil- 
lery regiment, a reception for ■ 
a. group of lowyers or scien- 



Auoctated Pres* 


Queen Elizabeth with Prince Philip and Prince Edward, 
12, their youngest son, at Windsor Castle recently. 


tists from abroad, and brief- 
ings on Tuesday by the Prime 
Minister. 

In theory, the Queen has 
the right both to dissolve 
Parliament and to choose the 
Prime Minister, but since 
1965 both parties that have 
been in power have been 
able to present the monarch 
with their choice of leaders, 
thus effectively thwarting 
her from making a decision 
in the event of the death 
of a Prime Minister. The last 
king to dismiss a Prime Min- 
ister was William IV. in 1S34. 

Unlike her father, who said 
he had influenced Clement 
Attlee co appoint Ernest Be- 
vin as Foreign Secretary in 
1945, or Queen Victoria "and 
other ancestors. Elizabeth II 
has shown no inclination to 
exert political leverage. 

Nonetheless. Elizabeth, as 
temporal head of the Church 
of England and Commander 
of the Armed Services, takes 
her role in Government se- 
riously. Twice a day. morn- 
ing arid evening, she receives 
Foreign Office telegrams and 
report? and Cabinet doc- 
uments. She is said to be 
blunt and informed. 

Insights Are Devastating' 

"Ambassadors off on a new 
posting get devastating — and 
often irreverent — insights 
into the foreign leaders they 
are dealing with, for she has 
met most of them personal- 
ly." said Robert Lacey, au- 
thor of a book about the 
Queen to be published next , 
year. 

Former Prime Minister Har- ! 
old Wilson, who developed i 
a warm friendship with the ] 
Queen, said at his recent fare- I 
well dinner with her at 10 ; 
Downing Street: “I certainly i 
advise my successor to do | 
his homework before his au- i 
dience or he will feel like I 
an unprepared schoolboy." i 


Officials at Buckingham 
Palace maintain that the 
Queen, especially in recent 
years, has sought to narrow 
the distance between herself 
and the public. There are 
“walkabout" or informal 
street meetings: there are 
garden parties in summer at- 
tended fcy hundreds of civil 
servants and invited guests, 
and there an? Christmas tele- 
vision speeches in relaxed 
settings. 

Moreover, the Queen and 
Prince Philip decided to edu- 
cate their four children io 
schools and not use private 
tutors. 2 move thar allowed 
the children to meet com- 
moners. 

It is a measure of the 
times, however, that the Brit- 
ish public has shown increas- 
ed tolerance toward critics of 
the royal family. In the 
1350’s, for example, John 
Grigg. a historian and author, 
who was then Lord Altrinch- 
am. mildly objected to the 
Queen's voice and had his 
face slapped in public. 

Mr. Muggcridge offered 
some criticism in the Satur- 
day Evening Post and was 
banned from the BBC and 
labeled a "traitor" by Sir 

.CHINA ASSAILS U.S. j 
j ON I TS EA ST POLICY [ 

! PEKING. April 20 fAgencej 
irrance-Pressej — China todayi 
(labeled the so-called Sonnen-! 
jfeidt doctrine a "doctrine ofi 
(’superpower division of spheres! 
j of influence." j 

! The Chinese attack on the| 
j views of the State Department; 
j counselor. Helmut Sonnenfeldt, 
(was made indirectly through, 1 
! , the publication by the Ki-inhuaj 
'press agency of various articles 
| on positions taken by foreign 
figures and press media. 

! The press agency devoted 
ja long report to condemnations! 


Gerald Beadle, director of 
television broadcasting- 

Mr. Grigg says now: ‘There 
was an attitude to be totally 
uncritical, which is never 
healthy. She was exposed 
to such a barage of adula- 
tion. If the 50's were in the 
main too deferential, the 60’s 

were too iconoclastic. 

"For the Queen this was 
a time of trial, but she sur- 
vived it gloriously," he went 
on. “A less steady character 
would have succumbed in 
one of two ways; Either by 
joining the large number of 
established figures who al- 
lowed themselves to be 
drawn into the trendy rat 
race, or by retreating into 
a morose but comfortable 
isolation. 

“Instead, she has kept an 
almost perfect balance be- 
tween stability and change.” 

He added, in an interview: 
“The family are the outward 
and visible signs or the na- 
tion's distinctiveness and his- 
tory. They give a three- 
dimensional feeling to the , 
nation. They make us vividly , 
aware of the continuum of ' 
natural lire, and vicariously 
convey to the public the feel- , 
ing of an ancient community, 1 
which is coherent through 
tirne." 

The Royal Family’s Money 

Perhaps the most delicate 
source of criticism, unthink- 
able a decade ago, is. the ; 
amount of the royal budget, 
or Civil List, which was in- 
creased by Parliament last 
year to about $2.8 million | 
to meet the impact of infla- 
tion. 

With the criticism that the , 
royal family is spending too , 
much money, there is a de- 
bate going on about the rev- 
enue, the expenditure and | 
the property of the mon- 
archy. Critics insist that the 
archy’s finances represent 
one of its most obscure cor- 
ners. 

Several years ago, Buck- 
ingham Palace denounced as , 
"wild” an estimate that the ! 
Queen’s fortune amounted to 
anything from $100 million 
to '$200 million. The palace i 
indicated that the figure was | 
closer to $4 to S3 million. | 

Even among the staunchest 
critics, however.- few insist ! 
that the monarchy should be j 
abolished. 

‘Teople must understand - 
that royalty exists to make J 
reality bearable by turning j 
it into an elaborate game,” . 
wrote the late Nicholas To- : 
matin, one of Britain's most j 
prominent journalists, who ! 
died in the 1973 Middle East : 
war. j 

“Only when smothered in ; 
flummery and nonsense can i 
we examine the conflicts of i 
real life with the necessary ■ 
calmness and detachment,” 
he wrote. 

"This kind of wisdom, 
learned over so many centu- 
ries, is what makes our na^ ' 
tional institution so devious^ 
so formal and so successful.” 

of the position put forward 
last December at a London; 
meeting of United States am-i 
bassadors. In a speech. Mr. 
Sonnenfeldt expressed Wash-; 
ington’s hope that the Soviet; 
Union and its East European 1 
allies could develop an "organ- 
ic” relationship based on oth- 
er than Soviet military power. 

Quoting from American. West 
German. French and British 
newspapers, Hsinhua said: 

“It was pointed out that the 
speech was aimed at carving 
up spheres of influence be- 
tween the superpowers and 
constituted a further develop- 
ment of the appeasement policy 
the United States has followed 
toward the Soviet Union." 

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a 


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A SUPERMARKET of office furniture 


524 WEST 23rd ST.. N.V. 
(BET. Iflth & nth AVENUE) ? 

FREE PARKIC^ 

Weekdays t£* AM. to 5:30 PJ' 
SaUirdsjs 9 AM. to 3 
VII prices F.O.B. Warehouse 
All items subject to prior sab 


















'*v* *■»» • * 

rvrvr rt ’,; 


• REQUEST ' 
9 )ATA DENIED 


ts Laid to Mfssr 
Are Disputed 

T1* X(t York Times 

ENTO. Calif., April 
deral District Judge 
=>n Soliah bank rob- 
Ifllpenied today a de- 
INn that would have 
I^Jtral prosecutors to 
^at Patricia Hearstl 
bout the robbery of 

1 * National Bank in 
Jalif., on April 21. 

m had argued that 

2 met with the prose- 
e Soliah case on 
ire than two weeks 
conviction in San 
or another bank 
I d told them that 
* iasn ot in the Car- 




THE NEW YORK TIMES, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 79?S 



!&-■ 




m 






it ~L~ ■ 



pr 








bilip Wilkins 

- . during the rob^ 
ad was a lookout 
is the only person 
n charged in the 
~'*bbery, in which a 
ner was killed by 
st 

utors in the case 
he stand two wit- 
aid they saw Mr. 

• bank. They as- 
rday that Miss 
“a woman who 
Ehfi m * : out for her boy- 
gflfy hat therefore she 
e believed, 
who was arrested 
her outside the 
i allegedly shared 
fjp**** " a *.b e « n de- 
Ms attorney as Miss 

nr- ■ 

strict Judge Philip 
j ivhat b&ti escribed 
i Je “tougher" court 

£ H Jo* ^r*,raade. 

tfense morion to- i 
8fHn Dwayne Keyes, ’ 
States Attorney 
stern District of 
io is prosecuting 
as not bound by 
United States At- 
he Northern Dis- 
omia, which in- 
nia. 

; attorney. Shel- 
ed yesterday that 
as talking to the 
:nt authorities in 
leniency in final 
■ her conviction 
obbig of a bank 
■ :l5co by the seif- 
. mese Liberation 

• '-ed the judge to 
.... ruling today be- 
, 2 s had "acted in 
tforination from 
when that infar- 
cts of the Fed- 
Investigation on 
automobile they 
for in con- 
the^.Carnichael 

^a. Proposes 

I Stylization 

,A^20 (UPO-t 

home 
^proposed 
wwzationiVjBith ( 

.» pi> 

officials 

;-^^g^^qncays 
to two 

^te&te^r refusing' - 
:»>; certain 

r ’* rs ^&na»6t&' would 
jh® defiant .husk - 






•rSf- 


[£■■ v- 




*- -• . 


■front, tucknbw, 
£ statprpf uttar 
gist a Ml 7 calling 
St for parents of 
i chfldren-'wouitt 
state le gislat ure 
^^^ral Government 

udia’s 22 states 
‘ * announced var- 
nts for govem- 
_with t£ee or 
and the western 
nshtra is study- 
ing sterilization 
. ;! ; parents of three 
• . •: ' ,-n. 

> r^~ 7T 

1 Visit-Franco- 

V'v 20 ftlPI) — For-{ 
• -.’ndrri A. Gromy-i 
■ ■ ' , ‘r four-dav visit] 
April 27 “to 30,! 
list ry announced] 


».% * 





. 





... - 

. V . ' ■ 


: . .-; -v * • *• ■ *■* . - ■ * 

-j 

¥ v<r oH-rrie-s k oulaer 

’ CRp-cach kind c f 

r 'en*erp : rrre n t. Light cnc } ;:X 
• cr; ^P -is-^otnced, cop^.’ef 
W . C>eS£--o 'e^sHej'rr.e'j^rdogn . 

;>var m syrT*:ner mains. 


: ’ 

, 

I . . • 

i * 





Meet James 
Daugherty, 
tomorrow, and flirt 
with his irrepressible 
collection at the 
informal modeling 
from 12 to 3 and 
5 to 7. 

His flowering chiffons, 
printed cottons, 
pastels and dazzling 
brights. Jumpers, 
jumpsuits, daytime 
things and fender- 
is-fhe-nighf dressings 
are the perfect cure 
for the hitherto 
incurable romantic. 

Left, shirred, cap- 
sleeved dress with 
long, tiered skirt that 
ends in a flounce. 
Multicolored cotton 
floral print, for 
4 to 10 sizes, *178. 
Exclusively at 5.F.A. 
Right, flounced dress 
with smocked bodice, 
red-and-white floral 
printed cotton, for 
6 to 12 sizes, *178. 

The Fifth Avenue 
Shop, Fifth Floor. 


Sailing through Manhattan with a flutter of 
jdding romance. One of the^T^V? . 
pleasures of summer from f jMf/J&rf 


’ . . . For your shopping convenience Saks Fifth Avenue will be open tomorrow until 8*30 : ’ ^ — 

Saks Filth Awariuaal Rockefeller Cemer(27ZJ PL 3-4000- New York open tomorrow umil 8:30p.m.. While Wains, Springfield and Gantoii chv mm, V-.-. « - 

Boston - Atlanta - Pittsburgh • Detroit . Troy . Chicago - Skokie • St. Louis Houston . Beveriy Hrlls . Woodland Hills ■ Palm Springs » Sa^PrSncsco - Palo Alto . UJotla ' ^',1 J Pla ‘ nS Spr ' n9Ue,a * Garoen City .-Chevy Chasa . Bala-Cynwyd 

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THE HEW YQ 


RK TIMES, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21. 1976 


s, nil w rcygiv «**>*»» ,r - — - — a — : — . ' — . — — 1 

Moynihan Begins State Political T out \ The New York She 


Buckley. The sponsor of a sue 
By MAURICE CARROLL cessfu j' nominee would gain 
Daniel Patrick Moynihan power and prestige, 

begun a low-key tour ot >ew regu]are & 0 n ot take 

York State's political ana C! '’J c i C j n dIv to the candidacies of 
power centers that his friends the Ramsey Clark, for- 

expect will end with a formal mer united States Attorney 
announcement of his long-ru-! General jvhc , has fdujlor 

. m orfdcmdid^°r*«D^.W™ h(wiu ^,- re ^ 

craoc nomination for United^ do not ^ genously- practices politics like a good 
States Senator. ! the 'candidacies, already . “frahowman. 

His path will be cleared, un-: dared, of Abraham Hirschleia,, Movnihan-Buckley cam- 

lofficiallv and discreetly. bv( a wealthv businessman, or As- 1 ' ~ •- 

Joseph *F. Crangle, leader of jserT1 blyman .Andrew J. Stein. 


never asked for his support 
in so many words, that hej 
would not work for a Moymhen 1 
candidacy. ; 

Another Moynihan plus, ac-! 
j cording’ to politicians whol 
would like him to run, is hisj 
speaking style. He is seen as 
!an exceptionally witty jn** 1 
and, along with other 


paign. 


Erie County's Democratic orga- 
nization. who is fresh from 
'successful promotion in the 
(state's Presidential primary 0 
•the undeclared candidacy of 
Hubert H. Humphrey. 

Mr. Moynihan, fonner United 

states representative at the 
United Nations and co-author 
of a much-praised book on New 
York City's ethnic groups, met 
(here with Mr. Crangle the othe- 
night for an informal survey 
of the state's political terrain 


Mr. Movnihans oratory 

the United Nations made turn. guckley faces a primary 
. ^vnrite in the challenge from ’ Representative 

sizable and imiuen*. ° 


munhy nt a sizable and influer^^ lc, ^ p “^“ r ^ Westchester 
rial block in any ^“Scounty. The fielde of Dome- 
nrimarv in New York. But he; --nHiHatos is to expand 


at | ,, would 


said 
be a 


Mr. Crangle. 
delightful cara- 


irimarv in New York, 
does not begin his pre-declara 
tion tour totally without pout! 
cal liabilities. 

He was regarded as a lacka- 
daisical. unpredictable cam- 
paigner in his one previous 
try for office, when he sought [ 
the Democratic nomination for 


craw candidates is to expand 
on Friday with a formal decla- 
ration by City Council Presi- 
dent Paul O’Dwyer. Also letting 
it be known that he would run 
if he could get widespread par- 
ty support is Representative 
Mario Biaggi of the Bronx. 



It's a re 
for real 


Unsufly. Inf 
bright, airy rc 
refreshingly cl 
Park, Fifth A vent 
iheColiseumandl 
Greal restaurants, and 
in an Old NewYc 
Sally's. Plus ra 
down io earth lit 
explaining to a comp 


A? k Frank 
New York 

For reservations call Ic 

800-325-3535. 


The NewYbA S9iera|| 



■.Mil -jjt-.51w.il -c~: 


,111 uis r ‘ ... 1 j luitr uwiiiuvkuuw »> _ 

iHe also chatted with labor 'e aa :! ctt v Council President in 1965. 
ers. A planned courtesy calli^- serv ice in the White House 
on Governor Carey was ae- u „der President Nixon and m 
ferred when it came to the L he united Nations 'under Presv 
attention of reporters. [ dent Fon i ma ke him suspect to 

"A Humphrev-Moynihan tick-- ome liberals, 
et," Mr. Crangle mused yester-l ^ a[s(> •‘unacceptable” 

day. “Now that would he a ;to qome black officials. One 
very strong ticket." 1 reason, according to City Clerk 

Opponent for Buckley David Dinkins, of the Council 

serting the sort of power he hshment labor, accordirig to 
Iwielded as state Democratic'Vrctor Gotbaum, head of Drs- 
j states chairman before 

nor Carey ousted him. . mci pa l Employees I Umon, who 

The party's mainstream poll- met with Mr. Moy^an the 
iticians have been floundering other night. In Mr. J*^ au “ s 
in their quest for a candidate self-described role as “not Es 
i against the Consen'ative-Re-'tablishment, he let *tw 
publican incumbent. James L. known, although Mr. Moynihan 


CACHE POT 
SALE 

Save on our imported, 
hand painted ceramic cache pots 
to use for plants or what you 
will. Choose A from Portugal 
or B from Italy in 3 sizes: 
small, 5” h. 
was 12.50 now 8.90 , 
medium, 6” h. 
was 16.50 now 11.90 , 
large, 6 3 A” h. 
was 18.50 now 13.90 . 

C from Italy in medium 
and large only. White with 
spring-green accents. 

By Jay Willfred. 

Gift Shop, main 
floor. Fifth Avenue 
and branches. • 


C tv, lilx Jfirt-i*. I-. 


Spend 20 minutes 
with us lea rning 
a new way to walk. 


Mail and phone for 1000 or more 




Conic to the 
Earth® shoe 
store and try 
something 
you've probably 
never experi- 
enced before. 
Pure Walking. 
You will foci the 


power paih of the Earth® brand shoe guide 
you along smooLhly, 
comfortably, easily. It's 
probably the most 
remarkable vehicle ever 
designed for walking. 


[earth 

shoe 


Style ZOO 
Dark Brown. 
Natural Glove, 
Sand Suede. 

$38.50 



Style 401 
Dark Brown, 

Camel. Navy. 

$35.00 _ 

only at Earth Shoe Stores 

The Earth ihae ii available ooly al the (allowing tocatnraa hilha NawYafk naa= 
New York N.Y_ 117 Eail 17th Siren! 793 Uxingta n be. (al BZwil 
Garden City. H.fc 933 Franklin Ave. While Plain*. JLls 108 Banafeneck imam 
lad in Kassadranelts only at: 

Cambridge Man.: 14 5l«y SL Hnrtingtoa HaiL Mats. 

Amherst. Man.: 264 No. Pleasanl SL 

Gift Certificates Available 


RvuLSluart 



Fitted for the man who 
keeps fit, our pure 
cotton Stuart Straight. 
With slimmed waist , 
chest and arms. Raised 
armholes, double- 
darted back and button 
cuffs. In an array of 
distinctive stripes, 
plaids and checks. $20 
to $27.50. The tie is from 
our collection of cotton 
clmmbray prints. $ 6.50. 
We accept the American 
Express Card. 



APRIL 21 ST -24™ 


SUPER SAVINGS ON: 

TENTS — PACKS — BOOTS 
SLEEPING BAGS - CLOTHING 
WINTER RENTAL EQUIPMENT 

FOR MORE INFORMATION SEE LAST 
SUNDAY'S N.Y.T. — 4/T8 — OR CALL 


E AS TERRI IViq UWTA INS PORTS, II\I C 

TR5SAVV;Mlbi; RIVER ROA& V- R, . : ' 
ARDSLE>?;:v W ; :,Y • $ 0502' ' '' V • - M-F 9 to 9 
B14'G99-:61 oQ. - :-V '-SARBR^SU 


ADISON AVEIIUE AT 4JTH STREET, MEV« YORK, H.v. ICCI?. MU 2-0230. OPEN 9-6. 



Get Altman's scoop of savings 
in your Times, Sunday, April 25 


*•' r -7 7 ^ ’ /A R ] 


- i 




Find templing sales plus ex- 
erting news on every page. 
Home savings, fashion 
values, cool outdoor-living 
ideas, gills ior June brides, 
more. And if Altman’s new 
Home News isn’t in your 
Times, write Mr. J. De Ruvo. 
B. Altman & Co., P.O. Box 16 
New Ycik. N.Y. 10016. 


t9 y 

rr^ ^ 



Reg. 

U.S. 

Pat. 

Off. 


nwOneinal BFO 

MANHATTAN -<6th FIc 
149 Fifth Avenue at 21: 
Phone: (212) 254-0059 

OPEN EVERY DAY 
INCLUDING SUNDAY 


Expensive Clothing . 
is the least expensiv 

These days we are all concerned with saving money. 

But, while smart men look to save, they don’t sacrifice quality t< 
Here at BFO, we know that quality clothing is less expensive th 
clothing. 

The reasons are obvious. Expensive clothing looks just as goot 
later as the day you bought it. 

You get better tailoring, so it fits better. Construction is softer, ! 
clothing molds itself gently to your body-. 

There's no' question. Expensive clothing is the least expensive. 

Especially at BFO. 

Because here, we offer only expensive clothing at prices that c 


anything but expensive. 


The original BFO Concept 
now in luxury furnishings; 

BFO plus 

Our new 2nd Floor department 
149 Fifth Ave„ at 21st St. 
(212)673-9026 

Famous Designers’ 
Dress Shirts, Sport 
Shirts, Sweaters and 
Neckwear for Men at Vz 
.Price or Less! 


Impeccably Tailored 

SUITS 

None higher than $75... 
Others $65 and $55._ 

Every important new fashion Iot 
elegantly tailored in vested moc 
European Designer shapes and 
shoulder styles. Huge selection 

Distinctively Bold 

SPORT COATS ant 
CLASSIC BLAZERS 
None higher than $45... 
Others $35 and $25. 

Bold new plaids.. .and bright ne 
soft comfortable fabrics perfect 
ahead. Distinctively styled in lei 
European Designer shapes or c 
traditional. Great selection. 

Famous Brand 

SLACKS 

None higher than $20... 
Others $15 and $10. 

An alt-but-endless selection...m 
quality labels in them. 

Authentic French Designer Fasi 

SUITS None higher than 

SPORT COATS V. 

None higher than $45 

The true European silhouette...! 
fit...the higher armholes. We ha- 
reputation tor our outstanding s 
our miracle low prices for this e 
clothing. 

Handsome 

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$35-$45 

We have an outstanding selectic 
popular new lashion that lets yo 
dressed up without feeling dress 

Superb 

ALL WEATHER COl 

BFO Miracle Priced! Beautifully/ 
classics in Trench Coat or Tradil 
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YOUR MONEY BACK WiTHiN 7 
on any unaltered garment 

Alterations available on premises 
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We honor the Amencan Express 
Master Charge and BankAmerics 


OTHER LOCATIONS: 

YONKERS — In Ihe BFO Walrtbaum Shopping Plaza (lormer site ol Palricia Murpb 
1 745 Central Ave.-iusl north oi Tuckahoe Road. Phone 19 14) 961-6700 
Open Mon. through Fri. Noon till 10 PM. Open Sal. 10 AM-7 PM. Closed Sun. 
CLIFTON. N J. — 550 Geliy Avenue (Strassi Factory Bldg. Adioining ihe Garden Si 
Phone (COD 546-9300. Open Mon. through Fn. Noon Ml 10 PM. Open Sal. 10 AM 
C!oo*d Sun. : 

CINCINNATI — Genlry Shops. 745 Swillon Center 000 








.tiVJ.vi. 


( 


ijpb&tfte: 


V--*vj 




'■'■'if 


•w * . 


It 




ii$?S£j :• 
: : 

:•••. ***** : . 


mmm 


:v.:-+rTri 


■+ wxai'rt 


::■ ?'-v:<jV %• : :i:H= :j£ .^fS^teefe 


'rf 

.+& 


surprise 
t's wrapped 


Von Furstenberg's ( .w I 
just for you. f 1 

So many people just follow.. L \ R 
the'pack. Welt at Bonwit's; PI - . 11 

it's j^itHe reverse? And -1 f.f? ■■■'! /fn 

tbat's^ ice touch -S ■■ \/j. ■' / Ig 
' ip put exclusive pinsy prijnts . v„ ' W .. ' J . fra 

• from Diape Vori Furstenberg. >•; ; i \ ■ :■ • fa 

■■f fey^rei^ H^ng£ : :'i ■' 1| 

• it ih frontor bare it in back^us t'^. v * . .’•■■; H 

< fpjr-i^efiin £apd=the '-3 ■' ; - .... ' ■ 5.11 

■of, gji i th^re^DS^i- ’• • • ;• ;•• -(M 

famous cotton^nd raycm icfHt.from :. . 1 

' :fe ty, designpp • 

■circleswitfr^ ’ 

%■ vroJefror -hi|ue ^ : ; =• ' ';. 

tbpshori;^ /■/>;/ 

predomil^^ to 14 sizes! 

Sports ^Dress^Ffft^ft^t^ ^ ;■ ;'_ ■ •• 

: F iftb Averuieat 56th- Street; ■ Mew York.,; 


Arthur Kill fa- 
double fence, 
d barbed wire, 
a minimum ex- 
nversiau. 
i that prisoners; 
je academic and 
Tarns planned 
.would have no 
years left to 
rms and would 
riy than other 
o attempt es- 


* no machine 
in view," Mr. 
rring to news 
had led some 
tess fear that 
sd at fleeing 


*iate liquefied- 
3 near the fa- 


c wning justtp i 
meet yob 'and show; rse nsatibrjal Spring £q ~ 
Sunlrpfef Cpilectido.tomprfow^ Thursday r wlth i : 
ihfon^I-^m^jing- :OO;tQ^O0;: Come,' ■ i 

'Qiarie^' added 




Mail and phone. Add 1.35 outside delivery area and sales tax where applicable. Call(-212) EL 5-2600 anv hour Rnmuft T a ib» l " 

- NewYflFk- -ManhsHWfT- ^hrwrHiiTc PhiiJZi^ ' i 7 nounBomwt Teller honorc 


American Express, BankAmericard and' Master Charge cards, 
Troy Chicago Oak Brook- Palm Beach Beverly Hills 


NewYoric- -Manhasset Scarsdale Short Hills Philadelphia Wynnewood 


Jenkintown Boston 




























f 


THE NEW YOJjK TIMES , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1976 


Many-Sided Economic Crisis Attracts 
As Many Cures as Lisbon Has Parties 


SptdAl to The ::«? Yett TUom 

LISBON. April 20— The key 
issue m the Portuguese elec- 
tions next Sunday is what to 
do about the economy, 

Portugal is faced by a serious, 
balance -of -payments problem 
and a drop in production, as 
well as inflation, unemployment 
and social agitation. 

Each of the major political 1 
parties has presented a pro- 
gram for solving the economic 


competent technicians. It is the 
only big party that is not part 
of the Government coalistion. 
The centrists openly oppose the 
country's socialist trend and 
favor a free-market economy. 
They are fervent defenders of! 
provate enterprise, calling for 
certain “denationalizations” 
and a suspension of the agra- 
rian reform law. 

The smaller parties offer a 
greater variety oE platforms. 


crises, and is asking for a vote 1 ™* ^olst sister parties, the 


of confidence. 

The Socialist platfrom calls 
for a ‘‘reconstruction” of the 
national economy, emphasizing 
the need to establish thejrules 
Of the game. They insist that, 
the “errors and abuses" of the 
controversial agrarian reform 
program be corrested and that 
tile public and private sectors 
be clearly defined. The Social- 
ists stress their close ties with 
the rest of Europe and its prom- 
ises of economic assistance and 
cooperation. 

‘Defenders,’ Reds Say 

The Communists, on the other! French bases in 
hand, insist that they are the ^ Ponular 
“defenders of the achievements 1 ine ^pmar 


Marxist - Leninist Communist 
Party of Portugal and the 
Worker-Peasant Alliance, de- 
vote most of their programs 
to attacking the “social-fas- 
cists," as they call the orthodox 
Communists. 

The third Maoist party, the 
Movement for the Reorganiza- 
tion of the Proletariat Party, 
equally denounces the “imper- 
ialists and the social- imperia- 
lists” — their mame for the 
Communists— and calls for the 
dismantling of ail bases used 

5 r foreign nations. This in- 
udes the American and 


the Azores. 
Democratic 1 


Union, believed to be the only! 
far-leftist party that has a 
chance of winning one or two] 
seats in the National Assembly, 
demands that Portugal pull out 
of the North . Atlantic Treaty 
Organization, reject all United 
States loans and ally itself with 
the third world. 

The other far-leftist parties 
emphasize, in different degree, 
“peoples power" and the polit- 
icizing of the armed forces. 
These are the radical socialist 
Popular Socialist Front, the 
Movement of the Socialist Left, 
the Trotskyist Internationalist 
Communist League and Revolu- 
tionary Workers Party. 

The small righist parties the 
Christian Democrats and the 
Popular Monarchists, like the 
Social Democratic Center, have 
vigorously attacked the 
Government's socialist moves 
as well as decolonization since 
the Revolution of April 25, 
1974. 

The decolonization of Portu- 
guese Africa is a prime election 
issue. Half a million colonial 
refugees are bitterly condemn- 
ing the Government parties for 
not defending their interests. 1 



TTto Km Yorfc Tinas/ litgatnrf Upmmb 

Mario Soares, Socialist leader, speaking in central Por- 
tugal. He expects his party to increase its vote. 


Portugal’s Parties Vying for Voters 


of the revolution”— the labor 
gains^ nationalizations, agrar- Captain Of MayagUeZ Seeks 
lan reform. They call for devel- f . __ . , _ 

opment of the public sector. Return of Marines Remains 

advancement of the agrarian 

reform program and a wage- MANILA, April 20 (UPI) — 
price policy that would favor The captain of the United States 
workers. cargo ship Mayagttez said to-, 

The Popular Democrats ^ day that he wanted to meet 
mand profound changes w the .. 
economy, insisting that they .^ am ^, odun _ Des J“*J 

are against both capitalism and Prime Minister, Teng Sary, and 
Marxism, but favor a mixed request the return of the re- 
economy. They want the agrir- m ains of two marines killed 
ian reform laws revoked and durmg the battle to recover 
new legislation worked oat .. £ 
with the participation of the m step last year. 
farmers. They defend “socially 
useful” private initiative and 
property. 

The Social Democratic Center I 
presents itself as a party of 


Capt Charles Miller, when 
the Mayaguez docked at Ma- 
nila, said that he was making 
the move on his own initiative 
and had not been asked to do 
so by relatives of the men. He 
also refused to disclose the 
names of the two marines. 

Captain MlHs* said the two 
were among those killed when 
marines stormed an island dur- 
ing the battle after the Maya- 
guez was seized by Cambodian 
Communist f wees. 



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Continued From Page 1, CoL 3 

government, counting on the 
abstention of the Communists 
or other sectors of the Parlia- 
ment to push through their 
program of national reconstruc- 
tion. Both the Communists and 
the Popular Democrats have 
warned that they will not give 
a Socialist Government support 
without a formal accord on 
the program, which implies an 
alliance. 

In the absence of a dearcut 
Socialist victory, the prospects 
are cloudy. A victory by tire 
two parties to the right of 
the Socialists, the Popular Dem- 
ocrats and tire Centralists, is 
increasingly possible and could 
spell new instability. The So- 
cialists and the Communists, 
which control labor, could be 
thrown into the opposition 
together, which would, undoubt- 
edly mean more social agitation. 

Coalition a Possibility 

Finally, if there is no possible 
majority, the only alternative 
is another coalition government 
s imfl ar to the present one, 
which induces the Socialists, 
Popular Democrats, Commu- 
nists, military and independ- 
ents. This coalition has been 
unable to tackle basic problems 
largely because of internal dis- 
agreement, which at times has 
deteriorated into open opposi- 
tion. 

The campaign itself has been 
fierce, with probably more cas- 
ualties than in the two years 
of Portugal's nonviolent revolu- 
tion. The main parties have 
all denounced the campaign vi- 
olence and called for calm, 
but aH of them have been vic- 
tims of assaults. 

The situation became so 
Lisbon, Antonio Cardinal Ri- 
beiro, spoke out last week 
condemning the acts of violence 
"which insult human dignity and 
profoundly injure the Christian 
conscience.” 

Terrorist bomb attacks have 
caused widespread damage, 
particulariv to Communist and 
other leftist property, and re- 
sulted in the death of a priest, 
who was candidate for a far 
leftist party, and a 19-year-old 
leftist militant 

A *Poster War* Is On 
The "poster war," or conflicts 
between zealous party mili- 
tants vying for wall space, has 
taken the lives of two leftists 
and injured many more. Poster 
hangers go in teams and are 
usually armed with knives or 


“all possible means” to guaran- 
tee free elections. 

Demonstrating their pledge, 
the authorities put on a major 
show of force last week to 
protect a conservative rally in 
the Communist stronghold of 
Beja, southeast of here. They 
took their preventive action 
after incidents following a Pop- 
ular Democrat rally last week- 
end had left one dead and 
more than a score of wounded 
Some 600 riot policemen and 
national guardsmen with horses 
and armored cars formed 
protective cordon around the 
Beja bullring, where about 300 
supporters of the Social Demo- 
cratic Center were gathered, 
most of them bused in from 
Lisbon and Oporto. The Beja 
artillery regiment and the 
cavalry regiment at Estremoz, 
to the north, were also put 
on the alert. The rally ended 
without incident, but down 
town, angry leftists stoned cars 
they thought belonged to Cen- 
tralists, injuring four persons 
“The bullring is empty out 
of fear, this fear made people 
stay in their houses,” Gen. Car- 
los Galvao de Mela, Social 
Democratic Center deputy and 
probable Presidential candi- 
date. declared, stressing that 
this was "a fundamental prob- 
lem we must solve.” 

Communists Threatened 

But the popular general has 
himself been guilty of violent 
attitudes, threatening to "drive 
the Communists into the sea 


guns. 

Party rallies are increasingly 
rough.* The Communists have 
been insulted and stoned in 
some conservative areas in the 
north, while the Popular Demo- 
crats and Centralists have been 
stoned and insulted in leftist 
strongholds in the south. And 
the Socialists have received 
stones and insults from the 
left and the right 

The arch -conservatives of 
Portugal's Madeira and Azores 
islands, who want independ- 
ence, have attacked almost 
all the politicians from the 
mainland. They have held Com- 
munist witch’- hunts, thrown 
eggs and tomatoes at the 
Socialists, attacked the Popular 
Democrats and even planted a 
bomb for the Prime Minister, 
which went off too soon. 

The Military Council of the 
Revolution, which is still the 
ruling body until the National 
Assem bly is In place, has con- 
demned the political violence 
and assarted that ic will use 


at a conservative farmers’ rally 
and waving a cudgel, which 
has become the party’s trade- 
mark. 

On the whole, the parties 
have used traditional campaign 
methods, which are still a 
novelty to this aspiring democ- 
racy. Election posters have 
been put up everywhere, on 
public monuments, churches, 
private homes, on wails and 
trees in the remotest villages. 

The Communists are ac- 
knowledged to be the l . 
winners of the poster offensive, 
getting to the best places first 
with the most porters. Their 
graphic art features innocent 
children slogans defending 
liberty all in the national odors 
of red and green. 

Just as widespread are paint- 
ed slogans. Here the extreme 
leftist parties, winch cannot 
afford many posters, excel. The 
conservative party’s new popu- 
larity drive is also visible with 
painted signs on the walls and 
highways of the leftist Alentejo 
district calling for "peace, love 
and progress.” 


will spend their evenings ini 
village cafes watching the I 
screen with fascination. 

The authorities have scrupu- 
lously divided TV and radio 
propaganda time among the 
14 parties. At the same time, 
they have barred news cover- 
age of even the biggest rallies 
put on by the major parties. 

This puts parties Hke the! 
Maoist Worker- Peasant Al- 
liance, with an estimated 300 
members, on the same footing 
as the Communist Party, with ; 
a claimed membership of 120,- i 
000 . 

This is the reason why the! 
extreme leftist parties, which | 
condemn "bourgeois democra- 
cy” are taking part in the elec- 1 
tion. 

In Portugal, as in other coun- 1 
tries, the personal image of] 
the party leaders has a lot 
to do with the party’s populari- 
ty and could be more important i 
than platforms in the way ] 
people vote.’ 

The four big vote getters 
are: Mr. Soares of the Social- 
ists; FYancisco Si Cam eiro off 
the Popular Democrats; Diogo 
Freitas do Amaral of the Cen- 
tralists and Alvaro Cunhal of 
the Communists. 

Mr. Soares is a 31-year-old 
lawyer who spent most of his 
life fighting against the former 
right-wing dictatorship and has 
led the struggle against a Com- : 
munist takeover in Portugal. 
He is an easy-going, expansive ] 
politician who comes alive in, 
a crowd. 

Also a lawyer, Mr. Si Carnei-| 
ro, 40, was considered a liberal f 
under the old right-wing regime i 
and tried to bring about change 
from within as a deputy for 
the official party. Reserved and 
sometimes dogmatic, he ap- 
peals more to small intellectual 
groups than to the crowd. 

The Communist secretary gen- 
eral, Mr. Cunhal, 62, acquired 
his prestige from long years 
in prison and exile. However, 
those years have made him 
suspicious, secretive about his 
personal life and reticent 
crowds. 

Mr. Freitas do Amaral, 34, ] 
was a man of the old regime, 
a university professor and a 
Friend of former Prime Minister 
Marcello Caetano, now living 
in exile in Brazil. Be appears 
every inch a congenial but a 
strict disciplinarian. 


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Parties Hold Briefings 

A less visible but important 
part of the campaign are the 
briefings that all of the parties 
hold in cities and villages 
throughout the country. 

“There’s where we teli the 
people what socialism means 
on the national and local level, *’ 
Mario Parra, a 24-year-old So- 
cialist militant, said. The ses- 
sions are open and often end 
in sharp debate with rival party 
militants. 

The Socialists were accused 
of using "American tactics" in 
their campaign, when they in- 
troduced drum majorettes and 
brass bands at a rally in Opor- 
to. 

Mr. Soares is actually a firm 
believer in personal contact and 
has barnstormed the country’s 
22 districts by plane, train and 
motorcade. 

But probably the most 
powerful campaign weapon is 
television. The Portuguese are 
a nation of TV-watchers and 



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YSIB 

Seasons 


al Electric and 2 Unions 
in Talks for Key Contracts 


} i By DAMON STETSON 

fi Ah /ll electrical unions Albert J. Fitzgerald, president 
J fl/l / & fads for substantial of the United Electrical Work- 
7 '// wj[fases, unrestricted ers. said that the primary con- 
s adjustments and cem of his union’s members 
— It improvements as was the “completely inade- 
s. ] national negotia- quale" cost - of - living clause 
^^•"^Ov-day f° r new con- with. a ceiling that had "drasta- 
^*be General Electric -cally eroded” their living stan- 
dards. They demand an un- 
- . ,. r »me of these nego- Mpped cost-of-living provision 
■ - 1 i 'Respected to set a that will protect them “penny 
JO other Genera] for penny" against rising pn- 
..ons that are coot- ces, he added. 

“ ^-I'ir bargaining with union also is asking 

opal Union of Elec- substantial across - the - board 
.... .. . <ers, representing increases in wages and saia- 
'■*'*' r*--?. employees, and ries," he said, “not only to 
Electrical Workers, VP but to assure an Im- 

16,400- proved standard of living dur- 

: " ” ^-'tiations also will of the upcoming 

closely by workers contract - 

: ‘ . ^nent at the West- Average Hourly Pay $5.05 

^tnc Corporation, General Electric hourly 
workers now earn, on the aver- 
‘ - t' :ir age, about $5.05 an hour, union 

lontlu Tbe General sources said. Under their pre- 
semen ts expire at sent three-year contracts, they 
'.'A'.-.rte ““ Vj.® received three wage increases, 

s pacts at mid- totaling 47 cents an hour and 
. . x . _ cost-of-living adjustments to- 

' ".“.'.Tngs at the Essex taling 41 cents an hour. 

day were brief but The expiring contracts pro- 
. . _ . ’in tone, accord- vided for cost-of-living adjust- 
1 l General Electric ments of 1 cent an hour for 
fie predicted, each full three tenths of 1 

. * there would be percent by which the Consumer 
;* -'.{ginlng” on the Price Index increased in the 
: raised by tbe applicable measurement per- 
. v expressed con- iods. But the provision sets 

• II: settlement would maximum amounts for each 

period,’ thereby limiting the in- 
r n r,trart Sonsht creases that could result from 
' ;: :-::r €ontrac£ Soasflt cost-of-living rises. Jt is these 
ngs, retiring pres- ceilings that the unions want 
E., said that this to eliminate, but there were 
time for unions indications that they might run 
the bargaining ta- into company resistance, 
dity or apprehen- Other unio n demands include 
, he added, is it improved pensions for workers 
iemand the moon, who retire in the future as 

..-a time when we well as for those already re- 

t-^?Tt^^ToaIitative in our tked, a union shop, a reduction 
' "' S A recognize that in the 40-hotff work-week with- 
~ im for the losses out a cut in pay, greater job 

T^-a steadily rising security and better income 
‘ and demonstrate protection during layoffs, 
e the necessary broadened health insurance 
fgoti'ate equitable coverage including dental care, 
MftAAfhblary increases,” elimination of area wage differ- 
I IlfflS • entials and longer vacations. 





. J ' 

T. " 

.r" 

&?■*** ' ’ 
-iV- • - 


Women's Milk researchers said in 

i lir4> . nivr the April issue of the American 
leavy Wltn UDT 3ournal Diseases of Children, 

. / AP > published by the American 

April 20 (AP)— Association. 

frchers m Tenjoes- The researchers, Bennie T. 

mi* found nigh Woodard of Meharry Medical 
v in the milk of College and Drs. Bruce B. Per- 
il black women, guson and David J. Wflson of 
iree years after Vanderbilt University, sampled 
ticide was prohi- the milk of 33 black women 
in Bolivar County, Miss., and 
ntaned DDT con- Lee County, Ark. 

Kariy 10 times The use of DDT was banned 
the World Helath by the Federal Government be- 
limit for cow’s ginning Jan. 1, 1973. 


ABRAHAMcp 


THE BROOKLYN 


BICENTENNIAL 


UTE TO 



SPANGLED 


yx.T£* 





? y\ 


T ns NEW YORK TIMES, WEDNESDAY, APRIL ff, 1915 






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Sis* 


THE NEW YOkK TIMES , WEDNESDAY. APRIL 21, 1976 

- Howard Hughes at End: Contradictions in Aco 

■— ■■ * ■ ■, • - 

Continued From Pace 1 CoL 2' lrfaff - ?op yaws he had maned hiar to the darkened the time and noting that the blank. -if Mr. K 

_ ’ (treated Mr. Hughes while also room because he was “con* plane had just passed from a stroke, head 

■ tient was not in a coma: i^icontlacting a busy family medi- cenied” about Mr. Hughes’s over the Gulf of Mexico across other problem i 
fact, be said, Mr. Hughes was]^- pi2c tj C e :n Logan. But early condition. Dr. Chaffin said ho the shoreline • to Brownsville, to his death, 
was partly conscious and hej- m 1975^ according to medical had found the patient breathing Tex This is a crucial point, obliged to reco 
found no evidence of a stroke.' associates he aaveun hw nrac- fast. only semiconscous and he said, because of the “enor- potion, accord] 
•Or. Chaffin said that more toe to "deteriorating rapidly” mous red tape” and “dilficul- of the bureau. 

hi nnrf-nrea-ni frozen test he or-!$? °n P \fr Dr * Chaffin said he took the ties" that would hare arisen In the last 

blood mea wmj 0 en test he or ^ Hu h6s Dr Tham is Mr- initiatiTC to blood and if Mr. Hughes had died in Mexi- Howard Hughe* 

dered late on Apnl 4 stared Ga/s bratiew-lzw srine tests. He said that Dr. co. functioned in t 

that Mr. Hughes was suffenog Dr. Homw c^aft orsau Cnme drew the blsod for the le mi expats also pointed awy to which 
from a kidney ailment and this tests. At midnight, the results out tSat the autopsy and medi- conditioned t 

was later noted as the cause ™ J J t5TcL»S tahim- came ^ Chaff ' Ui tp d cal investigation would have Wright, directo 
of death. But Dr. Montemayor, J ™ ^ sS t C^tv^Sat coofinned his suspicion tha been conducted by the Mexican Medical Four 
reading the same test results, iS*K Hughes had a kidney mi- aut horiUes. called Dr. Md 

said, ‘The blood test was good^ JggfiE& “ SSS ^ ^ The Houston autopsy has not ^ that Mr. F 

the urine test was gooj ^£ ll S*SSp S & Dr. JPSS&S* *«n made public. At a news «?* jo « 


^pr. Chaffin said that Mr. ££££* ~ ^ ^ ^jfter he ^nor Dn tfSSZS; he would not mayor wonde 

Hughes fell out of b«l on Tr^efndnnc "g* I? P* 3 *?? comment on whether Mr. Hug- Hughes had nc 

March 1 in Acapulco and sev- Blood for Transfusions outside the United Stotts. Dr. he5 - s physicians had underesS- ized sooner a> 
ered a haif-mefa tu mor o n lus i^t Dec. 23 Dr. Chaffin was Chaffin said he had called m mate / & physical durability, had asked the 
scalp, which left a fresh srax sunu^ed to Freeport. He pr. Montemayor. whose n ame adclin g. «>x not want to 'They didn’t e 

noted u the autopsy. Clarexice f oun d Mr. Hughes much weaker he had received from a patient even S n^ulat e jn this area be- quote explana 
A. Waldron, one of Mr_. Hughes’s ^ ie had been in August, The Mexican doctor said he know, i really ^This roan wa: 

aides, told the Mexican Fed- he Though called to treat arrived at 6 AM. on apnl 5. don - t ijyQw. A man himself able to return 
eral Police that Mr. ^r. Hughes, Dr. Chaffin says and ftw^ a nude, em * ciated has to decide if he needs some States for red 

had severed the tumor when fae was ,^ Qm asked to see man vnth bed sores who was hel _ ^ beyond that I just know ” 
he feU out of a chair in Free- parent From the day he covered by a pastel sheet. His know." Howard Rot 

port, Bahama s. arrived until Mr. Hughes died, hair was long but not hippie ATW 4i a +»,«* Houston Citv man who bui! 

For nearly two weeks before Dp chaffrn said, hehad only length" and bis beard was ‘ ^pnl 8, toe Hourfon manwno ibbl 

his death, Mr. Busies was inofficial ^ts” — visiS trimmed to about an inch wd ?^. u ° r ^ of Sernmen- 

treated by Dr. Norman Crane ^ f, e talked to and treat- a half, according to toe doctor. nnmmMmt 

of Los Angeles, one of toree ^ Mr _ Hughes. Dr. Montemayor looked at T 

physicians who shared respon- 53^ him almost daily " the results of the Wood and 

sibility for his care. Dr. Crane ^ doctor adds, “by going m urine tests and fund them both iS?* 

did not accompany Mr. Hoghes wW he “good." He said that in his 

when he flew to Houston on ££ opinion the tests could not ac- *2^. c ^p n [ c **** 1 

April 5. S^ariv FeWTmxy of this SSF tettTSS ^in which “ &e unmediate cause empu^ fa^er 

Chronic Kidney Ailment year, toe Hughes party moved he found Mr. Hughes. wther section of the certif- as If no one 

\ Dr. Chaffin said that he did told icate is reserved for listing he is really dt 

/ not establish that Mr. Hi^ies SJS. ,?p-Sf 5^' Uu 0 hes s dCKrtore had told ., other significant contributing reappear to 

f was suffering from a chrome JJjf 5“^ ??Et 0 o £ P^ v0U ^ ,^1 factors.” The section was left those who disc 

kidney ailment until a little « Hotel. Jfc Hughes stayed day, ApnJ 2, “he had a violent . ■ x — - g — g — - — 

over 13 hours before the time m a darkened room— its ^ win- and sudden shock, which I im- 

of death Subseauentiy an au- dows sealed by plywood and ag ine was the stroke probably JL/^^xL _ «. 

toosy in Houston established black curtains— where he slow- through a brain bemorrliage." EidrtftC, xV6iUEZA§[ C/UZfg 
that Mr. Hughes had died of i? succumbed to kidney ^ cfiatfrn said he never told m « if 1 • f ait * 

kidney faihir^ dls “ se i h — w ayi , thfk Dr. .Montemayor that Mr. J Tip tO AtTICCL III 1974 

In an extensive interview Dr. Chaffin and the Hugfaes had had a stroke, but r 

with The New York Times, otiiear dneton he said Dr - Crane a 

Dr. Chaffin, an 83-year-old. sur- Hughes t^lfoss ^^0^ with Dr. Monte- INDIANAPOLIS, April 20 1 Germ any, as 


jgeon who bad SSfiTte. » « S STy^out of -his 

iHughes since 1932, ackpowi- 5*5™ April ■J ^Cnf™n Of accounts abt 


earshot (a?)— S enator Vance Hartke can 

nt lfuvi Hlrt- _ a 1 j. C. 


r. Hughes was. suffering fed- teStteTHe was„w^l 



ro 5UDHUL W u ‘ c - afiduevalment ca»». i can iook at tnar ana giva wun wnat xm 

urine tests necessary to identi- . Houston Is Chosen you a 'report “on-it," the three- shows.” 

fy the ailment. -WiUftil Patient Local hospitalization was term Indian* Senator said when For An 

Dr. Chaffin said h^ad toeat He {jesefibed Mr. Hughes as -.igj out by the three doctors asked at a news conference ta y - n . 

^ » “willful" and difficult patient (Sse l the hospitals lacked explain the .discrepancy. “But 1 ^J n “ er 


3 keci though an' expense account he However, an 
filed in 1075 listed only a trip ton later sail ’ ■ 
such tQ the Ivory Coast. trip. 1 “We’re 

“I can look _at that and give with what tin '• : - 
you a' report’ on -it,” the three- shows.” 
was term IndJanfi Senator said when For Ar '» 


BOL Dr CtaHta Mid. ^ pro«t~ S JLX JSST ^ oSSS&t funds, or foreign 

m^t of A £ W* Las. Vegas sojourn, accord- officials said an effort currency allotted to senators b The 

medical condition was deten- ^ to the^octor, Mr. Hughes w S^e [ 0 charter T plane and representat was visiting A 

orating rapidly 1 so he suffered from anemia and mal- ^ Araculco but that none P was abroad, are provided by the Gui * 

blood ^.urtoetests without nutrition bn)Ught ^ by but none w ^ Departl ^ t ^ ^ ta Nm M r 

the patign^ potmssiom only candy bars, other sweets Meanwhile, Summa had effect authorization to make 

V? ©■« S' S' “St , » » SsS . 

PW 10 ' 1 - . fin says. “You could ask, why tm % r _ -t-w* w ho had been worked extremely hard." Sen- “ “ ® 


' VM fin says, “You could ask, why * Dr , xhain, wh o had been worked extremely hard." Sen- 

I b God* name rasn’t vacationing in the Bahamas, ator Hartke said in refuting 

\ ^ fidng done for him? But with d s-te him to Acapulco. The charges that he had taken un- “ j, 

s Dec 23. l®7o Hov^rd Hughes you just SJ^gtSd a? 8™ but nSeLary trips at the. taxpay- ^ n3 made 

1 of coul dp’ t d0 th £F-! F * Uure ■£ ft wls^hree hours before the ere^xpense. The charge was f t] ? 

1 vS T ^ inter^W in uJ P®™ 11 if te *JL e f ai £ Hughes party could decide who made recently by Represents- * !! : 

- j SSL2L “ihSPSTiSt Tf‘^ as “P^ ^ "T f f ? ujt woS]d araompany the billion- tive Philip H. Hayes, Mr. ^dto xet. 

I Angeles, which vras part or |, e ^, use he would not- allow t Houston. Hartke’s Democratic primary 

-! J 1 SSn” S^tLa^St? He mad * 1 ? ,s decis,ons » was finahy agreed that opponent 2*f3KS 

’« ” ‘ ^S? iJ22 aS: about everything” George Fran com and Dc. Crane In challenging the Senator’s of strt 

! SJS bmi " ,?* J' < ^?£J e " would take a commercial flight travels, Mr. Hayes said Senator sions with tf 

pul co and Miami. called, Mr. Hughes fell from t0 ^ Angeles. Three aides Hartke “took a free tnp around i n f an + Uj>« 

VhrtuaBy Bednddea his bed and struck Jus heito wete Ieft behind. to clean up the world at the expense of "^ r „ 

Dr Chaffin said that since on , ® table, shearing _off matters in Mexico. Hoosier taxpayers." Hartke . 

Mr Huehes broke his hip in a half-mch tumor. Tne accident The plane bearing Mr. Hughes must have been studying the 
L London hi i 1972, he had been S av e the doctor a chance to Jeft short iy af ter n a.M for problems of veterans along tha pher s Hospu 

fertuaUv bedridden and in- ^ the tissue, and he said Houstort Dr. Chaffin said Mr. Ivory Coast where I under- cessfully op* 

creasinslv dependent upon the he had found the tumor benign. Hughes was alive when the stand they [hotels] must charge g»ri bora wit 
irrivin °of aides and medical 0a March 5, Dr. Cnafnn plane took off. According to traveling veterans an exorbitant right side o 

- ^arotmd hL said - m - Hu ^ es was . Iucid - the information Dr. Thain later rate.” he added. blocked blot 

Mrist of the men closest to H l control of his faculties” and gave to Houston medical offi- The expense voucher Senator said that su 

Mr Hutrhes in his last davs inQdired of Dr. Chaffin about cials, Mr. Hughes died at 2:27 Hartke filed with the secretary’ rare and we; 

had Sen selected for the jo'b, several doctors and nurses who PJVI., about 23 minutes before of toe Senate in 1975 lists $14,- found in adu 

rtrrwtiv or indirectly bv Frank ha d treated him after an air- the aircraft’s scheduled arrival. 000 in expenses for him andlhours after t 
William Gav the ' executive P lane “S. 10 Dr. Chaffin said he did not two aides in 1974 for trips to she underwee 

vine nresident and director of Dr \ P 1 *™ said on April 4 record the time, hut recalled Iran, Pakistan, Indonesia, Sri growth was 
the Summa Cornoration. Mr. 311 aide to Mr. Hu^ies sum- ■ looking, out of the window at Lake, New Zealand and West (now recovers 
Hughes’s-, holding company. ■ == = — = — = — - = " = ~ g — ~__r =z 

Mr. Gay is a Mormon; in- - r ^ ^ 

deed, a significant number of ® 3 

men in the senior echelon at H • M ____ _ ■ 

Summa and around Mr. Hughes H A 

were members of the Church B ; ^ 

1 of Jesus Christ of Latter-day H ■ • . 

Saints (Mormons), fl| ■ ||^ W W 

There were, in effect, two - W * 

circles of companions , to Mr. ,B ■ ■ . MM 

- II I lUCtLwaUIv j|! D t* 

- City, George Francom. of Las — ■■ 5 

Vegas, Clarence A. -Waldron M H H - ■ pi 8 9 

Los ^ B- ff irf fh rth r? 1^ ^ I 

Theater circle included Eric H Zjk HVlffll ICj I |^£l| T-U " 

itssms. lomous IdDcl jj 

p^t&l visits- to their homes, |PHte B ' A - ' II 1 

as well as telephone calls and wB w 

requests through 'the Summa MM ’’A 

Corporation none of them 

would agree to an on-toe- ■■■ 

record interview.- ~ mBM 

.Rotation of Doctors IJ 

Ta effect the responsibility ■ . v • ^ 2% 

for Mr. Hughes’s medical care nBl^Kk HA — — - : ■ — - ? 

3ar‘j?eaff-2£ , ss„- 

he eoyiti get permission to ex- • . |^f| ftOL kSlL^I ,W W ' 

amine: Jdr. Hughes by, grang e ® wWf'-- MUr : ■- UBJI 

through an aide. He said , he ■ ' ‘ ' * 

did not believe that the other 
doctors had much better' access. . 

Mr. Hughes was regularly 
treated hy three physicians 
who rotated the responsibility 
of being on standby wherever 
Mr. Hughes chose to live. Dr. 

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. menufaeturers, Four great pin-stripe combinations, and a terrific range 

nearly a decade.' solid colors. For $129 you’ll look like a million. 

Dr. Crane had “inhented” __ . 

Mr. Hughes as a potimt, Dr. B A .B . A ’ \ 

Chaffin said, from his medical B jm ' m _ M A 

colleague Dr. Vernon Mason. 

who treated the industrialist .. Bfl Wfa gg Hfllf m |JU& H 

for many years and who (tied B ■ ffi HR H i|^ B B ■ 

in the mid-1960's. . B MR* H 

Dr. Crane was on standby _ y ^ ™ ** 

duty during Mr. Hughes's last ■MH Wjjfc, M ML R| 

two weeks in Acapulco and B L - JEM 

his view of Mr. Hughes’s medi- 1 B RbBbBR 

cal condition. Dr. Chaffin said, B B^ ^ jw B f fM 

would be informative. Howev- ' kr JR Wl U "l B '▼ fel HR 

er, repeated efforts to reach ' ter B H 

Mr. Crane, though his office p ™ • ^B^B IB W 

S a d Stoc,c - „ 7 |, Church Street (corner Vesey St.) Eveningstil! 6:30-Thursday till 9:00 

p&SKZr . s ro ^a« 5 f d an o 5 f h] 'Evenings till 6:30-Thursday till 8:0 

was also on tile Hughes medical DOIfl StOrGS 6 i M SatUrdaV— Master Charge. CltlCard anrl Rantf Amprlrard. 




3-piece 



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525 Madison Ave. (-bet. 53rd and 54th) Evenings till 6:30-Thursday till 8:0 
Both stores 6 PM Saturday-Master Charge, Citicard and BankAmericard. 


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K.^v: 

•*ST:JV Ev ft?--, 

S^3rt*i' 7 in i* ■ 
K 

.• '- 


ras JV'SW' YORK TIMES, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1976 



ber Talks Are Pressed at Deadline Issues in Rubber Talks 


FORD PAID SM,668|SSS“ “™K«™ 


•-' - ?=E DEMBART ! Consumer Price index rose 7 would be depleted in two to 

‘' C tw N ew Tne Tima ipercent and 10 cents if it rose three weeks. ’ 

;■ ‘ JtD, April 20 The) 9 percent. . The- rubber plants dominate 

.:.. . _ ;^>b6 r workers pre-j Other issues remained on the the city. They are enormous, 

.' . . E ‘v. :|V to shut down the i bargaining table, but a union grimy brick buildings, each 

I.-'; - Four robber com-) source said that they could covering acres. Their smoke- 

’V;^’-iego tiations con tin- be put over for further negotia- stacks can be seen for miles, 
z? -^ •:£- a midnight strike tion If some agreement could ®od the smell of rubber is 
jfeith the two sides be reached oq money. But he everywhere. 

was not hopeful about such The dispute Is an outgrowth 
- I.-" - . 5 ^i.close to the talksian agreement. of the Phase 3 wage controls, 

.. *■ union and the Fire- 1 Several persons repeated ear- which held down the settlement 

.. 1 Cl ad Rubber Com pa-j tier speculation that since both in 1073 when the present rub- 

. y" >' :• concern in the! the union and the companies — her contract was negotiated. 

' -■« -vi tfc- ®?’d this after- j Firestone, the Goodyear Tirs The rubber workers at that 


**;£*>"* 5^-; ,- ..^- u' ; ^v Bother side had and Rubber Company, the B. tiiwi accepted a„ wage and 

.* • -■ ^ 1 T; H-.^n its last position F. Goodrich Company and Uni- fringe benefit package of about 


jf , ‘ - - 1'}' avenue of com- 1 royal Inc. — expected a strike, 6 percent a year with no cost 

' •*!"' ‘ " ■ •ij.'yrt appeared. I they would not put forward of living clause. In the three 

■ r^_rl *!r. r * -a. % " ■ •' • ■■‘K’tiators were said; acceptable offers until a walk- years since the Consumer 

«■-.• - -l- - - >.ut resigned to a [cut began. Price Index rose 27 percent, 

iwsscas?*?-^ * . ‘J- :. -r^'iich would affect; James F. Scearce, director but the workers got only 17 

-■ - ' - - : - : ,>‘ers from coast to I of the Federal Mediation and percent more and are now try- 

* ‘ - - : could eventually J Conciliation Service, arrived ing to make up in one Jump 

*-.-.*■* *rz.y± ■ ; aobile production [from Washington to try to de- for what they did not receive. 

^ xe a costly settle- (vise a last-minute compromise, Mr. Bommarito. the union 

■' whig-. ~ ^ . •„ •' r r .'should increase the [but no one was sanguine that president, has been displaying 

aliiWWe. a .* : V : -'. ^'^-sand other rubber i it could be done. a research report released last 

- ^ ... . : • i::- V' j In Akron, the rubber capital week by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, 

*■- blackout has been -of the world, an hour's drive Fenner & Smith, the brokerage 

V . the ne<roLirtions. south of here, workers report- house, that predicted that the 

union official said' ing to the Firestone, Goodyear rubber workers would win a 
'-'.T' <>R-W. expected a and Goodrich plants appeared substantial package in the cur- 
^737^.. ‘ V--: five to six weeks, ready to strike at the call of rent talks, perhaps as' much 

t-*' whose negotiating their union. UniroyaJ is not as 39 percent over three years, 
is.*'- V ri ? ' c:-!ed by Peter Bom- represented in Akron. raising their hourly pay from 

W&- - ... ~ ; n terns Uonal or*s- Akron is a city of 265,000, an average of $5.50 to $8.04 

tedf*-*** " •“••••-. - - /.aid to be holding people, 25.000 of whom, 1 includ- and fringe benefits from $3.55 

■ ~i-s-.il demand for an ing 11,000 union members, to $4.73. r 

* ritiTr ■*' ^ ' ■-■-■increase of $1.65 an work at the three plants. Sever- Mr. Bommarito objected yes- 

i ble iLs members al thousand more work for terday to suggestions that the 
^ _ ' =5^; with the money the fifth largest rubber compa- consumer would ultimately 

L D ’ . * st " through. infla- ny, General Tire and Rubber, have to pay for any contract 

, ff.ZlutlflnN last .three years, where contracts expire on May gains. 

ItiRjr Wis!':. i«« . Ijuitimited cost of f 15. Altogether, the Big Four However, the Merrill Lynch 

ijttft-.. %£ ■ / Tf n tn a f -■ » .tor. The current [account for two-lhirds. of the study that he quoted projected 

m Jty wage is $5.50. rubber industry's tire capacity, that a large settlement would 

.W frff 4 * has not imnrovedj The union would not begin force the industry to raise the 

an hour over to pay strike benefits to its price of tires and other rubber 
* ». Vi- Qd a cost-of-livin 7 members until two weeks after products 6 percent this year 

f • . _-. :i <iacid edd 5 cents a walkout began. A union and 3 percent in each of the 


- *'■ J.- '2 


**,.* e* :< r- 


Mrs.,- ,i . ' : ‘ 

w war* 3 *:? 


n ’ . »st" through. infla- ny, Gf 

l\Ptljhn n fT- last three years, where 
(fvM'i w . l-Linlimited cast of|l5. Al 


•ai 


' • 

ms-': $■*? r ‘ 

•• ■ 

-t . ■ 


r#->. 


t s 1 - *■■--■- 


* mfisr 


m&K" 




!. !^^ : wage rates if thei source said the strike fund‘<next two years. 


'show you and your friends how to look terrific 
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Or our name isn’t 
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What we do is manufacture and sad our 
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So if it's savings you- want on men's 
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R {Our suits. sail from 84.95 to SI 20.95) 
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If it's free expertalterations you want-- 
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But...if it's a famous store label name 
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Master Charge and BankAmericard invited. 

Open weekdays from 9 to 6; Thursdays 
9 lo 8; Saturdays 9 to 5; Sundays 10 to 4. 


Special 10 Thp New Tort Ttmr» 

CLEVELAND, April 20 — Following ore the issues in 
the rubber industry contract talks: 

Participants 

The United Rubber Workers are negotiating for a new 
three-year master contract with the Big Four rubber com- 
panies — the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, the Fire- 
stone Tire and Rubber Company, the B. F. Goodrich Com- 
pany and UniroyaJ Inc. — but are concentrating their efforts 
on Firestone to make it set the pattern for the industry. 
The union represents '70,000 workers at the four compa- 
nies, 10,000 of whom have not been recalled from layoffs 
that started during the recession. 

Talks .are being held at the Sheraton-Cleveland Hotel. ‘ 
The union team is headed by Peter Bommarito, interna- 
tional president of the union, and the Firestone team by 
Josejih V. Cairns, director of industrial relations. 

Issues 

The union wants its members to catch up immediately 
with the production workers in the auto industry, who are 
now $1.65 an hour ahead of the rubber workers. It is' also 
demanding an unlimited cost of living clause, which it has 
not previously had. Management has offered an increase of 
51.05 an hour -over three years and a cost of living clause 
that would add 5 cents an hour- to workers’ pay if the 
Consumer Price Index rose 7 percent and 10 cents if it in- 
creased 9 percent 

’ Fringe Benefits 

The union is seeking higher pension, health and early 
retirement benefits and wants the companies to contribute 
more to supplemental unemployment benefit funds, some 
of which went broke during heavy layoffs. 

Industry Stand 

The Big Four companies say they want to force lower 
paid workers in nontire plants to accept smaller raises 
than the tire workers get. They say the competition in 
.those areas from small nonunion companies is severe. The 
companies also want to give lower raises to unionized tire 
workers at plants in the South and Southwest, where wage 
rates are lower than the $5.50 an hour national average. 
Officially the union is standing firm that all workers must 
get the same across-the-board increase. But there are indi- 
cations that it might agree to separate tire and nontire 
rates in an effort to save more jobs for its members. 


imw tnw ipo-JjUUO u *23,489. - ^ 

TIT 1AI7C TI n miTfTsrs Two weeks later, Mr. Reagan, Un -.DlorUI ED i/fvi/u 

IJt lo/O U.U. IAXKN who had resisted requests for 

All 1 U1U i nAQJ coropan ,ble details of his net BOSTON. April 20 (AP>- 

worth, issued a statement that Three Massachusetts women 
Continued From Page I, Col. 4 placed it at $1,455,571. Mr. whose mothers took a drug, 
filed their 1975 Federal tax said at the time that during pregnancy to prevent 

return on April 1. The White he expected to pay about 42 miscarriage filed a multuno- 

House said today that that It percent of his gross 1975 in- hon-dollar class action suit to- 

listed a taxable income of come in total Federal, state Federal court against 

" and ]oc&l taxes. His Iess-de- drug companies that produced 
l^in “bus^SpSS-S *iled disclosure Indicated that and marketed diethyfetiibestn^. 
included the cost ofpurchasin'* Mr- Read's total tax pay- Brenda Payton, 23 years old; 
and mailing 35.000 Christmas ments ta - some recent years Joanne Derbrot, 25, and Kath- 
cards. hf d been as little as 17 percent Murphy, 27, are seeking 

The return also listed deduc- - f rtA. damages of S2 million each 

SS* l*£l static ^piranj (TSfpSt ^ 10 Pharmaceutical manu- 

759.34 in charitable contribu- Ideocy who has issued a finan- facturers. 
tions 4 $150 in medical insur- S iaI statement comparable in Researchers have found the 
anoe’ payments and $1,087.39 det “* J® Mr. Fords is Repre- drug has caused thousands of 
in interest payments. daughters borne by women 

Mr Ford’s 1975' Federal tax that he a£d hErtfe £d who took the drug to contract 

MlS carae 9 ro lSleS 93 “ CDrae of * 70 -" 6 ,ast vear P re - cancerous and cer ' 

The "^teHouse *had saMi ore^ ^ P® 1 ** toxes of *22.813. vkal lesions .and is the cause 

vious^tiiat $106^00 Sdteen M Th L 1 r fl d 7i h£ ll fUed' *fo?l ^fSl ° f Bt ^ 120 ^ CanCerS * 
withheld last year from Mr. Mr- F ? rd J®* 1 JJJ 1 The women, who said they 

Ford’s biweekly pavchecks. y. ear m ^ suffered such problems. 

The mteroaKRevenue Service. Nessen said that the Pr^ident s are seeking damages and ask- 
evidently acting with excep- n « t wortt has not changed ing ^ drug companies to 
tional speed, already- has re- 1 W85 ^ search out and 811 di “ 

funded the SI 1,631.07 overpay- worth state . ethyl stilbestrol daughtereof the 

ment to Mr. Ford.. m Mf- his taT disclose da ° ger . ^ 4J ce “B® »• 

Fa flier Disclosure { nei ? t 30(1 J 1 f ^sclosure aminations. The suit also asks 

both suggested he was cautious ^ establishment of free clinics 
"It’s unbelievable how they about finances, having paid off ^ Massachusetts to conduct 
managed to get his return pro- the mortgages on three homes suc h diagnoses, 
cessed out of that whole and invested only in long-held I0 companies named in 

bunch,” quipped a White House securities, life insurance and the suit are A bb„ tt Laboraio- 
aide of the I.R.S. retirement programs. rie^ Chicago; Eli Lilly & Com- 

Mr. Nesssn said that in mak- When it comes t0 ^nioney. pany^ Indianapolis, Ind.; Merck, 
ing public detailed information said a senior aide, "He's a Sharpe & Dohme Company, 
about his tax return the Pres- very conservative man." W est Point, Pa.; Miles La bora- 

ident was suggesting "all tHe — rr r ” n-ainirHav tories - Elkhart, Ind.; Ortho 

randidates for President pub- Ley I and Lifts Capital Outlay pharmaceutical Corporation, 
lish their records.” LONDON. April 20 (AP) — Raritan, N. J.; Parke Davis & v 

The stress placed on Mr. British Leyland Ltd. Plans to Company, Detroit;. Rexall Drug 
Ford’s willingness to disclose spend a further 10 million company, St. Louis; E. R. 
persona] financial data mir- pounds on expanding its bus Squibb & Sons, Inc., Princeton,- 
rored statements made at the and truck plants, reflecting the n. J.; Upjohn Company, Kala- 
White House on Feb. 12, when success of this division of the mazoo, Mich., and Sandoz, Inc., [ 
the President disclosed in some state-owned vehicle maker. East Hanover, N. J. 


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Equip a recreation room 


State & Zip' 


B The Bowery Savings Bank, Consumer Loan Dept., Attn : Ann Fitzgerald 
110 East 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. 10017 • (212) 953-8315 


Name 


Address 


State 


DHNT-Mf 


I0SI 


















its 


THE NEW YORK TIMES , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1976 


Labor Leader Aids Jackson 
But Likes Humphrey Best 


By JAMES T. WOOTEN 

Epccul to TSc ”ew 7?rt Haw 

PHILADELPHIA, April 20— A , port in the state— he has no 
week before the Pennsylvania ‘staff workers assigned to Penn- 
Presidential primary, Senatorisvlvania — the Alabamian was 
Henry M. Jackson of Washing*; scheduled to visit several cities 
ton won today an endorsement] for television appearances and] 
from a union leader who pre-;new$ conferences, but no raf- 
ters Senator Hubert H. Hum-jlies, once the trademark of! 
phrey of Minnesota as the : his Presidential pursuit. 
Democratic nominee. i In this city, for instance, 

Edward F. Toohey. president I he wlU not even leave thej 
of the Philadelphia Council of* ! ~ ““ * 


the American Federation of La- 
bor and Congress of Industrial 
Organizations, announced bis 
support for Mr. Jackson at a 
news conference here this af- 
ternoon, calling him a “real 
friend" of organized labor. 

But later, Mr. Toohey con- 
ceded that Mr. Humphrey, who 
is not officially seeking the 
nomination, is his first choice 
and a favorite of most of his 
fellow union officials as well. 

His endorsement came on 
a day when Mr. Jackson was 

vigorously campaigning here in 

this chy and Jimmy Carter, 'had simply erected a 
his major opponent in the pri- 
mary next Tuesday, was seek- 
ing votes in Pittsburgh. 


airport on his visit tomorrow. . 

Mr. Jackson, on the other 1 
hand, left the airport here on. 
the run this morning after a 
fund-raising breakfast in Hart- 
ford, attended by Connecticut 
Governor Ella T. Grasso, one 

of his most energetic sup- 
porters. 

In Philadelphia, after a walk- 
ing tour of a men’s clothing 
plant he paused to reiterate 
his views On low-income public 
housing, about the closest dung 
to an issue that the 1976 cam- 
paign has thus far produced. 

He suggested that Mr. Carter 
‘straw 

man” in his remarks about 
high-rise public housing in sub- 
urban neighborhoods. Senator] 



Carter Emerging as Indiana Fc 


Jackson Appears to 7 ™!^“ 

Ibors just south ! 
[borders. 

; A poll taken i 
can State Conm 
— , Teeter of Detro 

tiai campaign on April i 1, few- ! Mr. Udall went awry just;*, 15 four 


| By R. W. APPLE Jr. 

j Sped zl to The Sew TwIcTUsm I 

I INDL4 NAPOLIS. April 20— ■ 
[When Senator Henry M. Jack-i 
Ison made his first Indiana ap-: 
pearance of the 1976 Presiden-] 


in State's May 4 Race 

for 75 Delegates 


- - . , SOD respondent 

jer than 400 people turned out^fore the filing deadline: it 55 percent, Mr. 
[for a rally in an auditorium ; was then discovered that Mr. cent, and an 
jat the state fairgrounds thBVufcM was short 35 signatures 12 percent unde> 
! bolds about 3.500. * i on his nominating petition * "PJ 

| The night before. Senatorj the 6th congressional District,^ JjT 

[Hubert H. Humphrey, the non-, keeping him off lhe ballot. California." said 
.‘candidate who somehow man-| Supreme Court refused j/gan. (he stt 

yes ter day to consider immedi- [chairman, who 
ately Mr. Details challenge to j idem. “Indiana 
beginning { a state j aw that requires ai°' P art y. 


Uges 01 show up in each Pres- 
'identia! primary state just as 
the campaign is 


and 


drew a sellout audience to aj^ndidate to qualify ‘"^^^If'lcumbents/’^ 


Representative Morris KJ Jackson said such facilities/ 
Udall of Arizona, who bor-jwere already antiquated and| 
rowed S30.000 over the week- 1 the question therefore was 
end to finance campaign efforts 
in Pennsylvania, spent the day 
in the Southwest with plans 


* Associated Press 

Senator Henry M. Jackson with Gov. Ella T. Grasso of .Connecticut and Henry Parker, 
state treasurer, at breakfast in Hartford. Senator Jackson is campaigning in the state. 


Democratic fund-raising dinner. 

“Jackson is trying to appeal 
to the same people in Indiana 
as Humphrey does.” said Frank 
Corsaro, Mr. Jackson’s local 
coordinator, “but they like 
Humphrey better." 

In Pennsylvania, where the 

same situation exists, the Hum- 
phrey forces are struggling to 
turn out a big Jackson _ vote 
to stop former Gov. Jimmy: 
Carter of Georgia in the staters 
'pivotal primary on April 27. 

1 But in Indiana, which votes 


tricts to run in any of them. 

The appeal of Gov. George 
C. Wallace of Alabama in this 
state, where he finished second 
in 1972 with 41 percent of 
the primary vote, has faded 
dramatically, by all accounts, 
leaving a head-on Carter-Jack- 
son fight Mr. Wallace has can- 
celed several campaign dates, 
although he still intends to 
appear here. 

.Mr. Jackson’s assets appear 
to be his popularity in the 
heavily industrialized belt 


week later, on May 4.! along’ Lake Michigan, where 


Mr. Milligan : 
Mr. Ford to tvi 
of the vote ai 
1 1 Congressi 
which under F 
would give h 
state's 54 deleg: 
Holds C 

Charles Bla. 
Reagan organi? 
much of Mr. IV 
ment But he 
that Mr. Feag: 
district or two- 
Indiartapolis ?r 
fomian is 3 bit 


mp0{ ! financial benefits 

But. like Mr. Carter. Senator) would ensue. 

Jackson said he believed thel Mr. Carter was in Houstoai Mr. Carter’s schedule will. 
Federal Government should aetjearlier today for a fund-raising I take him to the Scranton and. 


one w<-civ 1 at ci , un i***«j — , .t, -»« n i 1 

the Jackson campaing seemsihe has the support of the stMl- ! -• - — 

much less forceful, despite the workers and of Robert P^t^k ;distincuons on 
covert support of the state la- the Lake County Democratic , the two Repul 
bor federation and of most o'Jch airman; the faint possibility Live rampsusn 


he claims’ the Democratic convention in [took both Mr. Carter and Pres-L h e nartv organization . headed that Mr. Carter’s commenis] later this week. 

,j u ly {ident Ford to task for criticiz-j. \vfIUam Trisler. the Indiana here about “ethnic purity’ will- Among th* 

in Houstoai Mr. Carter’s schedule win ^ \ Democratic chaiiman. jhurt him wi th Hack voter*, well as the D 

Federal Government snouia acc : earuer toaay ror a fund-raising! take him to the Scranton and , uc h heaw attack! Local Preference | ... ^ 

“when the local government; breakfast and he told support- Wilkes-Barre areas tomorrow, to" Contrai . of locaI offices is w while Mr 

fails to let people live where: era there. that he was to fioan- where Senator Jac^njrtU ^«u was ^ed hy the Con fro! of Sell® I 


to return tu [he state tomor- 
row. 

Meanwhile. Gov. George C. 

Wallace, who finished second 
to Mr. Humphrey in the 1972 
primary here, also arrived in 
Pittsbiirgh today to begin two 
days of rather limited cam- 
paigning. 

Although he is given little. l 

chance or gathering much sup-] showed little promise of the! of a first-ballot nomination at 


they want to live. 

Yesterday, the Senator] said he had no intention of 
broadened his criticism of Mr. 1 “keeping a low profile** there 
Carter, the former Governor in the days before the state’s 
of Georgia, by saying his pro-; primary on May I. 
posais to recognize and con-| The Texas voting will be 
solidate Federal agencies) crucial, he said, to his goal 


, . .Democratic chairman. |hurt , . . . ... 

hasn t] „ . [and the fact that Mr. Jackson 1 Lion is focused 

week to campaign ; primary — the c 
Carter mustjnier Gov. Ei 
what counts in Indiana, one also campaign for the Texas.] against former 
of the last states where party, Georgia and Alabama prima-;G. Luger of 
organizations are openly fi- ries. 1 the right to op 

nanced by 2 percent kickbacks] “I don’t think Jackson can [Senator Vance 
from the salaries of public of fi- [make it.’’ commented one long- "We’re defir 
rials. So the real muscle of! time Democratic activist, “*Eth-Jnana,” said J. t 


By CHARLES MOHR 

SprdBl to Tile Mew V-irtTL-nre 


ALBUQUERQUE." N~M. ". April ! Mr - Udall says that, in an open 
20 — Representative Morris k. {convention, he still has a 
Udall told an audience this 1 ^hance to win because of his 
week that if he continued to! ideological acceptability to 
run just behind the winner j n liberal Democrats. 


each Democratic 
primary, he may 


Presidential 
ask Barbra 
Streisand to sing “Second Hand 
Rose from Second Avenue” as 
his official campaign song. 

The remark was characteris- 
tic of the lanky Arizona Repre- 
sentative and of his self-depre- 
cating. realistic, and perhaps 
destructive vision of himself 
and the political world around 
him. 

However, Mr. Udall still has 
hopes and a vision of a future 
that he thinks holds some pos- 


Thus. Mr. Udall has been 
combining self - deprecation 
with a modest form of opti-. 
misra. He joked in Phoenix that 
“I almost lost my amateur sta- 
tus by winning in Wisconsin/ 
But Mr. Udall also told a group 
of citizens in Tucson, “We 
stopped Jimmy Carter at the 
pass at Wisconsin and New 
York. There is now not going 
to be any stampede to Carter.” 
In an interview today Mr. 
Udall said that his staff had 
combined computation with 
prediction to conclude that 


sibility of his winning the Dem-, "there is no wav Jimmy Carter 
ocratic Presidential nomina-!can go * “ 

tion in New York in July. 

Touring the Southwest and 
Colorado this week seeking del- 
egates in tha area’s upcoming 


CIS mere uiak. lie was in uuoii- \ " "'•IV 7“ — - — -- -- . • , n, >» •• i,_ c ,jj 

ciai trouble in Texas. But hejalso be campaigning before he [British m 15>i-. he isaia 

- 'flies to Evansville, Ind.. for aj Actually, itej. wok place m 

Jefferson-Jackson Day dinner; ISM, but \.ith the P ni ?^jY| 

j election just a week away, Phtl- 
The Senator, in remarks he’.adelphia’s Democratic leaders 

tonight at the Philadelphia ver-Jaren't likely to notice a mistake __ , - . , . » .. , 

sion of that traditional Demo-llike that from the candidatelthe orgamzaUon is going into'nic punty* doesn t seem to me .coordinator hi 
cratic fund -raisin® banquet, 1 thev are supporting. la gubernatorial primary contest to have hurt Carter much, and is that people 

e ‘ — between Larry Conrad, the sec- the natural desire for Jacksomis a shoo-in 

retary of state, and Jack New. (that was here three years agojdo the work." 
the state treasurer, and not;has somehow evaporated, r saw Just to remir 
into Presidential politics. ihjm speak to 2,500 people iniHoosiers 01 t 
The Jackson campaign here — jl973 and turn at least 2.000) Mr. Ford inri 
hastily organized, as were; of them off.” [champion Inc 

those of his rivals, after Sena-j The Republican Presidential ; basketball tea 
tor Birch Bavh of Indiana left contest seems clear-cut. with) at the White 1 
the race on March 4 — has sent (President Ford considered like-jing. 

letters to each of the 8,990 . =r-r. — = ... — v. 

precinct committeemen and'l 


Despite Self-Deprecating Remarks, Udall Remains Optimistic 


■ nation before the convention in J present outlook in Iowa is thatlcently that the failure to re-jMr- 1 | 

■Madison Square Garden. And | Mr. Carter can be sure of only constitute the Federal Election ■> . almost no cause 

17 of that state's 47 delegates; Commission is “crippling" the * at al . 


Mr. Udall said 10 are sure 
for him and 20 are still uncom- 
mitted . 

“The uncommitteds haven’t 
panicked in Iowa," Mr. Udall 
said, “and they aren’t going 
to panic elsewhere. 

He argued that caucus results 
in Vir ginia, South Carolina and 
Oklahoma had been disappoint- 
ing to Mr. Carter and his sup- 
porters because no overwhelm- 
ing move to the former Gover- 
nor had taken place. 

However, Mr. Udafi has been 
telling audiences that Mr. Cart- 
er is ahead in Pennsylvania 
and is likely to win the “beauty 
contest” there — so called be- 
cause it is unrelated bo the con- 
test for the state’s delegates. 
Mr. Udall has been arguing that 


. . for optimism at alL 

UdaJl campaign through the Eu£ Mr L-daiL said that while 
withholding of about $225,000 early primary elections elimin- 
in Federal matching funds, as- [a ted seven Democratic candi- 
serted in a news conference in («*•*«« ** P* 1 ^ of elimination 
Denver that Mr. Carter was 


using his higher public recogni- 
tion as a weapon to hurt the 
Udall campaign in Pennsyl- 
vania. 

He charged that Mr. Carter 


is over. 

“The middle rnd late prim?- 
ries do not eliminate candi- 
dates. but are cor tests for 1 
deregates/* Mr. Udafi said. “I 
am one of the big three and 


A-ice committeemen appealing ATif C* OT1 C 1 

for help. But the committeemen j ST I CblLlClIt VxUl iMViCl 5 

Of Campaign Fund 


ne tnoigw mat mi. wuio ,, 0 _ in _ -m wav tn 

had “decided to duck all %ei« lea, 


to arrange joint appearances 
with Mr. Udall and with Sen- 
ator Henry M. Jackson of 
Washington to discuss election 
issues. 

So far this week he has 
ducked a debate on Thursday 
in Philadelphia arranged by 
Governor Shapp; he is ducking 


t hope to 
delegates." 


have 500 to 600 


1974 DIVORCES WEREl 
AT NEARLY 2% RATE 

WASHINGTON. 


help, 

were also asked to turn out: 
crowds for the April 11 rally. 1 
and they clearly failed. 1 

Not even the close Indiana 
ties of Robert Keefe, Mr. Jack- 
I son’s campaign manager, who 
worked for Mr. Bavh for many 
years, appear to nave helped. 
Democratic leaders here see 
no sign that Mr. Bayh has 
moved a muscle to help Mr. 
Jackson. 

The result is that Mr. Carter, 
who was virtually unknown 
in Indiana two months ago, 
has emerged as the favonte 


By WARREN WEAVER Jr. 

Special 10 Tbr Nrw York TOnei 


WASHINGTON. April 20- 
President Ford is seriously con- 
sidering vetoing the campaign 
bill now awaiting final appro- 
val in Congress, on the grounds 
that it deprives the Federal 
Election Commission of vital 
political independence. 


that Democn 
gave corporal 
unrestricted ri 
tributions fro: 
of middle r 
ployees, in a> 
lives and stocl 
President F 


iivciihk annuo, lie IS uuuuiiK'irnm vr . o A P nI k 2 ^|to capture a majority of the. Arguing against disapproval 
joint appearance arranged ■ “a pereent of ! states 75. delegates to the | ar e two major factors that havei'^JJJJ* ™ 

e Young Democrats on Fn- ! ^ p ? 1 i^^q74 d Democrat ic convention. Private i more to do with the 1976 Pres- JJ*^ 

bv the end of the p rimarv!a«enuon snouia oe iocusea pn-jday in Scranton; and I have r,' ,^ 0 cT d , P olls show him leading, and|i deirt ial campaign than wtih J®. " 

elections on June 8. It wifi [ mjfigr on the delegate contest.,^ learned in ^ few'^.^ M p - trisler has conceded the conteIrts pf ^egisla^n.!^ 

take 1 505 del<»®ate votes to 1 ^bich is based on races m; h0LIrs he duck a roint in-:^. mce WorJfl a fe “ era, ;orivately m recent daj'S that) a veto could make the Pres-: su^ect more 

_ gain the nomination. j Pennsylvania’s 50 state sena-] ter%>iew on and ^'' ernrnent stud y "Ported to-j.. barring roa j 0 r upheavals Mr.; ide nt appear to be a calculating! 10 

SSS STSn making 1«d ^ £ 

C f kls, , broken . or sec- U ciUng devei.pn,™,, inl^U - Jta. .of » A SSi ^ Georgiy « Z 

cnances in me Pennsylvania about 1.099.000 children under. s trong in southern Indiana, the; : nrosoerou'? because of President hai 

^ straight [region below interstate 70 motivated by 

lac tor* which Mr. ^iJdall °J a as’ A!so ' a cou,d . rf so arous J "JS 

panerns, «=>; Congress as to provide enough °! oaaiv _ neea> 

^i 0W r- h I votes to override, scoring a d,£ £ 10 h 
Mr Carter 'jj. point for the Democratic lead- De-mocratic 
do -well ,n j ers hip there and casting Con-^ .expected to - 


nnd-place. finishes in the pri-; nonprimary caucus states suchjticians indicate that while Mr. 
maries. !as Iowa, where the precinct] Carter is ahead in the popuiar- 

To audiences in Phoenix. .caucuses that Mr. Carter won ity contest in Pennsylvania, his| 
his hometown of Tucson, and on January 19 have been fol-j support is still soft and that icj 



former Gov ernor of; on Mav 29. 


(grounds. 


Georgia, can tock up the nomi-i Mr. Udall asserted that thej Mr. Udall, who has said re- 


ebusetts and New York. 

As guarded and qualified as 


(Welfare Department, keeps and Indianapolis and in the smaller! „ ss ralher |han , he White tendin 8 the , 

I reports its divorce rate statis-t industrial cities, such as Ander-| House in the role of political wouU hurt '* 
tics in terms of the female: S on and Kokomo, where t he ;reformer 


Democrats Found More Conservative Than in 1972 


Continued Fronj Page 1, CoL 3 swee P‘ n 8 generalities from the 
— • : attitudes of these early primary 

marie.s — for radical social, voters. The candidates were 

change. little known at first, and the 

The conservative mood in field was very large. Further. 
si “ jjffgppnt combinations Qf rivals 

vied in different states, leaving 
many voters without the oppor- 
tunity to pick their first choice, 
a tive. When compared with a, Tentative Themes 
national cross section of Demo-; H I s * moreover, difficult to 
era is polled bv The New York' '«v exactly how the complex- 
Times and CBS News last 

jnonUi after the Illinois pr- betT1 altered rf Senator Hubert 
inarv - , the primary voters hav 
more liberal views on a wide! party's traditional majority — 
range of political issues than the working people and liberals 

do other Democrats in all states '.'^bo coalesced behind Pres- 

.... - pnr Fi t -, r id- jidents like Roosevelt and Ken- 

.. . ' .. . . . Inedy — have found no congenial 

Tho chief beneficiary of the ouc j eL 6 

voters’ interest in new faces j still, a few tentative themes 
and domestic issues, the stud- emerge, 
ies Find, is Jimmy Carter. Thej Probably most striking Is the 
bard-driving former Georgia- waning of foreign policy issues. 
Governor has managed to el- [Four years ago. Senator George 
bow his way u» the front of [McGovern rode to the nomina- 


surveyed seems all the more 
significant because there are 
indications that Democrats na- 
lionallv are even more conserv- 


A traditionally abrasive and 
divisive Democratic issue — race 
relations — appears to be play- 
ing little direct role this year. 
The chief magnet for those 
hostile to black aspirations. 
Gov. George C. Wallace of Ala- 
bama, has done poorly and 
has all but dropped out of 
the race. 

About 40 percent of the 
Democrats interviewed felt, on 
average, that the Government 
pays too much attention to 
the needs of minorities. But 
these voters have not particu- 


Humphrey had been an ac-f forty favored any one pf the 
iave tive candidate. Thus far, the. remaining contenders — Mr. 


the Democratic pack with 
a constituency unlike that 
amassed in recent years by any 
other serious contender for the 
Democratic nomination. 

Apart from the blacks among 
them, tho Carter voters are 


tion on a crest of indignation 
over the war. This year no 
such compelling issue has 
emerged, except possibly in 
New York where Jewish con- 
cern over Israel and resentment 
against the Soviet Union helped 


generally of fluent suburban- 10 £i v « Senator Henry M. Jack- 

and rural, and seem, in many 5011 a vtct °ry- 

respects, like Republicans ini Xace Relations Issue 
S W were° more likely 

2KT sajrorsns 

in 1972 and more likely 
5rt tile party this year 


Nixon 
to desert 


vot * **^9 ident Ford lf tim/; Unfortunately for the Washing 

candidate is denied the nonu- r 0 n Spnarnr’? ■- -- 

ton benarors _aspirations.. much and administers 


Carter, Mr. Udall or Mr. Jack- 
son. 

What then has filled this 
issue vacuum? 

Basically, it appears that eco- 
nomic issues and questions 
about the size and functions 
of the central government have 
played the biggest role so far. 
Across all six states, voters 
selected “job guarantees" as 
the issue that influenced their 
vote about as often as any 
other issue. 

But ail major Democratic 
contenders feel that the Federal 
Government should do more 
to cut unemployment, and this 
issue has not been a “cutting” 
one. That is, those who agreed 
that the Government should 
guarantee a job ro everyone 
who wants to work have divid- 
ed their votes about evenly 
among the three leaders. 

What is perhaps more cut- 
ting, and it has worked mostly 
to the benefit cf Mr. Carter, 
is a feeling that government 
is too big. that it spend too 


nation. 


• hnwAi-or „ ““V””' 'Hiucn ana aumirusiers pro- 

Starting in the first primary Democratic^ vtSre in' r™ “~is rarns inefficientl y- 


Udail drew well among those 
on the liberal side of this issue, 
while Mr. Jackson did not seem 
to be hurt or helped by it. 

Of course, issues are not 
the only factors influencing 
voting choices. The personali- 
ties of the candidates, and 
whether voters perceive them as 
good leaders and honest men. 
also play a role. And some 
voters may want to vote for 
the man who has the best 
chance of beating the Republi- 
can candidate in November. 

Senator Jackson generally did 
fairly well among voters citing 
leadership and competence as 
important factors,. Mr. UdaJl 
among those citing consistency 
and honesty. But it was Mr. 
Carter who scored best among 
voters who seem to be playing 
an increasingly potent role as 
the campaign progresses — 
those who feel it important 
to elect someone who is not 
part of the Washington estab- 
lishment and who want 
someone who has a good 
chance to win in November. 

Mr. Jackson acd Mr. udall, 
who have been in Congress 
for many years, did not do 
weli among these voters. Mr. 
Carter, who frequently calls 
hHnself an “outsider," djd very 
wetl He also scored well 
among voters wanting a win- 
ner, Both Mr. UdaJl and Mr. 
Jackson generally did poorly 
among these. 

In sum, then, the polls sug- 
gest that the race nas been 
dominated by moderately con- 
servative Democrats. No candi- 
date purveying the program- 
matic liberalism of the New 
Deal type has emerged as the 
favorits of the working man 


partner. It said the 1974 rate 
was 19.3 per 1,000 married 
women aged 15 or older. 

• The previous postwar peak 
was 17.9 per 1,000 in 1946, 
a year of social upheaval In 
which the strains of wartime 


Workers hold 


United Auto 

rs auto workers and their 
partners in the liberal labor 
coalition form one of Mr. Car- 
ter’s main assets. 

Although no one will say 


separation took a heavy toll'so Tor the record, many Demo- 
on American marriages. icrats here believe that coalition 1 

tn 1967, the year before di-[ officials were responsible for 
vorces began escalating rapid-; the elimination of Representa- 
ly, the center said, the rate-tive Morris K. Udall of Arizona 
was 11.2 per 1,000 married : from the Indiana race. Negotia- 
women. 


rerormer. i v “* ^ 

In an interview with a group) P® rt1 3ps to 
of Texas editors made public , Senator 


does 


in snowy" New Hampshire and *" “LJH” As the primary season pro- ^ ^iai Uberais 

continuing in five other prima- worn- oiS^SftaE spetaal :Sres«d. the number mention- 

SSois, ^ wlsconsfn ^'n^ 0 Ne«v ' Jiheral^to* th remainin S; ^ourefof coS^l-ew pe?-! Sena5 > r Humphrey -the sur-j 
Vor^The New York 

} ,nd R C n^^ sqUeSl:oncd r ar - of Ariz0na - drew rather well f de ma : issu ’ -j whac ers wiH ,ook elsewhere in No-1 

ly 8.000 voters, in accordance among those who wanted to ^ raII ^ Federal^ ! vember. 1 

with strict sampling prove- cut mditary spending. Again. SuJJJJiS? b d I The Times and CBS News 

dure;, m an eifon to aeiermme> however, only about one of Po _ n - , nr .will continue to trace the path 

what motivated their votes, ten persons questioned listed j Personalities a Factor of campaign in future pri- 
V»hat issues seemed to benefit this as a major concern. Mr.; Moreover, he generally did maries. including the key Penn- 
one candidate nr the other?; Udall has done exceptionally, well among fiscally conserva- svlvania race next week. As- 
What qualities in ihe candi- well among those concerned' live voters —those who felt .sisting The Times in its survey 
daLC< seemed to influence the about pollution and environ-, it important to balance the [coverage is Prof. Gary R. Orren 

of the government department: 
at Harvard University. 1 



ing the campaign bill, said, 
“I am not going to sign bad 
legislation for any reason.” He 
criticized Congress for not get- 
ting the bd}] to his desk before 
the current Easter recess. 

Ford Awaits Bill 

Mr. Ford said flatty that he, 
, would not reach a final decision j 
;tions between the coalition and on signing or vetoing the bill 
~ 'until he had received “the pref- 

er document,” late this month 


current pnm 
perhaps to the 

today, the President, in discuss-l 

repeatedly lha 
phrey would 
in the general i 
Iy, in making 
political c&nai 
the opponent 
confident of de 
The bfH 
the White : Hc 
next two wee 
of a January 
decision, decte 

or in early May. Some interest- 1 sion improperi) 
ed parties have urged him to 
announce his approval now, 
so that candidates may borrow 
more readily against subsidies 
due them. 

Simply reconstituting the 
Election Commission to restore 
its subsidy powers “would have 
been the right thing to do, 
the President declared, adding, 

“Unfortunately, the Congress 
apparently has significantly 
changed some of the very im- 
portant provisions m that legis- 
lation, so that is what we are 
analyzing at the present time.*' 

The Election Commission re- 
ported today that the backlog 
of; unpaid subsidy claims rose 
by more than SI million this 
week, tp a total of nearly S2.4 
million. The lion's share of that 
money, more than $900,000, 
will go to President Ford when 
and if the campaign bill be- 
comes Jaw. 

New claims filed yesterday 
were the first since Ronald 
Reagan, the President's Repub-f 
lican challenger, made a nation- 
al telecast that his aides said 
raised S700.000 in private con- 
tributions. But the Reagan cam- 
paign filed for only about 


$154,000 in matching funds, 
for a total backlog since March 
23 of $436,000. 

Opponent of the Measure 

Among organizations urging 
the President to veto the cam- 
paign bill are the United States! 


cuuse four of i 
were named bj 
rather than 
branch. . 

In correcting 
Congress madt 
other importaiil 
campaign law. 

WESfVlRC 
PUT Off TR 


CHARLESTON t-% % ’ 
20 (AP)— -A lii | . p. * 
jurors to hear « g 
against Gov. Ar- • 

was reduced t 4 j* r 

first day of the r 'Y 

United ’States 
Joseph Young s- 
na! panel of 12 ? 

alternates Woulc 
morrow, i '§?jA ^ 

Mr. Moore, 53 • 

his fonnw aide, 
are charged witl f> 
extort $25,000 ijs 
JL Price, presidf 0 
fied Moantainee 

in 1972. |ffr. Pric 
bank charter, am •Ssf; 
was ninmng for i 
year. [ 

An ai^e to M 
that the GovCrno 
rub the istate, ^ 
was forced to 

hip timeiin a cot^gTM^v,. 
taking care of ew 
Norman Yost “H 
abreast of everyU&fssPi 


° c W aorcast ot every 

Chaniber of Commerce and the west Ver«>inia 
National Association of Manu-i^naut Governor 
Tacturers, despite a conviction SIate conslitutfcffiS^k 
among Congressional Republi-' ;Sriiate preside 
.cans that the final draft isjfirothcrtdn, is Hfe A SSj T .y^I- S 


! ,. . « c ‘ ,c| wus io rorp.iraie,nf succession. r 

fjwlitical committees than could Moore is* Repub 
.have been expected. ^ ' 


V 1 , , 1 Jfc' • 

Brothcrtop is tT-Si 


.mem. but very few of 
draw, questioned are. 



those, budget 
i cutting 


even at the cost of 
social services* Mr. 




Asioctefcd Pr*ss 

Gov. George C. Wallace arriving in Pittsburgh for a tele- 
vision interview as he began his- Pennsylvania campaign. 


Alexander Barkan, di rector [ a re poiitical foes. 


the political arm of 


ttet Mr-: 


the dikely 
,_eranon nr ijiT 

■and Congress ^ 

ganizations, is reportedli- angr> ' the Governor is Oi ; 


American Federation of Laborwoufd be "asked t.. 

of Industrial Gr-jof the state’s-: bi;r 


4fe- 












1 &**f p Tf,il 5^ Urges Industrial Enclaves 1 / 

~ T tS Del **«*. •$««•«*»« i ,^-j 

. . r the ss.of 14,000 / s V—JIS T « 

's^wrid 47 000 manufac-. />st. .■ 7/ W’bHCS/ I >£\ 


THE JVEiy yOi?,Y TIME'S, WJilWESDAY,- APFLL 21.19.7G 


*y-ygg»& / 

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1CHAI STERNE 
the ss .of 14,000 
'£*'-Hiid 47 000 manufac-* 
* i :?5 from he metropoti- 
in e las t two 
;^*i stud; by the Port 
p. *»f New ork and. New; 
’■■Jr-.a shon that the- 
>;'- er. cits still- have 
■ for ldustrial de- 

t poU tial can be 
2 rOg- stuc found, only 


NEW POINT 

/1/a 


DOREMUS V_^ 
k£\ MONTGOMERY 

mim 


STATEN ISLAND 


v^V- 

■ BROWNS — -. 

spring/ 

-CREEK V 


Thfl Hmv Tort Tiroes/ April 21, W6 


p •• one-sb 

Sl^liurtJIndustrial Parks Planned 

,;^; close good trans- __ a 

esthetical-j ■ T a RaI cfor ToroaTT (T* i fi q 


y industrial]' 
erected in r 


:r -vr chearenergy from 
. ! \ lid-was recycling 


To Bolster Jersey Cities 


-* : 7> . 

J ;-. . V, 


its study,} By JOSEPH F. SULLIVAN 

that such j SpucJal :o The Nr* Tort Unit* 

e BENTON, April 20 — The been studying this from the 

in New r eW ' ** erse y Economic Develop- businessmen's and investors' 
d • Jersey , en * Authority announced points of view, to find out what 
d' to ,hAl^ aa ^ today to build multi-mil- we have to do to compete 
e if ^ihon-dollar industrial parks in with the suburbs, 
d be wrif--l ^ e f? e y City and Elizabeth and “We’ve talked to many busi- 
lv ' ; .or. lea^e .them to private nessmen and are convinced we 

in t ere sts. . will bring industry to the urban 

The move is designed t,o rev- parks. It is only a small first 
included erse f} ow of industrial jobs step in a program that will 
heads of t ^ jr °> 1116 cities— and out of take decades, but it could be 
HAuriad companies ^ , stat ® — serve as a pilot one of the most important steps 
een 1969 P™!** for m0re ambitious deT the state has ever taken to 
industrial ve, °P raents w tbe future.- revitalize theciteis." I 

manufac- Because the state agency will In its report, the Port Au- 
for three ac< l uira u 16 laj1 d and build the thority pointed but that both 
expand factories, costs will be far be- target sites were close by the 
plants and J «>w what a private developer New’ Jersey Turnpike and port 
ts would have to be paid. A facilities and had a ready labor 

causes for s P oke sro®n pointed oiit thaj the pool for the industrial jobs that 
r erat crime ur- S® 1 * a S enc y could float tax- would be created. 

"oneetion and un- fre ® bofl ^ to generate capital The availability of mass-tran- 

- ff uncooperative a f d wouJd not have 10 worr y s,t facilities in the cities is 

■ ; . ~ • . . about making a profit to stay another plus, according to the 

--“ “Bnfflrs was that “ Jj^mess.; Port Authority analysts. 

- a tires when the %Ve realize that cities cany A number of firms that had 
■'lomvis' expanding a ‘ ^S® 4 ^ suffer from a relocated to the suburbs have 

- '■ is o market for nateynal u^age of crime, 'con- experienced difficulties in re- 
... ; : u e 0 f Qjd^x- gestion and racism that discou- taining employees because .-of 
' fnn buildings In ra ^ fis P rivate investment” said the nearly exclusive depen- 
hiA tvritpt nff RoweU Jr., executive dence on the auto foF the iour- 

. tiirector of the authority. ney towork." the Port Authori- 


■ 'in i« n rpsnurcp — " — — — - “'-j llicx'wjl sxuuiun- 

' fc develOTment! . ^ ut sentiment is not the ty report said. 

-'.T " key; were not going to talk “There appears to be a grow- ( 

■ Lb Study “ to private industries about their ing realization among firms of 
ri] spent a year nioral obligations: We’re just the value of mass transit net- 

" and now is go^g to make them a deal works in the attraction and 
“^^"heiasis of a fur- they can’t' resist economically.’' retention of an adequate labor 


"But sentiment is not the ty report said, 
key; we're not going to talk “There appears to be a grow- 
to private industries about their ing realization among firms of 


ijirl’-'-j— ^ ’ ’ /-, raid examination Study Planned »upniy which 

' v> ' I,** *■” ,'.v . ■ "• - m ..'?tn enclaves can . 3 growing pi 

u!#Cs!Pr<:-" - . V ■ I8-cduntv - Tbe authority plans to name citv location." 

jWw 'mm. t • - an architectural consultant this However t 


Study Planned 


supply which may constitute 
a growing plus for a central 




O . • - oji aiuuLcuiuai wjiisuiuinL uus However, the analysis said 

C f' .^.Tj sai|saverio Cap- t0 . ba 8 in . a h«as*ilitv Lhe cities still had a .number 

i >.. s . . * _ . j j;: xTif I tiso-of ' regional . °‘ lbe two sites and of competitive drawbacks, in 

- '*'* le^state agency, i a ; c ?®® “P P JsI,s addition to those mentioned 

ragl the wowth ty summer. A spokesman by Mr. Powell. These include 

3 bs the cities * or . ‘ue Department of Labor “time-consuming ' bureaucratic 

“ '.V ‘Hi,; . - jj-p and, Industry said construction procedures and high taxes . . . 

develop- c ^ uId start before the end of the cost of. reliability of 
■■ • :ve T. promoting .. -. ^ energy and tlie lack of regional- 

. . .. . . r Eenfarise. - - . '™ ^ 3 60-acre ur- | v-produced primaiy meta ls." 

0flJl - rCI)CW3l DGitT * Mod l* — ' ■■ 1 — 

:»>■. • « r . . ' Eomerv Street in Jersey Citv TCiTTITr ■ i i 


mm**- 


INMP 

mi**: 


. -p“ 

n*j 

m *■■** : 


-re pi 
• :ve 

- r g e» 

. - "‘’ve-.i 
irto ! 

- ajeai 



' r f^' ' 
g gV, ' 

'fv-T.v 
•--» ' 


ji haK'-r-** 


- ry to 1 
long 
-/ log ' 


,te develop- Si™, “ e ena OI 

.gremoting n ^ Q sUes _ k . fi0 . acrfe • ur . 

utfnrfxirinp" ban-renewal area n'ear’Mont- 

kSS! 2 °®^ street in Jerse ^ 

Lr?r!lnS !i and ® 3 °-acre. industrial and 
qornmercia! tract near New 
£ i* Point Road in Elizabeth— were 
t®? ““jvlf recommended by- tbe Port Au- 
tbority of, New Yofk and New 
r erode Jersey, which studied .dozens 
* of sites, in the two cities andj 

te findings hi Newark, Bayonne and Hobo-- 
apello said ken. at the.reqiKst.^f J:he stats:., 
lay where ^ibe study.-. which wasto erst 
t.they can the staie$ 50 .DOO,was eventual - 
as are- so iy underwritten , by- the Port 


energy and the lack of regional- 
ly-produced orimary metals." 


rrausepving dis- Authority, which said it had 
- . s. j • found the information valuable 

Tifferdals '■ f or its own purposes. . . 

n . . ’ - Although final figures will 

. a corany deter- not bw yaBable until the. ar- 
... : muanove, ne chitectural study, is complete. 
... becqra, literally, the cost of .acquiring and deve- 
' . 1 cant wherever lopjcg the two sites is expected 
‘ , loobesL And ^ cost more' than S30 million. 

■ 1 tny pds ' start fh e jersey City and Elizabeth 
;; cost ferentials, si tes were chosen for the initial 
; ind ip cheaper parks because they are virtu ai- 
from bmewbere ] y deared and pose no excep- 
problems of acquisition, 
rial s ite preparation of construe- 
ced- has tion. Some of . the -other areas 


ngTOTOM B5SH 

progrr- 1 ttt BAY9K 

UTmiL • »»•“ 

«“»*¥. 1 Mm St. CftMTWIS- 

E0HT1HEBTAL 

TWABS-UDC EAST) SSSI^S** 
'"•WSMlCIf- BLBtmS 

i^tcooi.r — ~ mo ram t 

Bfitt ST. EAST BgSmgi 

BET A J-H AVES liJVUl.l&MlJ 
IHM.MAfcAHiW.lll cokmlchwa-s 


1 own t cook run 

BStt ST. EAST 

BtT JrdiVtS 
I 2.M. MfcfcK.iMHI.il 

mmm chtoalfiaziv 

MISS' BMNtrrs 

HAZA SOUTH GWEMA22 

CtWldRTS BtDFOilJKiliM 

U a VCR ID • • fillWAL ClNCUA'S 

” T .™ MALL3«1KSWU. 

noiim i 

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UAWTEBBOBB twmi 

UACHEHA 

i*r shore 

■UkMirft 

wx 

. CAST SET AO RET 

UA SUBWAVE 2 

CATCHOGOE 

UASQUK W 

.meat woi tfESTHAWTQH 

- ccfcuwrs 

tdwb vmmuui 

GL1H COTE MOWtUlOTOW 

HUN S _ I j j JJ1 m I II I 

TWO SOUTH WM 

mc»Svilu UAim 

RKBTW»1« f0XPUZA#2 

LAUTOIGC NWW 

Ijiso MMPSUn»T. acaiMatr*wiPMV| 



• •. del 

i ined. 

•- 

caiis 

h f its 


' • yd A 

.( oster- 


"Tr-l.-th 

e ort t 


i ~j f- ' 

'•Tr^vT _ ^ 

lifir 

r- 


' ;tl-und ike would have to be coijected by .expen- 
, ' ;;.eth& d -by: the; si ve pfle-driving hr time-con- 
''Vbo& [tea; sum ing soil compacting. 

". i.the d gidvem- Joseph A. Hoffman. State 
- ‘ ifl-' wi !’ have to commissioner of Labor and In- 
■ Sffilgl dso' have dustry, said the state had been 
of tax discussing the industrial park 
: • What r abate- plans with the cities for almost 
. - Hfere i however, a year. 

...-■Jset k 1 new tax are convinced that be- 

’ -Iwjjt « gener- fore we can revive the social 
. . nd‘ busi- and cultural life of our older 

‘ » cities we must first put the 



MAim 

F0XJUZA#2 

NCWOW 


-aadej 

■k*sm 

; .- : tae i 


jobs back that make the cities I "g 5 
the . economic centers of the 


the . economic centers or tne 
allowing gtate once again," be said- 
ts of the “This is no pie-in-the-sky or 
.sites if ^ j! 00 _^>ciai project We’ve 


aU day Sat 
im-tHofe. 


NEXT STOP 
GREENWICH 
VILLAGE 

12-2-4-6-8-10 


-AT ran AVt . Ill-HN 


■W . 

.. : . 

■ «- -V- - 


y[jfMa.s$(erty and 

; , -ie^fevt York, 

, T .. - r ,ii»joISia.5-mil- 

Set*. Jersey 
-^m>bs, $17.1 
1 maiion 

V- .x i . . 

' •-,>^.nofid,yaid in 

. .:•£ jT'JfoIlri^i million 
• • " : ' ^Averr .jti, NeW- 

... fifSoto'^jonWto* 
1 


mn 


LAST 4 DAYS' 


“ENTHRALLING. 

I’ve seen 
GREY GARDENS 
four times.” 


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> 1 *^ otour fcuxj mrowumoR 

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rr is. 2 10.4 05. 6.0. 10 


/“Tlie suspense « The Sailor Who 
? reS From Grace With The Sea’ is 
I -?■ ^ spun out on film like the strands 
#;T^a spider’s web, with an ending 
mat really, stings. It’s mature, 

; ' sophisticated erotica, combining 
\ heatthy iust wkh undertones of 
psychologMal terror. Sarah Miles 
and Kris Kristofferson are a 
white hotromantic team.” 

' •-? ; ~ —Bruce Williamson. Playboy 

“Nudity abounds, but !sq (Jobs ' good taste - 
even to a scerie'.'of ^masturbation, and shots 
of :the' boy:' peeing whifehis mother makps 
love. An overall-sense of good taste and 
intelligence .• . .the .result' is a picture of . 
refinement.-and sensibility, a dark story. ■ 
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Sarah Miles ' is .supbrb'. ,T -Artftur Knight 


‘ALLTHE 


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wmmmmm —VINCENT CANBY. New York Times maram 

“★★★★ Highest RaUng!” 

— KATHLEEN CARHOLL. N.Y. Daily News 

“The best American film for years.” 

—KEVIN SANDERS, WABC-TV 

“An absolutely breathless entertainment” 

—FRANK RICH, New York Post 

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—GENE SHAUT. WNBC-7V 

“A terrific movie on every level.” 

— BERNARD DREW, GanneM Newspapers 

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The casting is impeccable.” 

—MOLLY HASKELL Village Voice 


1CM1 


57® SL N H An. 


ME.M.b’.ftgl.WgWW'M 


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FACE TO FACE 

IJ. 2 20. 4.J5. MO. 3-JO 





SEVEN BEAUTIES 

12. 2. 4. 6. 8. 10 


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. OFADELEH. 

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GREENWICH VILLAGE 

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KRIS KRISTOFFERSON m^HF SAILOR WHO FELL FROM GRACE WITH THE SEA* 
Based on tv roud by VukiO MjShimA UuscbyJOHN MANOEL Produced Cy 
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“A brilliant cast in a brilliant film." 

—PAT COL LINS, Y/CBS-TV 

“It is well worth seeing twice.” 

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20 


THE NEW 


In These Equations 
Lurks Lush Music 



\ORK TIME S. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1976 

"tf 


AN E XHILARATIN G THRILLER. 

Supremely droll 
and graceful. 
The old Master 
Alfred Hitchcock 
is in the 
cheerful mood. 
ITS A MOVIE 
TO RAISE YOUR 
SPIRITS.” 

-mtmwtsr.H.Y. mss 



There’s no body 
in the family plot 



; ioto "Formalized Music: Tiwugiit and Malhomailcs In Com wall Ion." br lanni* 
e 19FJ bv Indiana UnlMrsifr Press. Krortirted fir permission or Me numisner. 

Starting with a mathematical concept, Iannis Xenakis 
plotted a graph, top, that was translated into his first 
musical composition, “Metastasis,” above, and also plans 
for the Philips Pavilion at the 1958 Brussels World's Fair. 


ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S 


Bumily Purr 


starring KAREN BLACK BRUCE DERN 
BARBARA HARRIS WILLIAM DEWIE 

Music bv X)HN MilAMS ■ Sotenpty by ERNEST LEHMAN 
FranaieriijKl'fflERMNBIRD ROTWby VICTOR CANNING 
Directed 1^ ALFRED HTTCHCOCK 


J — PG!rusmsmmnttmnn> 

^ — — j MmowuiaMiwoguaB 

NOW at Universal Blue Ribbon Theatres© 

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iwi.'tnv * bsujow fuiio® luimu 1 nui™ 


By JOHN 

In a world increasingly 
dominated by science. Iannis 
Xenakis might well be con- 
sidered the most technocratic 
of all musicians. The Greco- 
French composer, three of 
whose works will be featured 
on a Brooklyn Philharmonia 
. program tonight at the Brook- 
lyn Academy of Music, does 
enlist a fearsome array of 
mathematical formula-, " and 
computer programming in his 
compositions after all. His 
books are largely unreadable 
by even the most willing mu- 
sician. unless that musician is 
also a trained mathematician 
or logician. 

None of which quite pre- 
pares one for the sound of 
the music, which— at least to 
an open-eared I is la nor — can 
be as cosmically Romantic as 
Wagner. And Mr. Xenakis's 
own prose is shot through 
with a heaven-storming ex- 
■ uberance reminiscent of both 
Wagner and one of his own 
principal teacher:. Olivier 
Messiaen. The purpose of 
music, he has written, is **to 
draw toward a total exalta- 
tion in which the individual 
mingles, losing his conscious- 
ness in a truth immediate, 
rare, enormous and perfect." 

But Mr. Xenakis (pro- 
ne unced zeh NAHkiss) is no 
swooning hippie, either; com- 
plexity is just as much a hall- 
mark of his esthetic a; it is of 
his music. He has denounced 
both "technocrats" and "in- 
tuitionists." And if that 
would seem to make him 
seme sorl of un'versslist. 
striving for a transcendent 
synthesis of all aspecu of 
humanity — "Man i? one, in- 
divisible and total.” he 
writes; "he thinks with his 
belly and feels with his mind" 
— and he turns out tn be sus- 
picious of that stance, too. 

*Very Agnostic* 

"I am very agnostic." he 
said yesterday in his room at 
the Regency Hotel. “I don't 
know if there is any objective 
world. After the debacle of 
19th-century science, we 
have learned that science is 
not absolute. Wi- work now 
as if something is so. realiz- 
ing that our assumptions may 
be defeated in a few genera- 
tions or even sooner. It’s so 
fragile, the axiomalies of 
mathematics, of logic. 

"I don’t know if I am say- 
ing the truth in my music or 
my books. But I do think this 
way of research is more nec- 
essary* than any other kind. 
I like to see things related in 
different universes — the sci- 
entific, Che artistic and oth- 


ROCKWELL 

ers we don’t know about yet 
but that we may be living in 
already. I don't say I love or 
admire njy music, though — 
on the contrary. I am distant 
from it" 

Mr. Xenakis was born in 
1922 of Greek parents in Ru- 
mania and trained in both 
music and engineering in 
Athens. After fighting in the 
anti-Nazi Greek resistance 
during the war — which re- 
sulted in a permanent facial 
scar and an escape from a 
death sentence — he came to 
Paris in 1947. Until 1960 he 
studied and worked as both 
musician and architect dur- 
ing which time he designed 
the Philips Pavilion at the 
1958 World’s Fair in Brussels 
and collaborated with Le 
Corbusier on several major 
projects. 

His career as 3 musician 
began with "Metastasis" 
(. 1953-34), and ever since he 
has worked explicitly with 
the translation of mathemat- 
ical and logistical formulas 
into sound. Or. as he puts it, 
"Music, by its very abstract 
nature, is the First of rhe arts 
to have attempted the con- 
ciliation of artistic creation 
with scientific thought." 

The Music Counts 

It would take a trained 
mathematician to pass judg- 
ment on Mr. Xenakis's 
mathematics, but as with any 
formal system used by any 
composer, that isn’t quite the 
point What counts is Mr. 
Xenakis's music itself — and if 
he is correct about the un- 
derlying communality of 
phenomenon, chances are 


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that the success of his music 
rests on the elegance and 
coherence of his mathemati- 
cal formulations. 

“Musicians are like all 
men, which is to say like all 
apes — they are imitative." 
Mr. Xenakis said yesterday. 
“My struggle was not to be 
imitative.” .As a result he has 
not only ignored ihe princi- 
pal trends of mid-century 
musical avant-gardism — 

serial ism, chance music, new 
tonality — but also cam- 
paigned ardently against 
them. 

One result of that has been 
that his works have only 
gradually caught on. espe- 
cially in this country. Actua- 
iy, he is by now one of the 
most- performed of all con- 
temporary composers in Eu- 
rope. with festivals of his 
music cropping up in all the 
major Western countries. 
(There will be a series of 
Xenakis concerts and master 
clashes in Buffalo under Mor- 
ton Feldman's auspices be- 
tween June 1 and 4.) 

But although he taught at 
Indiana University in Bloom- 
ington between 1967 and 


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Film 


CRIME AND PASSION, starring Oma 
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!w Passsr, at nelshbortHod thealers. 


BROOKLYN PHILHARMONIA'5 “MEET 
THE MODERNS." Brooklyn Academy of 
Mtiic. 30 LafavetfB Awnue, B. 

UGHT OPERA OF MANHATTAN, 
Easlside Playhouse, 334 East /4th 
Street. Gilbert and Sullivan’s 
Pinafore." 8:30 

MUSIC OF MATTHEW LOCKE, SI. 
Thomas Churdi, Fifth Avenue and 53d 
Street. 12:10 

DENISE BASSES LEVINE, son rare. 
Mann« Cor leae ot Music. 157 East 74lh 
Street, B. 


Music 


Dance 


NEW YORK CITY OPERA. Stale Thea- 
ter. Line sin Center. Douglas Moore's 
■Tii* Ballad o' Baby Doe." 8. 

MUSIC OF MIKIS THEODORAS IS, 
Awry Fisher Hall. It-roln Center. 3. 

NETHERLANDS CHAMBER ORCHES- 
TRA Clriwlc Hail, a, 

CLARION CONCERTS ORCHESTRA. 
Alice Tully Hall. Lincoln Cenier. 6:30. 

DON LAD GRAMM, iass-tarlloM, 
Tim Hill, B. 

DA CAPO CHAMBER PLAYERS, 
Carnal* Reef a I Hall. s. 

HIGHLIGHTS IN JAZZ. Nr* York 
University, Lert ShJWnt Center ” 
La Guardia Place. 3. 


, RCY4L BALLET, Meiawoliten ttoera 
House, Rcmea and Juliet," 2 and 8. 

JAMES CUNNINGHAM AND THE 
ACME DANCE COMPANY. To#n Hall. 
>3 West a3d Street. 5:45. 

KEI TAKEI'S MOVING EARTH, Ca- 
thedral sf St. John Hie Divine, Amster. 
dam Avenue and noth Street, "LisM," 
Parts 1-8. B. 


Cabaret 


5W 


MANHATTAN THEATER CLUB CAB- 
ARET. imnrovisaitonai comedy bv 
Cracked Tokens', at 7:30. 

ROSELAND DANCE CITY, Serena'* 
"A Night In Casablanca." 


1972, Mr. Xenakis has not per- 
formed here as often as one 
might expect. Part of that is 
simple resistance to the new. 
"I don’t think there are many 
working as I do," he says. “I 
don't see them around me. 
The superficial aspect of my 
music has been taken by 
others, especially dhe Polish. 
But art is twofold— it has an 
immediate appeal and then 
there is the thought behind 
it 

Two Problems’ 

“In America there arc two 
problems. In the universities 
awav from the big cities it 
is difficult to support a real 
musical life. And the people 
ae trained 10 or 20 years 
ago in the serial style, which 
for them is avant-garde. That 
makes for a kind of defiance 
about different kinds o fmu- 
sic. Besides that, my music 
is difficult to perform." 

It is this difficulty that 
has limited Xenakis perfor- 
mances in this country pri- 
marily to the chamber and 
solo works. leaving the gi- 
gantic orchestral pieces — in 
which the comneseris extra- 
ordinary "clouds" of sound 
con be hea rd at their most 
dramatic — to be heard large- 
ly on records. Although to- 
night's concert is sponsored 
by the Brook!"n Philhr.rmv- 
nia. it will offer only sroxll- 
ccaled works; a recent piece 
for chamber orchestra, "Eri- 
dancs," was dropped for lack 
of adequate rehearsal time. 

For ell its complexities, 
udiences seem to respond 
to Mr. Xenakis's works 
"There con be a kind of 
intuitive understanding, as 
with all music." Mr. Xenakis 
5 ? v«;. “Yon can enjoy Bs^h 
without understanding all 
the technical aspects; people 
try to get into it even if 
they den't have the tools. 
You don’t have to be a scien- 
tist o? genetics in order to 
make love.” 


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THE WORLDS GREATEST STAGE ANO SCREEN SHOW 

RADIO CITY 

/PmjJIC liAll _ 

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•ffy The Great Easter Show 

^hitjond^JAafiai^ 

"Sean Connery and a 

Audrey Hepburn » 
are superb together. 

JAY COCKS, Tn’U' Mnoizinr 



OPERA ANGLES Which 
kind of opera spread do you 
prefer — a scholarly display 
tracing the sources and trans- 
formations of 20 operatic 
works, or an array of Metro- 
politan Opera memorabilia, 
with a bonus of fun and 
games (a giveaway sweep- 
stakes?) Two such exhibitions 
open to the public today. 

Starting this morning, four 
branches of the Union Dime 
Savings Bank will be the host 
in turn to an assembly of 
photographs and material ar- 
ranged by the Metropolitan 
Opera for the bank, which has 
financed construction of the 
nostalgic display and later 
will donate it to the Met. 
Among the items are a horn 
and ring used by Lauritz Mel- 
chior in Waaner's "Ring”: En- 
rico Caruso’s cap from" “Pag- 
liacci”; a fan used by Ger- 
aimne Farrar in "Man on." 
and color pictures of Metro- 
politan productions, stars 
and backstage activities. 

Each hank showing, lor a 
month, will also include an 
opera sweepstakes, the top 
prize being tickets to five Met 
performances for two per- 
^®n. There is a weekly prize 


of two tickets, with a copy of 
the book "Chagall at the 
Met" as runner-up. 

The Met mini-showcase 
opens today at the Union 
Dime Savings branch on the 
Avenue of the Americas at 
40th Street: on May 24 at 
Madison Avenue and 39th 
Street; on June 28 at Park 
Avenue and 30th Street, and 
on Sept. I at 1900 Northern 
Boulevard in Manhasset, L.I. 

EVOLUTION Emphasis is 
on literary origins of operas 
at the Grolier Club. 47 East 
60th Street, a bibliophile's 
dub with a quiet, dignified 
atmosphere and some of the 
most immaculately planned 
displays of books "and manu- 
scripts in town. Representing 
more th 3 n 20 operas — not 
necessarily the greatest fa- 
vorites — are autographed 
literary and musical manu- 
scripts, firs; editions of liter- 
ary texts, printed music, 
original stage designs, and 
photographs of writers, com- 
posers and singers. 

Among the highlights are 
a first edition of Georg Buch- 
ner's "Voyzeck." with part 
of Alban Berg’s autographed 


score of the operatic 
"Wozzeck"; the autographed 
manuscript of Maurice 
Maeterlinck's “Pellftas et 
Mfelisande," with Debussy’s 
corrected proofs of his oper- 
atic score; a page of Goethe’s 
manuscript of "Faust" with 
Gounod's score for the 
opera, and Oscar Wilde’s 
manuscript of "Salome.” On 
display with Douglas Moore's 
manuscript draft oF a scene 
for ‘The Ballad of Baby Doe" 
will also be a novel operatic 
source — the 1935 obituary of 

Baby Doe Tabor that ap- 
peared in The New York 
Times. 

The Grolier exhibition is 
on view through June 12, 
Mondays through Fridays 
from 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. and 
Saturdays from 10 A.M. to 
3 P.M. 

DOUBLE-HEADER Town 
HaJL 123 West 43d Street, 
has two programs of interest 
on the agenda today in the 
Times Square area. At 5:45 
P.M,. the regular “Interlude" 
session will feature James 
Cunningham and the Acme 
Dance Company in the pre- 
miere of "Aesop's Fables." a 
six-part work choreographed 
by Mr. Cunningham and 
Lauren Persichetti and geared 
for "children, dance enthusi- 
asts and music lovers." 
Tickets are S2.50; the lobby 
bar opens at 5 P.M. 


Tonight at 8 , the hall’s 
“Sing Out, America” series 
will present Donald Gramm, 
the Metropolitan Opera bass- 
baritone, in songs by Virgil 
Thomson. John Duke, Paul 
Bowles, Ned Rorera, Richard 
dimming and Cb axels Ives, 
and some traditional Amer- 
ican numbers. Tickets are 
$2.50 to $6.50. 

POTPOURRI W.S. Mer- 
win, the Pulitzer Prize win- 
ner for poetry in 1972, will 
read from his works at 8 
P.M. In the auditorium of the 
New School, 66 West 12th 
Street. Admission is $2. 

Blossom Dearie and Oscar 
Brown Jr. are tonight's fea- 
tured singers in the “High- 
lights in Jazz” concert at 
8 o’clock at New York Uni- 
versity's Loeb Student Cen- 
ter. 566 LaGuardia Place at 
Washington Square South. 
Tickets are 1 $3.50 to $5. 

"Canterbury Tales" is to- 
night's screening at 7 and 9 
o'clock in the Pier Paolo 
Pasolini festival at Columbia 
University's international Af- 
fairs Auditorium. 420 West 
USth Street, Admission is 
$2.50, and 51.25 for students. 


For Sports Today, see page 
42. 

HOWARD THOMPSON " 


AUDREY 

SEAN HEPBURN ROBERT 

CONNERY - SHAW 

‘ROBIN AND MARIAN' 

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_NJGOl WILLIAMSON 

DENHOLM ELLIOTT MMNtE MHO* 

KTNXETH HATCH M.M HOLM 

^ „ RICHARD HARRIS — 

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ed a week’s run 


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SLL Tiiyjcg 

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3E 


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amic personan- 
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Bji 




ird Burton to Begin 
eric’ Filming May 17 


iffi 







urtcm. scheduled 
stint on Broad- 
lalyst in “Equus” 
II begin work- 
e»yie *The Her- 
riy known as 

in Hollywood 

“ 

who has. al- 
ed men of the 
ms — in Becket, 
adulterous Pro- 
er in another 
as . a priest in 
rdsni; 

w roles in “The 
gone to Linda 
'on Sydow and. 
John Boor- 
A- Warner 
itfw^ net Mr. 
.the mil 


e actor. 






Ifcie 

n has&oixacted 
ple fefin^e star- 
Too 
from 

°rn«nK. ^Ryan’s 
vain. 

t tecaatuifi five 
terfends 
W 

ri VJ Bo- 

* Z,ryC ^^Gaa^ Michael 
« -a* i* ^Ckmhe^'Elliotf 

'S Kru- 

♦ - . ; 4- ?* 5 • 2 01i)oer, Ryaa 

-1 6 ’ll,., .**«*« Bedford and 

"$&****** .^-SchelL ■■- Filming 

Stwt Monday 

. , •-...- ^Vvjhe Neth«iand£ 

intended for a 
-• 4 ' -ease, : 

i‘v! 1 Attenborough 

... - the; screenplay 

Si.,: illiam GoWaman, 

*" the President’s 

facers ;wili be 
*•. T ine anid Richard 


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lissn- 

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/ionic Sets- 
eToiirs - 

,, -y Fisher' Hall 
'•['./".novation after 
Jfew York Phil- 
^ tour the United 
irope. 

an portion of 
1-17, will be 

‘■trd Bernstein. 

will be made 
: merican works 
» for an Amer- 
! ■ touring abroad 
lude pieces by 
■ an. Roy Harris, 
hwin. Aaron 
' -les Ives and 

•. concerts will 
yt -rii^e to the 


United ..States Bicentennial. 

' They will be given in such un- 
usual places as the Deutsch- 
landhaJle in West Berlin, 
Stadthalle in Vienna and the 
. Jar dm des Tuileries in Paris. 

For the American tour, 
which will precede and fol- 
low die European - Concerts, 
Mr. Berntstein will share the 
conducting with Andrd Kos- 
telanetz. ' Mr. Kostelanetz’s 
programs will include music 
by Gershwin, Jerome Kern. 
Victor Herbert, Alan Hov- 
ftaness and Louis Moreau 
Gottschalk. 

The first concert will be 
in the Nassau Coliseum on 
May 1'9, followed by two 
concerts . in Carnegie Hall, 
May 20 and 21. Washington, 
Florida, New Jersey, Rhode 
island, Michigan, Missouri, 
Iowa and ' Illinois will also 
be visited. 

Smith’s Sculptures 
In fc Photo Show 

- More than 100 photographs 
of the late David Smith’s 
> sculptures will be displayed 
at the Bolton Free Library in •; 
Bolton Landing, N.Y„ from 
May 1 through, the summer. 

. - The photographs include 
many pictures showing the 
sculptor’s work in place in a 
field next to the iron works 
where they were forged— be- 
fore they had been sold, lent 
or stored by trustees of his 
estate. Several photographs 
show that Smith positioned 
some of his work to combine 
art with nature for greater 
effect 

Also available at (he com- 
munity’s library will be a 
collection of news clippings, 
catalogues and copies of ar- 
ticles on the artist’s work. 

Poets Will Present 
Awards Tomorrow 

Almost $10,000 in prize 
money will be presented to 
21 .-poets at the 66th annual 
dinner of the Poetry Society 
of America at the Plaza to- 
morrow. 

The society’s gold medal 
for achievement in poetry 
will be awarded to A. M. Sul- 
livan. a president emeritus of 
the society and author of 12 
books of verse. Sarah Singer ; 
of New Hyde Park. L. I., won 
her fifth prize in a row with j 
the Celia B. Wagner Memori- 
al Award of S250, Edward | 
GaHlard, 15 yearf- old, of ; 
Fresh Meadows,Queens, won ' 
the Elias Liebennan student 
poetry award of $IG0-He is i 
a student at SL Francis Pre- ! 
peratory School in Fresh ; 
■'~rtd0WS. 





WmA ( ^ 



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CE 


TEGHIUCOtOR.' 


Sparkle’ moves and glitters. The 
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gives us the delight of finding a new, 
sparkling star.” 

; -Maurice Peterson, ESSENCE MAGAZINE 

FROM . 

GHETTO TO (Q 


LIV ULLMANN IS 
NOTHING SHORT 
OF IMMENSE!” 

-Vincent Canby. New York Times 


•:./V 


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THE NEW YORK TIMES. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1976 


how thru May 9 only! 

- The Royal 
"Shakespeare 
; Company 


Stage: Heiress' a Stylish Adaptation 



I Well-Crafted Play Has 


Fine Acting, Staging 


THC HEIRESS, hv Ruin yd Auawlus 
Co;::, has^i w Henry Jjm«s no«i 
■W.ish.rtilon Sfluarc" Dirca:fl W 
Ow-o J.rdthitr srillna b? Ojrro/ 
Sriiiih: eosrtjmy by Ann p«p: 

»,<i bf DjvhJ F. £c«a‘; s»3» manj-ef. 
.'oe Laidin. piw.:n:<i b> 5ic«en 
Scr l ’*cr .mi! Thomas C. Smith: K.:n 
M?"rsc. asmnaie nrndu:cr. *« 'he 
Brojehars* Tneatcr, Wes* Street 


* 


I Mena ••• .. 
Dr. Aualm Stwr 
Imiih] p.ymlimn 
1 Clhrum SlOflCr 
| Eii:abOh Almrmd 
Arlnqr To-roscnd.. 
Marian aimonil 
i . 1 * 01 x 15 TKMHl . 
Mr;. Montgomery 


Sharon Layjhiin 
.. .Riihsru KilW 
. . .. Jan Miner 
Jane AlCs-ndf 
Dorethv Blackburn 
.. . .Fegcr Baron 
. ... Crct'la Hart 

. . . David Sclav 

. . .Toni Damar 



4 



today WEDNESDAYS Tp*40RRCW KTAQ.MA^ > 
FfflOAY AT.10C30AM* as30* 

SATURDAY Al^lOrSOAM* 3:00 6 B*K3Pf,I 
’ SUWDAY At TrlSa i'lOPfirj ~ 


PROGRAM FINAL WEEK 


■ ■ Manhattan Theatre Club 
IVNWE UEADOW-Artislic Director 

Li .' V. I III.’ n Will 

N.Y. Shakespeare Festival 
JOSEPH PAPP-Producer 
pr.r-sonl 


InTheWineTime 

Previews Begin Today 

Al ihi Kt.inh.ii:. in Thoalre Club 
22 1 tait T Jr.l Slrcol Oil S Jltdl 
R.’sorc.Hioiij 28$--bOO 


y' ^51 



Cc actant Villivn GJMrrsan 

By CLIVE BARNES 

Critics nesd to be consis- 
tent but never consistent 
enough to be tediously pre- 
dictable. Last week this col- 
umn offered the mildly dog- 
matic opinion that one could 
not really make plays out of 
novels. This week it cheer- 
fully asserts with a certain 
stirring skepticism that I 
should have remembered 
•The Heiress," the adapta- 
tion by Ruth and Augustus 
Goetz of Henry James’s 
novel "Washington Square." 
This plays absolutely splen- 
didly. 

My folly is compounded by 
the fact that I had already 
seen the play once this sea- 
son — in a fine staging by 
Michael Kahn in Princeton, 
N. J. Last night, in a totally 
different production. it 
opened at the Broadhurst 
Theater, and re-established 
its claims as an engrossing, 
literate piece of theater. 

• 

The story of a rich, little 
ugly duckling who grows up 
to remain just that, a rich, 
little ugly duckling, is sensi- 
tive and touching. The house- 
hold of the widower Dr. 
Sloper in the Washington 
Square of 1850 is an oppres- 
sive environment for the shy 
and delicate Catherine, his 
solitary child. Her mother, 
seemingly a brilliant woman, 
died in childbirth, and the 
plain Catherine has always 
been a source of pain to her 
father. Now she has a suitor, 
Morris Townsend, who is 
handsome. wordly and 
charming. He is also penni- 
less. Is he a fortune hunter? 

It must be admitted the 
play does lack something of 
the James tone and style — 
how could it be otherwise? 



Richard Kileyand Jane Alexander performing in drama 


Also the authors have natu- 
rally enough somewhat sim- 
plified the narrative, making 
it slightly more coarse; 
grained than the coolly so- 
phisticated original. But it 
undeniably works. It worked 
in 194S when it was new, it 
worked earlier this season 
(with Maria Tucci and Jack 
Gwilem) at Princeton, and 
now it works again on 
Broadway. 

• 

The reasons are easy to 
see — strong characteriza- 
tions, an easy, flowing story 
line and an oddly satisfying 
ironic ending. The play 
leaves nothing to chance. It 
is as well-crafted as a Chip- 
pendale ebair or a Balan- 
chine balleL 

George Keathley, who once 
ran the enterprising but now 
sadly defunct Ivanhoe The- 
ater in Chicago, has directed 
the play with low-keyed sub- 
tlety. He has seized upon the 
play’s two atmospheric ele- 
ments of gentility and claus- 
trophobia and allowed them 
to set the production's style. 
Oliver Smith's setting is aus- 
terely elegant and formally 
correct — but just a little 
chilly. Compare it — should 
you be interested in stage 
design and its effect on a 
play's tone — with Mr. Smith’s 
other current drawing-room 
interior for "The Royal Fam- 
ily,” for the difference is 
crucial. Also Ann Roth’s cos- 
tumes — stiff, and, except for 
Catherine’s Paris gown, bor- 
dering on the provincial — 
are sweetly accurate. 


Jane Alexander's Cather- 
ine. with her pursed lips, her 
bewildered eyes searching for 
middle - distance happiness, 
and a dowdiness she wears 
the way other women, wear 
chic, as a statement rather 
than an apoiogy, is super. 
She goes through the play, 
slightly submissive, hoping 
for better things, and. until 
the embittered eod, defen- 
sively pliable. 

She is matched by Richard 
Kiley’s Sloper. The authority 
of Mr. Kiley is never less 
than remarkable, and here 
he has a role where his qual- 
ity of almost arrogant diffi- 
dence, a wary tiredness, 

■ heavy-lidded and remote, 
works very well for him. He 
did not have the neurotic 
sensibility that Ralph Rich- 
ardson once brought to the 
rale, but somehow, he was 
even more convincingly dis- 
illusioned and disappointed. 
• 

Of the others, the eager- 
eyed avariciousness of David 
Selby as Morris was affect- 
edly effective — here was pho- 
niess with just the correct 
overlays of sincerity — and 
Jan Miner made a nice thing . 
out of Lavinia Penniman, the 
tough-minded and well-mean- 
ing aunt-chaperone who sees 
Catherine's plight with a cer- 
tain loving realism. 

Do you recall those novels 
that used to be called “a good 
read?" This play is absolutely 
the precise theatrical equiva- 
lent. It won't change your 
life — but it will divert you 
between dinner and bed. 


I T0N16KT AT 8:00 .THE BALLAD OF BABY DOE Wetting. Bible; Fredricks; ! 

1 Sompgi i ! ; 

JHURS. APR. 22 8:00 LIZZIE BORDEN Schailer. Fail!. Hynes (detail); Pierson, 

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m APR. 11 8:00 ft BjttflffRE 01 SiWBLtt Haley. Walker; Pm, Cowan 

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Ballet 

April 27-June 27, 1976 

i BOX OFFICE NOW OPEN 

Tickets also at Bloommedale'S. Manhattan and Hackensack. Bee Olfice open Monday. 10-8; 
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PREVIEWS START TONIGHT 4 ; 


Town Hail Interludes 
sponsored by 
American Savings Bank 

Today 5:45 

James 
Cunningham 
& Acme 
Dance Co. 

‘delectable madness" 
(N.Y. Times) 

ah lickcissrso 

CocHailS IrninS 00 
Town Hall. iJ.TW.JJrd Si. 
Tel: JU 24536 


Nygaard Conducts ‘Early’ Mozart 


. LAST 2 WEEKS! 
"ABSORBING, COMPELUHG. I 
A TENSE THRILLER." 

-Duties Will. Daily News, 

Tonight at 6 PM 

CKAflCir Mini tied* C*« -212- 239 M.T 
t Cfets AUo a« Jiuoie J 1 1 tsntea 

Theatre de Lys 

IT! Ckustopner S> NVC rJi:iS2*-H7B2 


! Japan Society 

I 1^1 FF1 Prcscnl* 

% . . jj L£CTURE by 

PROFESSOR ARTHUR DANTO 

or Columbia Umvervlty 
• "'A Pfruonal and Pniiosophical Memoir of 
j Munjkala In New 1 ock" 

! ji Japan House 

[333 Ejst 47lh Slreol) 

ProlOMor Danto will talk about Ihe works ol 
1h« Ia!e Mood^ilock artist Shiko MunakaU 
as an amslic and pnunsophicai optession. 

Tuesday, Apnl 27lh at a p.m. 

Conlubulion 52.00 


I TONIGHT AT 7:30 

LET MY PIQPlg 



By RAYMOND ERICSON 

Prodigy that he was. Moz- 
art began composing at the 
age of 5. and he turned out 
a considerable body of music 
in the following years, which 
is largely dismissed by biog- 
raphers as relatively unim- 
portant and which is ignored 
by performers. Jens Nygaard 
recitified this in the concert 
he presented at Alice Tully 
Hah on Monday nighr. offer- 
ing seven works written by 
Mozart between the ages of 
5 and 13. 

The major piece was 
"Apollo et Hyacinth us." a 
school opera with a Latin 
text by a professor at the 
University of Salzburg. It was 
composed and performed first 
in 1767, when Mozart was 
11. As such, it is a remark- 
able score. If one had not 
been aware of the composer’s, 
youth, the work would have 
seemed the product of a 
mature musician. The craft- 
manship is impeccable, the 
style and taste are of a very 
high order, but the invention 
is only of intermittent inter- 
est — which is where the 
opera suffers in comparison 
with Mozart's later works in 
this field. 

There is one inspired num- 
ber. a duet for soprano and 
tenor, slow and quietly 
poignant which the corn- 
poser might have written at 
the height of his powers. In 
fact, he thought well enough 
of it to use the music later 
in one of his early sym- 
phonies. 

The performances, which 
may have been the first of 
the work in this country. 
was first-rate. Mr. Nygaard. 
who is one of this city's fin- 
est musicians, conducted with 
an easy authority. His West- 
chester Chamber Orchestra is 
a well-disciplined ensemble 
of mostly youthful players, 
and his Westchester Cham- 
ber Chorus is even better, 
with a tone, pitch and enun- 
ciation of unusual purity. 

The three expert soloists, 
who sang the five roles. 


were Barbara Hendricks, so- 
prano; Jeffrey Gall, counter- 
tenor. and Grayson Hirst, 
tenor. Miss Hendricks, with 
a beautiful lyric voice and 
lovely style, confirmed with 
this appearance that she is 
well on her way to a major 
career. June LeBell handled 
the narration, stringing the 
musical numbers togeather 
with deftness and humor. 

• 

Earlier in the program, Mr. 
Nygaard played the first two 
piano pieces that Mozart 
wrote, tiny but neatly formed, 
and one of the piano con- 
certos (K. 107c.l the com- 
poser based on piano sona- 
tas bv Johann Christian Bach 


Amadeus Performs Noble Beethoven 


The Amadeus Quartet is 
currently engaged in a six- 
concert traversal of Beetho- 
ven's string quartets at Hun- 
ter College. One might hope- 
that the remaining dates of 
the cycle — tomorrow and 
May 3 and 6 — would draw 
more of a crowd than that 
which appeared on Monday, 
for this is quartet-playing of 
a distinguished sort indeed. 

The adjective "distin- 
guished" suggests a certain 
sobreity. however, and those 
in search of fire-breathing 
impetuosity in their Beetho- 
ven may be a little disap- 
pointed by the Amadeus’s 
approach. This is a group — 
Nobert Bramin and Siegmund 
Nissel. the violinists, and 
Peter Schidlof, the violinist, 
are transplanted Austrians; 
Martin Lovett, the cellist, is 
a native-born Briton — that 
has been together for some 
30 years, located in London. 
Their playing betrays the 
allegiance to classicism and 
sweet-toned good sense that 
might be expected given that 
longevity and base of opera- 
tions. 

On Monday, Mr. Brain in’s 
playing wasn’t always quite 
as serenely secure as one 
might have liked, which trou- 


Manhattan String Quartet Shows Flair 


_~.ho.DD'> in I .-.I --.AHinn?* 

t L r- n— I ■; .- -n .. i ^ 

"47 Tuns rou c4r close tour efes r 

f« STOft TW-BE HEEffiK 4 70UNG. 



The Manhattan String Quar- 
tet is a young group that 
plays with ensemble sense 
and makes up programs with 
flair. Anchored at one end by 
the forceful if wiry first vio- 
lin of Eric Lewis "and at the 
other by -the mellow tone and 
superior musicianship of Ju- 
dith Gyde on the cello, they 
presented, at Town Hall on 
Monday night, a program oF 
an early Haydn quartet (Op. 
20, No. 4). Respighi’s "II 
Tram on to” for quartet and 
mezzo-soprano, and Beetho- 
ven's F major quartet (Op. 
135). 

The Haydn showed off rhe 
talents of the group, because 
Haydn allows all the instru- 
ments but the poor viola to 
have a semisolo turn. It was 
performed with dispatch and 
cest and with particular at- 
tention to the shape of long 
phrase?. 


The Respighi, set to a less- 
er Shelley poem, is one of 
those Post-Romantic seam- 
less evolutions of undulant 
sound in the Chausson vein, 
but handled with restrained 
dexterity by the composer. 
Joanna Simon’s warm mezzo 
gained in intensity as she 
sang, and though she domi- 
nated rather than partnered 
her quartet, her very sen- 
suousness brought out the 
work's sunset flavor. 

Perhaps the quartet should 
not have tackled the Beetho- 
ven F major.- That majestic 
farewell of joy, pain fun and 
quintessential serenity needs 
a deal more acquaintance, 
Familiarity and understanding 
than it was given. But credit 
the Manhattan String Quar- 
tet with making a solid ef- 
fort. 

Patrick J. Smith 


bled the Apollonian surface 
here and there. But generally 
this was music-making that 
epitomized the Amadeus ap- 
proach. In the opening meas- 
ures of the “Grosse Fuge,” 
for instance (played on its 
own. rather than as the last 
movement of Op. 130). the 
musicians steadfastly refused 
to dig deeply into the sfor- 
zandos. 

• 

But a quick movement like 
the Presto of the opening 
Quartet in D (Op. 18, No. 3) 
of the second "Ras umovs ley" 
Quartet in E minor (Op. 59, 
No. 2), which Beethoven asks 
to be played “con molro di 
sentimento,” they balanced 
emotion and classical form in 
a wonderfully moving man- 
ner— ^-not sentimental, but 
full of chastely contained 
sentiment. The whole evening 
was like that — Beethoven for 
those who expect his music 
never to forsake nobility de- 
spite all its technical interest 
and torment. 

John Rockwell 


TONIGHT AT 8 

Town Had cordially invites you 
to hear Ihe great 
American bass-baritone 

DONALD 

GRAMM 

in his only New York appearance 
this season as pan ol the 

"SING OUT. AMERICA" series. 

Donald Hassard at the piano. 
Works by Thomson. Ouke 

Bowles. Rorem. Gumming, lues 
and a group of Traditional 
American Songs. 

Luge £6.50. Orchestra S5.50, S4 SO 
Baton* SJ 50. $2.50 
(Sjudcnls and -Sr. Cn ' . mice} 

TOWN HALL 

1 13 W. 43rd SI. 

JU 2-4536 



FRESH &H0 ENGAGINGLY 01 







. 

The Birthday 
s' Concert* 

\ TO BE RECORDED BY 
Iff;-. WARNER BROS. 
fr^X- RECORDS 


L/ M 




music 4.1, CO *tov A 


and probably wrote when the 
former was 9. There were two 
short appealing choral works, 
"God is our Refuge” (X 20; ■ 
and a Kyrie in F (K. 33j, from 
Mozart’s ninth and 10th 
years, and a Cassation in G 
(K. 63} from his 13th year. 
The latter, an orchestral suite 
of seven movements, had two 
attractive slew movements. 
Otherwise the music in this j 
part of the program was thin J 
in substance, despite its be- | 
ing well made. Mr. Nygaard 
performed a valuable service 
in making this music avail- 
able to the public, but the 
concert was, for the most 
pan. of historical rather than 
intrinsic interest 


Only New York Appearance This Year! 
SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 8:00 PJkf. 
Tickets: $8.50, 7 . 50 , 6.50 now at box office 

His first New York rap session following 
the concert and four new songs from. 

This Black Eagle. • 

■fr Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Music Hall— April 27th 
■■and Philadelphia’s Academy of Music— April 29th. 


-“‘MONTY PYTHON UVE’- 
IS ABSOLUTELY TERRIFIC 

PORE ADOLTEMTEB MADNESS . . . MONTY PYTHON truly is tte snaka in 
tfca garden of Modern Eden — a child of (fur tines, 
a raptilB if tnrtj SIGNIFICANT IMMEDIACY . . . there has bees noth Ing 
to heat It since Genghis Khan .” — CINE BARNES. H.YJIMFS 

“EXUBERMTXYBRiGhTAND lA/ACKY. 

Monti Python Is VERY FUMY, sometimes hysterically so . . . 
the MADDEST and BRIGHTEST comedy revue to come along since 
'Beyond the Fringe '." — M ARTIS GOTTFRIED, N.Y. POST 

“‘MONTY PYTHON UVF IS HILARIOUS! 

, — ^ — ALLAN WALLACH. KEWSDAT 

"Trrtnc, F»«U4tlt.^^ 

f w»i4«w. . . for children between the ages of 24 asd 

f • GMtfrteram'ftitertsg*. « 25, or perhaps 18 and 19 or even five 
pnm4>t|»4 PiiNUOUciNMouicrfl and sli . . ."—DOUGLAS WATT, DAILY MEWS 


OPENS TUES. APRIL 27 


CHARGE ncttEISer PHONE WITH AIL MAJOR CREDIT 

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MON. APRIL 26 thru SUN. MAY 2 

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"A NIGHT Of FUN. A CAMPV OfiBKT .'/.T 
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come alive iu VANITIES. See a lie's. 


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EXTRA! 


• Irene Worth, 1976 Tony Award winner, will per- 
sonally host a special vacation in London this sum- 
mer featuring the Covent Garden debut of the 
Martha Graham Dance Company. Find out how to 
join her. Read the exclusive story in "The Travel 
Advisor." 

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TONIGHT AT 8 

£} “EXTREMELY 
FUNNY!” 

-Barnes. Times 

Israel Horovitz* 

The Primary 
English Class 

Mi*cif4 br 

Edward Berkeley 

CRUSH; taciYE tj pbroi 
w*J4Wtn4tt cart v-735-7 177. 

CIRCLE IN THE SQUARE. Downtown 

-» 199 Btedur£L, M.Y.C. 10013. 25441U. m 


MATTODA 




Original Cast A&ibi an YanpordReM 

CHELSEA’S WESTSIDE 

407 West 43rd St. (at 9th Av 

STUDENT RUSH NIGHTLY! w 





1 JWsliiuAHJ 


















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“ABSOLUTELY ENCHANTING MUSICAL!” 

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vkey 


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Goool 

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A MUSICAL 

coMepy 


BOOTH THEATRE 

45th SL W. of B'was ■ 246-5969 


SEE ABCS FOB PCTAJLS 

MATS. TODAY & SAT. 
at 2. SUN. at 3 



EVIEWS BEGIN TCM'W at 8PJ. 
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WORLDS GREATEST MUSICAL 

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EVENINGS AT 8:00 SHARP; MATINEES WEDNESDAY S SATURDAY AT 2.-00 SHARP. 

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S. TODAY mo "ROMEO & JULIET 

i^Sat Mat' i Eve.: SWAN LAKE Fri. Eve.: ROMEO & JULIET 
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NOMF thru MAY IS ONLY! 

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A147N TMM Y A- SAT AT*: M V 3 
“A VERY FUNNY PLAY! "-Jiair./m ABC 

K Jl-LES FKIFFKRS 

NOCK KNOCK .'. l 

Directed By MarStwJtW. Mason < 
PRICES Evgs. Tues. thru Fri. B Mats. Wed. 
Sat. 4 Sun.: Orcfi. sW: Mezz. JIG; Bate. 9ft 7. 
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In the new comedy L 

' THE NORMAN CONQUESTS A, 

by ALAN AYCKBOURN pH* L<+ 

directed by ERIC THOMPSON J r£g J *..Jk m 

BRIGHT SASSY, AND BAWDY. --J 

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BOX OFFICE OPENS TODAY AT 10 AM 

PREVIEWS APRIL 27-MAY 12 > OPENS MAY 13 

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MOIL thro Fri. Evgs. & Sat. Mat: Orch. & 
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“Quality performances in a quality' 
play are the grand satisfactions 
in ‘THE HEIRESS’ Jane Alexander 
gives a memorable, firm portrait. 
Richard Kiley is masterful!” 

-Richard Coe. Washington Post 






m 




1976 Tony Award Winner A 
Wrectw of a Play w. 

• 'fa. L 

Rosemary LeGaBienoe ESs r\ 
Hams -jJ— e Rahb j| 

the y 

rOval familvj 

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ELEN HAYES THEATRE 4Mt SL West of B'mr 24M3W 



JANE - 

RICHARD ALEXANDER JAN 

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„ TODAY*** tPJi. 

■j PERFS EVESYSVN.oeUOS: 

M "LINDA HOPKINS 15 TERRfFIC 
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“3 Tcny Awards 

BURTON in. 


“H.V, : ft 


AU5,-«ezz. S12J0. Aft 
A* *D: Men. 110 , 1 . ft sa*. 
*r a in. 9. r 

^ 236 W. *65 "St. 746:8154 
CJ.VI.V VMJ - AVI Idtl 
/RF. 5UN. MAY 2 #4 8 


X ACIFIC OVERTURES 

ANmM«lol 

Tues. thru Sat. Evas, at 8 PJW. Orth ft Luge: 
S15.00; Mezz. 111A 7 Jtt 5.8ft. Sat. Mat. at 2 
PM. ft Sun. Mat. at 3 PM.: Orch. ft Logo: 
S13JD; Mezz. S9Jft 7JXL 5J». Wed. Mat. at 2 
PJU. Orch. ft Lose: slim: Mezz. 19^6, 6.5ft 
500. Enclose sett-addressed stamped en- 


f 4’u 

1 tv'J {0 

Kre;^ : , 




.» 'SAT. at 2; SUN. 3 
w SOUTr-ft»irf. YH'.* 


otdannilipllit 

• 79ft 10.9ft 8.50. 6 l Sal. 

9 1 1.9ft 9.9ft 6.90, syed. 
r ■ 4.50. Sat. Ntah. 7 

' .»*- 8.90. 7 JO. 5.9ft 

^ QfiLY CALL 354-1(0? 
. ,OTW; ClJ «/.,TSO 
W. 45lti St. 745-5760 
I V Cmf. L'orrf, > j ,«1 

P' - 


Winter Garden Theatre. 1634 B'way,' 245-487* 
GHQVP.'iUd&rri WtVOBt«nw ,Ht is«t 

Km. na all i tedit 1 wni»' 74.VAI47 


.\I ounce * Tbrfm £ Sat at arl 

II ISXKIt tlF.i TONV t «Vl Hlri 
BROADWAYS BIGGEST HIT 
MUSICAL comedy; 

■’EKTRAOROtHAFY MUSICAL ■ THEATRE. 
SPLENDID. MAGNIFICENTLY STAGED 
. AND PLAYED." - - .V «,» 

PlPRIN • 

Tiie5.-Sat. Eves, at 7:30: US. ll ill & 7. 6. 
Wed. MaL at 2: 511, U. 9, ft 7. 6. Sal. Mat. at 
3 ft Sun. Mat. *t 3: OL 1ft 9. ft 7.6. Endow 
sUnroed seft-artffEssed envefcoe. List 
altwnateifctes. 

Mem -HI iZll'lini 0 .Si/i-i' lS«r*i< 

IMPERIAL THEA, 349 «JJl St- CO S-33M 


previews Beg TwnYr Eve si * ttvu May 3 Evg. 
OPENS MAY 4 • SEATS NOW’ 

KF34 PATTtK '1A I'.IIJTKHT * 

HOWAIII7 HOUTIJilJGK ItUCKn 


XtiOD PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE 

A .VrrJfnn/ 

B~4i aiiH hno by Mn far 

Al AN JAY LKDNAUn 

LKHNKK BKIINSTF.LV 

PRICES: Mca-Fri. Evas- Sat. Mats. S Hoi, 
Mat. May 31: Orch. *15; Mezz, sis: Bale 
511.5ft 1ft ft 6- Wed. Meter Orth. S13: r«22. 
512: Bair. Sift ft, 6. 5. Sat. Eves. Orch SI7 50; 
Mezz. 517.50: Bale. 514.32. 1ft ft 

\f.m .sol. of*. Mo 11 .r Sot 

pur Tiwj.vh v/. r.r.. m mu 

r H.TKfHT «H> * 'r»-»f -IT 

MARK HELLINGER. Slst ft B'way. 757 TOM 


Previews: Tontahl. Tom'w. Fri. Evg. at t 
Sat. at 3 & 8 • Next .Mon. at I 

S Upcrr. .Iprr/.TM aMi.4 J l*J7 

ROBERT MORSI-; m 
O LONG, 174th STREET 
,1 >*<•■' Vumrnl ( Wift 
RESERVE TICKETS BY PHONE 
WITH MAJ. CRED. CARDS: 239-7177 
All Evgs, A Sal. Mats.: sn n sft Wed Mate.: 
»2 to 54. SUL-M4IS.: 513 to s7. Eva. 41 ft- 
Mate. Wed. ft Sat. al 2: Sun. at 1 PM. 

5EAT5 AT TICKETRON: 541-7290 
FOR GROUP SALES ONLY CALL: 796-3074 
HARKNESS THEATRE, B'WAY ft 63 ST. 
{adjacent Lincoln Center] SfiWOXLji. 


46a.jtd 

T , 7YJ.v/r,7rrar*' pu 

Joseph Pace prntnl. 

HE THREEPENNY OPERA 
A ww Yort Shakespeare Festival Production 
_ CHOICE SCATS AVAILABLE 
FOR TONIGHT'S PERFORMANCE 
Tucs- Sal evgs. at 8 PM *12. SML SS Sat, Su>. 
Mate at 3:30 PM and Sun evgs. al I PM SID. 
58. 56. v/ed Mate at 2:30 PM 59, S7, 15. Rush 
To 125 vT5 ft under, u vr* ft overi 51 Student 
G roup rale 51 Call AbbVs G»ew« 477-1753. 
INSTANT CHARGE EN ft 76 1 6 BUV II* by 
phene and charge to major credit cards. Tu 
alto al Btaomirwdales. 

BEAUMONT Thaa-'CINCOLN CENTER 
150 West tefh St. EN 2- 761 b 

U.ITH TWMT* AIT sI V t 

II f.V.VFK I JF;7n\T III IK/.s - m is:; 
ImladturtoSTUI S'/r'W. 

T he wis 

The new musical venfan of 
The wonderful wizard of Qz 
Tue*. thru Thurs. Evgs. ar 7:30; Wed. ft Sat. 
Mate, at 2 & Sun at 1: s£L HL ft 6. Fri. ft Sai. 

Evas, at 7:30: S1L 12,W.ft6. 

Tttirt* aim nt TtCKHTROS; fSlJI Stt ?*W 

ton i.'6rrrf'p s.uj-jt vail- aw tmiatr 

MAJESTIC. 247 W. 44fti 5t. I2IZ1 244406 


■ SNnSilASHTFAK 

•' ,f ONE OF THE FRESHEST, WARMEST, 
FUNNIEST THEATRICAL EXPERh 

crKTES." ~ffi{/ ft'olw.rfwn. Arnr 

DOY mefts boy 

A .\ViT tJiTOTirl r«nl> 

. A-P Mon., WW„ Thiirv ft FrL BrOO; • 

_ Sat. 7:a> i u>:30; Sun. 3:00 ft 8:00 
ACTORS' PLAYHOUSE, 100 Seventh Ave. So.' 
Phone Res. Accented: 70-9657 
CHA fhSIT: Sluj. Cmt. Cord. 017)239.117? 


"HILARIOCIS' SILLY, FUNNY. SWEEt. 
BUT MOST OF ALL HILARIOUS! A GREAT 
NIGHT. —tlire Boma. N.Y. TBkek 

-THE HAPPIEST NEW S«pW^ TOW?L" 

PERFS. THIS WEEK: Tbfl^al^si^J^* 
and Sal. Evft & Sun. Mat. 

AImi: Tl,r^ i,M. Ml. 5/1 Enpc £ Wed. 4J2SVed. 

BoY MEETS GIRL 

bvKKJ.LAftSAMSPKWACK 
Directed bV JOHN iJTHGOW 
Tuev Thu»«. at 1. 19: Fd. ft Sal. at 8: »». wed. 
Mfi. al ? 17; Sal. MaL at 2 ft Sun. at X St. 

.siinhml ftadi'ihr.befmfvrtaCn 
C-.S'pSaTrlBfsrmtujn. TtS-teSO 
R.-rme TirlH. hr nhme rm afar credit rardr. 

. ' JHE PHOENIX THEATRE 
al THE PLAYHOUSE, 3S7 W. M.SU 541-900 

Nowthro May 9 Onlvl 
The Royal Shakespeare Company 

JlIenry V 

Tues thru Sat eves at 8 (ex Apr 22 at 6:38): 
^ 4t yj; Sw mate at 2; Weekday 
mate Apr 23 and Mav 5 at 2. Prices; Fri evb 

552' 5LS: ^ S-Ofli 3Jft Special fieri, at 
P£‘ T t., W * ! ' r 1 * 8 at 2PM. 

IJ£!? re -. ttmtf ySr- c itlan rush. SftSft 
^Focoshrite' ’ and ^attended oarting. Ftr 
flcket urn. gron> dlccnmtft arvl Menhattwi 
636-4100. To 

2?^ f| SSE. b ' r 'N* :ine can CHARGIT (2121 
??.’ ^’g-jgyKLYN ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 
JO LOiavette Ave, Bklvn. • 

H l«lr lljrij.^ MniLzi.i, 

tilLNKIil a *1 N.i . 

■MJf. P1NAFORK 

riSS'r 1 ?? 11 AS *Vm. t 

EAST5JQE. Playhouse, 33* E. 74 UN 1-238 



H1NT-F0NTSNNE IHEJIBE 

205 W. 46ft St-.O^SBE-aoSS 


A DELIGHT... SOLIDLY ENTERTAINING. 


“Deliriously 
funny 1 

.-^©arnes. N.Y. -Times 

P. “Triumphant” 

-•'■"•''U Kafem; Time Mac 



atTVOO & £:00PM 

Colleen Dewhurst Ben Gozznro 
Edward Albee's 


Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? 


• : . -s.YdUSj £-,£5; 
OVv>77‘ nc«l»3it ■*»t; "T" ■ ’ 


LAST 2 WEEKS 

prior to national tour 


"bkhmothg:.. spuhdbwtouchmg.’ 


XlCKLES BY TUCHOLSKY 
A Cdmt Htboarl 
sSaranfi 

HELEN GALLAGHER 40BMASIELL 

rBrertal In MONI YAK1M 
MAIL OROERS ft PHONE RES. ACCEPTED 

CUARGiT: Umj. Cred. Cmb.X9.7l77 

THEATRE FOUR/4M W. S5tb 517246-8 545 

TdmZ -. Wftft mm&ni of A. 

T , Sal. at 7. VI £ It t An. nr .1ft SM 

‘-DELIGHTFUL MUSICAL."— r,W 
US C A LOOS A 'S CALLING ME 
FH. ft Sat. S7Jft ftSD. AH other Perte. MJft 7J& 

C.HAltfHT: Mol Cred. 

CHELSEA'S WESTS! DE THEA. 407 W. 43 SI. 
■ S4H3WStmfam Rudil Group Sate: 354-1105 

rz _ TONIGHT or X PM. 

UNNERVIHGLY FUNNY .‘-ftmM 

ANITIES 

Toes.-Fri. Evgs. 8; Sat. 7 ft 10; Mats. 
Wed. 2; Sun. 1 Seals *7 JO ft &5J0. 

CHA KG IT: Ua,. CrrJ Coni, ffl.sg.19 n ;; 

QKUei-5 Westeide III MO V 04 3, M l 8394 

/ lumen EsnusiatEyTntNHuiTui rji. 

GAIA PFKKtlUIANi 'E Till 'flSJiA 5" 

D1 VINK IN 

TnMUVKCK KUNNIK-rriliMKIiY HIT 

^VoMEN BEHIND KAKS 
DIKKLTKIt BS* (b n >JNh 
MAIL ORDERS NOW Tue*. Wed.. Thun.. 
5un. eves at 1PM, Fri. ft Sal. nn at 8 & 
HKTOPM. All oerfc. WSL SSJft SiJO. 

CHAStUT-.ilm Cm 7 Cad. f.'1-ji JJ; a. - ,' 
TRUCK ft WAREHOUSE THEA. 39 E. 4lh St. 
Phene 



TO(Wat2&8 


■ "■ TODAY at 2 ft 8 " T . . 

“A LOVELY AND PASSIONATE PLAY: 

n VANESSA REDGRAVE IS MASTERLY.’! 

£]' — Cbve B arms. N.Y. rones 

t %nessa Redgrave 
ftt Hin^e 
John Heffeman - 

Henrik Ibsen's .■ .-.•.Michael Meyer '* - 

c lhe c Lady from tljc Sea 

^ i NOW THRU MAY 23 • AU. SEATS 58.SS 


[CIRCLE INTHE SQUARE 


££.] CIRCLE-CHARGE 581-0720 
l. ft Uth Street WKtifBmdmv 





























24 


^amfly/style 


THE NEW YORK TIMES, 


Food Day WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21 , 1976 


Kitchen Adventurer: 
It All Began 
In the Fine Arts 

By CRAIG CLAIBORNE 

Nan Mabon. whose adventures in have tatot 

her from London to Pans to New York, came hy her 
professional involvement in food in a n ° ubl 7^ e .^^ 
manner. It began, she recounted recently, about 10 years 
ago with a midday meal in London. 

‘7 was born in Atlanta and had a ^d'tJQnal Southera 
background in food." she said. ,, Che«e gn^, crab dishes, 
hot tamales, country sausage, oyster lMf--the usual. 

Serious cooking had never entered my brarn 

"After graduation from a proper womens Catholic 
college in Boston I traveled to London to study art his- 

wrv g More art history. I got a job at the Victona and 
Albert Museum, attending lectures m Medieval art and 

weekend my roommate's mother came to town 
and said she’d heard of a fine little restaurant, which 
turned out to be Rosemary Hume's C°rdon Bleu cooking 
school. After lunch we went upstairs to watch the 
students, and both my roommate and I enrolled in die 
c asses Fantastic. I spent a year thera. absolutely 
in love with the training and when I fished ■ 
some good fortune, was taken in as a sort of exchange 
student by a French couple with a main house in Vichy, 
a seaside resort home near U Rochelle and another 
home north of Monte Carlo. It was a family of four 
aSd none of them spoke English. After four months or so 
I spoke French fluently. 

■We Dined Well’ 

-Mv duties were slight. I washed vegetables j. made 
salads, baked breads and made various kinds of fruit 
preserves. But we dined well with local sau .sages | and 
cheeses, and every day a man would stop by with a truck 
filled with assorted loaves, brioches and croissants. 

Madame was an excellent cook, mostly ^siinpte dl ^s. 

You know, gigot on Sunday. They insisted 1 taste 

e 'oTh*r & return to the United States the young woman 
sot a job with the Metropolitan Museum, and this time 
fter museum role had altered considerably. She was 
no longer involved in art history but rather with planning 
of parties and special exhibitions. 

"It was in 1970. the museum's centennial was under 
wav and there was a party every night," she recalled. . 

When her husband- to-be, Robert Mabon, a lawyer and 
citv planner, moved to Washington, she , continued, i 
went along." They lived in a small apartment in George- 
town and entertained a good deal. 

“So many friends asked me in those days for recipes 
and advice on cooking 1 decided to make a business 
of it." she said. "I opened a cooking school, which 
she chose to call the New School of French Cooking. 

The Mabons have recently moved to a commodious, 
simplv furnished and stylish apartment on Manhattan s 
West' Side, and the present kitchen could serve as a 
model of how to convert the kitchen of an old building 
into an impressively handsome, modem and functional 
room without destroying all evidence and feeling of 
substantial age. , . 

“But you don’t know the labor that went into this 
project,"' she said one recent morning. ‘The former 
occupant was a recluse in her declining years who is 
•.said to have never left the premises for five years. She 
never let anybody in the door and everything here was 
littered and broken down." 

Today, the room is as bright and neat as shiny new 
copper ‘with immaculate, newly installed chopping block 
counters and an old-fashioned, well-powered six-burner 
gas range with two sizable ovens. The kitchen opens 



Some Recipes Friends Love 


Spinach and Veal-Stuffed Chicken Roll 


l /2 

4 


whole chicken, breasts 
{see noteQ 

Salt and freshly ground 
pepper to taste 
pound fresh spinach 
tablespoons butter 
7 , cup finely chopped onion 
pound twice-ground lean 
veal 

y. cup cooked rice 
^'2 teaspoon crushed dried 
thyme 

1 teaspoon crushed dried 
oregano 

I egg. lightly .beaten 
Parsley sprigs for garnish 
Brown sauce (see recipe; - 

I. The chicken breasts for 

this recipe must be boned. 


ft cup finely chopped celery 
cup finely chopped carrot 
\/ 2 cup finely chopped onion 
3-i cup finely diced 
mushrooms 

J4 cup peanut; vegetable or 
com oil 

3 tablespoons flour 
l teaspoon tomato paste 
1 clove garlic, peeled and 
crushed 


The skin should be left Intact 
and they should not be split 
In half before or after boning. 
Sew them together -to pre- 
pare them for stuffing. Place 
the breasts skin-side down 
between two sheets of wax 
paper. Pound the chicken 
lightly with a flat mallet and 
remove the top layer of wax 
paper. Sprinkle the chicken 
with salt and pepper. 

2. Meanwhile, preheat the 
oven to 350 degrees. 

3, Rinse the spinach well 
and trim off and discard any 
tough stems. Add the spinach 
to a saucepan and cover 
closely. Cook in tb® water 


that clings to the leaves. 
Cook briefly until wilted. 
Drain well and squeeze to 
extract excess moisture. 
Chop the spinach until fine. 

4. Heat half the butter in 
a skillet and cook the onion 
until it is translucent. Add 
the meat and cook, stirring 
to break up the lumps. When 
the meat loses its pink color, 
spoon the mixture into a 
mixing bowl. Add the 
spinach, rice, thyme, oregano, 
egg and salt and pepper to 
taste. Blend well. 

5. Spoon the mixture 
down the center of the 
chicken breasts. Fold oyer, 
the two ends to enclose the 


stuffing and roll in 
der. Tie with strii 
up Lhe seams en 
Smear K\e remain 
soften jd, over th 
Bake -15 minute 
often with pan 
Increase the hej 
degrees and bake 
longer until nice! 
all over. 

6. To serve, r 
strings and serve 
a parsley garnish 
brown sauce sepa 
Yield: 6 to S st 
Note: A bone 
chicken cm be 
for the chicken b 


Brown Sauce 


1 bay leaf 

y 2 teaspoon dried basil 
ft teaspoon dried thyme 

2 sprigs fresh' parsley 

2 tablespoons chopped cel- 
ery leaves 

5 cups brown veal brotn or 
fresh or canned beef 
broth 

I cup dry white wine. 

Prepare the celery, car- 


1. 


rot, onion and mushrooms 
and set aside. 

2. Heat the oil in a heavy 
saucepan and add the vege- 
tables. Cook, stirring often, 
until golden brown. Add the 
flour and continue cooking 
and stirring until lightly 
brown without burning, 
about 10 minutes. 

3. Stir in the tomato paste 


and when well t 
the remaining 
stirring well topi 
ini>. Cook ovei 
stirring often, 
hour. Strain, pusl 
a bit of the sol 
thick, add a little 
If too thin, cdo 
heat until reduc 
Yield: About t 
half cups. 


Southern Biscuits 


-me New Yon Times/ Alfred Wbmmt 


Nan Mabon prepares Southern biscuits 

into the dining room as well as into a bright, comfortable 
office that aJso neatly blends youth and age in its 
furnishings, including an angular table and a 
wash-basin installed a few 1 decades ago. That kitchen 
is used mostly on evenings and weekends. Mornings 
she prepares lunch in downtown Manhattan for urn & 
Duff us Inc., a small English concern that deals in coffee, 
cocoa and sugar in the commodities markets. ' , 

We had heard from mutual friends of Mrs. Mabon s 
prowess in the kitchen (her "mclt-in-the-mouth biscuits 
out of her childhood are famous) and w« asked her to 
accommodate us with an assortment of dishes, both 
those of her Southern background and those in which 
she now instructs. . , , . 

The cost of a series of five weekly lessons is Sl-iO. 
Students — attendance is limited to six per class — dine at 
the end of each class and appropriate wines are served. 
Information about her classes may be obtained by tele- 
phoning 724-8807. . . 

With the exception of the rolled stuffed chicken and a 
splendid berry ice made with a food processor, the recl P*s 
offered here do not represent the French cookery taught 
in her classes. 



Uutdbwim - * 4 haoov lo «*-ol Co*»»n"**nt Food 
Sump*. To i.nd no.v to jodI* <■:■» Food Sumw. 
<4>l :i.s -.0.1 IteeroipWr. BOO 3*3 • 37 10. 


PLEASE REQUEST A (omutrabif iT** "> <»n 
<«i«- 'stod Ji'nlift* j: **-v IVairfbtun. it .1 an 
Md *i«m •* out o! »<«i . 


Waldbaum's food specials alio avail, 
in TSS Hampstead & Lawrence. 



2 cups sifteef'flour 

2 teaspoons baking powder 
i/ A teaspoon salt 

3 tablespoons butter 

l tablespoon solid white 
shortening 
cup heavy c ream. 

1. Preheat oven to 450 de- 
grees. 


i pint fresh, red, ripe 
strawberries 

1 cup water 
y 2 cup sugar 

2 tablespoons cassis syrup, 
optional 

1 1 0-ounce package frozen 
raspberries, thawed 

2 tablespoons raspberry 
jarrl 

5 or 6 additional straw- 
berries for garnish. 

1. Pick over the straw- 


frozen 


2. Sift the flour, baking 
powder and salt into a mix- 
ing bowl and add the butter 
and shortening. Cut the but- 
ter and shortening in with a 
pastry blender or two knives 
until it has the texture of 
coarse com meal. 

3. Add the cream gradu- 
ally, working the dough with 


the hands. Knead lightly 
and gather it into a ball. 
Flatten Iightlv on a lightly 
floured board and roll it out. 
using as little .flour as nee- 
essarv on the board to pre- 
vent 'the dough from stick- 
ing. Roll the dough into a 
quarter-inch thick circle. 

4. Use a. 2-inch biscut 


cutler and cut 
into rounds, 
be about IS bis 
biscuits are cut 
on a baking shi 
5. Bake 12 t< 
or until nicely 
top. Service wi 
jam. jelly or m 
Yield: IS tost 


Strawberry-Raspberry Granite 


berries and remove the 
stems. Rinse the straw- 
berries well and drain. 

2. Combine the water and 
sugar in a saucepan and 
bring to the boil. Simmer 
about 10 minutes. Let cool. 

3. Puree the strawberries 
in the container of a food 
processor or electric blend- 
er. Add the puree to the 
syrup. Add the cassis if 
used. 


4. Drain the juice from the 
thawed raspberries and add 
it to the mixture. Blend the 
raspberries and jam. then put 
through a sieve to remove 
most of the seeds. Discard 
the seeds. Add the raspberry 
mixture to the strawberry 
sauce. Stir until well blend- 
ed. Pour the mixture into a 
metal container. Cover and 
place in the freezer. Freeze 
overnight. 


5. Several 
serving, cut 
chunks and ad 
tainer of a fo 
Blend quickly 
and immediate 
pour the mixtu 
tic container. ( 
turn to the fre 
individual disl 
fresh strayben 
for each. 

Yield: 5 or f 
(More recipes 


grocery special 


■lAl 


I %r 


specials specials g 


Prices avail, in N.Y. State stores only. 


Coupons are limited to 7 per 
family. No substitutions. 
Plus tax where applicable. 


Keebler 


*12sj 

Zesta Saltines NYT * 

49° 


save 14c. 10Q?i pure, Florida Citrus 

orange 
juice 


’i-gallon 

coni. 



save 41c, orange juice 

Minute 
Maid 


4 -oa< 

cans 


3 100 ft. 

■ Glad Wrap 


#1 29 
NYT 


Mb. 1 

pLg. | 

I wHh lint coupon I 

good 'til Sat. nigM April 2*. 1978. I 

WALOBAUMS 


Elmhursi or other local brans 
where Elmhursi is no! avail . 

skim milk 

save 20c. Weighl Watchers. pasl. process 

cheese slices P'S 89c 


2 1 -quart 
conn. Dac 


’S' 49c 




e 

roll 


vllh ihl* coupon 

good 'til Sal. nlgtii April 24, 1976. 


3 ..... - WALDBAUM’S 

5"' 


health 

& beauty aids 

avail, in stores with 
Health & Beauty Aids dept. 


save 30c. natural 

Kraft aged Swiss 


£ 93c 


89 


* Night Guard nyt| 
J deodorant w.'-.Ys™ i 

j **•*•"* *“• J 

■ »I1Ii thl* coupon | 

good 'ill S»1 night April 24. 11TB. 

\ .WALOBAUMS 


Si 1.1 9 


economical 

Maalox liquid 

medium or hard 

Pepsodeniiooihbmshes 4for*1 


save 23c, Breakstone cream cheese 

whipped 12-oz. 

Temp Tee cup 

assorted flavors 

Light & Lively yogurt cw> 29c 

savelOc.Maybud 

Edam cheese ‘p£ 89c 

save Me. in our margarine dept 

soft Nu Maid 


save 20c, orange juice 

Minute Maid 

save 30c 

Jeno’s12pakpizza pkg.1.09 

save 1 2c. ail varieties i 

Lender's bagels 2°^ 01 85c 

save 26c 

Gorton Sole fillet SI .59 



save 16c, New! fresh caught, 
fresh pack, fresh American 
tuna of the finest quality 

Del Mont 


save 40c, all natural 

Olde Fashioned 
Recipe 
ice cream 


ed 

'^gallon H 
cant.- H 


39 


K29c 


a? 55c 


r“— 

I pine 

i all purpose 
■ Lestoil 

12-oz. cont. 


69 


i 


Hdhlhlt coupon 
goad Til Sal . night Arpil 24. 1976. 


#13^ 

.■NYT" 


talc 

Shower 
to Shower 


8-02. 

cont. 




Friendship 

Cottage 

cheese 


Mb. 

cup 




save 4c, Waldbaum’s 

mixed vegetables 

save 1 0c Waldbaum's 

whole strawberries Cup 65c 

save 16c 

Light ’n Lively ice milk «£[ 39c 


save 30c, marble or pound, 
there are no chemicals in this cake 


r “ " “ — 

i Spray 
J ‘n Wash 

! 99 


.WALOBAUMS 

#132 | 
NYT | 

I 


more savings 


Chock Full 
O’ Nuts cake 


79 * 

full pound'pkg. 


pint 

can 


- wli* trni coupem ■ 

- 1 good 'III Sot. mghi April 1376. ■ 

WALDBAUM’S 

f 30 Stay Free #l3 ^ 
J Maxi Pads 

139 

pkg. 


Vanity Fair 

bathroom tissue 4 A 79c 

Waldbaum's 

large prunes 

Wally 

tuna cat food 

Waldbaum's Concord 

grape-juice 

Welch 

tomato juice 


14 «S z '49c 


2»« 89c 

2^ 35c 


6:**or. 

can 


49c 


1 -quart B-oz. 
bonus 


1 -Quart l -PM 
bon'e 


79c 

79c 


Laddie Boy 

chunk dog food ’ 2 

Del Monle 

light chunk tuna 

Waldbaum's 

tomato sauce ’^33c 

Del Monle 

new whole potatoes 229c 

Waldbaum's 

stewed tomatoes 


bakery 

specials 


1-ib. 

can 


37c 


NYT 


1 

! t 


ELY. stores -mly 


Diet Rite .'.^gallon 

QqJq nore;.bortie%^%^ 


■nlh Mil eoupan 

good 'Id Sal. nlgM April 24. 1976. 


reg. or diet, N.Y. scores only 

Vrgallon nor Ct . 
7 Up soda 


twin pack 

FFV 

Mallows 


7-02. 

box 


47 


bottle 




WALDBAUM'S] 

fight blend, suck 3 I 


i Imperial 
r margarine 

'■ 440 i m 

1 8 pkg. 

1 


NYTI 

I 

• 1 


Mhtnti coupon 

good '1*1 S41. nlgM April 24, 1|T». 


WALDBAUM'S 


eis:n!e=!an: 

Lysol spray 

K;ng oscar 

Brisling sardines 3 ™*-67c 

Mended 

Violetta oil S5T2.59 

Siradord Farms 

Grape Jelly , 57c 

Waldbaum's 

corn oil® SKI. 29 


CQ 

IdOMl I 


boneless £ skinless 3’i-oz 

Granadaisa sardines “"‘65c 


15/s-oz. 


1.89 


niccs elf active in N.Y. Metro Stores only. No case lot sal?. We reserve the right to limit quantities on all advertised items. 


Whiiney 

pink salmon can 

not avail, in Suffolk Co., Waldbaum's 

blue detergent .89 

Waldbaum's 

pineapple juice 

balhroom 

80 Solo refills pkg. 49c 


gaucho, ludgeiown fumifa, or iudgetown choc. 

Burry’s Cookies • ’^69c 

Sunshine 

oatmeal nut cookies £- 67c 

cheese crackers 

Keebler Chedo's 59c 

Nabisco 


Nilla vanilla wafers 


59c 


SS'45c 


Waldbaum's 

large 

white bread 






save 14c, family size 

Heinz ketchuj 


49 


1-ib. 

14-oz. bottle 


save 40c 


gallon Pope 
olive oil 

5 79 


each 


save 1 7c, Cling, halves or si iced 

Waldbaum’s 

peaches 

3=1 


mvq 14c. soap pads 

10S.O.S. 


29 


pkg. 


save 10 C 

Del Monte peas & carrots 

save f 6c. ass' l variety tor spagheni 

Progresso sauce 

save 1 4c. Waldbaum's 

purple plums 

. save 12c. Diamond A vehicle 

whole green beans 

save 1 2c, Lindsay colossal 

ripe olives 

save 5c. Waldbaum's 

mixed vegetables 


i-tp ii 
cjn 


TM 

<* 

2 ii 







Fri, 


5iS*StKHed C--. 

&-••- .. ; — --^r: l. 


THE NEW YORK TIMES. WEDNESDAY. APRIL 21 . 1976 


W"*? -C^K z*;,,. . 
Wk.-Xxr* 

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->■ • .■ 
iSH*' ■•.'?. U .. 


Vas a Good Day 
jr the Japanese 


By BEBNADINE MORRIS 


5^-. 


.J* • original, in his way, 
. v - ' .ferp is in hers, out 
:: Or Zandra 

; ’ -i/; i London. His name 
- \e was trained as a 
‘ ■ '^'pneer in his native 
• ■ stndied the history 

■ ^ rfme in Chicago for 
: -md he was in his 
* ^S'before he started 

. ■'■■■■.*. about deigning 

.. , it to London' for 
•- -.lying fashion in 
■. a bit and then 
iHoring at the side 
ihael, then Norman 
For finishing, he 
th Cardin in Paris. 
its ago, he started 
v- . ssznaJring business 
- r / and today, accord- 
1 ~:;;ie who know, “ev- 
" ies to him to have 
‘ de.” 

> , ; who has shops at 
: Avenue (at 58th 
. > i In Palm Beach, 

: % while ago to see 

v, happening. She 
ressed she invited 
*alm'- Beach last 
id yesterday she 
him to her clients 
irk. 

r Overwhelmed 

•re suitably over- 

by clothes that 

./ in new ways, 

' ■ =••- -sexy, . and un- 

■ : -aMduaL With a 

'^twe, .despite their 
' feminini ty- Jersey, 

' aBc jersey, in the 

‘started out, Jw- 
-ifemand, and Jean 
uloring it beauti- 
Yuki, now 34, ex- 
w be developed 
style. 

my clothes, and 
nt them to look 
. luir. So while I 
f, the idea came 
■’:ything is cot on 
• -I don't .waste 
-.• is became an im- 
. of every dress.” 
in the square is 
\ apes and wraps 
wer the dresses 
„ points, but it's 
yto'delve deeply 
; -akiiig' theory to'", 
ifts- 

uer aim is to elim- 
. as much as pos- 


“I try to make the simplest 
dress possible," he said “I 
concentrate on how It 
moves.” 

It moves well. AU that 
technical background pays 
off. If you don’t want to look 
like everybody else, Yuki’s 
"work is worth investigating. 
His prices start at $695. 

• 

Issey Miyake stepped down 
off the stage at the end of 
his fashion show at the 
Fashion Institute of Technol- 
ogy yesterday and embraced 
Diana Vreeland. The doyenne 
of American fashion' was 
wreathed in smiles, as was 
her escort, Oscar de la 
Renta. 

F.LT. was the place to be 
at 3 PJtf. Ottavio and Rosita 
Missoni were there with Mar- 
vin S. Traub, the president of 
Blooraingdale’s. Doris Smith, 
whose brother, Willi, is the 
•designer, was on the runway. 
tSephen Burrows was greet- 
ing his friends at the door 
and Elsa Eeretti was peering 
inscrutably through her horn- 
rimmed glasses . and under 
her big-brimmed men’s fe- 
dora. 

All the designers were 
commending their Japanese 
colleague. It was a good day 
for Japanese designers in 
New York. 

“Inventive, but they were 
not costumes,’’ observed Ro- 
sita Missoni as her husband 
grabbed for one of the post- 
ers showing Miyake's jungle 
scene. “So many ideas, ”.mur- 
muced.Mr. de la Renta. 

Mr. Miyake, who had pre- 
sented his clothes in Paris 
two weeks ago (he works in 
Tokyo) decided to bring his 
show to New York “to show 
to friends.” 

It seems he hadn't had a 
show here for three or four 
years and missed the creative 
climate, which he finds invig- 
orating. Once he worked for 
Geoffrey Beene on Seventh 
Avenue, and his life’s ambi- 
tion is to be a New York 
designer. 

With skirts . that knotted 
into waistbands, obis that 
confined Sowing dresses and 
drawstrings that changed the 
shape of coveralls, he put on 
a good show. If he wants to, 
he’ll probably end up on Sev- 
enth Avenue. 








* || S« ? 


l? “is';- 


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. , - 4 

- . v-T ’ 

'i.-v-vv;,/ 

■ . ; ■ 


■ ' — t. 

' - I 

* - V -ril 

- 


The New Yort TlraBS/WIIIsoi E. Mura 


‘Louise Lasser, Louise Lasser’: 
A Slight Problem of Identity? 


Draped, dress, based on a square piece of 

fabric , is typical of Yuki’s 

sexy, dramatic evening styles at Martha. 


By JUDY KLEMESRUD 
Louise Lasser. who plays the coun- 
try’s most talked -about housewife on 
television’s “Mary Hartman, Mary Hart- 
man," hdd a news conference here yes- 
terday that had all the melodrama of, 
yes, a television soap opera. 

. She sipped from a glass of grapefruit 
juice to help soothe a sore throat She- 
tugged on her blond bangs. She ner- 
vously nibbed her forehead. She looked 
uneasy, vulnerable and harassed. 

In other words, she could have been 
bade in the Hartman kitchen in Fern- 
wood, Ohio, where her character, Mary, ~ 
is married to Tom, an occasionally im- 
potent assembly lice worker, has a 12 - 
y ear-old daughter who witnessed a mass 
murder, and a grandfather who is an 
exhibitionist known as the “Femwood 
flasher.” 

A Little Overacting? 

But then, since “Mazy Hartman. Mary 
Hartman” is a spoof of television soap 
operas. Miss Lasser might just have 
been doing a little overacting yesterday, 
too. 

Are you Mary Hartman? she was 
asked in the St Regis Hotel. ‘Tm having 
a problem with it” she replied with a 
half -smile. “When you’re doing some- 
thing duly, there is a fusion between 
the reality of what you are and the 
reality of the character. But I happen 
to love Maty, which is a help. But I 
feel her pain, too.” 

Miss Lasser, who is in her early 30’s, 
said she viewed Mary Hartman as “a 
survivor in a world that might not be 
worth surviving in.” And the character 
has not fouled up her personal life, she 
added, “because there is no personal 
life, so that’s not a problem.” (Miss 
Lasser is divorced from Woody Allen, 
the comedian.) 

AU of a sudden a bewildered Mary 
Hartman look passed across the ac- 
- tress's face. “Please be quiet,” she said, 
rather dramatically, to the noisy group ' 
of about 50 reporters and photogra- 
phers. “Please be quiet Can we cut off 
the pictures now?” 

90 Episodes Completed 

A native New Yorker, Miss Lasser 
said she was in town fbr a week’s 
relaxation before returning to the gruel- 
ing daily production schedule in Los 
Angeles. She said that 90 episodes of 
"Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman” had 
been completed out of a total of 130 
that have been committed to indepen- 
dent television stations across the coun- 
try, “and after the summer, it's up in 
the air as to whether we continue.” 
The series, produced by Norman Lear, 
is seen in New York at 11 P.M. daily 
on Channel 5. 

How does she explain the series’ tre- 
mendous nationwide popularity? “People 
identify with a person standing in the 
kitchen all day with nothing to do," 
she replied. “And it's not just women. 

I think the show appeals to men. too, 
because it basically appeals to the emo- 


7 happen to love 
Mary , which is a help. 
But I feel her pain,.too / 


®§| 
■ilia 



y < %4* 





-me New York Times/ Roberi Walker 


tions. And it shows the staticness of 
American life, and it shows the Ameri- 
can gothic, where someone's death has 
no more meaning than someone brush- 
ing his teeth.” 

Do you know anything about the 
endless boredom of being a housewife? 
one reporter asked in a hostile tone. 
“I don’t know about the externalism of 
being in the kitchen,” Miss Lasser re- 
plied evenly, “but I certainly know 
about enniri.” 


Intellectual izing about “Mary Hart- 
man, Mazy Hartman” has become com- 
monplace across the country, and one 
television critic called the series’ dia- 
logue “the American interior mono- 
logue.” And even though she indulges 
In it herself at times. Miss Lasser said 
that the intellectoalizlng generally 
caused her to “giggle a lot” 

“That’s the kind of world I came 
from," she said, probably referring to 
her upper-middle-class New York Citv 
background and her education in politi- 
cal theory at Brand eis University. “But 
I think the people on the show like it 
[the intellectualizing], even though we’re 
not a message show. We’re not trying 
to tel! you anything, or teach you any- 
thing.” 

The room grew noisy again, and Miss 
Lasser looked pained. “Please be quiet,” 
she said, struggling with the microphone 
in front of her. ’‘Please be quiet.” - 

‘Personal Feedback’ 

Miss Lasser, who was wearing a very 
un-Mary Hartmanish diaphanous beige 
blouse over snug-fitting light blue jeans, 
said that although she never read the 
fan letters that are written to her, she 
did get good “personal feedback” from 
viewers. 

‘Tve never been treated with such 
affection.” she said, “l&ople will come 
up and say, ‘Mary, can w do something 
for you, can we help you?* It's huge 
affection. It’s as though they know the 
inside needs of the person.” 

Although the senes has dealt with 
such formerly taboo topics as exhibi- 
tionism, masturbation, menstruation and 
anti-Semitism, there was only one epi- 
sode, Miss Lasser said, that did not 
make it to the airwaves. 

“That was one where we talked about 
orgasms, and Mary said she didn’t know 
whether she's ever had one, and she 
talked about it with Tom. One station 
said they were afraid of it because it 
was so explicit, so we went along with 
it" 

Won't Reveal Plots 

Miss Lasser smiled broadly when 
asked if she would reveal some future 
plots. “Disaster, total disaster!” she re- 
plied. “But really, that’s one thing I 
can’t do. That’s the whole fun of it" 
Someone asked the inevitable ques- 
tion about Mary Hartman, the unhappy 
housewife, and women’s liberation. 
“Really, a lot of people are thinking 
thejr should be liberated, but not feel- 
ing it,” she said. “From what, to where? 

I think a lot of people are being bom- 
barded because they can’t find a viable 
solution for themselves. We’re stuck 
with it; we’re stuck with what we are.” 
And how is she— Louise Lasser — feel- 
ing. really feeling, these days? ‘Tm so 
exhausted, but Tm also very hyper.” 
she said. “Fm very vulnerable physi- 
cally right now. I'd like to write, but 
Tm so racing right now." 

With that said, she decided to cut her 
news conference short and go for a 
walk in the lobby, “to get a little air.” 



spei 


resb 

i California 






ious ripe 
Del Ifevberries 

white 


<mry 


dry *./ .. - ‘ ^ ; | 

pittreont., . .m-. -v 




- t-. -*■*. . .V . **W s . 

lint • 3ror*1 


large 32 size bulk, 
Indian River.. 



1 40 site, Washington Stale, gotten seedless; . 

)us apples r>.39c ^ grapefruit 

pears *39e C.AI 


m JfcC nges.il3sirabulfc£ » w* .. 

A fj stKavets -£;■ '- 12^*1 

'.Z'/^mmLStze 

"TW osh apples 3"^ 69c 

dustas, Imported 

•for gripes k79c 

„ Puerto f&an, red 

.* 1 ■ ; l ’sh pineapples each 69c 

- . . size A, genuine Idaho Russet ... 

- ' 9 potatoes ■ 4 ^69c 

£79 


5*99“ 

1 0 c less than last week* 

Frond# Valencia-, 1 00 size bulk 

juice v;‘. 
oranges . 

15 89 




• fkmripe 

‘g 

toes; 


3 



29 


idea, franks, specials, . . 

ami or bologna, 

fia'ngdejAj^a. ‘ *« ' " 

* Bring dept. assL chicken wheel as awgjl.'fresh tasty ' 

oonSfci^^ver ib.1.29 chopped liver %&.79c , 

Passover, choc, covered kosher for Passover # . ' ■ 

■macaroons or frairputs, • - krichpr kishka ■ ib.99d. 


^■‘oons 


ih.1.79 






fresh crisp _ 

sliced toorder ■ .-|t3!l3n 2 

lean boiled or baked hrpaH ■ 7 v, D ?Tr , ^P 

Virginia Style, DredU . 

k ham sale Hlllshire Brand, country smoked 


Polska 

Kiefbasa 


Beef up while prices 
are down. U.S.D.A. Choice 
eSmick steak only 69 lb. j 




In these uncertain times, one of the few 
things you can depend on absolutely 
is the quality of Waldbaum's beef. 

That's because we sell only U.S.D.A. 
Choice beef, so you know it will 
be tender/ juifcy and delicious. 

Right now, during Waldbaum's Beef 
Sale you can save on our Juicy cuts. 

But prices are going up. And next / 
week they could cost you more. Q 

So, hurry in and beef up at 
Waldbaum's while our Jpg 

prices are low. wttm 


w 

^waldbaum's 

^ 












freshly ground beef 

chuck 


U.S.O.A Choice beef, boneless 

-shoulder 
London broil 


5 



lb. • 


chicken parts sale 


kosher lor Passover , .' r 

kosher kishka ■ ft».99c J- 


fresh 

chicken livers ib.89c 

iresheut ■ ■■-•■ 

flounder Fillet ib.2.19 

fresh pan ready 

Flounder ib. 1 .29 

U.S.DA. Choice beef, diaphtagm 

boneless 
skirt steak 

455 fuSDA> 

■ ,u . (CHOICE).. 


With ribbons 

chicken breasts 
^drumsticks 
chicken thighs 

wiih thighs 

chicken legs 
chicken wings 

U.S.D.A. Choice beef, boneless 

chuck 
pot roast 


lb.1 .09 
ib. 89c 
ib. 85c 

lb. 89c 
ib. 69c 


boneless ■ 

corned 

brisket of beef 

^ thin cui 

89 “ 1 t 


U.S.D A. choice beef- 

Short ribs foman ken Ib. 99c 

U.S.DA choice beef, boneless 

deckle pot roast .n>. 1 .1 9 

U.S.D.A. choice beef, semi-boneless 

chuck steak . ib.1.19 

U.S.DA choice beef, boneless 

chuck fillet steak ib. 1 .39 

U.SD.A. choice beef chuck, boneless 

pepper steak ib.1.59 

U.S.DA. Choice beef, with bone 



chuck roast 

U.S.D.A. Choice, boneless 

beef ip 
for stew 


3.1.15 


19 


PPI 




■ i : -ss 


U.S.D.A. Choice beef 



asv 


I USD A 

[choice] 




FIRST OR 
CENTER 
CUTS 


Swift's, reg., beef dr maple flavor, frozen 

brown & serve sausage K 89c 

frozen 

Jones’ link sausage ■ SI .59. 

frozen 

Jones’ sausage roll Si .39 


U.5.D.A, Choice beef, for London broil 

boneless fSsBqd 

MVMVIWWW toaiBE) 

flank steak ^ 


I 85 


Certain items S prices not avail, where prohibited by law. 


All prices effective thru Sat in stores with complete supermarket only. * 



1 




;H lllfep 



there 
no 

D’Agostino 


near you 
move. 







MEAT 



U.S.D.A. Choice Beef 
Shoulder or Bottom Round 


BONELESS 


ROAST 


lb. 


1.09 


Fresh Rib or Loin End 


LOIN 

PORK 

CHOPS 


lb. 


.79 


FRESH 

GROUND 

CHUCK 


lb. 


Frozen 


SLICED 

BEEF 

LIVER 


lb. 


U.S.D.A. Choice Beef 


X 


SHOULDER 
LONDON 
BROIL 1 .49 


U.S.D.A. Choice Beef Chuck 

CUBE STEAKS 


U.S.D.A. Choice Beef Rib 

SHORT RIBS 


Hebrew National Chubs 

FRANKS or SALAMI 


Rich’s 8 oz. pkg. 

SLICED TURKEY 
BOLOGNA or SALAMI 


Hygrade All Beef 

BALL PARK FRANKS 


Schickhaus 

ALL BEEF FRANKS 


Schickhaus or Swift 

SLICED BACON 



< * - % 

: • * r- Vi 


THE NEW YORK TIMES , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1976 


PRODUCE 


U.S. *1 Idaho 

POTATOES 

5 lb. bag 


Salad Pleasera 


1 2 oz. pt. cont. 


Fresh Florida 

JUICE 
ORANGES 

1 0 tor .69 


Firm Green 

CUCUMBERS 

2 for .29 


Washington Slate 
Extra Fancy Golden 

DELICIOUS 

APPLES ib. .39 


FROZEN 


Foodtown 

ORANGE 
JUICE isoz .39 


Pepperidge Farm 
Chocolate, 

Lemon Coconut 1 2 oz. 
Banana, 1 1 Vi oz. Small 


LAYER 

CAKE 


each 


.79 


Morton 

CHICKEN IN 
BASKET 

2 lbs. 1.99 


Foodtown French 

GREEN BEANS 


20 oz. bag 
Foodtown Cut 

BROCCOLI 

20 oz. bag 


Aunt Jemima 

WAFFLES 

10 oz. 


Good Humor Ice Cream 

CHOCOLATE CHIP 
or ASSORTED 
WAMMYS 
-8 pk. .79 




DAIRY 


Kraft Cheese Slices 

NATURAL 
SWISS soz .89 

Parkay Soft 

MARGARINE 

2-e oz. cups .59 


Friendship 

PINEAPPLE 

COTTAGE 

CHEESE 

12 oz. 


Tropicana 

ORANGE JUICE 


.39 


qt. cont. 

Dorman's Sliced 

GOUDA 
CHEESE 

6 oz. 

Breakstone 

SOUR CREAM 

pt. cont. .65 


.83 



All Prices Apply Wed. Apr. 21 thru 
Sal. Apr. 24. We Reserve Iha 
Right to Until Quantity to Three (3) 
Sale Items. 


GROCERY 


Red Cheek 

APPLE 

JUICE 


qt. 

Dei Monte 


SAUCE 

8 oz. 3 for ■49 1 


Del Monte 

SLICED 

FREESTONE 

PEACHES 

29 oz. 


Ken-L-Ration 

DOG 

FOOD 

15!S oz. 6 for 1.09 


Skippy Creamy or Crunchy 

PEANUT 

BUTTER 

18 oz. .99 


Ragu All Flavors 

SPAGHETTI 

SAUCE 


15 V: oz. 


Foodtown All Flavors 

“LOW CALORIE” 
SODA 

16 oz. 6 for. 8 9 


Pampers 

OVERNIGHT 

DIAPERS 

12’s 


1.19 


Keebler 

CHEDDS 


9 oz. 


Burry 

MR. CHIP 
COOKIES 


13 !i oz. 







Pillsbury 

CHOCOLATE 
CHIP COOKIES 
isoz. .89 



of the 


nice 



Gadgets, Some Esoter 
For Cooks to Play 


By MffiH SHERATON 

h. 1 . it is at least part craft, cookery inspires a secminjlj 
array of gadgets, roost of which prove to be overdes.gned, orerspecfc 
unworkable. The following, however, are exceptions, all well worth 
hoard space they occupy and the purchase prices they command. 


One of the simplest and most efficient 
kitchen utensils to come along m quite a 
while is Fat-A-Way. a graduated Pyrex 
beaker that takes fat away, not from 
your hips, but from your gravies. Pour 
pan juices in and, as the fat rises 
to the top. the greaseless juices sink 
to the bottom and are then poured 
off through the low-set spout. 

In addition to this basic use; Fat-A- 
Way simplifies the task of clarifying 
butter or other solid fats by a quick 
and almost foolproof method described 
in an instruction sheet that accompanies 
it Since the glass is flameproof, it 
can be used to bail water, and because 
its slender spout has a precisely formed 
lip. it pours water neatly into steam 
irons or directly onto the soil of bushy 
potted plants. 

The plastic handle is welFangled for 
comfortable gripping, and if there is 



Tttt t. 


one improvement possible, 
be the addition of a lid u> ki 
warm. A long thin brush is 
for thorough cleaning of - 
This handy gadget can l 
from Fat- A- Way. *H>95 East S( 
Albany. Ore. 97321. The co: 
postpaid, SS.23 with the cleai 


While there are a number of con- 
venient utensils with which to grate 
cheese in quantity for kitchen use. 
it is more difficult to find a practical, 
small grater attractive enough to go 
to the table where it can be used 
to grate cheese directly and freshly 
on to pasta, soup or salads. 

One very satisfactory answer to that 
need is Mely-RoII, a substantial, plastic, 
rotating grater that works much like 
a peppermlll, and which now comes 
with its own fitted saucer to catch 
random flecks of cheese. Although made 
in bright kitchen colors such as red, 



blue, green and veUow. it is most ele- 
gantly ceramic-like in white. Made in 


Italy, and useful also for grating choco- 


late over desserts, the Mely 1 ^ 
S3. 75 at Maiso'n -Glass, 52^ 
Street (PL 5-3316). ^ 




TwieSif: 




The simpler a dish is, the narrower 
the margin for error in producing it. 
and when it comes to something with 
as few ingredients as the classic vinai- 
grette dressing, all must be first rate. 
It seems one can get more opinions 
on the salt, pepper, and type of oil 
to use in that dressing than the vinegar, 
yet the relative richness and mellowness 
of that all-important ingredient is vital 
to a successful result. 

For that reason, many devout food 
buffs .have vinegar bottles, containing 
vinegar starters or mothers, to which 
they add dribblings of leftover table 
wines to keep the supply replenished. 
Nature does the rest with enaymes 
from the mother that turn the new 
wine into vinegar, a feat far less dra- 
matic, perhaps, then the biblical chang- 
ing of water into wine, but welcome 
nonetheless. 

The Perpetual Vinegar Cask, made 
by Franjoh Cellars in California, offers 
an attractive, convenient and practical 
container in which to make your own 
vinegar, perpetually, as the name sug- 
gests. 

The handmade oak cask with brass- 
studded hoops comes not only with 
a full-fledged working mother, but with 
a starter supply of vinegar made for 
the most part of red zinfandel wine 
and which has a mouth-puckering, tan- 



talizingly piquant bouquet 
After that you're on your O’ 
deepen the flavor, by ustr 
vour best bordeaux and bu 
tages, if you like. 

A spigot through which 
can be drawn off. and a 
tidy refilling, are included i_ 
age which can be ordered fr“ 
Cellars, P.O. Box 7462, Sloe 
95207 for S39.05 postpaid' 
also a toll free number, SC 
and the purchase can be 
Master Charge. The cask is 
able in Bloomingdale’s sixth f , 
wares department foe $40. 




A timbale of crisp, buttery pfite brisfie 
is the perfect, edible serving piece from 
which to spoon out such luxurious 
dishes as seafood newburgh or cardi- 
nale, breast of capon & la king, blan- 
quette de veau or sweetbreads finan- 
tifcre. With a touch of sugar added 
to the dough, the same form can hold 


mold of the same metal. Bet 
pigments retain heat rather 1 
it, they bake dough thorough 
durably crisp crusts. 

The timbale mold consis 
parts — a bottom shell and i 
fitted, cone-shaped lid or 
Rolled out pastry is used t 



dessert fillings of fruits and whipped 
cream or ice cream combinations. 


Usually, the main difficulty in making 
these elegant pastry shells at home 
is shaping them and having the shapes 
hold up during baking. To overcome 
that difficulty, Isabel Marique, the cook- 
ing s choo l teacher who also designed 
the extra-deep, black steel quiche pan, 
has devised Tout en C route, a timbale 


bottom pan, while another 
wrapped around the cone. Wh 
the parts fit together to fbnr 
ered serving pastry-dish. 

Manufactured in Belgium e 
for Isabel Marique, Tout e 
will sell for $3.95 at all brand 
Pottery Barn. Though not yet ii 
is expected in about three w 
check" on its arrival, call 675-4 


Although nothing can compare with 
carbon steel for sharpness, many people 
avoid cutlery with such blades because 
of the extra care required to keep 
that metal free of rust and stains. 
Anyone willing to settle for a very 
good second best in the interest of 
easy upkeep would do well to consider 


recommended by the raanufac 
cause of possible damage to ot 
sils caused when the sharp bl 
jostled in the washing proce 
preferable to wipe the knivt 
separately. 

Professional chrome finished 
ing steel is suggested for l 



iZZy-r- 




the new Four Star cutlery service made 
of high carbon stainless steel in Sol- 
ingen, West Germany by J. A, Henckels. 

These hand-honed blades take the 
sharpest edges I have yet come across 
on stainless steel, and are made with 
extremely comfortable, firmly grippable 
handles of black polypropylene. Unlike 
carbon steel, stainless is dishwasher 
proof, although that method is not 


cutting edges, along with an oc 
rehonmg on a carborundum stow 
The service contains a fid- 
of wide-b laded cutting knives a 
row sheers, plus a carving fc 
sharpening steel, all available at 
Herald Square. A small parinj 
is $!2 while a 9-inch wide-biad 
is $30, which gives you an J 
the laity price range. 







TSE NEW YORK TIMES, WEDNESDAY. APRIL 21 , 


- 

27 


i y;*. * coincidence that 

ifa*.- ... L three 1 different 

feaSi* (J» matter how 

A ! ^' n -* it). currently being 

ftn w *" r : the Hadler Gal- 

%£■ ■>= 3 “ " ' r ' '^ley work in quite 

“:!«**** r\!“-W=i ... '^aiedla. Yet, there is 

‘ s v ; similarity of con- 

- ; • . . . 1 '%.,ough one works in 

p£?B R S' . boiih Aguado). ooe 

SWV-* . . Deborah Warner), 

jes construction out 

-ica.-^ tfrai.--' and assorted min - 

£&-** ~V* ’ % <§*«i Itapoport), they 

• T‘ •■*. i ^'s2S rt ^A“ latill E lina and 

*sr -.„V ; • - |.-^'WingL:with; di- 

ag*>> ,,, ..... Vj$H 

king about, if be 
not do function-- 
Esentational work, 

... to be concerned 

3**-, !- . .- -.- ietic abstractions: 

ment and rhythm; 
*■■*.••••.- ’• imensionality and 

. "■ •' •.■*. This show just 

LafttJ-. . V . - .. -. o offer three in- 

^ "■ • : • V.. samples of those 


■'. - - ;.er Experiment 
;• blem with seeing 
■ (on of Miss Agua- 
irork is- that, witfa- 
recard. you don't 
dw what you're 
. Miss Aguado is 
- 1 ail kinds of en- 

feats that become 
-i - ''■'•fames, and these 
r ‘ — -^jcompletely with- 
r >MpIan ation. You 
v - you're looking at 
j - ^neticulously craft- 

would prob- 
\lielped if.the gal- 
: mounted ’ some 
nlanatory text. 

s* & recent preoccu- 

>v ta J 8tom-tbe show 
8“* d “ 

‘*'■^4 save helped— 


iu I/Cl “ 

spective. 

These jewelry-sized exer- 
cises turn out to be emotion- 
al metaphors for this crafts- 
man: Her father was an 
. ironworker who made steps. 
Now she is making silver 
steps and, seemingly, taking 
steps away from the things 
keld her in childhood. 

She creates steps that re- 
mto great distances, 
abstracted railroad tracks 
that disappear into infinity, 
huge stairs that could only 
be climbed by a giant Ex- 
cept, they are all just a few 
inches high. 

Spatial Games 

But, alas, one has to look 
so closely inside the Plexi- 
glas display boxes that hold 
the work, that the wonderful 
sweeping spatial games 'are 
almost completely missed. 
Perhaps one day Miss 
Aguado will decide to work 
on the scale her conceptions 
deserve. 

Deborah Warner's flat 
weavings, in natural-toned 
linen and fine sprays of • 
horsehair, look very simple 
at first glance. 

O.K., here are these ridges 
of woven linen rising out of 
the flat fabric, some with 
horsehair curving out of 
them, or cannonading out in 
little tufts. So what else is 
new? 

And then you look again. 
Back and forth. Up and 
down. And you suddenly 
find, by the action of your 
own eye, that something ki- 
netic is being created by the 
differing lengths of lines, by 
whether they are horizontal 
or vertical, by their very 
subtle shading, by the curved 
opposition created by the 
horsehair. And everything is 
moving. Tour muscles are 


*3*1 .r-*- 

C”A - 


s^asiVri 

j * 




m 





3^ sSbs^E55^«q 

^ .;i| 




. - : • •' - slijtwa 

■■■• - ■■ 1 ” ThtU«wYorirTlBi«/siii aiiw 

Deborah Warner* s . linear weaving 
combines linen y arm and horsehair . 


)f Nan Mabon 


KN-STYLE 
TOMATOES 
_-3N PEPPER 
rt pepper 
-..i» raf, ripe. 

. JwMjl ground 
.^.’tapte _ . 

te butter 

- J , chopped onion 
ohed ham, ■ 

- ^topped 


. = ;: ,Sw»?'tO 350 

yi^\£r&y.? ■ 

>#epper 

ffiwst. ‘Rtaiove 
' .: the.. : se^ ^ 

Set'asidt' - 
c ° re . from each 
discard it cut a 
.- tfa.tpp; jig. eadi 
■' spoon, care- 

- >;out the jnflp 0 f 

^^gA’-fairiy 
; ' . ; ; ldifor stuffing., 

P^P* Sprinkle 
.^ [■.natoes with salt 
~ ' - to tastei , turn 
' down to drain. 

3 tablespoons of 
skillet end add 
wk until wilted, 
ato pulp, ham, 
bread crumbs, 

-- if, salt And pep- ' 
-i .. Cook, : stirTing 
five minutes, 

- : 'V *e bay leaf 
^ . Mn the s t uffi ng 
Lightly oil a 
^ that will hold ' 
i “d green pep.- 
Stuff the vege- 
he tomato nux-* 

. tinkle' with re- 
nbs: Dot with 
itter. Bake .50 
until the vege- 
ider. Cut each 
into thirds be- 


,’fvings. ' 

' EANS-STYLE 
: .sr LOAF • 

' i WICHES 
■■'.it sauce (t 


-'.Uxtvea French 

■* ms butter . . - 
shuched ‘ row' 


H cup white com meal 
cup. flow 

Salt and freshly ground 
pepper to taste 
Peanut , vegetable or 
com oil for shallow fry- 
ing 

DQl pickle slices for 
ganush 

Lemon slices for garnish 
Finely shredded lettuce 
for garnish. 

1. Preheat oven to 450 
degrees. 

1. Prepare the hot sauce 
. . and set aside. : 

3: Cut off ' the ends of the 
loaves of bread and set aside 
for another use. Cut 'the 
loaves in half, width-wise, 
then slice in half lengthwise. 
This will make four sand- 
wiches. Arrange the loaves, 
split side up, on a large bak- 
ing sheet and dot with butter. 

4. Drain the oysters. 

5. Combine the corn meal, 
flour, salt and pepper to 
taste. Blend well. Dredge the 
oysters, one at a time, in 
the corn meal mixture. 

6. Add the oil to a skillet 
to a depth of about half an 

-. inch. Heat thoroughly and 
add half the oysters. • When 
browned oh one side, turn 
and brown on the other. 
Drain well. Cook and drain 
the remaining oysters. 

7. Meanwhile, place the 
bread in the oven and bake 

. until butter melts and bread 
is warm. It should not be- 
come too crisp. 

. 3. Arrange the oysters on 
sandwich halves and serve 
with hot sauce and garnishes. 

. Yield: Four sandwiches. 

HOT SAUCE 

1 cup tomato ketchup 

2 tablespoons mustard, 
preferably creole or use 
an imported mustard 
such as moutarde de 
Meaux 

2 tablespoons horseradish 
.2 tablespoons freshly . 

. squeezed lemon juice 
■ % teaspoon or more Tabasco 
sauce 

1 tablespoon Worcestershire 
sauce 

Salt and freshly ground 
pepper to. taste. • 

Combine all the ingredients 
in a mixing bowl and blend 
wtriL ... 

V.' Tieldr About' one' and^ aafr " 

half cups. 



Construction in metal by Deborah 
Aguado is only a lew inches high . 


tensing. You’re getting a bit 
dizzy. You're even getting a 
little angry and excited. Goad 
heavens, what is going on? 

Then a visitor to the gallery 
remarks on how soothing the 
works are. And you begin to 
wonder. . . . 

Is there something in the 


nature of the human eye that 
permits it to abstract all form 
into quintessential pattern? 
And then feed into that es- 
sence, the emotional freight 
we all carry around with us? 
It’s worth musing over. 

Debra Rapoport is only 
peripherally included in the 


show. There are a few pieces 
—miniatures for an artisan 
who creates walk-through en- 
vironments — hanging in the 
small back gallery. 

Her works are minutiae of 
wallpaper, tissue paper, pos- 
tage stamps, film strips, cord, 
thread, string and baling 
'wire, contained within each 
other, or set on surfaces 
that are set on other surfaces 
. . . forms upon forms, forms, 
within forms. 

It reminds one somehow of 
a precocious child playing 
artfully with bits out of a 
scrapbag. It is almost pretty, 
but It does not quite work. 

No matter. The point about 
these three Deborahs, who 
can be seen at the Hadler 
Galleries, 35 East 20th Street, 
through Saturday, is that 
they are, in their very 
distinctive ways, making 
some attempt at investigating 
appearance and reality 1 . 

And the relation between 
appearance and reality is a 
question that has been con- 
cerning people for a very 
long time. 


-FOODS of all nations from the corners of the earths 


|J- rar frhA * 

fTY'HVE' CE 










V GSb 


•111.1 ni- !j. CHI Mv 






JUCTOW JflOUKPWf SMOKEHOUSE 

THE FASHION CENTER • Para.mus, NJ. THE MALL *Sh ortHUIs! Nj! 

GIMBELS EAST • 86th SL & Lexington Ave., New York N Y 
ROUTE 202- Flemings, NJ. . ROUTE 202^^ NJ. 


Price & Pride Present 

SUPER NTS 

FOR SAVINGS YOU CAN SEE! 



Each of these advertised items -is "re- 
quired to be readily available for sale 
at or ’below the advertised price in 
each A&P store, except as specifically 
noted in this ad. 7 


BEEF LOIN-BONE-IN 




OUR BUTCHER S PLEDGE 


We prortiiseio always pack the bet- 
ter side of every cut down. If you like 
the side you see in the store, You’ll 
love what you see at home. 


One More Reason lo Shop ASP 


porterhouse 

Steaks 

locluitaat-® 098 

I 5 ® 



Tailless Porterhouse Steak » 1 . 99 



Jane Parker 
Apple Pie 


FRESH, GOLDEN, TENDER 

Sweet Com 

fi O@0 SALAD FAVORITE 

u«r.o9 PhorMf 

GREEN OR • 

Yellow Squash 

3^1.00 tinerry 

CLEANED & WASHED 

fresh Spinach 

^ 4g , Tomatoes 

INDIAN RIVER-WHITE 

Grapefruit 

4.99* jpi f « VUG : 

TEXAS-NEW CROP • 

x OO 

Yellow Onions 



Regular 8“ Size 


79 c 


Jane Parker 
Mini Donuts 

. Any Variety 


te s \ Roast 

\ggpM BCCf 

Sliced To Order 


Duncan 
Cake Mixes 


Any Layer Variety 



half 

pound 


r 9 


I8Vgz. 


59 c 


Wilton, ffldgefW^O^w^l^fef^k, 5 ^^ STt* !!?’ RBMdlf ' B ** con ' Artf,ur,hur * Southeast and Stamford, Greenwich, Darien, Georgetown, New Canaan, ^ 

wunn, raageneia, via t>r*emvich, Norwalk, Conn. Not raapontlbla tor typographical ttrare. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO UNIT QUANTITIES. ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE ARE NOT AVAILABLE IN CASE LOTfJ 




• J’kOt 3^Ail a W>.W.V. 







By FRANCES CERRA 


In New Jersey, Connecticut 
and 47 other states in the 
country, it is possible to open 
■ the Yellow Pages, look at the 
listings of dentists and find a 
specialist like an orthodontist 
or a dental surgeon. But open 
the Yellow Pages for any part 
of New York States, with the 
exception of the area around 
Binghamton, and it is Impos- 
sible to tell the general prac- 
titioners from the specialists. 

The reason for this is that 
all of the local dental societies 
in the state, with the excep- 
tion of the one near Bing- 
hamton, have not allowed 
dentists to list, with their 

• names, a line reading: “Prac- 
tice limited to. . . 

This limitation by die pro- 
fessional societies actually 
has the backing of the State 
Board of Regents and die 
State Board of Dentistry, 
which have interpreted state 
laws against advertising by 
dentists to include such list- 
ings. 

But, in a seeming contra- 
diction, neither of those 
hoards has moved against 
the Binghamton dentists, ap- 
parently because no com- 
plaint has been lodged. As 
a result, to eliminate the 
loophole, the board of gover- 
nors of the Dental Society 
of the State of New York 
recently proposed an amend- 
ment to the society's code 
of ethics that would make 
«uch listings a breach of 
ethics everywhere in the 
ctate. 

The 13,500 members of the 
lociety will vote on the 
amendment next month, and 
two- thirds of them are need- 
ed for approval. 

But the proposal comes 
at a time of widespread at- 
tack on all kinds of profes- 
' sional restrictions against ad- 
vertising. among them a suit 
by Dr. Joan Staker, a Say- 
ville. L.I., orthodontist. Last 
month. Dr. Staker went to 
Federal District Court in 
Brooklyn on Constitutional 
and antitrust grounds to es- 
tablish her right, to list her 
specialty in the Yellow Pages. 

Dr. Seymour Nash, execu- 
tive director of the Dental 
Society of the State of New 
York, said that most on the 
board of governors are 
against listing of specialties 
because it could “lead to 
abuses like self-diagnosis by 
the patient, and possibly 
treatment by a specialist for 
something that is not neces- 
sary.” 

Dr. Nash conceded that 
the present system, in which 
patients normally get to a 
specialist only upon the re- 
ferral of a general practition- 
er. holds the potential for 
fee-splitting, which is illegal 
for dentists and doctors. But 
he emphasized that he did 
not believe any such prac- 
tices were common. 

To Peter Shuck, a lawyer 
for Consumers Union, the 
prohibition against dentists 
listing their specialties “is 
one more example of how 
professions use their control 
over information to reduce 

• the ability of consumers to 
\ behave rationally in the 
' market place.” 

Consumers Union has filed 
two suits seeking to overturn 
such restrictions. 

Consumer Week 

Did you ever wish you 
could take a professional 
consumer advocate along 
■with you when you go to 
the supermarket? The next 
best thing will be possible 
. on April 29. when employees 
of the New York City Depart- 
ment of Consumer Affairs 
will conduct guided tours of 
two Manhattan supermarkets 
as part of what Mayor Beame 
has officially designated as 
Consumer Week in the city. 

The tours will be conducted 
from 1 1 A.M. to 2 P.M. Any- 
one who wishes to go along 
should call 566-0094. 

The highlight of Consumer 
Week, according to the de- 
partment. will be an all-day 
conference at the New York 
Sheraton on April 27. which 
will feature a host of con- 
sumer, government and busi- 


ness leaders. Among them 
will be Alfred Kahn, chair- 
man of the New York Stste 
Public Service Commission, 
Betty Furness, consumer re- 
porter on WMBC-TV. John 
Whitney, president of Super- 
markets General Corpora- 
tion. owner of Pathmark Su- 
permarkets and Felix G. Ro- 
hatyn, chairman of the Emer- 
gency Financial Control 
Board. 

There will be morning and 
afternoon workshops on the 
following topics: new direc- 
tions in providing legal serv- 
ices; computerized credit and 

banking; food issues; govern- 
ment regulation; energy and 
public utilities; the advertis- 
ing. design and safety of 
products, and the Federal re- 
sponse to consumer prob- 
lems. There will also be a 
luncheon with keynote 
speeches by Miss Furness 
and Mr. Rohatyn. 

Admission to the confer- 
ence. including lunch, is 
S12.50. except for students 
who may attend for S2.50, 
not including lunch. Persons 
who wish to attend must 
pre-register by writing to 
Jane Katz at the Department 
of Consumer Affairs, 80 La- 
fayette Street. New York. 
N.Y. 10013. 

On April 30. the depart- 
ment will conduct a work- 
shop at 10 A.M. on consumer 
abuses aimed at children. At 
1 P.M. the same day. there 
will be a workshop for the 
elderly on coping with rising 
prices. Persons wishing to 
attend either session should 
send a self - addressed. 

stamped envelope to Lilly 
Bruck. at the department. 
There is no charge fer either 
workshop. 

New Matches 

As one inveterate smoker 
pointed out. the new-fangled 
book matches that are about 
to hit the marketplace won’t 
be very popular with mothers 
trying to light the candles 
on a birthday cake, with 
campers starting fires or 
with smokers who let their 
matches burn down before 
lighting up so they don’t 
have to inhale any sulfur 
fumes. 

For people concerned about 
fire safety, however, the new 
matches that the Diamond 
International Corp. is putting 
into production are a wel- 
come change. For two years, 
the United States Consumer 
Product Safety' Commission 
has been working to develop f. 
safety standard for matches 
designed to reduce the num- 
ber of deaths and injuries as- 
sociated with their use. The 
Commission estimates that 
during 1975. 9.500 people 
required hospital emergency- : 
room treatments for match- j 
related injuries. Among the i 
causes of the injuries were 
matches dropped on clothing I 
or home furnishings which | 
failed to extinguish before j 
starting a fire and children 
playing with them. 

The commission has now 
proposed a standard for book 
matches calling for a match- 
book that is child resistant 
in that It requires two or 
more sequential motions to 
open, or more than a certain 
amount of strength. The pro- 
posal also calls for matches 
that self-extinguish within 13 
seconds rather than the 23 
that most matches now re- 
quire. thus the problem for 
campers, birthday - candle 
lighters, and so forth — and 
that have a striker on the 
back, among other tilings, i 

The new Diamond match, I 
trademarked “StopLite.” e. r - ! 
sen daily meets the proposed I 
commission standard except 
for the child-resistant fea- ! 
lure, according to a company j 
spokesman. The company, I 
the largest match-book mak- ] 
er in the country, is switch- | 
ing its entire production to ! 
the new kind of match; broad | 
penetration of consumer mar- : 
kets is expected by fall. The j 
spokesman said the new kind 
of match will be somewhat : 
more expensive than the old 
kind. i 


KEY FOOD EXTRA SAVINGS 

Jpy . . KEY Quality 

Liquid Tnma 

Detergent 


Progresso 

Sauces 


Del Monte 

Solid White 70Z 

Tuna 

KEY Quaiity 
Bartlett 29 02 

Pears “ 

Glad 

Lawn pkq 

Bags 


49* 

59* 


Round Tomatoes 
Sweet Potatoes 


303 

SIZE 

CANS 


KEY Quality 

Sliced Beets or Carrots 
Mixed Vegetables 
Whole White Potatoes 
Green Beans French or Cut 



'SAVE t 


SAVE- 


ASS 


with Coupon on Pago 


PEPPERIDGE 

LAYER CAKES 

8 F 99 * 

MINUTE MAID 

Orange Juice 

2 i& 55 ‘v 53 * 


U.S.D.A, Choice Beef 

Chuck 


c U h S o?ce)U.S.D.A. Choice Beef Loin 


er [Sirloin $ 12 ! 


703 $1 49 

PKG I 


AUNT JEMIMA _ _ . 

Waffles Wl 5 5 4 

CHEESE OR SAUSAGE _ _ . 

John’s Pizza ’AS 89* 

GORTON S * . AQ 

Shrimp Scampi 23 1 49 

PEAS 3 CARROTS 
CUT CORN or CUT BEANS 

Key Vegetables 8 £y53* 

Key Spinach 

5 $ 4 LEAF 
lOOZ.^ H or 
PKGS. ■ CHOPPED 


,10 02 . 

1 PKGS. 


LEAF 

or 

CHOPPED 


M 69 * 

Boneless Breasts 

Chicken 
Cutlets 
$4 89 

LB. I 

Chuck 

Chopped 

astr Q 

2r L 5ihE© 5^ lb. 



teaks 


WE DO NOT REMOVE the fillet 
mignon portion from the sirloin steak 

Porterhouse $ 45Q 

Steaks 1, 


LB. 


Whole or Half $ 

Loins of Pork lb. 


29 KEY Quality 

Franks pkg'. 


T-Bone 

Steaks 

99*23 


*1 


SroqciW 


/) USDA ? 

>j ( CHOICE jU.S.D. A. Choice. ..Boneless. ..Beef 


mmi 


BREYER’S 

ICE CREAM 

$ 4 29 




29 


HALF 

GALLON 


ALL 

FLAVORS 


BREYER S ..ALL FLAVORS 

Yogurt 3 $ 1 00 

CRACKER BARREL...KRAFT 

Sharp Cheddar WEDGE 95^ 

NON DAIRY DRESSING 

King Sour c$£. 49 c 

NON DAIRY MARGARINE 
Mazda UNSALTED PKG 65^ 
MINUTE MAID HALF 

Orange Juice 85^69® 


Top or Bottom Round or Shoulder 

Top Sirloin or £ 4 30 Boneless Chuck 

Rump Round m* | > Pot Roast 


LB. 


. *1 


idrooettf 


Large 88 Size Navel 

Oranges 


Ribier Grapes Chilean 1 . 79 $ a 
Eggplants K, 3u.*1“ 

Zucchini IS 3 lbs. $ 1 00 jet g* m* 

Cucumbers && 7 tor s 1°° 

Oranges B3 8 1 2 for $ 1 00 FOR M 

Grapefruit SST 8 tor $ 1 00 T Ama f# 

Anjou Pears lb 39* 1 
Red Apples Et: lb 39* j* $ afj 
Pineapples & e*. 69* FOB ■ |j 


| 

v ^ Only in siOMSWlthseTVice^ 

Lean Sliced * j 9 q 

Boiled Ham v, lb. 1 

Bologna or 

Liverwurst KSsher : ! lb. 59 4 / 
T urkey RollSMSS ■„ lb. 9 9 * > 
Cole SlawSXmy lb. 49® ! 
Jarlsberg^SceLE $ 1 99 j 
. Imp. FontinaK; ! p* e Lg $ 1 99 \ 


Grapefruit 

Large 32 Size Florida 

5 ~ $ 1 00 




Florida 

Juice 


Carton 3 or 4 



i Glad 

Lawn Bags 

? 1 39 



^ — ■ W -mm WITH I 

pKC. ■ THIS I 

10 ■ COUPON « 

Without Coupon *1.69 j 


Lipton 

Tea Bags. 

99 c 


■Mp HA GOOD AT KEY FOOD 

1C0UP THRU APRIL 24 1976 

LIMIT ONE COUPON PER FAMILY 


>7 this 

lOO COL 

Without Coupon *1.34 
MFRA GOOD AT KEY FOOD 

COUP THRU APRIL 2A 1 376 

LIMIT ONE COUPON PER FAMILY 


WTTH , 
THIS I 
COUPON j 


HP 1 O^OFF 

^“"“THE REGULAR PRICE WITH COUPON 
Package. 15 

Large Garbage 

Glad Bags 

MFRA GOOD AT KEY FOOD 

roup thru Apffl L 24.1 s ?s 

UUUr LIMIT ONE COUPON PER FAMILY 



T—’^THE REGULAR PftCEW 
* 2PouodGt 

! Maxweft.F 

i Goff© 

I MFRA GOOpATffl'f 

I COUP LIMIT ONe'cOUPONFi 


12 


GOOD AT KEY FOOD 


THE REGULAR PRICE WITH COUPON r**— ^ 

16 Ounce Conf. , 

Woolite ! 

Cold Water Wash * 

fS,,D * mfbb 


3 ) 1 O^OFF (| 

THE REGULAR PRICE YflTH COUPON I 

Package 20 I 

Bounce ! 


25 


to 


HE REGULAR PRICE W 

King Size 84 Ou 

KEY Out 


.1 U OFF 1 it OFF I v OFF XO'OFF » 1 VC \ 

* THE REGULAR PRICE WITH COUPON THE REGULAR PRICE WITH COUPON J^S^THE REGULAR PRICE YflTH CXIUPON l^i-^THE REGULAR PRICE WTIH COUPON REGULAR PWCEJ W 1 

j 16 Ounce Package 1 16 Ounce Conf. f Package 20 | 72 Ounce Package | King Size 84 Ou ^ 

i Hebrew National Franks' J Woolite i Bounce j Top Choice J KEY Quj u 

^mfrr goodatkeyfood , M ,_. Cold Water Wash J Fabric Softener Country style Dog Food { Laundry DeK'dii 

l COUP LWir ^ U col^ON - Per ! ’f 6 ama.y • 1 COUP ™ ^FnL E 2^p76 ! mup TtS& D ^ K L^/?976 l MFRA |MFR8 ™rl?ap«^/ ‘ 

1 UMCLP25 SWKS fe'UMftL J. 2— — w/R_ON_E COUPON J coup ^ljmit S piral^ pehYaajly _ Jcgup__ E . 

Prices effective Monday-Saturday, April 1 9-24,1 976 We reserve the right to limit on sale items. Items offered for sale not available in • i, 

■ Not responsible for typographical errors. Meat, Produce & Deli at stores with items a 


Laundry Deh'diiH 


Prices effective Monday-Saturday, April 19-24,1976 


Do your best shopping 

with the Food Day 
feature of 

The NewYorklimes 


If you’re looking for better ways to stretch your dollai 
let The Times Food Day features be your guide. 

Every Wednesday, these special food pages carry 
the advertising of many of the big food stores in y?; 
area. They offer you a big selection of best- . 
food buys and plenty of Those money- saving coupor^ 

And remember: Every Wednesday, Food Day . fj 
brings Craig Claiborne's weekday food recipes and J 
advice, Frank d. Prial's “Wine Talk” column, the l : . ='■' ^ 

“Consumer Notes” column and other stories ! . ' 
about food. 

So for better shopping, eating and entertaining ^ 
every week, take the time— make the time— to read 
the Food Day feature ... 

Every Wednesday in 

Slje Jfeto Work Siines ; 














THE NEW YORK T2MES , IVSDNESD* Y, APRIL 21, 1978 


people 


[savT 


ferity 


owts or Ca. 

»*•** Vegetables rots 
H»ia« White Pa!!. 
HgwBeans ^ 


Jecisldn- made : her husband, John, the former 
'Attorney General, have been 
l-SSy separated since 1973. A re- 

3uhe -. P 0 ^; m the May issue of Mc- 
p Xjfc at’^jrrec- ".Call's magazine describes 
i^Sak Diego.”- Mrs. Mitchell as nearly iso- 
fcf.fonner Har- ; Jated, shunning the telephone 
(gist, . a leading - and with no visits from her 
tbft'-drug-. LSD- -> husband or her- equally es- 
, h^-j«rved a. ^ranged 14-year-old daughter, 
-ytOT. ^sentence Marty. Her only regular 
bglSv^vana. - visitor is Jay Jennings, her 
a§ appealed the 28-year-old son by a previous 
Eton of his pa- carriage, who is research as- 


an LSD Advocate , Paroled 


tion of his pa- carnage, who is research as- 

fhe- board, vot- sistant for the Senate. In- ‘ Airways, but is not allowed 

$n ^tfasbrng^on, tenj^l Security Subconunit- to leave the airport area, 

reason farther, tee.' “Mora seems in ' relative- • 

luiced to prison iy good spirits,’* he said Barry Brunette of Stafford 
Escaped- tar^I- -yesterday, "bur she seems to Springs, Conn., Is expected 

er to Afgfiai^- ■ have withdrawn a bit to fight to get possession today of 

* was/. arrested this by herself.” the $10,000 state lottery 

/to" the United • prize he won last fall, but 

IL^aiy gained When Prmceton University' could not collect. He was 17 
CidvlsIi®^youDg - posted the admissions Jist : - years old, and the cotnmis- 
Sela, -turn oh' for the Class of sion that runs the lottery re- 

1980. one-of the. names was fused to award the - money 

Hilary Margaret Bok, daugh- because ticket purchasers are 
ter of -Harvard’s president required by law to be 18 or 
Derek C. Bok. Miss Bok has over. Yesterday. Gov. Ella T. 
been -preceded gt Princeton Grasso signed a bill that per- 
by.hdr cousin. Hfflary Abi- mits Mr. Brunelle to be paid,. 


an actress, was born .of a 
World War TI romance while 
Mr. Tate was a naval attache 
assigned to Moscow- 
Asked if she would see Mr. 
Tate, who lives in B range. 
Park, Fla., the 64-year-old 
character and comic actress 
said, ■ “Who knows? He has 
his family and I have mine.” 
She added that she looked 
forward to meeting her son- 
in-law, who flies to Moscow- 
frequently for Pan American 


STATE FACES LOSS mast * f trative personnel. ^ 11 ^ * **g ■ u^n rd JdCstvG IU " 

v<| ■ f m AT? 'BrniTni A F Dftimc An official of tpe State t>e- The operating budget for the ' ■ V ^ \ 

" Uf IvLElM 1 Ail rtl-WJyli of Mental Hygiene Department of Mental Hygiene' NEW’DELHi April 20 (UPI>-AfcJL. 

-*• VAWVA in Albany said yesterday that is $913,280,000. Dr. Kolb said 'An Indian patrol was Fired 

w nn phsntM in th* l Federal requirements conflicted the agency had requested yesterday by Bangladesh 

S-Sf ! FedBrai «* n °» of 10 >T"V" c ^% ior0 * --i^ c « rc si s ri „“t a w n oS 

. • I. Decentralizing Centers the department calling for an rent fiscal year but instead i t he Foreign Ministry said to 

' emphasis on local care rather had its funds cut 2 percent dav. 

Insrh^ in k!" t kmw -' jnstitutiopri treatment. by the Legislature. The ministry said the Indian 

mg his plans to be the first gy GEORGE GOODMAN Jr. A five-year plan^ which Dr. Alcohol treatment was in- Government had lodged & ■ 


ltina ln M r,i4M ItS lUDUS cut x. percent. oav. 

hi! Sc Wh!* (STi ■ than institutional treatment. by the Legislature. The ministry said the Indian 

mg his plans to be the first gy GEORGE GOODMAN Jr. ,, A fivoywr plan, which Dr. Alcohol treatment was in- Government had lodged x ■ 
Spanish ruler to visit Amerira - -♦-*», rien»rtrru>nt nf . ?**“ has been approved eluded under the department’s “strong protest against the um JltS 

since Columbus claimed it fr~ by P* H ^ !t ^-> Educa ‘ ae « is * he ***** adding Sll-mil- provoked firing" and had asked.., 

spam, will be in Washington -— J may lose size t um and Welfare officials, now lion in operating costs to the Bangladesh "to institute an ini- ' 

June 2-3 and will meet with million in Federal reimburse- commits the state to reducing current budget. mediate inquiry into the in-’’ ’ - 

President Ford. His visit to merits unless, the Federal half the population in its “Unquestionably, the- state’s ctdenL” 

the New World will begin, as Government agrees to modify 20 developmental centers budget will make this task The shooting occurred at the* - --- 

previously announced. May [ts nolicies for treatine throu 8 hout the state by 1981. more difficult, since it will re- border between Bangladesh and 

3Q in the Dominican Republic. Jr ’ *rr f ThsamiMi quire the reallocation of exist- the Indian state of Meehalaya^ i. 


SAVE, 


g lfr-jan.ap- 
OT8i i an 
prisdp be 
otallyre- 
w - $e 

feidtr'apycir- 
.TOcate the ase 

who has 
Mjemo therapy 
jfmca form of 
bospa- 
l v 5brgery.'fol- 
Nbd- operation, 
k" r drtn'bfdken 
fer apBEDhent 
r^ewaed- 
no months-at 
ring Institute 
tearch, had a 
ttion for a 
l&$eIow.t& 

V&bone mar-. 
KeS ^Saff.sdf- 
fore's of^tfe 


According to a 
newsweekly, the 


king's 7-year-old son. Prince [Hygiene. 


• e P uhnc - th e mentally retarded accord- The Budget 9 uire reallocation of exist- the Indian state of Meghalaya^ i. 

me mentany retaraeo. acewo s mg resources, but the budget The ministry said the Indian^' 

Madnd mg to or. Lawrence C. noib, *rh, e de-mslitutional policy will not be used as an excuse border security force directoh 1,T 
Spanish State Commissioner of Mental and current budget curtail- for maintaining the status quo,- and two other' officials werfe'*'* 


Felipe, was upset when be "■•This loss would seriously ** employment, some of which Locally, administrative con- where ~an Indian patrol party- 
was not invited to a school- .. "can be accomplished through solidation plans would involve had been- fired on earlier by IT -- 

raate’R party. When Queen “ normal attrition. Dr. Kolb stat- Northeast Nassau, and Kings Bangladesh security forces. 

Sofia telephoned the party- afforded the mttitally retarded ^ but he added that there Park, Hoch and Pilgrim and “During this visit Asdiwajlf Me . 


ments will result in reductions!" Dr. Kolb said. 


visiting a spot in Meghalaya. 


aged 57, and 


1980’ one -of the.' names was 
Hilary Margaret Bok, daugh- 
ter of -Harvard’s president 
Derek C. Bok. Miss Bok has 
been preceded at Princeton 
by her cousin, Hfflary Abi- 
gail Bok, a senior, who is the 
daughter of Dr. Bole’s older, 
brother. Beta P. -Bok of Los 
Angeles. Other names on 
yesterday’s list included 
Nancy White, daughter of 
Justice Byron R. White of the 
. Supreme Court and John 
Andbindtiss, son of Louis 
Auchincknat, the author. 

• 

hi Moscow, Zoya Fyodo- 
rova picked up her three- 
month exit visa yesterday, 
paying the normal fee of 
$344. She said she hoped to 
leave for Stamford, Conn., 
April 28, two weeks ahead of ! 
the expected birth of a grand- 
child. The Soviet' actress’s . 
daughter, Viktorfya, married ; 
an American airline pilot, 
Fred Pouy, while visiting in 
this country with her father, 
Jackson R. Tate, & retired 
admiral. The daughter, .also 


col," the queen was reported Avenue of the Americas, 
as saying, • adding that she [ Dr. Kolb said the sti 


lericas. ence. neither Dr. Kolb nor Dr. considering consolidating the try said. “A s a result of this; ' 

the state has Kevin M. Cahill, special assis- J. N. Adam Development Cen- unprovoked shooting a member^ 





TARGET ■ is wilMngtp sit down andnego-1 

TRIKERS A large' group of pickets at 

T m ' about ‘ 6:30 AM. blocked en- 

“ D 0 11 6 ■ trance lanes to the AC Transit 

a . . ^.yorke^ Terminal> arrival - departure 

Steaks bv P9 iat £ or buses rtat carry about 

** **" displavs of 20,000 cesnmuters to and from 

* ‘ --oburban bus Oakland, Berkeley and other 

a Hall-.. . . East Bay cities. 

v circled Tn A few pickets were maced 

w other by state police, and all the 

.Mia^xos5 the pickets left the state-owned 
at woiit.. terminal by 7:30 AM. ‘ ' 


T-Bone 


feitmn ks 


Martin Rosengarten. President. ShopweH, Inc.' 
400 WabwiAue. Bronx. N.Y. 10454 

♦DoiryDepf 

Tropicana \ 
Orange Juice I 

K r , QQ<: I 


■ — ' ‘ - --Jburbar 

5 QQcfe 


Ught n Lively ’ ^ 

Yogurt 

Muenster Cheese 


'>42 9 


„ 29 * 

D.IU. ‘^69* 


Mrs. Gordon, 

I agree with you! 

In your letter last week, you said we weren’t 100% perfect yet . . . and I agree with you. 
But we’re getting better every day in every way. With new ideas and services to help our 
customers spend less and get more for the best . . . when they learn to ShopweU. Did you 
know that the only bee! we sell is US DA Choice . . ."the choicest of the choice.” And 
that in our produce departments you always "pick ’em yourself*. . . so you buy only what 
you want and only as much as you want. We're also proud of our "no questions asked” 
money-back guarantee ... on every single item we sell! And how about our cleaner, 
brighter stores . . . and most importantly how our super people are getting more super. 
Mrs. Gordon, I know we’re not perfect yet ... but l*m working day and night to make it 
happen. And 1 want to keep hearing horn you ... so 1 know exactly what you want us to 
do to make ShopweU perfect. 100% . . . For nobody but you! 

f Quaii-fed U.S.DA Choice Boneless Beef Bottom 

Round Roast I 



Muenster uneese « xoa 
ffiSK Cream Cheese 7 ks ,! <s89‘ 

J& fis-Fgotiate Now)'* It also accused • Delicatessen Dept • 

wouldhb^.:' 5a n Francisco' Board, of S- “J m~' m m •*. '- 

S so ?u^5^^rs [Boiled HamV 

“during responsibility to- set | - • ■ ' ■ ' - - 'ffik 

by collective -bargain- j • • 


USDA 

CHOICE 


or 

Shoulder 

Roast 


Your 

Choice 




19 





Salami or Bologna 
Arrrer. Cheese . v jss . 
Chicken Roll AUWhitiMui Kib. 
Chopped Liver ftesWwm Vjft. 

• Frozen Foods • 


Coffee Cake 


Top Round Roast “ts 
Flank Steak r^ts 
Sirloin tip Roast £ 
Eye Round Roast “"S; 
Beef Chuck Roast ts 


, S 1 W 

.’1" 

.‘I 39 

.’I 59 

, S 1 M 


Beef Chuck Roast 
Chuck Roast 
Beef Rump Roast 
London Broil Bml 
Sirloin Tip Steak 


Beef Boneless 
C«VK Cut 


Boneless Beef 
Round 


, s 1 39 

J1 49 

J1 33 

Ji 89 

JV 9 


U.S. Choice — Genuine American Grown 

Lamb Chops 

Shoulder $^59 

fiQ4 • - I f CHOU 

Combination it,. H 



WMl 

PmmSRIir 


Veal-Parmhjana w*ravy. Beef Slices. 

Banquet wTi^uyWGnv. 2 pit,, 5 S 
ShopweU Cut Corn ’^.65* 
Brussels Sprouts sJS '^39‘ 
Cheese Ravioli Sudani *£89^ 
Aunt Jemima Waffles ’"^59 e 

• Bakery Dept • 

• Bakery Mm Start Uo<l, End Sal.* 


Cinnamon Loaf 

Shopweli 7 Qt 

I2oz. pkg. • ^ 


Shoulder Steak BondassM R>. 
Chuck Filet Steak Baulas b. 
Beef Cube Steak 
Ground Beef Round Fresh ft. 


USDA | 
CHOICE 


•A; cKidTen^east - k 79« 

* ' Turkey Loaf «99* 

ft. I Ren's Turkey Ham or ■ . 

« 1 » Turkey Pastrami 8 4 s 1 


bol$129 

oka. I 



i CAROLINA 

"IkP ^^■0?0(^!|o'N utS || 


- f VV 


sK '• .'Yi w' 

v,r 




far foxglove, leopard’s 
he^’a bill, fleabane, butterfly 
■ "• ■■*^’*4 pwtxidgeberry, larkspur, dragon,’* 
Tt. dogwood and horse chestnut. 

^ j—frflT tlpT T^ ~P flgr »«c in ■ Section 2- of the 


V" r Jk. ugvw *** . — — _ 

^ es . . . every Sunday - . - for seasonal 
articles and advice about what you 
[d be' doing: “Around tie Garden.” 
. '^n Pages. Every Sunday- Section 2 of 


4 - 


Walnut Ring Shopwsii pkg- 
PoundOake •, 

"V Health & Beauty Aids • 

( Right Guard 

Deodorant 

Regular 7 oz. |>Qa 
or »««>■ 

V Prouder « n . 


13 0E.5TW* 
nko. ■ 


Regular 

or 

Powder 


Q-Tips Cotton Swabs ^'^48* 





Fine 

Bavarian 

China 


y/,1 

' 


Sugar Bowl 

ONLY 


Chock Full o’ Nuts Coffee s -l 49 
Kleenex Facial Tissues ^ s45* 
Hecker^s Unbleached Flour ^79^ 
Ajax Cleanser . 5^ $ 1°° 

Tuna ^SSM 7 s 66* Kidney Beans .■•a 3^89* 
Ultra IV ! *’Sd 1 §s ^74* Kitty Cat ^^32 5 8 =s98‘ : 
Miracle Whip **««**, ' t98* Dressings -^*"£ i£44* 
Carolina Rice ^ , ». te 69‘ Tomatoes ’ 11 ’ »49* 

Soups "■•"ijaMs ’“^39* Ajax Laundry Detergent 3 ft ' ’iSi 5 ! 19 

ShopweU ' M /|x Shop-Mor Cut ^ ; AFj, 

Applesauce 'VtT Green Beans 5 


Chidcwi onhsSBa-Wldts 7ac.CCt 
SoW Picked in OH or Water canyU. 


/ Badwom Tissues 5*5. d"7At 
2 Ply-Assorted Cotas 4. ntts * “ 

! Whip 's98* 

a Rice " . !B te 69‘ 

Projyesso — Lartfl • Tomato 1 lb. 4 dlOQ( 
Macaroni and Bean 'canw^ 


SaiaiMtassihg 


l' no w^r^wr 

- ONLY 

^ Start Your Set Today 
See Display in Our Store 


Shopwefl ' M /|x 

Applesauce 

Learn to 


0 ,Daitch.. 

NKfNVdl 



• Produce Dept • 
Sunkist Seedless 


auiuusi oeeaiesi ■f* - 

Navel Oranges 

19 Si 00 K 

. 14( JL ■ Man i 


Fresh Lemons ™ ,B a- 5^44*?-’ 
Red Rome Apples"^’ J9% 
Southern Yams 2, *39^ 
D’Anjou Pears ,,34?;^ 

Escarole or nA .^S 
Green Squash ib 47 ? 

Cut horn Fancy Young Poikets 

Roasting Pork 

-Fresh 

Shoulder ' #llC 

Bone-ln / ^ 


Pork Chops BaJas 

Pnrk Rl ittc Smoked amwless 

1 L/l rv LJULlO SnouMer (Water Added) 


[ - N»« En^and Cure Boneless 

Corned Beef 

l ji* cS k b .89 t £ UBDA 


Dubuque Cold Cuts frs*1*T! 
F ranks S .89* 

f Checkerboard Boneless \ ' ; .”" i 


Turkey Roast 

60% vKMea 3 lb. 19 

2 bs. 10oi Turkey Pkg. ^ ^ ~ 

l 6 oe. Gravy lb. -a 


m nm 

Catch of the Week! 


Boston Mackerel 
Fresh Shad 
Whiting Fillets 


Fiesh 

Pan Ready • lb, 

Ran Ready -lb 


'Coupon 0 " _ - Coupon 

Spend Ov Less 

Toward the purcluse of one box of 100 

Red Rose Tea Bags 


COUPON GOOD THROUGH 
. SATURDAY NIGHT. APRIL 24 
Limit One Coupon per Family 


jmnvaL 


Mir. Mrt 

°— Spend 15 * Less °S* 

■ Toward the purchase of I qf. 1 oz. plastic bottle 

Final Touch 
Fabric Softener 


COUPON GOOD THROUGH 
SATURDAY NIGHT. APRIL 24 
Limit One Coupon per Family 


sHOPwai 


^ Spend 8 C Less c t 

Toward the purduse of one 10 oz. box of 

Cheerios Cereal 


COUPON GOOD .THROUGH 
SATURDAY NIGHT. APRIL 24 

Limit One Coupon per Family; 


Sales Start. Monday, ^>ril 19 — End Saturday, April 24 1 * u Limit One Cuupun per 

We Reserve Right to limit Qaentitiet to 3 Sale Unfts. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors. Meat. FUh. Produce. Health & Beauty Aids Available Only at Stores with These Denis 

HOT mum FOR STORES IK TORKTOWN HQ6HTS, . CR0T0M-0K -HUDSON, BRiARCUFF MANOR, BEDFORD HILLS, mm, IH0RNW00D, MOUNT H5C0, MAHOPAC & CONNEOICUT. 















I HA 

1 “We've 


“Wine Sale 

HAROLD BEARAK 


says 

"We've taken the confusion out of buying 
German wines by offering you the best, at a 
price that can't be beat. No steins, no 
schwarzes, no bergs to remember for this 
one— just a couple of short words: 

Bernkastel— (tie world famous Vineyard town on the 
Moselle River. The Doktor vineyards are 
here. 

Bernhard-renowned shipper or German wines 
since 1794. 

Green Label— a crisp, light wine. deKdousty trash with 
a touch of sweetness." 

DEINHARD GREEN LABEL 

goes with everything and everybody. Chill it for dinner or 
even without dinner. Truly luscious. 

S 42 66 case $ 3 95 ^e 


CepdMn 

Macon Villages Blanc '73_ 

Claret 71 

Bourgogne Blanc '74 

Cotes du Rhone '74 

Muscadet *7<t 

Sevre el Maine 


$095* 

O bottle 

SELECTIONS 

bi: case: 3 ca 8cS 

lois lots 
_ 2 99 32.00 29.95 28.50 
_ 2.99 29.95 27.00 24.00 
_ 2.49 27.00 24.00 22.00 
_ 2.49 27 00 24.00 22.00 

_ 2.49 27.00 24.00 


CEP DE VIN SAMPLER $/L£% 

20 bottles — 4 of each of.the above 

Any 6 cases at the 6 case price. 

CALL FOR DELIVERY-— 268-0^00 

Delivery Information — Our trucks cheerfully 
deliver to all five boroughs, Nassau & West- 
chester and throughout N.Y. State. 

Call or write. We will gladly send you our 

monthly ‘‘Notes From The Cellar/^ 

free of charge / 


The Wine Merchants 

Forest Hills Liquor Corp. 

108-09 Queens Blvd. 

Forest Hfifs, New York 113 75 
Telephone: 212-268-0800 


STATE OF NEW lORK 
DEPARTMENT OF 
ENVIRONWENTAL CONSERVATION 
NOTICE OF PUSUC HEARINGS 
PROPOSED REGULATIONS 
’ STATE ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY REVIEW 
DEPARTMENT OF 

“ ENVIRONMENT Ai CONSERVATION 
IMFLEJICNTATWG REGULATIONS 
NotK* n ire, dry v*cn Pul maviren id Sccton 
^ 0 l 13 of A/icle S fEnwpnrawW OuafcTv Revww) 
0 l Re EiMqnmenial Coflseralnn Law, ihe 
D HMifmevP el Enmeniacntal Comtmhon ■>') 
Came a put*c tom mg *o be hcM al [he lobowng ' 
place and tone May S>. 1976 at 1 OD 0 a m . Roam 
106 . SO WN Road, aim ny. Mew Ton 
The pmoh of m* hfwmq is lo otHmn the 
views el al persons, muncwakliei. mgan/aMns. 
CtfiwalMi or igMCKl of Do Slate teqvdng Pie 
•doghon of [he Depa'imem of Enamnunenlal Con- 
srevai-on lequUMms to vi m lemenl the Stale Enw- 
fonmenui OuaMy Renew Act as a retains M 
. Oepanmenf acimbes A»bc<e 6 of me Enmonnien- 
W Conservation Law provides thal any acbon 
whch a Stale pgenev or isu of gave* renew under- 
• QAes Onecily. hards <M for which A rtami I perm), 
actnsa o' orhtrr emmeniefii snal be renewed lot 
Pa iwenMl emunnmrntai anpacts h pie probable 
onjucti may have a efleci on PM erm. 

wmienr. Urn acnon s"a« be the subject ol an *n. 

, vaonmenu) impact staiemanl Part 617 of Title 6 
or the Ofhcui Compilauon of Codes. Rufes and 
. Rcquunons of *w Slate of N«w Yota. wfach was 
adwlod on March 79 . 1976 . a'* regutaoons oJ 
staiewafc aw*cptvMr- Proposed Part 6 i 8 conseu 
Olieguiahoru mar woukt agpiy ro ore Oepartmenr s 
own acoons and those over wtreb r has paisdK- 
bon. 

- A n opportunity to be heard aafl be wren the i 
pubhea' the sniaec I bearing The freanng «e con- | 
hnue unN al persons preserf who wish to be J 
heard have been heard Written statements are en- j 
couraged and al such wrlllen stilemenls received I 
pno* lo 0 > U P<e hearings and oral slpleapnls p«e- ; 
sented al Ihe hearing wi be consul e< pail ot me ] 
Official record. The record at me heareq wfl i 
remain open unlit May ?. 1976 . tor aoddunal wrP- 
ten jUfemenfs which may be sent to Deputy Com- 
rwww Siephen L Gordon. Department of Enw- 
ronmeniaf Conscrvahan. Room 671 . Sd Wo» Road. 
Albany. New Yota I ’233 

Comes ol the proposed requtawms «s be 
avaAabte at pie Departnrenl of Emmonmenfai Con- 
senahon, Room B.’i. SO Weil Road. Albany. New 
Tort l??J 3 . and at toy Tie fporrai Ofhcfti of the 
Department »l w* following locations DEC Regmn 
I Othce. Bretong 40 . SONY of Stony Brook. Stony 
Brook, ttow York II 7 M. DEC Begum S Office. ! ! 
World Trade Cenlw. New York. New York 10047 ; 
DEC Regnm 3 Office, 27 South Pun Comers Road, 
New PiU. New York 12561 . DEC Regmn a Ofkcr. 
50 Won Road. Albany. New York 17733 : DEC 
Reg»n S Othce. Saranac Lave Placid Road. Ray 
Brook. New York t? 9 f 7 . DEC Regmn 6 Othce. 
Slate Office BuAomg. Washington Sheet. 
Watertown. New York 13601 . DEC Regan 7 Of. 
hce. 100 Etawd Dam Drive. NorPi Syracuse. 
New York rare. DEC Region e Office. 6774 Eam 
A von -Lima Road. Avon, New York 14414 . and 
DEC Regmn 9 On ice. M 4 Delaware Avenue. But- 
Wo. New York 14703 

Dated Albany. New York. Apnl 19. 19/6 

DEPARTMENT Qf | 

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVAItON I 
STEPHEN l GORDON j 

Deputy Commissioner J 


POWER AUTHORITY Of THE STATE 
OF WAV YORK 

ASTORIA rjCNCfiATKlO SYATIOM- 
Uf JIT NO. 6 

AOVERTlSEMCktr Fi 'At PROPOSALS 
FOR THE 

FURNISHING ;ND DELIVERY 
OF 

FUEL OIL CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS 
CONTRACT NO l>AS-P--lOO 
HEVI5CD APRIL Id.’S 

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS THE POWER 
AUTHORITY OF THE 3IAIC OF MEW YORK 
will rnv;ervw ae.ite.J r'hpijvit for Conn n i Flo 
.<sAS-P-2QiT lor tnn Fuim-J and IX liver v of 

flirt CM Cenlnfudal Pumpr, Icn |h- lygiM 
Genei.iimi] Slnbon Unit N-.> A unlil 1 0 30 a m. 
E-v'tein Oajh-ani Davinm Time on U.iy .’5, 
f 7TC ar the Auinonfv ohi. n. ISlfi floor . Tnr» 
Co'nnum Tower, 1C Ccdijintui^ C-rcl.-. Ttpia 
Yolk, Nnjr York UH}19. .11 «1Mi lim^ and 
jiia-n b-si will bo pubbefy opened aruj road 

aloud 

DnJ-. *’l bn rof ei.Ort lor Ihn Furtnitnnd and 
Oonvery of Furl QJ Cnnlnluii.il Pjmp-, m ac- 
eoidance vnih too B>q.> v] Schedule as sialud 

In C'C-04. 

Comptelo Held rleliverv ol the ■hiuiDmenl wJI 
ho inuiwed September 1. V"<*” 

Orddiro v.»Jf cu imMcd to Amendan Man- 
■iiAiJtiiota. 

Conlnd Documcri*. HYCludiP!] proeosai 
lorniy, Inr im V\c rv m.i/ bo obtained from Huy 
Power AuiMrir/ o» ihij EJ.iie ol Now York. 
Iv'fn Rear. The CdAVwm Toiaer. lOCotunriw: 
Orele. Nave York. Now York 10019. upon Ji>- 
phcalnn and prew,n>>nr Ot toe Ol s:s OO pnr 
initial Mil ot Contracl DdCwncm^, and SIC 00 
pet sel lor additional sets, no part ol wnr:h 
w>H be iWunded Cormacf Documnnls. Inc Hid. 
mg proSosat Iriitns. i« ilu; work mil be on liln. 
m ine Authority □ olKco and bi Ihn plfieos of 

Ihc-Ervji nee's, jton* A Webster Engineering 
COIOtVilfign. New >oi* Opurai iOiii C-nl-yr, 
pne Penn Tffau. New York, tfcvy York I TOO I, 
and may be inspected by porspeenra bidders 
during Office hours. 

Bids must be made and returned in hioticaiw 
m hEC0rdan>;e wim ir.ji ructions containwj m 
lire Inlormaimn lor Bickters. OuHrtintec vnO tte 
roouued lor each ted in an amount ol nol less 
than 20 oeiconi the gross sum b"J. 

Tha ngh| n reserved to meet anv or ail fc>ds. 

GEORGE T berry 
GENERAL manager 
AND CHIEF ENGfMCER 


GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 
requests BIDS f>Qm small business uon- 
ennns lo REPLACE MAJN ROOF f INSTALL 
AKMJIONaL ROOF DRAIN! al Iho US 
Customs Court and federal BuMmq. 2G 
Federal Plaza. n#w >ork. n y. Proi«: No. 
RNY 760W IWimalM co« from $2^.000. 
In 5100.300-) Bidding nnien.il may be iHJ- 
Mined Irom GSA Business Service Center 
Bid Rcom. Mam Floor. 26 Feoornl Plaza. 
Hew York. N Y. I00CT. wtwrc waled bios 
will be received unw 1.30 P.M meal lime at 
Ihe if «e oi Bid Gponmg May 71. 1B?6 
and then publicly opened. 


THE NEW YbRK TIMES , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21. 1976 


WINE TALK 


Qualified Enthusiasm for 75 Bordeaux 


By FRANK J. PHIAL “Those vintages which are 

Each year some of the generally accepted as being 

wire leading shippers pm- ^Vi^s^'^hadl 
pare reports on the most j U |y t0 September rain- 
recent vintage and the cur- f a jj 0 f under 110 millimeters, 

rent market for French wines. Other very good vintages 

Of them all, the best invari- went up to 150 but, even 

ably is the report prepared allowing for the phenomena 

by Peter A. Sichel. the head of local storms, the 229 mflli- 

of the Bordeaux branch of meters of 19 io is a little 

the Sichel wine interests. worrying." 

Mr. Sichel is .the first to Magnficent Color 

cualify enthusiasm for the . ... 

1975 vintage in Bordeaux, He notes, however, that 
already hailed in other quar- since quantity was down— 
ters as the greatest year 40 hectoliters to the hectares 
since 1961. 85 opposed to 56 per hectare 

"Almost certainly, some in 1973 — the wines have the 
very good wines have been, highest natural sugar 


complete ’wines that have 
been made since 1966," Mr. 
Sichel sums them up as “a 


It was a good year in 
Chablis. Mr. Sichel reports: 
‘•Not only did it escape 


1961) " he says, “each had a quality vintage that will re- spring frosts, but also the 

total July to September rain- quire professional selection.” heavy ram and had storms 

faJI of under 110 millimeters. While Bordeaux, because which did so mudi i dama* 
Other very good vintages of its many financial prob- farther Burg y 

went up to 150 but, even Jems in recent years, has two Be^jOlajs). The 8 

allowing for the phenomena to three years's stock on hand, sugar contents g 

of local storms, the 229 milU- Beaujolais Is practically out than have been seal io 

meters of 1975 is a little of wine. Mr. Sichel reoorts. many years, a _ difficult 


meters of 1975 is a little 
worrying." 

Magnficent Color 


of wine. Mr. Sichel reports. 

The 1975 Beaujolais crop 
was the smallest since 1957 
and, hu says, added only sev- 


He notes, however, that months’ requirements at 
since quantity was down — fre current rate of sale. 

40 hectoliters to the hectares nniu mp Hniution; 


mentation and low acidity.'’ 
Should Be Excellent 

While the acid may be 
lower than the growers 
would have preferred, the 


made” he reports, “though 
it would be extraordinary if, 
with the high rainfall of 


4U necrouters io uie netLaics “There is onlv one solution; 5 TV~vI 

as opposed to 56 per hectare R^^mS^e S "<nef should tm out to be 
in 1973— the wines have the Srereis onlv one way of «ce Uen£ * ^ Siche} sa > rs - 

highest natural sugar since tfus—SicreLe prices.” On the C6te d’Or he 

1961 and magnificent color. Q nB , reports, 1975 was a disaster. 

They are high in tannin, . Quality 'Variable with more than double the 

making them extremely dif- 


On the C6te d’Or. he 
reports, 1975 was a disaster, 
with more than double the 


August and September, they ficult to judge while they are 
will reach the standards of still young. Describing the 
being great. 1973’s 35 “probably the most 


A Plpr A orenev Lawyer Testifies j Variable." previously depressed market 

, J-* • r 1 But Beaujolais is once in- in good burgundies, which 

On Lunch With Judge DiLorenzo ^TnS Io 

i soon after the harvest and to invest in burgundies, par- 

u ! that judgment here, at least, ticularly the 1973's. 

By EDITH EVANS ASBURY j was that the 1975 wines were A small 1975 crop in the 

A short lunch in the Pubjlrps said Judge DiLorenzo dia| quite poor. If the high prices Rh6ne will mean increased 

restaurant across the streetinot teil him why he wanted- at the shippers in France find prices for wine from Cdtes- 

from Manhattan Civil Court j t0 meet Mr. Piazza. j their way here, there is sim- du-RhOne, too, Mr. Sichel 

was described over and over N Judse uePh illips! no jusUfication for paying reports. However, the m- 

again in State Supreme Court throw Jight subject) creases m France are not on 

in Brooklyn yesterday at the of the in^rsation between i By comparison. Mr. Sichel the same scale as thme in 

perjury trial of Ross J. DiLoren- ^ piazza and Judge DiLoren-j says, the whites of the Beau- Beaujolais and, since Rhone 

zo, retired judge of Civil Court. z0 ’ jolaus and Macoonais regions wines here never enjoyed the 

But still in dispute at the end ^ e tr j a | i before Supreme! were quite good in 1975, both popularity oE beaujolais in 

of the day was the purpose justice Leon Polsky. on I in quality and quantity. The the United States, the 

of the luncheon meeting. four co^ts 0 f penury broughtl best known of these wines is chances are that it will con- 

There was no disagreement agaiDst j u dge DiLorenzo by the Pouily Fuissfe, but the best tinue to be a viable aiterna- 

about who arranged the lunch Maurice H. Nadjari, the special bargain is the Macon, which five when and if the bcau- 

at the restaurant, at Lafayette state anticorruption prosecutor, is shipped to this country in jolais prices take off again, 

and Franklin Streets, or who wi jj todav at jq aJM. I considerable quantity. as they did in 1972. 

was there. It occurred on Feb. : - ■■ ■ = = = 

6. 1967 after Judge DiLorenzo 

telephoned Judge Arthur De ^ ^ 

a fong-time acquaintance. It 

was attended by these two ■ ' A . .' -Ir j-T ■ 

judges and Anthony Piazza. - •- .^0 rf I *|k- *\ LIWUUM 

a lawyer for the waterfront * a w • — rV/'-. 

Commission who was investi- - ; I ■’•’l I >‘ TYa 

gating alleged underworld acti- i L ~r* Tljlr” ■ .f,, ■ I- . f . . .- 1 

vity on the Brooklyn piers. Tfl • ’.*■ j • | j ^ a mia g*^ ’ | " 

Mr. Piazza, the Waterfront JJB w J \ . . 'm " mmm " 

Commission lawyer, completed _ ULL I 2 \ *' • ^ 

his third day on the stand * quart V r. Jfc-*.- 

yesterday still swearing that -J f; )cw»Q'i i « i ■■■■- ■ . , 

leach store is independently owi 

I “go easy” on the investigation. O , gm m » ■ h m 

| Judge DiLorenzo complained [' M. ' M W M W M M M M ** XI 

? that friends and neighbors of ful . * n IllllV fl ■< 

his were being “harassed" by --I quart ; kwm HIIW ■ Mi 

being subpoenaed for question / 1 ^ w m m m M M U 

Piazz*a te t sUfied VeStlgaCl0^, ^ J | 1/ A I II 

“I told him. they all came \ jKSij " , • M W HLII 

in with their lawyers, 1 treated . r - -MZW W ™ ^ 

i them very nicely, I don't know §■ jjxk MM 

iv.hat they are complaining . ilgjl f#**M Yfl woof M al Hwi 

•jabout,” Mr. Piazza testified. ;^4>JilLQy m AJH| 

{ Mr. Piazza said he had re- j, t ^ “ ■ * * i f^than — 

ported the conversaton to his 
superiors at the Waterfront 
■Commission and suggested that 
he put a tap on the j'udge's 
| telephone and get the conversa- 
jtion repeated on tape. 

The superiors, Joseph Kaitz 
and Stephen Bercik, the two 
commissioners, and William 
Sirignano, executive director. HM||| 

told him to defer action on gffJHK 

Judge DiLorenzo until comple- fi* 1 ™ 

tion of the current investiga- LESS THAN 
tion, Mr. Piazza testified. gffk 

Meanwhile, they told him to 
dictate a memorandum about “ 

the luncheon. A tape of that PULL ^ ^ „ 

memo was played in the court- (Jr * 

of seven men and five women pflBfc a.* i 

listened. ’ u ■ I \essthan j ^ -j- t- 

JudgBb^- 01 ^; 0 ' who has . scoroi 

Sat fa^ed to reach a^d^isiom — 

He 64 insists that he asked ^ ; - y m 

an introduction to Mr. Piazza ^ |k^. Vvl K 1 

to enlist Mr. Piazza’s help in 1 proigrc L/ p* 

screening applications from the !■ 

Brooklyn piers far the Ameri- 

can-Iudian Anti-Discrimination owrutru U)tTt5h 'kM'. - '■ Wn«j f pJr \ 

League. Judge^ ^DiLorenzo, a ^ 

UX 35'dg» De Phillips, now re- ^ 

tired, was also a witness yes- IrQ-'' S' • /f Chignti. 

terday. His recollection of the . : /\ -HALF 

luncheon meeting was in ac- - .. '-.j. / V bauiW 

cord with Mr. Piazza's im most '"x V ' ^ : 

respects. However, he. said he ■ ■■ - \ ‘ Ftftt ' a A 

could not resolve the question MR 

of its purpose. Judge De Phil- _ ^sT 


Thus, he reports, prices in ordinary rainfall and gray, 
the Beaujolais today are sunless days when the water- 
double what they were eight logged grapes rotted on the 
months ago. He u also kinder vines. Buc, he notes, the 
than might be expected re- problems with the 1975 s 
garding quality. He calls it have tended to firm up the 
“variable." previously depressed market 

But Beaujolais Is once in- in good, burgundies, which 
stance where the consumer are rare in hte best of years, 
can make his own judgments So it might be a good time 
soon after the harvest and to invest in burgundies, par- 
that judgment here, at least, ticularly the 1973's. 
was that the 1975 wines were A small 1975 crop m the 


du-RhOne, too, Mr. Sichel 
reports. However, the in- 
creases in France are not on 
the same scale as those in 
Beaujolais and, since RhAne 
wines here never enjoyed the 
popularity oE beaujolais in 
the United States, the 
chances are that it will con- 
tinue to be a viable alterna- 
tive when and if the bcau- 
jolais prices take off again, 
as they did in 1972. 



7 _ 


& 

m 



NEW YORK CITY 
AFRICAN VIOLET 
SOCIETY SHOW 

Sat., Apr. 24, 2 PM to 9 PM 
Sun., Apr. 25, 12 noo»-7 PM 

RBANUSSM 

house rum raSfHu^ 

HFIKNtnOUTS 
a SHPPUB 

FMUII A 

The Horikiltvral Sec. of M.Y. 
128 West 5Stfa Street, H.Y.C 


POWER AUTHORITY OF THE STATE 
OF NEW YORK 

ASTORIA GENERATING STATXMMMT NO. 6 
ADVERTISEMENT FOR PROPOSALS 
FOR IHE 

RlRMSHWG AND DELIVERY OF 
CARBON STEEL VALVES - 3 H AND LARGER 
CONTRACT NO. SAS4>-»4 
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS: THE POWER 
ALITHOftlTY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 
wiB receive sealed proposals lor Contracl Mo. 
SAS-P-3CU «0f Ihe Furnish mq and Delivery ol 
Caroon Sled Valve-*— 3 In and Larger tor ffie 
Asiona GeneraWtg Slamm UnH No. 6 unit 
10‘JO a m Easiern Daylight Saving Tune on 
June 8. 1978 « Ihe Aulhonly s office, lath 
Hoar. The Coliseum To*cr. '0 CtPumDuS Cir- 
cle. New YMT. New York 10019. al which 
time anq place ftds will be poWicty opened 
and reed aloud. 

BWs vWI be received tar me Fumahing and 
Delivery ol Carbon Sleet Values- 3 In. and 
Larger m accordance with the Bidding 
Scnedtde a* staled in SC-04. 

Complete lie Id delivery ot Ihe eompmerff wM 
be 'entered March 1. 1977. 

Bidding anti be restnded lo American Man- 
ufacturers. 

Connect Documents. Indudng proposal 
torms. tor the work may be obtained horn Iho 
Power Authority ol me Stale of New Yon.. 
l?lh lloor. The Coliseum Tower. ID Cafaimbui 
Circle. New Yotk. New York 10019. upon ap- 
plication and prepayment H lee ot W5.00 per 
m.hal set ol Contract Documents, and 510.00 
par set tor additionaJ seta, no part ol winch 
wdi be refunded. Contracl Documeiw. tactad- 
ing prtxwsai torms. tar the work win be on Itte 
a, Ihe Auihcrty’s office and in the offices ol 
me Engineers, Stone A Webster Engineering 
Corporation. New York Operations Center. 
One Penn Plata. New York. New York IQOOl. 
and may be inspected by prospective bidders 
dunng office hourv 

Buis must be mode and relumed in tnpficaie 
in accordance vrth Bistnictnns contained in 
the Information lor Bidders. Guarantee wN be 
i «u uirsd lor each bid m an amount ol nol leas 
man :0 percent of (he grass sum bfcJ- 
T«e nghi h reserved lo reiacl tnycraSMx 
GEORGE T. BERRY 
GENERAL MANAGER 
AND CHIEF ENGINEER 


You can 

have 

COLOR 

in your 

garden all 

summer 

long. 

It just takes a bit of 
planning . . . and 
planting. Follow the 
informative articles on 
the Garden Pages of 
the Sunday New York 
Times for advice 
written by experts. 
They'll tell you what 
to plant, how to plant 
and when ... to insure 
a beautiful garden 
until the first hard 
trust in autumn. 

The Garden Pages, 
Section ‘J. 

Sundays in 
SI) c Jfau J3 ode Simr s 


LESS THAN 

A79 

FULL . 
• QUART 




LESS THAN ] 

e 29 




' FULL 
- QUART 1 


EACH STORE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED 

SPRING me / 

VALUES! ( 


Market Bas. 
Rises Shat} 

By WILL USSNER 

The awaited rise of beef pries began las: 
a result the cost of feeding a family of fo u , 
Citv rose substantially. 1.7 percent, the | 
rise since Feb. 15. 1975. the City Departaam 
Affairs reported yesterday. 

The 1975 rise, produced by soaring mea 
truckers’ strike, was 3 percent._The nigjhes 
was 1.6 percent on Jan. 24. 1975. 

The department’s 38-item market haskt 
Si .26 more than the week before. The 
average prices of the items was 2.9 t 
than it was last year at this time when 

Commissioner Elinor C. Guggenheimer 
movement confirmed her department's fei 
beef prices w’ould develop. 

“Unfortunately, our predictions that 
in the number of cattle being kept in 
lead to higher beef prices, is beginning 
Commissioner Guggenheimer said. 

"The bulk of the cattle that were sta 
and sent to market in order to avo 
costs have already been sold. From 
at least the middle of the summer fc 
probably escalate rapidly." 

The rise in beef prices was led bj 
the average price of which rose from 
a pound. Bottom-round roast rose l 
ground chuck 3 cents to S1.05 and 
cent to 52.01. Reflecting a rise in grai 
in the 5-pound sack, rose 3 cents tc 
is still 3 cents under the price a year ago. 

To help shoppers cope with the ris 
department issued a list of foods with sta 
prices currently: turkey, haddock, co 
skimmed milk, 'plain yogurt, onions, cel t * 
carrots. All provide good nutrition wi 
of calories, it noted. ’ ^ 

The State Department of Agricultur 8 
reported that frozen turkeys under r" 
selling at 49 to 59 cents a pound u j 
birds at 59 to 69 cents. Broilers an *- 
sale at 39 to 49 cents. Fresh asparagus - 
and Mexico is selling mostly aL 69 i 
pound but at sales is priced at 49-59 cents t 



GREAT 1 

FRENCH BURG! I 


LESS THAN 

199 

FULL 

nilAQT 



LESS THAN 

E59 

m FULL 
%QUART> 


I LESS THAN 

6*i 

QUART 



SINCE 14Q0 


25 

OUNCE 


rjHMnaiMK-HM 


I LESS THAN i 

m 


©EWAKS 

“While Laber * 

ihe .S'oi/cA that Jf 


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LE«TMAN 






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CANADIAN 

LORD 

CALVERT 



CtaJljKyt. AAdP^-l 


PRINCIPAL DRAGGED ! 
FROM HIS SCHOOL 

NEW HAVEN, April 20 (AP) 
— A white elementary school 
principal who admitted he 
kicked an 1 1-year-old black i 
youth last month has been ! 
dragged from his school by 
irate blacks. 

After the latest incident yes- ! 
terday, school officials told I 
Nelson. Rinaldi, principal at the 
predominantly black Baldwin , 
School for two years, not to 1 
return. 

Kenneth R. Redmond, a black ■ 
executive assistant in the 
School Department, was named 
Mr. Rinaldi’s temporary re- 
placement. 

Superintendent of Schools 
George Barbarito told a crowd 
gathered at the school that 
he would recommend that the 
school board give Mr. Rinaldi 
another assignment Mr. Barba- 
rito added. "He is an excelled 
principal whose record has 
been without blemish." 

Mr. Riaaldi was forced from 
the school yesterday by about 
!20 people, the Superintendent] 
-said. Among them were mam-' 
hers of the Black Coalition, 
the Urban League of New He- 
[ven and the Center of Advocacy 
1 Research and Planning. Mr. 
jEarbarito said. Mr. Rinsldi cn 
March 31 broke up a fight 
at school and when one student 
involved made derogatory re- 
marks, the principal said, 
“without thinking, I reacted! 
and kicked up." I 


JMbQf*3£i» ^ 
-SPANIP^^ 


CREAM 






- ■ > ■■ > -I 


m 

QUART: 


■SadwAjt, Chianti, Rose- 


SPA 

UKKER 

PACKER 


| .. T • _’?* ss^Wirh! 


LESS THAN 

3"~ 



QUARTl 


i import^ 0 

FRENCH: 


tfSS JOE ADDED 

MANAGER OF 

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED 

LARKFIELD 

WINE & LIQUOR Inc. 


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I0NSUMER PLEASE NOT E! T SiSKSffrS^ # SSSS J ‘ ,,B PA,D Foa BT ™* “s™» m aiu« * 

WCTTTTMTR a OWN BITteWBM JOINT OPSRATHMf Ol eOMMOM WteB* r 


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OTIMEPARK 
CUM LRLITME INC. 
>4. IS-IPIKAto 
TWJRTC 

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OOMERlM-SWALR, 
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12771* Are. 
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(HI DOT HAHPl OH 
WMAtaARA LlO INC. 
PUia Im I*. Ill m ci. 

617 US 


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Rh* V^l S0ME m CURBS f& 

se s j , out view York aee under study? 

5 W Men aod a Harmonica ' l ”" 1 




wed & operated! 


.. ; / : gy TOW 

.- 1 .j'v.n sat on adjacent 
• tfie promenade 

' >. - 'jcwg the Hudson 

" Paris the other 

■“ "• -■ . V. vJ-it there in search 
•’ « - " . 

. r on the center 

. ' . :'. >;' ed a harmonica.. 
. i , ^heerfuJ . whiskery 

•:! V^When he played, 
r . ' ' y ^.flapped out wide 
■ nth engulfed the 

1 -■..^s'fuck up a tune, a 

-'-’v •/; :-^ho stopped to Hs- 
:• in mind Of Wai- 

chewing up Gary 

• \. 5 >.Meet John Doe.” 

~ ,,!«w bars of rich. 

-- Viog, the old fel- 

-- tray. 

^ listed,*' he said, 

- the knob atone 

■ ■* phner Chrometta. 

- . ' r ' • Viulled out it per- 
: . s.^ihg of the sharps 

. ‘ the tune again. 

. V- 1 got a bit farther 
:• the slide slipped. 

V ember it now?" 

• '. • passer-by. 

• :t ; : -V.’er-by said he 

' as 1 a ballad from 
'- .. ailed "Blue Vel- j 

: the old fellow j 

■ =y. “but it got I 

v rine. I called it J 

. .. 2'Tm Only Dream- 

■ i:-hese lines: l 

^ 1 only drcanung j 
^ I never dreamed . 

~^f£fcasTgcrt." he 
always more of j 
than a 'lyric 1 

L y^thg tune again, j 

1 ] pL be greatest com- 

hS* ii 


heard -of ' Larry 
1 the man on the 
right. . . 

1 ird of him.” the 
player, whose 
^ames McNulty, 
: great” 

Dusin,” the man 


By TOM BUCKLEY 


. THE NEW YORK TIMES, .WEDJVESVA r/ APRIL 21, 1575 ^ 

SOME RENT CURBS V T ZU ^ Bkrs ^“ som ^i Geneva Parle * 10 

ADD injnnn OTnm >.. with due re * art tn ^ K ^ a ^ menoan jc-c-,™n rr 27 h ‘ s m Code ofWarOpens Today l&gTZ&ZZSS 

riltljl UflUMl (J 1/ Y jventing uncertainty, hardship sp«w loTiw.vetrY^kTinio [ A guerrilla group calling itself GENEVA April 20 (Reuters) n . atl "onal as well as nonint^roa- 

■ ; . . (and dislocation.': . ; Caracas. Venezuela, April i the Revolutionary. Command ^Diplomats from 150 countries bo ?l al wars » including jptvil 

_ > However, the law also gives 20*-The Government is op-Ihas demanded that the ■Ameri-I gat * ,er here tomorrow for an stnfe ‘ ” 

Continued From Page I, CoL 7} l J* Housing and Development ^ to navine ransom to can company buy food for nee- ,ei ® h1- week conference to r .rTT . e . .. 

~ Administration the- power to P ™ H 10 P a> ‘ ng " , 10 dy families and na/addkio^i i m «ieniize the code of conduct C.M. Vauxhalf Strike Ends * 

mum increases of /.5 percent define a "class of apartments.'’ guerrillas for the return of an 5 {j ras mncun^ng to S3 49 mil ’ of waT bar isthuman treat- ELLESMERE PORT %ng^- 
]a year. Increases permitted in' Commissioner Joy said in an American businessman kid- u 0n f 0r ^ re iKise of Mr Nie- ment of “vilisns- lend, April 20 (Reuters)'-^- A 

stabilized apartments vary de-i interv ' ew that he did nQt consi- napped more then seven weeks hous. ' . The conference, the third and week-old strike by 1,400 as- 
pending on such 'actors as ihefe*® 11 a P a runents renting for ago according to Interior Mi- _ f inal . in a se ?e* begun in 1974. sembly workers at the Gen- 

iPMd. A I . 7 jl* 300 or m0re to M a single “fL’r octavin lenaee Sun Oif Is Now Sun Co ine i s aimed at ov erhanling the eral Motors* Vauxhali plant in 

| length of the lease signed and 'class. He and his aides have ■ „„ ^ fotJr Geneva conventions of central England ended earlv ; 

tt et tv : a ._ new _ tenant . is mov -i! a ii f. h .=L, a ..:: c ? h “L v r goS^i^ c £ S £ t when ** voted to: 


lot of whether a new tenant is mov- said that a "cohesive” ^ d L»Lror«i mS the' S ^^r^V^s ComMnv Q1I I 19 .^- whose 400 articles today when the men voted to- 

ing into an apartment or an more "carefully defined" clw oM^STSllh SSSTdSSS " ’ ”1?'^ ?" d civilians against return to work after m££g“. 

opeans old tenant is renewing his lease, would take. into account a nar- ° r tfhf c h a ? uses .„ ment promised suspension of' 

silver- Generally, landlords hold that rower range of rent levels than WIlfa^^ShoiB the Sun cSSSSJ Inc f the DeJegates wiH discuss about the unboxing of German-made I 

quite a all these limits lead to inade- simply everything . renting f or napped wniiam F. Nienous. tneisun company Inc. ,140 new articles contained m components. 


though,” said Mr McNultv ) stabilized apartments vary, d e .j*nterview tnat ne tua not consi- 

“A - .voTd r a M dis N pu£: “ “ «>=!moo ir a m^ e t n <> iT^ngk 

He played in. a lot of en 5™ °' lease signed and;class. He and his aides have 
movies. He had a lot of whether a new tenant is mov- said .that a "cohesive” and 
originality, too.” ing into an apartment or an more "carefully defined” class 

“Some qf those Europeans old tenant is renewing Ids lease, would take. into account a nar- 
were terrific," said the silver- Generally, landlords hold that rower range of rent levels than 
haired man. "I heard quite a all these limits lead to inade- simply everything . renting for 
few of them on the air- quate rentals at a time of soar- *300 and more, because vacan- 
wa ^'” inflation in housing costs. c y ?pp«arad to vary shar- 

' There was a very popular Tenant spokesmen argue thatiP‘1' within this .overall ' class. 
South American years ago," the rent limits are too hi-h and; " r c* 11 ' 1 sa y how man y ?P art ' 
said Mr. McNulty. ‘Tito hurtful to many tenants wbo lment5 ' if ^ wou,d bi? in - 

Guizar. are beset by inflation. vo5ved lrt decontrol.^ he said. 

I see Uiey re * going to J James Peck, lawyer for the 

tear the inside out of Avery Decontrol Steps Listed landlords 'whose application 
Fisher Hall for the third The study of possihle decon- prompted the city study of pos- 
tirae,” said Larry Adler’s trol of apartments renting for sible decontrol, said the owners 
cousin. $300 or more stems from a re- would, go to. court if Com mis - 

“You know the Beacon cent housing and rent survey pioner Joy responded' in a way 

Theater on 74th Street?” carried out for the city' by the the owners deemed inadequate.- 

said the silver-haired man. United States Census Bureau. The same owners .are also 
"They’re sold out for all The survey found that although seeking the removal of apart- 
those rock concerts they the overall rental vacancy rate meats renting' for $300 and 
have there.” in the city -wa s only 2.8 ‘per- more from stabilization. 

“How do you like this cent, the. vacancy rate for * 1 T" 

on ,, ■’ Mr- . McN uIty- “1 apartments renting for $300 or Ford Proclaims Earth Week 
BII S r ''' , j 'more was 5.7 percent. WASHINGTON. April 20 

hir e h/n!fi, a hoedOWn on L Under state and city rent (AP) — President Ford pro- 
h -a U | Iaws - . when is a finding claimed the week beginning 

MimwHrh™ “ B r orrah P 81 ^ vacancy rate is 5 per- Thursday as Earth Week and 

■ as * Larr y cent or more— either in all urged every American “to.de-, 
Adleris cousin. The Har- apartments in the citv or in vote one rlav riurimr this wmIt 


said Mr. McNulty. 'Tito 
Guizar.” 

“I see they're * going to 
tear the inside out of Avery 
Fisher Hall for the third 
time," said Larry Adler’s 
cousin. 

“You know the Beacon 
Theater on 74th Street?” 
said the silver-haired man. 


GRISTEDES 

Superior Foods 


hi® harmnni^ , a “ ,lc “ ,,u ***■? Icnl rresiaent rOKI . p“0- 

" 'Vnn rp? 0 'mi, tj u 1 ! w ** . when ' tiiere is a finding Claimed the week beginning 

Minwftrh™ B r orrah 11131 the ; vacancy rate is 5 per- Thursday as Earth Week and 

fl^eyitch. asked -Larry cent or more— either in all urged every American “to -de- 
monki 5?®* HaT ‘ a P artmen ^ in the city or in vote one day during this week 

T ^ St WaS particular class" of apart- Ito a significant activity which 
some great act. raents — then the category b a v- jimp roves our environment." 


_ Mail to:' 

■ M an c al Sofpac Bathroom Tissue Offer 3 
| P.O. Bbx #218“ 

Elmwood Park, N.J. 07407 1 


NAME:' 

CITY:— 


3 et lfree. ! 

e Send ns the “Special Offer" sunburjt _ 
from the front of I package®! ' - I 
War cal Sofpacr Bathroom Tissue,^ and $ ■ 
we’ll send you a coupon good for 1 free package /* 1 * " 
at your local store. Only 1 coupon to a family.' | 

■ 

-ADDRESS:: - ■ P 


-STATE:- 


WHERE PURCHASED (STORE) 

Void wbwtr pnUbilMt or tend. Offer expire* 12/31-/76 





" /md cousin. He's * 

/ ’3?ltimore. He got | 

/ \\ playing a news- _ 

' 'Ijjfed the harmo- ■ 

Iway with Fred 
>aire." The. man I 
informa tio*| 

:^ear.qf Richard ■ 

#^^>ked §af- ® 

\ f map on his left ■ 

- ‘ \ Ifntified Mr. Hky- ■ 

\ M^hof.note. ■ 

said Larry ■ 

®d, cousin. “He ■ 

-right up there ■ 

deprive. He's iw; _ 

‘DEft.AESu like this fdr |j' “ 

asked Mr. Mc^ ■ 

' 1 '“'‘ayed a tune in ■ 

iear some great ** * 



r m — ! 

Not everyone would agree that 
GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES 
but there is no denying that , 

PERSPICACIOUS ^ 
PALATES ^ 

PREFER PRIME! 

Since March 3rd Gristede’s has been advertising its policy of selling U.S.D.A«“Si$ 
Prime Beef, reminding one and all that, while Choice is Good, Prime is Best; ' 

Your response has been tremendous--at times our telephone switchboard has been lsk4 
flooded with incoming calls for further information. Many calls were for beef cuts ^2 
other than those featured. 

This weeks promotion should satisfy just about every request. Wholesale 
cuts of U.S.D.A. Prime Beef Loin. Round, Rib and Chuck. This means you can 
buy Prime Porterhouse, Sirloin, Rib, Club, Round and Chuck Steaks-Rib, Round, . . 
Rump, Sirloin and Chuck Roasts on a money saving wholesale cut basis— all i 

custom cut to your requirements at no extra charge. Now’s the time to fill your freezer# * 

' WHOLESALECUTS^U.S.PJt PWWggCEP atVI^VCHCHCE PRIceSI' ^ 1 

Rib of Beef Chuck & Shoulder 

WHOLE-WEIGHS 2D TO 25 LBS. ^ WH0LE-TO16HS2DT025LBS. Irl l 

CUSTOM CUT TO C£0 | CUSTOM CUT TO f«5s> */ 

YOUR REQUEST H l.l»UO YOURREOUEST ^ II. / O 

Sirloin Tip Whole Shoulder 

BONHiSS-WBGHS 12 TO 14 LBS. ^ WKOLE-WEIGHS 20 TO 25 LBS. ^ A 

vramtiSfD? ih I JSH CUSTOM CUT TO «s> .. QQ^ 

YOUR REQUEST W. X # yOUR REQUEST -T-' ft- %J 

Whole Round Chuck of Beef 

B0MELESS-WEI6HS 40 TO 45 LBS. ^ m WEIGHS 50 TO 55 LBS. 

CUSTOM CUT TO | KK CUSTOM CUT.TO 

YOURREOUEST; ^ 1b. YOURREOUEST W \b.XJ& 


WHOLE-WEJGHS 2D TO 25 LBS. ^ 

CUSTOM CUTTO V 52 V 

YOURREOUEST ^ Ifc. i O 

Whole Shoulder 

WKOLE-WEIGHS 20 TO 25 LBS. a 

CUSTOM CUT TO 
YOUR REQUEST 


Chuck of Beef 

WEIGHS 50 TO 55 LBS. 


YOURREOUEST; 


CUSTOM CUT.TO itL 1 

•YOURREOUEST Ill.Ut/ 

Bottom Round 

WHOLE-BONELESS-WEJGHS 25 LBS. ^ M 
CUSTOM CUTTO .. | 

YOUR REQUEST 8a * * • 


uaver 



Tissue 


63 


Loin of Beef 

WHOUE-W EIGHS 40 TIMS US. . _ _ 

CUSTOM CUTTO (uim) "fl 
YOUR REQUEST t-5> lb. X • O 57 


1.49 


PRICES EFFECTIVE APRIL 19 THRU APRIL 2<L 1976 



iear some great )™ 
aA^down there ' at 
3q|ter," said the _ 
/'I'ntified Richard 
• : ' ? only trouble is | 
to go.” _ . 

/ iapneLI3,” said 
stecakid cousin. 


, RESORTS . 
'CAKlREAN 


RESORTS 

CARIBBEAN 


"-/the 'best music 

/ w * greatT 

/ M. other 

j ^ 

i ^considered the 

'■ >- fc-V . . ' . 

r i jglffle scoye ; is. 
' I rMme.'fiiin is coin- 


Tnra 


PHONE 
-FOR THE, 
'NEAREST 
iRISTEOE’: 


WESTCHESTER (914) 

723-4082 

Extension Z19 

R 


HEW YOHK CITY (212) 

824-2000 

Extension 219 


LONG ISLAHD (516) 

676-7494 

Extension 219 



llfiec 







Wi 


■m 






^ T’S' - -c - ■ 







»■* 










mated total of 
Americans with 
uns, more . than 
it had. their hear-. 
■ a. doctor, the 


5 million of those 


faring aids, tfae 


: ** v V 


This is where the party's gothg to be all sum- 
nier. At Caneel, Bay Piantafion on St. John in 
the U.S. Virgin Islands. .With 7 of the. most 
beautiful beaches in the Caribbean. Creatteh- 
^is,.too»von T courts, with .a Sports Illustrated 
pro 'and as much instruction as you want. 

And at Little 'Dix Bay, our hideaway 
resort on Virgin Gorda in the British Virgin 
Islands. Only 6& rooms; The dearest tur- 
quoise waters to snorkel, swim, and scuba in. . 
Great tennis. Water skiing. And "water taxis" 
that zip you to other beaches and islands for 
the day tfree). * ' . . ' 

. Enjoy them both, this slimmer, between 
May 15 and November ), on Rockresorts' 


unique Capeel/Little Drx Combined Vacation 
Plan. 1 . 

if.gives you a total of 7 days, 6 nights 
including a mini-cruise or short flight 
between resorts. AIL meals. Plus water skiing, 
useof snorkel ing gear,' sailboats and water 
taxis at Little Dix, and many extras at Caneel. 
Allfor just $575 for two. double.occupahcy*.; 

S£e your travel agent Or call any Loews 
Reservations office.- •' 

In New. York call 2 1 24586-4459 • . 

tCaAJtfffL bv PtAATTBenOW (SZtSl 

Si. John, L'.N. Virgin Minds .* XSryBr 

M: LITTLE Dlk BAY 

.Virgin Oonld. EUu isJi Virgin Wandi, 

Operated by RacKfesons. Inc 



Now you can take advantage of some] gj 
; great Drake bargains, t 

We Ve already lowered the prices of’ \ : f$ 

‘ some of your favorite Drake's cakes: Devil k 
Dogs, Ring Ding Jr.'s, Cookies, Raisin Snacks^ 
Swiss, Rolls and Family Pack All-Butter Pound f 
Cakes, Yankee Doodles and Sunny Doodles.s 
Look for the specially marked prices on f . 
J selected Drake Family Pack and Snack Cake> 

. items. And enjoy-fhaf good old taste at 
'new low price, 



Borden 




















5 th-and 6 th-Grade Schools ‘SCHOOUJ 18 CITY 


PLAN GRADE SKIFTi 


5th and 6th Would Return 
to Elementary System — 
Saving Would Result 


School 

I t.S. TO . . 
US. 44 .. 
MS. SI . 
IS. 10 ... 
• t.S. 134 .. 

Continued From Page I, CoL 5- 11 Si :: 

J.H.S. IM 


Following is a list of inter- 
mediate schools and fumor 
high schools that now have 
fifth-grade and sixth-grade 
classes, and the number of 
pupils m these cfassess 
MANHATTAN 


_ Pupils 
Grads Credo* 
District S A 


the reorganization reflects thei Total 
fact that the Board of Educa-< 15 
tion now allocates funds to; '4 ’?? 


BRONX 


local districts bv a complex 1 lj; ]\\ 


formula that provides relatively! [j- }“ 
more money to intermediate!}.! t&r . 
and junior high schools than!{| ^ 
to elementary schools. jisioi ! 

Under the system’s contract 1 {f- }f) • 
with the United Federation of.is.iw 
Teachers, teachers in interme-.^f 
diate schools and junior highs|J *lsIws 
— even if they teach the fifth I j.h Jfi 
and sixth grades — receive moreti-y-S ut 
preparation or free periods. 1 1: iso . 
than teachers in elementary;- w 
schools. Is m ; 

The reorganization would end 
these discrepancies, and the j.‘hV iw 
money thus saved, according Tohl 
to the plan under study, would | 
be "used by districts to offsets fjf n7 
budget cuts that would increase H r 8 


7 

... . 7 
..... 7 

7 

.. . 7 
... . 7 
... . 7 
. .. 8 
.. .. 8 

8 

. 8 

8 

8 

... . 9 
. .. 9 
.. .. 9 
.... 9 
...10 
. .10 
.... II 

II 

....II 

12 

... 17 

... 12 

u 

12 


144 

360 


316 

163 


300 


195 




I. 5.13 . .. 

J. H.S SO .. 
I.S.49 .... 

1.5.71 ... 
1 5. 318 . 

I. 5. SI ... 

is.aa ... 

J. H.S. »42 . 
J.H.S. 293 
IS. 79 .... 
J.H.S. 61 
.1.5.210 

l.i 7J6 ... 
IS 370 .. 

i.s. in ... 

SI «.S. 718 
Si 1.5. 307 

|ia®. 

Is JHSH 
136 J.H.S 7B . 
7 ?fli 1 *s. ss . 

I. 5. 271 

I H S. 7.*S 
95 I.H.S. Ill 
SIM 1.5. 291 .. 
All 

191 * Total 
125 

?Jz » 5 6» . . 

®J.HS. 73 . 

J. H.S. 119 
13? IKS. 125 
3 S IS 74 
415 J 5. S3 
50 J.H.S- 198 
257.' V*. 
256 I S. 77 
030 • J H3 • 

390 ij 59 
j’S J.H.S. 192 
195 I S. 238 
3fU 1 S. >26 .. 

S« 15 '45 


14 

.... U 


.14 

.14 

14 
.15 

15 

15 
.15 

16 
17 
17 
17 

. 17 
. 19 
. 1* 

. 19 
. 1? 
. 30 
. 20 
21 


W 


294 

165 

327 

163 

498 

196 

476 

107 

571 

27 

410 

316 

381 

4«8 

198 

340 


ipceted to mean, earthquakes! The State Education Commis-j 
jor floods. Is a financial crisis! sioner, Ewald B. Nyqmst, wrote 
_ v htith TT n /irrmn ' 2 comparable situation?** } to Dr. Bell last fall 
F Avlli \I U U v il 1 b' ® t * lEr Fe ^ ecal education offi-, if he intended to grant a waiver 


!cial 5 and specialists on Capitol reganfing the library and coun- 


Hill have said that N6w YorkiseUng money, which is author- 
Financing of Disadvantagedjrnay merely be the most visible; 




'r*y*i ri hMrinnin*i D r; BelTs decision on that case 

Programs Is Imperiled i° 0 f teoonS.ntodrrtttSteBiJ® “ tteprece&nt 

If rinrine o nnriAfi ■ for the other programs. The 


iwhen’SS aJSs-ta *!££“"*■ “ ^ awaMn * “* deci - 

'■* is no longer growing pr, 510 ^ ^ ^ ^ his incUna . 


By JUDITH CUMMINGS 
The K- Vo* . C* 


| system 'is'm ’danger losing j Louis have been listed among; 

4os more than S125 million in Fed-j^ 1 ^ 11 - _ _ . _ _ 5 its problems, but that he was. 

] under pressure from some law-] 


359 


. . 22 
.. 73 
. . 23 
73 
...32 
....32 


77 341 


3?5 eral aid it receives for the] 
Si? education of the disadvantaged! 


Possible Losses 
New York stands to 


lose. makers to refuse to -grant a 


477 tnr n *,,it smrt vocational 1 nearly S120 million in TitleSwaiyer that they fear would 
gand for adult and vocational i for ^ disadvan-i bring other cities to seek sum- 
s'? education in the coming co million for vocationaLlar Federal beln- 


241 


QUEENS 


BROOKLYN 

. .. 13 

» 


280 

»9 

•519 

Total 


5-59? 


^7 

STA 
I.S. 7 

TEN ISLAND 
31 

.. 536 



IJS. ?4 

31 

884 


387 

f 5. 77 . 

31 

5® 

1.954 

7.155 

1.5.34 

1.5 51 . .. 

31 

31 . 

337 

731 



1 5. 61 

31 

421 


438 

310 

Total 


3.4)1 


i,« — ----- - - Itaged, $8 million for vocational :lar Federal help. 

-^--■because of cuts in the city's location and S2.5 million for! The local-financing require- 
9 .current spending for schools, ' a <jult education unless it can. merits were enacted in the first 
777 according to state and Federal j obtain a waiver from Office: place, their argument^ holds, 
M4 rt fr r jal«; iof Education regulations, said in order to prevent districts 

!g l \Cui Si * million in another I AH**" 1, MacKinnon, the top ! from simply placing local mo- 
About SI-S miUion m another rferrf affto gp^-aist in thelney with the Federal contnbu-} 

4» program for school ]ibranesj state ^cation Department:' tion and thus cheating those f 
378 and guidance counseling hast «nie requirements include that jthe program wa intended to,> 
< 2 sr already teen withheld in the; local financing may decline fay benefit _ . • . 

current school year because of no more than 5 percent 

ie year to' the neaL j t hrough both houses of .the 

In adult education, for which Congress that would modify 
rancine is computed on a | the local -financing, require- 


the Board of Education's 


372 in counseling services. 

Funding for these 

. ic In taring rriv Koraneo nt tan. 


'statewide basis, the city cuts' 


meats. 


One biEC sponsored by Sena- 



, dkaLC > aiiuvauwu. JUUJV VW 16144 Injnr. 

■lion this year. The Board of-J'JJJ 
I Education has effectively elKSES' 

inorder to be“ ei^teTo/toeiminated free adult education ■ “ Se‘£SE!^ l to- 

imonev. ; to save money. ■ . ' stead of beare withdrawn en- 

' ^ K Disadvantaged and vocational jgJJJ _ s 


propor- 


class size.” or to meet other; . , . - . 

tool needs. . . ^ |A ' Commuter Study Urges ! trai ' n last £“* 5 To Face Decision am pom- 

The reorganization is the . , _ _ 1 . ; occurred between Trenton, .N.; - programs, nowmer, are com , ■ « 

subject of a "discussion paper"; Gates For Rail Crossings! j., and Philadelphia and killed 1 The United States Comnris- puted locally. . pnr. - - 

prepared by the staff of theJ (three, persons. Isioner of Education, Terrel H.; More than 400,000 school Thais Bar Vietnam Refugees 

~ ; *"’ "" "" The two-car Reading commu-iBell. wUI ultimately be face d> children in the a ty system are j BANGKOK, Thailand, April 20 

ision whether to ex-! classified as disadvantaged, (y 


School Chancellor Irving An-j WASHINGTON, April 20 (AP) 
ker. He is planning to make — A Federal accident-in ves ti- 
the paper public next week. /gating agency recommended to-. 
The matter is on the agenda;^ ^ ^ Federal Gai - e rn- 

TtbXSi yg£5ai ? -t.»Q'4» mandatory warn- 


ter train was traveling 60 miles -with a decision whether to ex- ■ classified as disadvantaged, (aP) — A hundred and fifteen 
an hour when it hita tractor- 1 empt New York from the rule! based on their demonstrated jrejugees who escaped from 
semitrailer truck at a crossingjas a fiscal “disaster area,” or (educational deprivation and -south Vietnam in four fishing 
at Yardlev, Pa. |to make it toe the line to | residence m a poverty-area. ; boats last week will not be al- 

Two crewmen and the lone l prevent other financially hard-' Although the recently enacted lowed to come ashore in Thai- 


ahd its consultative council], ing lights and crossing gates Monger on the late evening'pressed cities from claiming ! Stavisky bill would require theliand, officials said today. The 

ssings used by train died when the truck's similar waivers. : city to restore spending to an -interior Ministry said the boats 


composed ' of representatives 


from each of the system's 32 
community school boards. 

Centralized Policy 
Elementary, intermediate andj 


at railroad crossings 


commuter trains. ) steel argo smashed into thel “The law provides for exemp-i average based on the precedmg arrived last Wednesday,. Friday 

The National Transportation! commuter car. A third crewman [tions in the case of certain! three years, its implementation -and -Saturday. It said some of 
Safety Board's recommendation! on the second car was injured; exceptional circumstances.” Dr.lwill apparently come too late;the refugees indicated they 
was an outErowth of its Invest!- slightly. The truck driver wasjBell said in a recent interview.! to affect next years financing .wanted to go to the United 
juemeniary, iniermeoiaie ana into a truck-commuter 1 not hurt. . (■This has usually been inter- 1 for these programs, he said. ’Stales. 

■junior high schools are operat-i 6 , ■_ - , ====== ~ — g — - ■ : ■ . - =s= g — — 

ed under the jurisdiction of 


the local boards, although the 
central board set policies for 
the system. 

After obtaining the comments 
of the local boards, and further 
study, the central board will 
make a determination. Opposi- 
tion is expected from some 
of the district boards. 

The changes in grade or- 
ganization, the discussion paper 
said, would not affect the edu- 
cation of the children. 

"Research generally supports! 
the view,” the paper said, “that' 
it is the school program rather) 
than the grade organization] 
that is educationally important" i 

Until the mid-1960's the city' 
was committed to a 6-3-3 grade 
organization. This involved six! 
years Df elementary school,] 
three years of junior high t 
school (covering the seventh. [ 
eighth and ninth grades) and) 
three years of high school. i 
Change to 4- 4 -4 I 

In May 1964 a state advisory] 
committee recommended a i 
change to a 4-4-4 arrangement, 
with a key feature being the 
establishment of a middle or 
intermediate school covering 
the fifth through the eighth 
grade. 

The plan, which became city 
policy in 1965, was seen as a 
major step in improving racial 
integration in the school sys- 
tem. The middle schools wefe 
supposed to draw pupils from 
a wider area, than the neigh- 
borhood elementary schools, so 
their pupil compositions, it was 
felt, would show a better racial 
balance. However, the new dis- 
cussion paper noted, “popula- 
tion changes since 1965 have 
reduced the possibilities for in- 
tegration" through a 4-4-4 plan. 

The middle school was also 
supposed to offer a distinctive 
educational program. Whether 
this actually took place is still 
a matter of debate. 

The system never fully put 
the new setup into effect At 
first, the Board of Education 
said it lacked sufficient physi- 
cal facilities, and later there 
were other problems. As a re- 
sult the school system now re- 
sembles a crazy quilt of vary- 
ing school organizations. 

There are elementary schools 
that run through the fourth, 
fifth, sixth and — in a few in- 
stances — the eighth grade. 
There are three-year and four- 
year intermediate schools that 
start with the fifth or sixth 
grades. There are junior high 
schools that start with the sixth 
'grade .and run through the 
eighth, and others that begin 
with the seventh and go through 
the ninth. 

And there are senior high 
schools that offer three-year 
or four-year programs^— and of 
these, some are academic 
schools, some are vocational 
and others are comprehensive 
or a combination of the two. 


r HONGKONGi 


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Double Km Sun-i ^ 7S 

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Susanin* Worsted Swls_ 95 Z 


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leather /Suede Coats .... 12SZ 
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20000 to 

yurt um ma A fbwr t aiwihsns oft prwvsts. 

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ImbOmu 9 AJH. u 7 P.M. 6 day* a weak. ■ 


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4 P.M. to 7 F3t- 

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4 pjd. to 7 F JL 


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urban studies. Field 
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DIRECTOR O F ADMISSIONS ' ~ - 

/ BROOKLYN 




BRjOklyn, N.Y. 11201 ( 212 ) 834-6100 

Rlease send me infqmiaticn on .1976 Summer Sesstow. • 
□ Undetgraduate □ Gradual© 


Name 




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PROJECT DIRECTOR 


A four county federally-assisted ambulator 1 
care program in beautiful western .Michigan # 
seeking to fill the position of Project Director 
Candidates must possess a graduate degre— 
and*- have had five years of administratiy 
experience in ambulatory . health care. , 
sound background in financial managemei^L 
and grants management is also essential. i®!Q! 
new health center bullding is presently und&i J 
construction.- Salary is negotiable',’ excellent | 
fringe benefits.. Regional Health. Care is ai . — 

equal opportunity employer: - r Reply: .Ralph #»U rrrn 
Cemy, Chainriah, "'Search - Committee!^ 1 '-*Uoal UOfTl 
Regional Health Care, P.O. B6x 638, Baldwin! 

Michigan 49304. 


ds child 


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Steady? 


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BS, Md-fach and riuukf possess supar- 
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tology OndutUng Bnraunotena«*>gy) or 
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ROCHE CLINICAL LABS 

Shthetdiarv of HofTaioo IjRndre 
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Neeto tar p nmrtrom T&tna BSycbWk 
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MEDICAL FIEf 


Sell unique emerg- 
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to hospitals, emery 
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experience lo MD & 
important. Send resume - 


ttICROMEDEX IM 

2750 S Shoshone Si 
Englewood, CoL 6011 


f 


.CERTIFIED 
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r To efired stale approved gem 
; laboratory of nwtfical groups 
l "' Mid-Hudson Vritey on e rer 
pan-time basi& Commuting 
tance N.Y.Ci Position 
July 1,1 976, Reply to: 

TF 5971 n 




' STUDENT -ACnvmES ;e> -V. 

COORDINATOR ; 


Under *ec ton rfmtftoat tar . 

canpw nhadMi «. Mrt A «tol*» *V - . 



Avhntap A-.-mWWTr 1 ^ 

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flam A Jtw A.1»aidjj4a 

Md rmw Bifyvtflft ItaWy^N. 

> iihk ifaMA Odtafl*. {> 


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thmm.nr ID5T7.- ’ . 

An SflHl OKM ***■/&"*•:*! 


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Technologist 
LfaflMML Foil Ontfl. 

coriaer. 


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HI*} 737-9000 tier 398 

Mr. BoneorDr.Bflriln 


■PART TIME — -w 

Can, W,JLLtesW3,IL»- U 1} 

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York fwtd«" " '■^*“*0 ' 

Mrd ednowirai poptn « mtd % 

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. WrtPt loir Je* Deeer^pfton. X 
achfldgtoqf^PU W J QW4W K 










jSWlMJ'sifw; 



THE JffiV YORK TIMES, WEDWS5&AX APRIL. 21. 1975 


p^WtSfecv. 

ttf^ag afe: '• 
ape. & :**.» 

-A-« 

- 

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ducatiorf 


se?*" Duties Replace Ceremony for School Trustees 




-- R.FISC5? ■ ?. Changes in the nature of 
r Increasingly £ boards of trustees began in 
Itfons. py make the 1960's when many 
°*,.%2 nJU *3i '.schools made efforts 
relauods and ^broaden their makeup 


to 

by 


SSleSe Electing women, minority 
^aS iSSwS - gr °up members. young alum- 
aJld even representatives 

wTSmL S*.** 1 ® facuff y and student 
- - i\ heir boards op, > a body to seat^ on their boards. 

■ ‘ ~ ' ' 'At Wellesley College, for in-. 

stance, the board roust now 
include a "young al umn a" 
elected as 
ntor.i 


a,f V5 


-fa**- 

X* 

SJWSmwfA..' 

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ifcfe-o •?' 

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fe- • : . 

*'■»**■ V*ev, 
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nterviews with 
r'chooiadminis- 
v \5ed that board 
in the past 
Ven accustomed 
_ t ierabhial duties 
*■- 2 f Sitting, in tong 
"Vhnical issues. 

. r roles r as toeti- 
1 n the.process, 

• influence on 
Jicies. V, 
of an laoof. 
do -nothing - 
K” said James* 
f xustee of the 
tool . in . Mill- 
"Any school 
this today is 1 
going out of 


2 


a graduating se- 


Commitments involved 

- Even more significant than 
the changing makeup, though, 
is what board members are 
now expected to do. 

“Our board used to come 
Friday, have cocktails, hear 
the . president's report and' 
go away," said Peter K. Gun- 
ness, headmaster of Bucking- 
ham Browne and Nichols 
School in Cambridge, Mass. 
‘‘Now a major commitment 
is involved." 

Institutions invariably re- 
port that they are asking 


trustees to put in a great 
deal more time. At .the Loo- 
mis School in Windsor. 
Conn., for instance, trustees 
meet four to six times a year 
for two days, and Ynost are-' 
on committees that require* 
additional hours.- 

. "The same change Is ofccur- 
ring at the college level . 
"Over the eight years of my 
chairmanship burdens of the 
office have continuously In- 
creased with the various cri- 
ses that have hit the college,” 
said Elizabeth Purcell, chair- 
man of the board of Vassar 
College. Frederic 0. Glover, 
secretao r of Stanford Univer- 
sity. said that potential nom- 
inees were now asked quite 
frankly about their willing- 
ness 'to make "time commit- 
ments." 1 . 

The major reason for fhe 
new demands is the growing 
complexity of running a pri-' 
vate institution. 

"The problems in education 
are so intricate and changing' 
so rapidly that a headmaster ' 


■ or president needs direct sup- 
port and guidance.” said Eu- 
gene L. Swan Jr., a trustee 
of the Purnell School in Pot- 
tersville, N.J. 

Presidents and headmasters 
are turning to trustees for 
. guidance not only in tradi- 
tional areas such as -invest- 
ment policy, hut in new ones 
that did not previously exist. 

U.5; Action Involved 

A. Hamilton Bishop, the 
headmaster of St- Anne’s-Bel- 
field School in ■ Charlottes- 
ville, Va., for instance, cited 
new Federal affirmative ac- 
tion requirements. 

'Trustees now have to be 
conscious of everything that 
pertains to the Federal . 
Government's involvement in 
education, and all tfae ways .. 
that private schools are ex- ■ 
pected tq implement public - , 

i: m 


buttons we think a trustee 
can make,” said Mrs. Purcell 
: of - Vassar. "We’re looking 
for more people, whether 
they're men or women, with 
specific knowledge in the 
fields of business', law and 
finance.” 

Changes have also occurred 
in the relationship of board 
members to fund - raising. 
Schools are finding that they 
..can no longer rely on a few 
• large contributors to solve 
tbeir financial problems and 
that broader efforts are re- 
quired. "We want work — and 
some wealth— but we really 
want people who can put 
in time on development,” Mr. 
Bishop said. 

The day also seems to be 
policy," he said. over when a large check au- 

> Such needs affect the proc- ", tomati rally guarantees a 
ess of selecting trustees. board position. 

"We • are getting more "Financial support for the 
specific in- the type of contri- school comes as a corollary 


to being a trustee, but it 
comes after being elected of- 
ten times rather than be- 
fore” said Thomas M. Arm- 
strong, president of the 
board of trustees of the 
Waynflete School in Port- 
land, Me. 

The other side of the coin 
of increased demands on 
trustee time is that they are 
also exercising more authori- 
ty. This results hot only from 
their more detailed knowl- 
edge of school affairs but 
from the. increasingly rapid 
turnover among presidents 
and headmasters. 

"In the past seven years 
we've had four different 
headmasters,** Mr. . Ann- 
strong said. “That's not much 
time for each man to estab- 
lish control." 

The growing visibility of 
trustees has also made them 
targets for student protests. 
This, coupled with the in- 
creasing demands, has ap- 
parently changed the appeal 
of what Was once a largely 
honorary posL 

"I fear that anyone who 
wants to be a trustee of an 
eleemosynary institution or 


director of a corporation 
ought to be put behind bars 
for being out of his mind,” 
said Thomas Wagner, a long- 
time trustee of the Hotchkiss 
and Salisbury Schools.. “Back 
Ln Salem they used to hunt 
and burn witches. Now they 
hunt and bum directors and 
trustees, who are only trying, 
for free, to help. God save 
us all." 

• 

Th e American University 
of Beirut, which had to delay 
its opening this year until 
January, has been closed 
once again by the fighting 
in Lebanon. 

The university campus, lo- 
cated in the midst of a heavi- 
ly Moslem neighborhood, has 
been hit by a number of. 
mortar shells in recent 
weeks. One student was. 
kiled, and at least IS have 
been injured. 

Richard Schaplowsky, 
spokesman in New York for 
the institution, said officials 
hoped to reopen the universi- 
ty on Monday and, by using 
weekends and holidays, com- 
plete the current semester 
by May. 


Even if' this takes place, 
the survival of the institution, 
is in doubL Members of the jQ 
faculty, who have not- $ 

the city are working without 
pay, and Mr. Schaplowsky 
said that the school can be- f -~ 
|pn another semester in May , 
only, if the Lebanese govern- 
ment comes through with_ 
an $S million long-term loan. ^ 

' • . . . 

The Women's College Coa- T „ 0 j 
lition, an organization of 72 
women's colleges .reported ? _-j; 
yesterday that applications 
to member institutions were -u 
sharply higher for the. second: sr*cf 
year-in a row. rmot 

Of the 69 institutions re-'-'r: 
s ponding to a coalition sur- nftf- 
vey, 44 reported application s e.? 
increases. 14 said that appli- . 
cations were holding steady.'.':; ■'-* 
and- 11 reported decreases.:; “T 
As a group, they reported: :s.i 
an average increase of 14 '* — 
percent, which is twice the .-cf 
last year. -n**v7 

Among those showing;.* rii 

strong increases were the -id-.;. 
College of New Rochelle and:'T 
Kauka College in New York; ■ “A 
which reported gains of 3hrr.*n 
and 40 percent respectively. • -it o* 




. / y ; - . v»:-- 

• : »’ * - ■, 



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PROJECT tiff 




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•-'7 * 


WHY STUDY SPANISH 
WHEN YOU CAN LIVE IT? 


Too, Senor,Senora, or Sen or it a, can leam-fypajiol the besiway • 
possible-taking a University Accredited\Cdu?se jin Bbgota; ' 

bia and living ak the same time with a Spanl^Tspeaking family. 
(and it ; s excellent Spanish, too). We off er oiipp, " 
week tours starting as low as $695, including ail meaisj university *• 
ices and some sightseeing. Bueno, hmmm ? For-^illiuf^nution see '■ 
v;our travel agent, send the coupon or call u& : fd&/rcc. t ; ‘ 



Matv*. t.Q. B0K83B.f «raiirgfale. NX 1 1735 
PleaM send mbniution an yotx Lmng Spansn Tous. 
Nun# ! 


SNrT4-2l 




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(In N. Y Stale, (800) 442-5920, in N.Y. City, (21 2) 586-6040.) 


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igular classroom, 
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» .^summer trimester of courses 

environment Three- a^dit 
management techniques / 
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„ Other courses are designed to give 
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is for the primary classroom / building 
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-oursesmeet once weekly for three 
‘p Oiy -Campus; tuition $60 per credit 
V 3-Jurife 14 and June 21- July 26. 
r-Ft£ Aprf}-; 19 - 30 ; iate registration 







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A Bronx; NY 10475 (212) 320-0300 


[ADVANTAGE! Become <r 

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W^l^Aniilantfrwunx Program. 
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far MffiSbto Edneo H ott Dept. . 

trMtmfytetan, 



WW 9*5 PM. 

_ _ ua for our gradua tes NO FEE! 
5TTTUTE. WC. DEPT. O 
N**t York, N.Y. 10038(212)484-4705, 



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School 


• CawefsaHofl classes- - 

Nw Tern darts soon- .. . 

■ Native French teachers, 
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Cm 644-1620 tor catafeg. • 

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Rench Institute / 
fijiance Francaiss 

Afeemfly comer of Trance ' 

at 22EL 50 SLN.Y. 10022 


Yale College Summer Term 

May 30— August 15 


Attention Pre-Med Students 

Study at Yale this summer and completeayearof 
lecture and lab in: 

Organic Chemistry 
General Chemistry 
General Physics 

Plus a unique opportunity for Science Majors. An 
integrated approach to the study of: 

GENETICS AND BIOCHEMISTRY 


-f 


For students interested in the Social 
Sciences, fhe Yale College summer 
term offers a wide range of courses. 

introduction to the Study of Legal Institutions — 
Psychology and Law— Sociology of Law— The 
Common Law — Legal and Moral Decision Making- 

Psychology of Language — Cognition and Education — 
Nonverbal Communication.— 

Public Management and Policy Analysis — Models of • 
Decision Making — Housing and Community 
Development — Government Policy and the Economy 

Spend a Summer at Yale 

’ A complete semester, full credit a wide selection of 
"courses taught by Yale College faculty. 

Humanities Center offers such unique programs as: 

Colonial America— An Examination ofthe^ 1 t ; 
formative years in thedevetoprnent of an American-, 
nation. • 




Film — A study of film 1 h ro u gh-p rod u cfrgrv; 
analysis, historical development. '■ - ' - • ' 

Forms of Literary Modernism ” Studies dflha-" 
modernist pesriod in twentieth century fiction, 
poetry, drama in Europe and America. 


I 





for Executives 


'r.ori 




How it cam help you* 

This unique graduate 
business program for 
executives permits, 
managers in mid-career . 
to pursue a 4-term 
Masters; Degree course 
of study i^hout interrupt- 
ing their professional 
careers. 

Every semester begins . . 
with an intensive £ 

weekprogramin- y-'M 

Tesidenceat a^earby’; >. u^—. 

• v # — r-_ c •_ . 



Applicants must be 
sponsored by their 
organizations. Tuition is 
$2,500 per semester 
which includes all books, 
study materials, meals 
and coffee breaks on 
Fridays as well as meals 
and room accommoda- 
tions during the in- , 
residence sessions.’ 

The Admissions ‘ 
Committee is now : 
accepting applications. „ 
The final deadline for 
applications is August 1, 

. for the class beginning 

meet all day, each Friday at Ups Hali priihe [ September 12, 1976 and December 1, for 


na. Techletot. Inc. background- 

j^J^ffl6^C(?oference’ .'JjjJjSJS 

Center. ForJtlfi remainder; . ' "V company .^sufaol »meaaoab It business successes. The. 

of the seirieste^ passes ^ 


Momingside Heights Campus of Columbia 
University.:-.'; ; ' 

■ The participants go through the entire - . . 
program- as an integrated group thus berie- 


the class beginning January 9, 1977. 

If you are anticipating moving up in 
management, then this program is a 
vital tool for 


^yourdeve 1 

enriches and reinforces the learning process. .. , opmenL 

Call: <212)280-3395 
. Or WteeiTIie Master's Degree 
ft dgmnfar & M Qti ws 
. 7be Graduate School of Business 
807 Uris Hall. Columbia University 
; New York, New \bik 10027 



ness 


A 

T IT 2 
■■Ain 


-j ns 


-- 1 





imagine being 
able to telf a 
/computer what 
todo. 


Learn 

COMPUTER i- 
PROGRAMMING 
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The only book that is a complete 
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i : i V, k’f * : i :{i?i ;w A ^ 


FOUR GENERATIONS OF GREATNESS 
by Jack Shepherd with an Introduction 
by Daniel J. Boorstin 

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MAIN SELECTION 


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A 

‘Including Boon Cltlbs. 


vy tot a ai t tft t ctt jw T ittv.r a tour of .cocktail lounges and House for President EiserJnwc; 

* . restaurants in the east midtown ana had- completed the assign* 

; • 6 ^. chae L5. reer l} he section seeking information ment during the zdministrscflr 

i rj tenor . decorator who was f^om anyone who might have n * p-^jpn, f n _t.. 
found dead Monday in his Park Mr Greer last Friday °*2? eftd f^ t John F - Kennedy. 
Avenue apartment with his feet ^ e weniag when he . J 1 *® ■•J® _™ fo™d 

bound, was murdered, accord- i s believed to Save been inur- - ? , G !? >ert . MIDs of 330 West 
ing to an autopsy completed dered ‘l 1 his wife, when 

yesterday. Officers workine on the in- “* ey _p am ® se® him about 

“Our examination has shown v estimation said that Mr Greer \ ^bey planned to give 
that he died .of aephymHon ^ 

by strangulation,” . said Dr; tors that- he had been 5™? 18 , SDIU He m 

Dazainick J. DiMaio, the Acting dWnkma heavily hi recent SP*®* !, ace ."P* DI ^ ™ 8 
Chief Medical Examiner. SKgf tSToWoot were ^ ^ -™* *** 

The police then listed the working on the theory that ^5 p^e^estoia^^rhe 

"KiSTHg SJS&5K JS'ASSfi 

HU f dde U ™he‘Z«??hI«S - ***** •*-**"_■ ^ a Ted SP °SeSa. M e 

ts-s^ss sgjjisrjw 

Greer’s apartment building at rator. As president of the tenor-decorator field, and Bar- ( 
525 Park Avenue,.. at 60th National Society v of Interior rrwyr , 

s AZy£ SSSS 23SS& StdSBSSl £ «- -2SS 

copdon room, u W White no™ hjm^out ^ 
“T “ 7 ' 7 " Miss Kraus said that he had 

Hollis Boy Is Found Shot Dead, SSL'S 
HandgunLyingNearHisHead 

- had succeeded Mr. Greer as; 

A 12-year-old Hollis, Queens, partly under his head. The boy 
boy was found fatally shot in had a single bullet wound m 

^ bedyesteiday. a -22-caliber the right temple. J^g' 

“Saturday night special” hand- The police said the W. a “ did2t^ 

gun laying nea rhis head. sixth grader, was borne from know fro^ 

The police said they sus- school because of life." 

pected the wound had been vacation. Both hu Btepfamer Mr _ Great’s $l,000-a-month 
self-inflicted. “ d fifth-floor apartment was de-’ 

They said they believed the _ f scribed "by the police as looking! 

cun was the weapon purchased . ( ^7 a _ AUea ^ f '“Tike a museum." It was lavish- . 

iSTthe boy’s stepfather, but re- ?£»^!SsSl- ly - f F nisiied ^ French 

saws# Mond^ a iS 

tie hoy bad weld thee have: 

in his room by the stepfather, Alien said the bov ? ecn P° ssib] ® ?“■ «ms«rae to! 

the police said. The stepfather Wltn ^ e iaw : of ta s. death, they said. j 

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television set, they said TOKYO, April 20 (UP!) — 

Mr. Sconiers called the- po- Four officials of the Palestine 
lice. An ambulance attendant Liberation Organization arrived 

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nounced the boy dead at the at the invitation of Prime 

scene. Minister Takeo Mfld's govern- If you lOVe 8 RWSten 

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right side in street clothes. They the visitors might arrange with CftlPVPI-flDEniA ftE 

said the gun had been found Japanese officials to establish Elfbl vtUrEUlil Ur 

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Bridge: L e S 


Reisinger Team Tournament 
Gettine New Look This Year 


By ALAN TRUSCOTT 


The traditional Reisinger 
team championship, the pres- 
tige event of the New York 
tournament calendar, will 
have a new look next month 
— a very new look. 

Instead of the usual knock- 
out contest there will be an 
arrangement reminiscent of 
the repechage method used in 
rowing: A team that loses 
in the first few rounds will 
have a second chance, via a 
Swiss teams that eventually 
contributes a few successful 
teams to the main event 

Play will start at the New 
York Hilton Hotel on Satur- 
day May 22, and a big entry 
is expected since this revised 
Reisinger will appeal to those 
who enjoy Swiss teams as 
well as file top-ranked ex- 
perts who favor the tough 
test of knockout play. 

Complex Bidding Used 

Two of the players who 
won the Reisinger last year 
were Matt Granovetter and 
Ron Rubin of New York, who 
have developed complex bid- 
ding methods that may start 
a trend among players of the 
top rank. 

Granovetter and Rubin res 
centiy set a record by win- 
ning the monthly bidding 
contest in the Bridge World 
magazine for eight straight 
months. Much of their bid- 
ding follows the relay con- 
cept, in which one hand 
makes minimum bids while 
his partner continues to 
describe, his hand. 

Such sequences need to be 
decided like a ' diplomatic 
message. On the North-South 
hands shown in the diagram, 
however, they followed a nat- 
ural route, reaching an ex- 
cellent slam in the face of an 
opposing opening bid. 

As this was a bidding com- 
petition, the two players 
were simply given the North- 
South hands and told that 
West had opened one heart 
Granovetter, as North, made 
a take-out double, which is 
almost always the right first 
move for a player with a 
very strong hand faced with ' 
an opening bid. He followed 
with a cue-bid of two hearts 
to show his strength. 

The crucial decision came 
on the next round, after 
Rubin had bid diamonds and 
then clubs with the South 
hand. This implied at least 
five diamonds and at least 
four clubs, but promised 


NORTH 
4 AKQJ 
V A 75 
O 9 2 
4 AKQ2 

WEST (Dj EAST 

476 4 10983 

q KQ J 10 6 4 O 983 

OKQ104 O 85- 

£ J - * 9876 

SOUTH 
4 542 
<3 3 

O AJ763 
4 10543 

Ease and West were vul- 
nerable. The bidding: 

West North East South 

1 n DbL Pass 2 0 

Pas;- 2 Pass 3 4* 

Pasi 4 N.T. Pass 5 O 

Pasi 5 N.T. Pass 6 

Pasi Pass Pass 

West led the heart king. 

nothing in the way of high- 
card strength. 

At this point, the rival 
Norih was content to bid a 
safe three no-trump. Assum- 
ing that four club tricks 
could count nine tricks. But 
Granovetter was. more ag- 
gressive. 

Hoping that his partner held 
either a five-card club suit 
or a singleton heart, he 
leaped, to four no-trump, ask- 
jng for aces. He had decided 
to play six chibs if his part- 
ner held the diamond ace, 
and when South' responded 
positively he even flirted 
with an improbable grand 
slam by asking for kings. 

The small slam would have 
been precarious if South’s 
distribution had been 2-U-5-4 
or I -3-5-4, but as it was the 
contract was entirely sound. 
After a heart lead, for ex- 
ample, by the imaginary 
West player. South wins the 
ace and ruffs a. heart. He 
then enters dummy with a 
trump lead to ruff - another 
heart 

With file cards as shown 
in the diagram the club jack 
has appeared singleton. It is 
then an easy matte/ to cash 
the club ten, enter dummy 
with a spade lead and draw | 
trumps. Superficially, the 
slam has a 73 -percent chance, 
but the fact that West has 
indicated heart length some- 
what increases the danger of ‘ 
a bad break in clubs. 

• 

The pre-Olympic interna- 
tional tournament scheduled 
to begin this Friday has been 
canceled. 


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Angela Kinnersly of ABC Is Married 


Angela Kinnersly. manager 
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office of Dressel, .Diramltt & 
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graduated from Brown Uni- 
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'THE NEW YORK TIMES. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1976 


Books of The Times 


Shakespeare in His Place 


SELLER! 

entertainment 
slon fierce, the 
ng." 
politan. 


SHAKESPEARE AND THE REVOLUTION OF 
THE TIMES. By Harry Levin. 334 pages. Ox • 
ford University Press. SIS. 

pie rather majestic title of Harry Levin’s 
collected essays on Shakespeare and other 
Elizabethan dramatists does the author a 
disservice in a way. It suggests a volume 
of narrow scholarly concerns, perhaps a 
. ponderous investigation of the upheavals 
w Shakespeare's day and his place in them. 
Mr. Levin, who teaches at Harvard, makes 
clear that the “revolution” refers to the 
changes wrought by time, and that his aim 
is to see Shakespeare in his time, to see 
hun in ours, and to follow his progress 
from one to the other. 

In doing so, he has provided some superb 
reading, meaty and challenging, whether 
be is dealing with the way Shakespeare 
utilizes or overcomes the limitations of his 
stage; the habit of dogmatic commentators 
to force the most 'capacious of poets into 
a single mold; , why certain scenes of the 
plays were probably more convincingly 
conveyed under Elizabethan stage condi- 
tions than under ours, and why Shake- 
% speare occupies the place he does in our 
consciousness. One of the essays is so 
insightful (“The Shakespearean Overplot”) 


By THOMAS LASK 


■ ,.that the reader is inclined at the end of sible. 


that Shakespeare was limited, circumscribed, 
by his audience and that this was. respon- 
sible for a certain coarseness in the writing 
and untidiness in the structure .of the plays 
gets no support from him. . “Lightweight ' 
purists," Mr. Levin" calls such critics. In 
the theater the plays work. 

His quarrel with Jan Kott, the contempo- 
rary Polish theater critic, is of another sort. 
For he disapproves of the practice of read- 
ing the Shakespeare plays' as current docu- 
ments in the twin chronicles of Fascism 
and Communism. Where Mr. Kott wrenches 
the plays out of their orbits to fit' ellipses 
of his own making. Professor Levin is prob- 
ably right. But Mr. Kott can provide star- 
tling insights of his own. 

In one chapter in “Shakespeare 6w 
Contemporary, “ Mr. Kott came up against 
the' psychologically troubling passage in. 
“Richard HI" in which Anne succumbs to- 
the . blandishments of the Richard of 
Gloucester, who bad murdered her husband - 
and father-in-law. Kott's commentary cited 
those French women who in World- War II - 
collaborated with the Germans who had> 
just killed their fathers -and husbands. It 
was a disturbing but striking gloss that 
made an improbable scene humanly pos- 






5 best yet". 

• go union. 1 
Ipussus- 
SP.Examirfer. 



inS 


2 no 



■* 'it, to lean back and think through all (hat 
is implied in that short-but powerful paper. 

In the introduction. Professor Levia re- 
calls two men who influenced him: George 
.. Lyman Kittredge of Harvard and Elmer 
Edgar Stoll of the University of Minnesota, 
a rnan now largely forgotten. Kittredge, as 
everyone knows, had an' enormous reputa- 
■ tioh, but he was a disappointment to Levin. 

. He does credit him, however, with concen- 
trating on the language of the plays, gloss- 
ing Lines and references .and bringing the 
students close to Elizabethan English. 

FnlargingTPoirit of View ’ ' " 

It was Stoll, however, who enlarged the 
young man’s view of the poet by empha- 
. . .sizing, that, .the .theater. wa&_ Shakespeare’s . 

' natural habitat, a fact trot- always self- 
evident in Kittredge’s classes. Stoll, put 
Shakespeare iback into his-time and showed 
that his.' work 'reflected the Elizabethan 
world .view.- 

The influence of both of these men fan : 
still- be felt in the essays. Shakespeare’s 
language surfaces in “Shakespeare's No- 
-menclature,’*: in which the connpta- 
tive .. value of a name, the sound ’arid 
texture of the syllables are shown to 
aid and abet the meaning of the text in 
, the most cunning of ways. “The power of 
naming is; intimately allied tx> the gift of 
characterization,” Mr. Levin writes. 

■- Language figures also in ’Tons and Sen-; 
sibilxty In Roq\eo /and Juliet.” Mr. Levin - 
points out how the speech ■cfthe charac- 
ters alters with the ebb and flow of their 
feelings in such a way that one can judge 
-.the state of their emotions from the num- 
ber of'monosyllables in their lines. 

His insistence that' Shakespeare was a 
craftsman-in his own time and not merely 
. a classic provides interesting confronta- 
• 'tions both with the quick and the dead: 
'with Charles Lamb, Robert Bridges, Jan 
Kott. He sees no merit in the notion enter- 
' taihed'by the first two that the plays are 
. better considered- as literary efforts than 
.' as dramatic vehicles. -Bridges’s argument 


"Falsta/f Uncolted” is altogether be- 
guiling jn showing how clever and re- 
-sourceful Shakespeare was in making tip 
for the limitations of the. stage. The plays 
are full of horses of all sorts who show up 
in-.our minds but never on the stage. 

"Shakespeare’s imagery,” Professor Levin 
writes, "Is so pervaded with terms of horse- 
manship, and his descriptive passages are 
such a vivid substitute. for the actual ap- 
pearance of horses, that we seldom miss 
the animals themselves.” The value. of the 
essays is that such close reading alerts 
the playgoer to notice those small things 
in Shakespeare whose effect he has felt 
but whose cause he has overlooked. 

The finest essay in scope and fruitful- 
ness, however, is the one referred to, “The 
Shakespearean - Overplot. '* which can -be 
defined as one “that looks backward and 
forward * from- the highest vantage point 
over the broadest area/- reaffirming those 
principles erf social add cosmic order 
: Ulysses enunciated in. Tfoilus and Cres- 
sid£’ ” 

Don’t Slight Overplot 

It is, if I understand it right, the moral 
order in which the plays take place. To 
lose sight of the overplot is to diminish ' 
the dimensions of the play. For a director. 
Professor Levin says, to give undue weight 
to the lovers in “Antony and Cleopatra” 
and to slight the overplot is to forget the 
primary vehicle for the assertion of public 
• duty and higher morality. 

The idea is akin to A. C. Bradley's ob- 
servation that villainy is never left vic- 
torious at the close of Shakespeare's plays. 
The violation of the moral law leaves a 
fissure in the Shakespearean universe that 
like a geological fault closes up impas- 
sively but inexorably so that that particular 
evil does not endure. 

•‘Shakespeare and the Revolution of the 
Times’* is as impressive hr detail as it is in 
its larger judgments. It is hard- which to 
admire more, the scholarship contained in 
it or the-Hses-tn which it is put. ' " 


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‘llMl Piiaw XUKti TlMtiS, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1976 


Ndtr Jlork ®ime$ 

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ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Publisher 

• 

JOHN B. OAKES, Editorial Page Editor 
A* H. BASKIN, Assistant Editorial Pago Editor 

• 

A. M. ROSENTHAL, Managing Editor 
SEYMOUR TOPPING, Deputy Managing Editor 
ARTHUR CELB, AvaiatoiU Managing Editor 
PETER M1LLOSES, Assistant Managiu g Editor 
JACK ROSENTHAL, Associate Editor 
• 

CHARLOTTE CURTIS, Associate Editor 
CLIFTON DANIEL, Associate Editor 
MAX FRANKEL, Associate Editor 
TOM WICKER, Associate Editor 


Running of the Bulls 

Politicians like to run for re-election in rising markets. 
This has become such a truism that business cycle 
theorists can chart a predictable relationship between 
the coming of a national election every four years and 
the incumbent Administration's expansive fiscal and 
monetary policies. With, the exception of I960, every 
postwar Presidential election year has seen at least a 
mild economic boom. 

The economy is running true to form for the Ford 
Administration this year. Hie gross national product 
calculated in real terms rose 7.5 percent in the first 
quarter, a sharper gain than almost anyone had antici- 
pated. Consumer and business confidence have clearly 
begun to revive with many individuals once again buying 
automobiles, household appliances and other costly 
items. Stock prices may be shaping up into a new bull 
market. 

Even inflation and unemployment — those twin eco- 
nomic nightmares— have; superficially, become Jess 
scary. The rate of inflation dropped in the first quarter 
to less than 4 percent, and it is now a reasonable pros- 
pect that unemployment by autumn may fall below 7 
percent Both figures are still very high compared to 
what used to be considered normal but they are well 
below the levels of recent years. 


From. President Ford's vantage point as a candidate 
for election in November, what matters is not so much 
the exact statistics as the trend of events, with the rate 
of new layoffs low and inflation apparently abating, 
voters are much less apt to be in an angry, punitive 
mood on Election Day than they would have been if the 
recession of 1974-75 were still inflicting its full misery. 

Is President Ford justified in taking electoral credit 
for this recovery? Democrats in Congress observe that 
they gave tbe nation a bigger tax reduction and a bigger 
budget last year than Mr. Ford wanted and that without 
this added stimulus, the economy today would be per- 
forming less well. Administration economists counter that 
in such a huge economy, it is unclear whether the added 
stimulus made much difference. 

What is clear is that what most Democrats had 
thought their best issue — the Ford Administration’s 
management of a faltering economy— is fast melting 
away. Having planned to depict Mr. Ford as a second 
Herbert Hoover, they must now develop other and more 
complicated issues, of which there are plenty at hand, 
as we endeavored to demonstrate in a recent series of 
editorials on the subject 

• However. It would be truly ironic if Mr. Ford did not 
get to enjoy tbe political benefits of the economic 
recovery. As the stock market soars, consumers buy and 
workers return to the assembly lines. Ronald Reagan 
hammers away at the President for his alleged delin- 
quencies in foreign and military affairs. It is just barely 
possible that jobs and prices may mean so little to 
conservative prosperous Republican primary voters in 
Texas and other major states, that, beguiled by the possi- 
ble loss of the Panama Canal, the growth of Soviet 
power, and the dangers of detente, they could turn away 
from the uninspiring Mr. Ford. Even when the bulls are 
Tunning, the way of an incumbent President can be 
strewn with rocks. 


Closing College Doors 

. In announcing his intention to leave his post of 
United Slates Commissioner of Education on Aug. 1, 
Terrel H. Bell cited as a major reason for his departure 
the imminent prospect of having to support three sons 
in college. Mr. Bell’s new position as Commissioner of 
Higher Education and chief executive of the Board of 
Regents in his home state of Utah will pay $11,000 more 
than his present salary of $37,800. 

Coming from this high-ranking Federal eduction offi- 
cial, an otherwise very personal decision makes a point 
of considerable public interest It underscores the dam- 
aging impact of the appalling inflation in college costs. 
A state of affairs that makes it difficult for parents ’ in 
the $37,000 income bracket to finance their children’s 
figher education suggests outright disaster for the vast 
majority of American middle-class families in the $12,000 
to $ 20,000 range who are considered too affluent for 
Federal or state scholarship aid. 

Is it too much to expect that the Education Commis- 
sioner’s persona] experience . might persuade the Ford 
Administration to open its eyes to a clear and present 
danger — that college gates are being shut to increasing 
numbers of able, middle-class young people on economic 
grounds alone? Nothing less is at stake than the future 
of an open, upwardly mobile democratic society. 


India’s Peace Drive 

By this time there can hardly be any doubt that 
India's Prime Minister Indira Gandhi has embarked upon 
a major peace drive, an effort to improve her country’s 
relations with ail the significant nations whose ties with 
India have been scarred by major tensions in recent 
years. 

It is most unlikely that mere coincidence is at work 
when New Delhi announces within a few days that it 
win exchange ambassadors with China and that it will 
take steps to normalize relations with Pakistan, its two 
principal enemies during the past decade or more. In 
this same period, United States Ambassador William B. 
Sax be proclaims that he sees improvements in United 
States-lndian relations, which, he implies, justify the 
substantial planned program of American food and devel- 
opment aid to India. 

- Whatever its reason, this turn in Indian foreign policy 


has to be greeted enthusiastically by all who wish a 
more peaceful atmosphere in Asia. .Cynics will argue 
that Mrs. Gandhi is trying to improve her international 
image, which has been so badly tarnished by the dictator- 
ship she has instituted. But even on this hypothesis Mrs. 
Gandhi’s moves must be welcomed since the more posi- 
tive India’s foreign relations are, the less ground there is 
for continuing the extraordinarily repressive domestic 
measures that have been in effect in that country for the 
past 10 months. 

The one capital where there is probably concern about 
Mrs. Gandhi's new activist peace policy is Moscow. For 
the Soviet Union, the ideal situation has been that of 
recent years in which an isolated India fearful of its 
neighbors and distrustful of tbe United States has looked 
almost alone to Moscow for aid of all kinds. In the new 
situation, the Soviet Union will have to recognize that 
India is achieving greater freedom of action as it seeks 
a wider variety of friends throughout the world. 


Elusive Pay Freeze . . . 

In deferring a decision on the three-week-old transit 
pay pact, the Emergency Financial Control Board has 
once again sidestepped its responsibility to clamp a 
tight lid on the municipal payroll as an essential part of 
its mandate to restore New York City to solvency. 

The cost-of-living increase granted to the transit 
workers will seriously complicate the problems of the 
deficit-ridden Transit Authority, which already is talk- 
ing about another fare rise. If the transit pay pattern is 
extended to other municipal workers, the impact on the 
city’s fiscal plan could be devastating. Nevertheless, 
the control board, which is charged with overseeing 
the integrity of the plan, has resorted to legalisms and 
technicalities to avoid a ruling. 

The law establishing the board last September called 
for a one-year '‘freeze" on the “salary or wages of 
employees of the city and employees of covered organi- 
zations," including the Transit Authority. It gave the 
board broad powers to enforce or modify the freeze and 
to extend it for the duration of a three-year emergency — 
an extension which the board voted without fanfare at 
a recent meeting. If there are ambiguities in the wording 
of the law, there is no obscurity about its basic mission. 
Its duty is to save the city — and its employees — from 
fiscal ruin, and that means holding the pay line as 
one key element. 


The plain fact is that the Transit Authority, with its 
fares already raised beyond prudent limits and facing 
the prospect of diminished Federal aid, cannot afford 
any increased payroll costs. Even if the transit pact 
contained ironclad guarantees of productivity gains, 
which it apparently does not, all tbe potential savings 
would be needed to help close a widening gap between 
income and revenues — a deficit that neither city nor 
state has the means to overcome. 

The control board's inaction on the transit pay 
question unfortunately fits into a pattern of evasion 
on the broader wage-freeze question. The board still 
has not ruled on last fall's costly school settlement, 
nor has it objected to the recent payment of increments 
to teachers, despite the absence of any agreement with 
the teachers' union on a wage deferral. And, in face 
of its own recent decision to extend the pay freeze, 
the board has not ruled on arrangements concluded by 
the city with most unions which would, in fact, restore 
the deferred wages in the fiscal year that begins 
July L 

If this, city and state are to survive the rough 
fiscal road that still lies ahead. New Yorkers 
need a control board that really controls, a wage 
freeze that stays frozen. 

> 

. . . Pension ‘Ripoff 

There seems no end to the propensity of New York 
State legislators for giving away money. New York City 
does not have. _ . . 

Latest example of legislative profligacy at the city’s 
expense ds a “sleeper” bill that was pushed through an 
accommodating Senate by John J. March!, Republican- 
Conservative of Staten Island. The Marchi measure would 
freeze into municipal pension systems a temporary 
provision which "presumes” that any heart ailment 
suffered hy a police officer or fireman is service- 
connected, entitling him to retire on three-quarters pay 
regardless of age or length of service. 

Since the so-called heart bill was first enacted on an 
annual basis six years ago, there has been a virtual 
epidemic of “service-connected” heart disease among 
police and firemen, many of whom have left city jobs 
to take equally demanding work elsewhere, meanwhile 
collecting fat municipal pensions. The resulting sharp 
rise in disability retirements costs the city an estimated 
$17 million annually. 

This "classic ripoff,’’ as the City Club has described 
it, has been denounced by a municipal police surgeon 
who has helped to administer it and who points out that 
policemen should have fewer heart attacks than ordinary 
citizens because they are more active. Both the State 
Pension Commission and the Mayor’s Management 
Advisory Board have found the heart provision unjusti- 
fied and have called for its elimination among recom- 
mendations for broader pension reforms. 

That is the direction in which the Legislature must be- 
gin to move — toward sweeping pension revision — if this 
fiscally embattled city is to be relieved from the crushing 
burden of soaring pension costs. The Marchi -bill is an 
intolerable retrogression to the^kind Of political irre- 
sponsibility which helped create the fiscal crisis in the 
first place. It is particularly disturbing that it comes 
from as normally responsible a legislator as Senator 
Marchi. 


Letters to 

Greed vs. Our Democracy 


To the Editor; 

All this hoopla -about the Bicenten- 
nial may turn out to be Hi-conceived. 
Instead of a hymn of celebration, 
perhaps more appropriate would be a 
requiem for an ideal that seems to be 
dead: a truly, democratic society, with 
justice and fairness for afl. 

The Teamsters’ contract settlement 
of April 3 provokes these somber 
' thoughts. Once more, as so often in 
the past, a powerfully entrenched 
group has flexed its muscle and done 
its will on the American society and 
its economy. *Th& public be damned” 
. seems to be the spirit of the day. 

Coming at a time when unemploy- 
ment is near its high for recent dec- 
ades and when control over inflation 
is in critical balance, a settlement 
which gives an already highly paid 
group of skilled workers a cost-of- 
living provision plus an absolute in- 
crease of $1.65 an hour over three 
years phis sizable ■ fringe benefits is 
strongly inflationary, economists Seid- 
man and Greenspan to the con tr ary 
i notwithstanding. 1 am not an econo- 
mist, but I am an expert on inflation^ 
with a dozen years of experience* 

The Administration, which could, 
have invoked the Taft-Hartley Act 
and called for an eighty-dav cooling- 
off period, did nothing. Now Secretary 
Usery says that the settlement was in 
the best interests of the Teamsters (no 
doubt it was), of the trucking indus- 
try (perhaps) and of the country (this 
only in the sense that it is better to 


Supersonic Hypocrisy 

To the Editor. 

It is with some amazement that I 
realize the Senators and Representa- 
tives who voted to ban the SST be- 
cause of its effect on the ozone layer 
are the same people, by and large, 
who have voted to approve funds for 
the B-l bomber — $21 billion for the 
production of 244 supersonic bombers. 
The media also has kept a low report- 
ing profile on the fact that for more 
than a decade there have been regular 
and very numerous supersonic mili- 
tary flights, complete with the prob- 
ability of heavy radiation from the 
nuclear warheads which they carry. 

It seems very hypocritical to me to 
vote to ban one without banning the 
other. I feel sure that British Airways 
and Air France will have their Con- 
cordes running at scheduled times so 
that there can be strict controls main - 
tained over the numbers of flights, 
height, etc., while I am not so certain 
that military powers in the various 
nations with supersonic planes flying 
will be so obliging. 

As 1 understand it, the problem 
with supersonic planes is that at the 
height at which they fly. (in the 60,- 
0 00-foot range) the exhausts purport- 
edly affect the ozone layer of the 
earth's atmosphere. This holds true 
for both commercial and military 
planes. I believe the reason that most 
people are protesting the SSTs in 


To Love a Child 

To the Editor: 

The April 10. New York Times 
carried on article on the return of four 
children to their mother after five 
years with foster parents. It is one of 
the most glaring acts of injustice that 
I have ever read about. 

Their mother, Miss Wallace, does 
not love them or she would not have 
neglected them. 

Their foster parents do love them, 
and consider their welfare. 

Their mother does not mind remov- 
ing them from school in the middle 
of the term. Their foster mother is 
worried about it 

At the home of Miss Wallace, who 
will be their father? 

At their foster home they have an 
adopted father they love. 

One of the most outrageous remarks 
made by the State Supreme Court’s 
Appellate Division was that "the 
foster parents should not have allowed 
their love to grow so deep.” 

At what point does one stop love? 

The fact that the children will not 
be allowed even to see their foster- 
parents is cruel. To separate them 
(sending two to a new foster-home, 
and two to their mother) is inhuman. 

How will Miss Wallace bring up four 
daughters who do not wish to live 
-with her? Elizabeth McGhee 

New Canaan, Cram., April 13, 1976 


Of Education and Racism 

To the Editor: 

Ronald Rubin’s attack on the City 
University Graduate School [Op-Ed 
April 20] displays, both racism and 
ignorance. When he argues that we 
should support “the minority-member 
high school graduate seeking to be- 
come a beginning civil servant” but 


be robbed than to starve' to - death). 

Mr. Salrirngn says it is too early to 
tell 'whether the settlement is. infla- 
tionary, that we must wait and see. 

' Well, well see, ail right. Unless, in the 
labor, settlements ahead, other unions 
curb their appetites while the Team- 
sters- gorge theirs, the result is not hi 
doabi. Mr.' Greenspan admits ruefully 
that the settlement was at the outer 
limit of tolerance but says it" might, 
not be inflationary this year because 


What Carter Is No. 

To the Editor;. ' ” 

I would hardly be a Jimr.J * 
apologist, and have, as a 
out of Georgia, written, of b’ 
past with something Jsssthm 
menL But it strikes me, be; , . - 
^derations of his own canty" 
a particularly mischievous b 
ness, CM' ^current feverish 
transmogrify tfaosentray, stu ^ \ 
phrases of bis about ethnfc ‘ - 

hoods/iato the inadvertent' „ 
some submerged sink of rad; , r ; 


of the small number of contracts com-'. Lord knosvs, there are re&s& 


mg up for .'negotiation. Is the big 
problem, then, to get through this 
year, or past the November election? 

R is not intended -here to single out 
the Teamsters for criticism, although 
a group which owes most of its pros- 
perity to an Interstate Highway Sys- 
tem built at public expense, might have 
shown more conaderation for the 
hand which fed it. The criticism is 
meant for every power group in the 
nation - which is ready to shut, down 
however large a segment of the Ameri- 
can economy to gain its selfish ends. 

Greed must be curbed. Unless the 
multinationals, big business, financial 
Interests, labor, professional people — 
all of them— curb it within their indi- 
vidual domains, there win - arise an 
irresistible demand for an authori- 
tarian government to set things - 
straight. Should that happen,- the 
celebration of 1976 might seem rather 
hollow in retrospect {Editorial April 34 
william Wallace ford 
Amherst, Mass., April 6, 1976 


0$ 


New York, for example, is the sonic 
boom. The Concorde, however, has 
very strict regulations about where it 
can go over the speed of sound — 
which is over the sea and nowhere 
near New York or Washington. 

I don't know of any such regula- 
tions for military planes. However, 
military airports are usually not so 
dose to civilization as ere civilian 
ones. I feel that there should be some 
clarification on these points, and some 
honest and unhypocritical decisions 
made— either for the SST (both nuli- 
iary and civilian) or opposed to it, 
but not pro military and con civilian 
supersonic jets. Laura M. Wilbur 
Southport, Conn., April 13, 1976 


' to - have : misgivings . abou - ' . 
Carter, but this -is simply n > 
them. : 

One need only glance agaf 
whole experience "of Carts . 
recogmre that, pn this couh - * J 
he has acted* steadily ‘ not 
considerable decency brit,_'j? 

. private and miedebrated" 
with a singular courage. Wh ■ ' 
pening, .though, seems a sur, 
ect to extract, put of the c& 
all his past,' those few- uni.. 
precisions of term in Indiana - : 
with a mighty forensic ltd -. 
them, as .it weije, into a sepai 
cartoon of tile man. \ ■ 

One mighty not have been' 

* surprised at -this reflex in 
when it comes .to gulping a: ? 
conceivable passing advan taj~ 
-prayen raore aftenthannot • 
discrim mating -as a mullet in ~ " 
frenzy. "But Jt-ili becomes ol 1 

- Udall arid Julian Bond^both 

• I happen to know as far moi !- 

tive arid elegant , of sensib". - 
they, have appeared in purs 
ploy. ... 

The real poiirt is. this: Vr 
democracy: hair most critical! 
is illusion, unreality, polemic- r 
time in its images of the j - r 
■whom its destiny Is-- inroi.:-' 
desperately otk^- popular ./• r 
of -this ; long national detisio - . 

■ presidency are. already muzr 
fuddled enough: The clangor 
alchemize Carter’s clumsy ' 
into the -testament of a-xov^’ , 
is really no more than anothfj” . - ' 
ous investment in bedlam. * • 

- We; can never know all 1 • 

about the nature of a partic" 

■ who would* lead us, but we 
tairily recognize some of th . 
that plainly aren't true. And * 
elre Jimmy Carter may be, he- 
ft racist. If, from -his unlucky " • 
of terminologies at one or two l . 
his competitors should now it 
conjure Turn into that, .it v - 
victory of polemical hoodoo 
serious ’ reality. 

. It’s hard to believe that 
responsible and sensitive ol.. 
ponents — like Udall, like Bor 
find any real cheer and rei — 
in that species of political v tr ~ 
Marsha: 

-- Atlanta, April 


not "the doctoral candidate in Renais- 
sance history,” his clearly racist as- 
sumption is that members of minori- 
ties are incapable of doing more than 
low-level clerical work. Should black 
and Spanish-speaking students, women 
and older> persons be denied a chance 
to become scholars, scientists and col- 
lege professors if they have the 
interest and ability? The CUNY Grad- 
uate School serves a much greater 
proportion of such students than any 
other major graduate institution. Does 
Mr. Rubin believe that these students, 
virtually all of whom have to work 
part-time to support themselves, can 
afford to transfer to New York Uni- 
versity or Columbia, with their 
dwindling scholarship funds? If so, he 
must be completely out of touch with 
academic and economic reality. 

Wendell Stacy Johnson 
Professor of Engtishr Hunter College 

New York, April 10, 1978 


Loch Ness Levity 

To the Editor 

Your recent reporting on the Loch 
Ness monster in daily and Sunday 
editions of Tbe Times has elicited 
comments from pundits. Eric Sevareid 
stated that “there must be something 
in it” if The New York Times took 
recent reports seriously. 

The April II Week in Review tells, 
us that the British naturalist Sir Peter 
Scott suggested the designation “nes- 
siteras rhombopteryx” for Loch Ness’ 
“endangered specie,” so that recogni- 
tion could be secured to bring it under 
British laws protecting wild animals. 

Since an anagram of "nessiteras 
rhombopteryx” is "Monster Hoax by 
Sir Peter S.,” what we really need is 
protection of newspapers from "leg- 
pulling” scientists. ■ - A J. Gracia 
Soufhbury, Conn., April 12, 1976 


Corporate 


Thai York Times 


Affiliated Companies 


HYTk The Ne w YorkT imes 
I Company 

l eUd 2»TfeBt4SdSt,N.2HM»S '. 

■AgfruUtt OCHS SOL T i BRIWrE B, ChairBumtMdPntidauI. 
J OStN Jr. MCCABE, Senior Vice President 

JAMBS C. GOODALE, Executive Vies President 
BtrCHAEL E. EVAN, Secretary 

RALPH BOWMAN, TrecMWtr 

WALTER MATTSON, Executive Vice President 
JOHN MORTIMER, Senior Vice President 
JOHN D. POMFKET, Sewr Vice President 
DONALD A. NTZEN, Vice President 
FRED D. THOMPSON, Vice President 

SYDNEY GKUSON, Executive Vice President ' 
BENJAMIN HANDELMAN, Senior Vice President 
CHARLES'S. BRAKEFIELD, Vice President 
WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Vice President 
JOHN >1. HARRISON, Viet President 
ROBERT S. NOVEMBER, Vies President 
ARNOLD 20HN, Vice President 


Back to the Cold 

To' the ’Editor: . 1 . 

' It is interesting to read of J" 
Kissinger’s,comment on the el. 
Communists to West- Europear^ 
meats. -In' decrying this sitaa 
Secretary inserts the U.S. dire „ 
the electoral politics of other 
erratic” countries. However, 

Secretary believes this to b« . 
priate, he cannot object whei. 

East Germany or the U.S.SJL il' _ 
intervene on behalf of what tl 
sider to be their own interest T V 
politics of Italy or France. 11' 
however, even more reveaiin ' 
the approach taken by the S-7’ '• 
of State is his concern as to ti 1/ 
tion of the U.S. which Cor . ~ ' 
electoral victories might prod f 
seems to forget that for the bel- ; - 
of two decades the official '. 

U.S. vis-d-vis the U.SJ5.R. wa. ' 
cisra and isolation and the enc ^ ' 
ment of a “drang nach ost / ■ 

Adolf Hitler. The problems CC. ; ' • 

faces now are a result of its pa ■ /' ‘ 

rices in international affairs, n 
which have not changed since t*. ; 
of Theodore Roosevelt and the 
up' San Juan Hill in the Philipp . 

Is it not now time for Ai . .. 
foreign policy to address itself ... 

. problem of how the U.S. can pea-,.^ : 
live in a world the majority of :"" ' 
people reject imperialism and 
economic domination, to 
U.S. still adheres, and where m - ' , 
these same people also have ' 
doubts about the American me *■ 
capitalism? If these same peofL. '~ 
Emope and- elsewhere, now lotV”-- . .. 
other rotations, the U.S. must / : . 
the blame; retorn to warmer ^ r-.. 
cold-war diplomacy will coj./' ■ 
more Europeans of the bankrup ~ - : 
our policies and our system. ^ 

Robert J. Rt-' v * . 

Philadelphia, April 9, : .' :: . 

• ■ ; v._ 

Tribute to Louise Huger : . 

To the-Edrtor: 

With sorrow and a great sens>. 
loss r read the dispatch about 
death of Louise Huger Beaver,^;.-. ’ . 

before her retirement in 196S « >].’ 

. with . distinction as letters edito ■ 
The New ■' York Times. 

Although I did riot know.MfesH^ > -- 
personally, I had much contact /- ■ 
her office over the-yeare. V* 

A few months. ago, by coincide' .. 

I met her for tbe first time in Me- 
chusetts and learned from her bos' J' .. 
that abe was very ill. with, term 
cancer. Though she- knew that ;• 
days were- numbered, there was nt-. . 
trace ■ of sadness . or self-pity ah . ! . 
Louise Huger. It -took only minutes. 
be. aware that -.one stood' in ; 

presence of a rare, keenly intelligt :. 
gracious arid - perceptive lady. Th 
are too few of . her kind around. S • 
will be missed.. 

• -Helenka Pantalsx _ V : 

New York, April 12, )'■ ; 



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Torture in Iran: ‘It Is a Hell 
Made by One Man for Another Man’ 


-2-v.v* 
,"■ ■<-: ; •-/- 


':^ v - - ;.. 1 , 
i^ r *v^ James Restoa 

- ," J 1> : ; ■ ■ 

.:; . ;;^«rror*. April 20 * — Ever 
' A: .?sto- Rockefeller withdrew 
:.- J • ;'T076 Vice-Presidential race, 

' --: i ; ; ned to drop out of tbe.head- 
y ' -st as completely as Spiro 
oat has he. bees doing, and 
‘ 3 going, if anywhere? 

: ' r -’^S one thing.- he has been off 
•:. l< world leaders about what 
■‘.: r ,;p\an regard, as a serious de- 
' ; 1 lexica’s influence, and for 
'■•■-• has. been preparing and 

:: -I .^nhe best series of speeches 
:.: 'rnal problems r of any poli- 

• . r “" re scene todays 
. . f 1 -' : o great’ compliment, for as 
.. ' - resident himself observed 
..'J. 1 ay, “We are pot having an 
:: ’ u ebate on. the . grave issues 
' :'^esent-^ay America, . ': . In 
■': \ of primaries, we witness 

xmallty contests. . . . - • 
re the* facts.^’We’ve been on 
" negative’; kick for four 

- ■' -^ie.been too king backward 
: - '^ ■C^ been rehasifiiig the past! 

Vr’s face j&e toEnre. It’s rime - 
. ^ pur national self-interest. ' 

• i: 'devote our energies 'to ' 

: -for this third century.” 

T^.’^iuiot have been amused. 

. . '' ■ ; a i awn advice, Mr. Rocke- ‘ 
j SeS to define -these present 
'•* r -i v issues In eight different 
'"'••“ Tsar the last tsw> months: ' 

•'. ;^cfissive. expansion of gov- ' 
' - -d'the -deciine of authority ! 
- ; - i ptoties in^merica; 

:■ :*iw-iJse of selfishness, the 
. -4-i special-interest groups, 
of our. energy policies; 
LTeral-state orations and 
.'.tax, spending^ and regula- 
Js, together with his own 

^SHINtiTON 

~r,. dealing with revenue-. 

: solidation -of Federal aid- 
' 'ms, “100 percent . Federal 
' , public assistance pro- 

rand religion in American 

- ;-..ihe basic principles of 
-mding and its growth — 

- v i ta human dignity and 

- nature of man, .its trust 
^_Vlduak taking responsi- 
~ eir actions — are being 

"■ teilehged. . . . Centrally 
' filnost- totalitariW power 
' ^uhd, not losing it . . . 

.fed' ho comparable chal- 
: - f way of life — our very 
In : ail our history.” 

^'farmers and the Ameri- 
ca economic freedom and 
partnership between the 
^ . irivate domains;., oo, .Ute ? 

»f both growth and con- 
the capacity' of science 
.•■•he two. 

■ ai sentences merely sug- 

! of Mr. Rockefeller's ef-. 

has done is to interpret 
- . he Critical Choices Com- 
ablished after he left the 

- Of New York, and apply 
ng years: What is inter-- 

.J his analysis of the 
_.'ris pretty -good, was 
' .»d, because the news- 
_>wniu thought-tis polib- 
■ ked fairiy bleak. 

•; . Rockefeller keeps plan- 
' .^es oa the future, not 
xriitical - future is very- 
tbecanse he needs a job. 

- <p|^didike him, agree or . 

... -,his- ; policies, but ever 

. .- ^Roosevelt ^ioi^ht him 
Washington de- 
-Latin. Amer- 
. ffon’t.^ave, he has 

’ ; public service, 
-t^ir^ised, but he was - 
. '- . Men-. Richard Nixon 
..!• ^iS fpr 'the Vice Prea- 

- " fi Spirt^ Aghew disaster. 

- - ■* : ^e authority- and the re- 
^,-.: ; . ^0jjed^fpr t and - thought' 

-■ - 1 " 1 after 3fr. Ford nomi-' , 

'• He sulked ' 

-J i ' v iflowed Bo 

.. . v offers ^to- snipe at him 
■ i-'/Oratf-f^S^th Ronald/ 

- 1»566^c refuge tn 
.■ v "®‘ . * and ’ is- 

•’ ’ - -without 

^&-thrPFfesident’s poll-’ 

• ■ -^c cornevto terms with 

• — ■"< -this compromise, arid -he 

-.r -'. in the President’s elec- | 
^-hut after, that, what? 

: iler has -always said tie j 


i iiplpr 

MV/WiiM a 

i r'ii Z'l-t’ : - 

__ mm 

\ gsra^?. - 


By Reza 
Baraheni 


He looked at toy 
wife. “Madam,” he 
said, “we’ll bring the 
professor back in two 
hours.*’ Nobody said a 
word. 

Their two hours 
means 102 days, and 
sometimes ■ the. whole 
of eternity, ^nd once 
you are out of their 
prisons, that Is, if you 
are out at all, you are 
so different that nei- 
ther you nor anyone 
who knew you before, 
can tell for sure 
whether it's actually 
you who have 'come 
forth from the deacL 
They took everything 
away from me. When 
they blindfolded me 
again, I had no belt, 
no shoelaces, no socks, 
no handkerchief, no 
pen, pencil or paper. 

The double chin, the 
protruding- globe of a - 
belly rising right from 
below the double chid, the yellowing 
teeth with one or two teeth studded 
in gold, and the fists- ever ready to 
- raio their blows upon their opponent, 
l and the instruments hanging from the 
walls convinced me at a glance that 
X was in for- some thing I had not- ex- 
pected in my life. It was a sudden 
revelation -with both sudden and grad- 
ual consequences. 

'Tie him up,” Dr. Azudi ordered his 
men, and turning to me he said: “Go 
and lie down!” There was a bed bn the 
floor. There were also two other iron 
beds, one on top of the other, in an- 
other comer of the room. These last 
two, 7 later learned, -'were used - to 
bum the backs, generallythe buttocks, 
of the prisoners. They tie you tp the 
upper bed on your back, and with the 
heat coming from a torch or a small 
heater they burn your back in order 
to extract information. Sometimes the 
burning is extended to the spine, as 
a result of which paralysis is certain. 

There were also all sizes of whips 
banging from nails on the walls. Elec- 
tric prods stood on little stools. The 
nail-plucking instrument stood on the 
far side. 

The gallows stood on the other side. 
They hang you upside down and then 
someone beats you with a club on 
your legs, or uses the electric prod 
on your chest or your genitals, or they 



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lower you down', pull your pants up 
and one of them tries to rape you 
while you - are stiir haiiging upside 
down. 

There were in the other torture 
rooms worse instruments which other 
prisoners would describe:, the .weight- 
cuffs that break your shoulders in Jess 
than two .hours, of horrible torture; 
the electric shock instrument, appar- 
ently. a recent, introduction into', the 
Iranian torture 'industry; and' the pres- 
sure. .device which imposes pressure 
upon the skull, to the extent that you 
either tell them what they want or let 
your bones break into pieces. 

When the whip came down it was 
like* a huge, hot charcoal; live, Burn- 
ing and tearing at the sbles of the 
feet, crippling the whole legs. I waS 
screaming at the top of my voice. Now 
I'could Understand the meaning of the' 
screams of the other people the bight 
before. These screams stayed With me 
for 102 days, and 'when I left the 
prison, they didn't leave me. 

Once, months later, when I called 
my interrogator to tell him that I 
wanted to leave Teheran for a few 
days, as soon as he picked . up the 
receiver the same nauseating, plead- 
ing and pitiable screams - could be 
heard over the telephone. The tele- 
phone number was 320773., Everyone 


. By Harrison J. Goldin 

New circumstances tend to generate 
new and often confusing language. 
“Backloading” is not a better way 
to put freight on trucks; “stretch- 
out” is not a miracle undergarment 
fabric. Both terms express the wishful 
thinking of some -people that -New 
York City can still, at this late date, 
put off into the future the far-reaching 
and painful reordering of the way it 
raises and spends money , that is es- 


why $?00 million- had to be cut by 
the expiration of tije curyept .fiscal 
year on June 30- 

In the new fiscal year, starting July 
1, the city would, without further 
cuts, enter the year with a SI billion 
deficit ($200 million of the $2.2- billion 
starting deficit having already been 
cut this year); but the $6.6 billion 
package provides that-of the $1 billion 
gap between' revenues and expendi- 
tures only $470 million will be -cov- 
ered next year. • 

Hence, while $4-70 million of the 


sential to the development by July. 1, ' billion dollar deficit will be covered 


1977 of a budget in which expendi- 
tures do not exceed revenues. 

■ The arguments for delaying budget 
cuts are strong and appealing: fewer 
employees, who would be condemned 
to joblessness will have to be let go; 
private institutions receiving aid from 
the dty will have more time to make 
alternative arrangements as municipal 
support is cut back; Federal and New 




• an ything - Jess 

... f -Pr&sideocy, but this 
never- fit/hfe: tempera- 
.3er. He Is good at the 
■ of government cere- 
mtially jie' is a man of 
it for recraiting*nien of. 
„ ^Imposed . few problems 

. I--"’.-.. ' * personally, ■ yef he 
, ; j pi^Iem-so bring. . 

'orit wins in November, 

. ^amg fdr a Secretary of 
Henry Kissinger; who 
•'"/-■'.JP of Government life 
• 4 . jrefnlieg’fr recommenda- 

• 7 If ■ Ford 1 doesn't win/ 

■ s the’ respect of the 

pem«Satic Party, and 
; * y havd- the opportunity,' 
y for continued Service. 

' V ' bbugh he woddn't like 

• \ •• will 'undoubtedly play 

.-elder Statesman, think- 
coming age. "with His- 
.-. misin. lt is useful . 
^nobody is paying much ■ 

, at he says, he' is about 

• - rienced ■ politician on 

• /seeking, out the - best 

. ; country and' trying to". 


York 1 State matching programs can 
be sustained a while longer. . 

But such arguments, despite their 
appeal, have a fatal flaw. They do not 
deal with the fact that delaying a bal- 
anced budget beyond the next fifteen 
months will produce levels of spend- 
ing for. which no cash exists and no- 
cash - can be -found. The Federal 'Gov- 


next year by cash froai'the credit 
package, the remaining $530 million 
of .the deficit must. be. eliminated 
through cuts.!,- . .. 

By the same token, tig city would— 
without more cuts— enter the last year 
Qf the plan on July. .1, ■ 1977 with ' a 
$470 million final deficit, except that 
the plan makes no cash available to 
subsidize an' operating deficit that 
year. That is why the remaining $470 
million deficit 7 requires- equivalent 
cuts in that .’amount for that year; 
voila,- a balanced budget in the third 
year! • 

• Proponents of backloading and 
stretch-out . apparently, believe that 
some new source of large-scale financ- 
ing wiH appear, possiWy from Wash- 
ington, to enable the.. city to live-. with 
its- defiriL But even if -a*- sympathetic 
new President .• takes . offiep -. on 
Jan. 20, 1977, would- hardly .pro- 
vide thrift to enable the city to avoid 
the Cuts:, scheduled for even the third 
year of the-financial plan,. starting. qn 
July !,-■ 1977, not to speak of the-fiscal 
year starting July J. 197& .- 
With nine months of its crucial 
three-year grace period already gone, 
the city does its^f; a- disservice by 
indulging in hopes that will not be. 
fulfilled. It creates t false- expectations 
that the timely .balancing' of its budget 
can be avoided. It ' disappoints and 
frustrates its friends, arms its enemies. 


cash can be JouraL The Fedend Gov- contributes to the further impairment 
emment is hostile; the state^doesn’r rf - own credibility, and feeds thd 
have it; we now know that trying to -^ onir in 


tax . to raise it will only accelerate its 
flight; nobody will lend it. 

A convulsive effort last November 
and December led, to a $6.6 bQJipn 


discontent 'among those' is Congress 
who never liked the idea: of even tem- 

place. 

Can $1 billion be cut from the ex- 


credit package ealejdated as suffipi^it - ■ .pensg. budget without tearing the city 
to cajry the nty ^through the three- -ap^to^jntji the city has demonstrated 


year period of budget balancing, and 
not beyond -ft -requires rapid, progress 
toward the achievement of actual' par- 
ity between expenditures and revenues 
by fiscal 197S. ’ • ' ' 

. Any backloading — the deferral - of 
scheduled budget cuts to the third 


that.it has fundamentally .re-rational-; 
ized bow- it spends money and the 
way it delivers services, it won’t have 
the standing or credibility to make the 
assmtion. So it ought to get on quickly 
with' the job— not of mindless peresnt- 


uMUfien. ^ ^^.^agecutsby departments, 2 percent 

year of the budget-balancing penod— -. ffl; * 1 ■ • 

orstretch-out— -4he extenSionTf that -» ^ ^ 3 f pei ^f nt her *T 

period beyond three years — would 

s-* ta 3? "• z, 

cu“ ii« city,-; *** ^ 

expense budget was roughly $12 bil- ' P® 10 ™ • 

lion in the red. But the credit package - — — — : - 

will give the city .only' $1 < billion Homson J. Goldin, is Comptroller of 
this year to meet the' deficit; that’s New York City . 


is welcome to ring up and hear some 
genuine screaming 

In only a few hours the torture 
chamber takes you back to the pri- 
meval forest With fear as the only 
reigning monarch. The meaning of life 
departs, and' you are suspended in a 
stupid.void in' which you are -totally 
atone, desperately alone. 

The hell Is with you until you dis- 
appear and then, somehow, it moves, 
on in the eternity of its own infernal 
presence; because, after all,' it might 
go on living after you cease to exist. 

You write because you think that 
you .can get rid of torture through 
writing about it. That may be the first 
urge. But the second urge arises from 
a more humane source. You write be- 
cause you think that torture and op- 
pression were made by man and can 
only be destroyed by man. 

Having come out of that hell, I 
know that there is nothing super- 
natural about it. It is a hell made by 
one man for another man, and it 
should be, must be, destroyed by man. 

Reza Baraheni, an Iranian who was 
arrested in Teheran in August 1973 
by the secret police, is the author of 
three novels and two dozen short 
stories. He is now in New York City. • 
This article, excerpted here, was pub- 1 
lished in a recent issue of the British i 
periodical Index on Censorship. I 


Unrest 
In France’s 
Academe 

By C. lr„ Sulzberger 

PARIS — -The 1968 French student 
uprising almost overthrew’ President 
de Goalie’s regime and,, indeed, wound- 
ed it so seriously that some months 
later, the general abruptly resigned 
and retired from public life. 

Now another wave of university 
manifestations has begun and the 
question is widely asked: Is the nation 
on the verge of a repeat performance? 
The answer is almost certainly no. The 
problem today is less critical than it 
was eight years ago, even though it 
is also more serious. 

- In 1968 there was an explosion by 
undergraduates against the- archaic 
system of administering universities. 
And, as their demonstrations gathered 
force and violence, other discontented 
elements derided to join in. 

Among these were organized labor, 
various left-wing or liberal parties, 
which never accepted de Gaulle’s ide- 
ology, as well as a hard core of right- 
wing anti-GauIlists who had refused to 
accept his Algerian independence pol- 
icy. The latter even infiltrated a few 
armed agents into student lodgings. 

For reasons having nothing to do 
with undergraduate protests, the op- 
positional movement gathered power- 
ful support that rendered the situation 
far more critical than it is now likely 
to become. This time, unlike eight 
years ago, it is not expected that 
unions will back the students and 
' thereby precipitate major crisis. 

Virtually all Frenchmen know there 
is a big problem In the universities 
whose student population was sud- 
denly swollen from 300,000 to 800,000 
after the 1968 difficulties. The figures 
officially tabulated aren’t exact since 
many young people only list them- 
selves most of the year as “students” 
to benefit from privileges like cheap 
meals. 

Nevertheless, almost 200,000 grad- 
uate annually from France’s 76 uni- 
versities and, armed with diplomas 
and great expectations, demand jobs. 


In fact engaged in wholesale manu- 
facture of social misfits. 

How the issue is resolved, mdst. 
determine the potential of France's 
next generation. The students them- 
selves show no desire to adjust their, 
-eurriculums to hard facts of life. Since 
1968 they have participated in. the 
administration of universities thro ugh 
elected student bodies but the latter 
. haven’t responded realistically. 

■ The extreme left (Trotskyists, Mao- 
ists, etc.) boycotts the elections of 
representatives and the moderate 
“silent majority” is too uninterested 
to participate effectively. This leaves 
the well-organized Communists— re- 
garded as “bourgeois” by the far ' 
left — in virtual control of s tuden t 
representation. 

. However, progress of the Socialist- 
• Communist . alliance- bn - France’s na- - 
tional scene inhibits its sponsorship 
of university violence. It is committed 
to seeking an electoral road to gov- 
ernmental power and doesn’t want the 
chances damaged by student riots. 

Therefore, paradoxically, the stronger 
the left alliance becomes in national 
politics, the Jess the possibility of - 
serious university violence. Nor is the 
general public sympathetic to protest- 
ing students as it was eight years ago. 
One underlying problem is that all 

FOREIGN AFFAIRS 

76 -universities are officially listed a* 
on a par, much as if Harvard and 
Slippery Rock were considered equal, - 
regardless of disparate faculty and ' 1 
student levels. The state controls 
entrance qualifications and examina- 
tions plus issuance of diplomas, which 
is not an autonomous responsibility 
of each university. 

This system is self-paralyzing; some 
institutions’ diplomas are clearly more 
equal than others. The universities 
talk about tbe need for individual 
autonomy but fear to practice it. The r 
weaker ones would immediately be “ 
exposed as such if no longer shielded 
by the anonymity of total state con- 
trol of all educational requirements. 

The Government wants the business 
world to be consulted on what job •' 
opportunities lie ahead so new cur- 
ri cul urns could be proposed, reducing •> 
reliance on the humanities. But most 
youngsters consider such a pragmatic A 
option as demeaning. 

Stalemate is the result The existing ' 


But about one million people or 4.7 educational machine is counterprt> 
percent of the labor force are un- ductive in terms of French society’s 
employed, the highest figure since needs. Prodded by their own well- 
World War IL Since most diplomas organized minority, the students 

are granted in ithe liberal arts and agitate against practical reform, mean- 

most students expect Government jobs while risking debilitation of French 
(mainly as teachers), they find them- society in coming years, 
selves increasingly out of luck. But the political, parties with which 

Ten or fifteen years ago about SO that organized minority is associated 
percent of graduates did get state- do everything in their power to pre- 
paid positions; now only 30 RercenL vent university discontent from explod- 
Therefore. although diplomas are sup- ing against the Government itself— as- 
posed to betoken learning, status and it did against a far stronger Govem- 
a job -ticket, the universities are now ment ip 1968. 



• In .1735 printing the truth 

• was a crime. The press was • 

- free only so long as it didn’t 

offend anyone in power. 

’■ Then along came John Peter 
Zenger. A German immigrant. 

■ A naive man in his way 
because he listened to people 
who pleaded with him to print 
criticism of the government. ; 

.. And when he did what they, 
asked he was jailed and brought 
.to .trial. His crime, printing the 
truth: 

Of course, today Zenger is a 
hep. But his heroism has been 
’ muted by the years. His story 
: retold so often ifs become 
a cliche. Like the words 


truth and freedom. Giant 
words, thrown about so lightly 
that they now seem vague 
and emptied of their promise. 

Truth and freedom are the ■■ 
heart and soul of a free 
society. The people of this 
country have a constitutional 
right to know the truth. And 
at Knight-Ridder Newspapers 
we feel it’s our responsibility ■ 
to give it to them. Fairly and 
accurately. We also believe in 
a free press as the necessary . 
protection of our other 
freedoms. And naturally we 
believe that each one of our 
newspapers must be free. 
Completely free to serve its 


own community in its own way. 

All of us understand the 
importance of truth and 
freedom. And we hope there 
will always be men like John r - 
Peter Zenger with the kind of 
courage it takes to give these 
words their real meaning. 

Philadelphia J nquirer ■ Philadelphia Daily Hews • 
Detroit Free Press - Miami Herald • St. Paid Dispatch* 
Si. Paul Pioneer Pres • Charlotte Observer ■ 

Charlotte News • San Jose Mercury • San Jose News • 
Wichita EaeJe • Widiiu Beacon * 

Akron Beacon Journal • Long Beach PtesTetegam* 
Long Beach Independent • Leaintdon Herald ■ 
L«msion Leader • Gary Post-Tribune • 

Duluth NcuvTnbune • Duluth Herald • 

Macon Telegraph • Macon News • Columbus Enquirer* 
.Columbus Lodger • Pasadena Star-News* 

Tallahassee Democrat • Grand ForLs Herald • 

Journal of Cbrnmcra and Gommndal • 

Bradenton Herald - Boulder Daily Camera * 

Aberdeen American News • Boca Raton Now* 

Niles Daily Star 


Knight-Ridder Newspapers 


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%**&**' - 



iSiligl 


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V.y.W:'*'*. 




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THE NEW YORK TIMES, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1915 






\ 

iefkowitz Requires Copy of 
- Actual Contract Before 
’ Ruling on Wage Rise 


fflilT OPINION 
SLOW IN MING 


magazine that was up in advertising pages in 197 

Why Forbes, in the first four months of 1976\^ 
up anrunprecedented 23% in advertisrhgpages OY;? 
the same period in record-breaking 1975.- :... 

And it’s why more of America’s top-corpora •* 
executives read Forbes regularly than any btht 
major business or news magazine'. They know thi .^ 
Forbes has a winning knack for delving into eve - 
the murkiest subjects. ,1 : . v r’ 

And clearing things up.- / ‘ : ■ • 

FORBES: CAPITALIST tQpL 


If you’ve ever drawn yourself a cold drink 
with a foamy "head” — and the tap was the cold- 
water faucet of your own kitchen sink— you. know 
why Congress passed the Clean Water Act. It au- 
thorized $18 billion for municipal water treatment. 

That was back in 1972, when a far-sighted com- 
pany named Envirotech was ready with a new, in- 
dustrial category called "the anti-pollution 
business.” They looked forward to cleaning up. In 
more ways than one. 

By 1974, however, low-profit margins and high- 
cost escalation were beginning to sink their stocks 


out of sight. But they got their heads above water 
again. How they did it, through diversification, and 
how President Ford's release of a still-uncommitted 
$9 biliion for waste-water treatment helped put 
them on stream, are covered in a recent Forbes ar- 
ticle called ''Up and Down with Envirotech.” 

It’s the kind of lively, informative reading that 
explains why Forbes’ top- management audience 
keeps deeply involved, issue after issue. 

Why Forbes last year went ahead ofFortune in 
advertising pages. 

Why Forbes is the only leading business or news 




:J By FRANCIS X. CLINES 
Attorney General Louis J. 
Lefkowitz said yesterday that 
he would he unable to issue 
an opinion on the controversial 
. wage rise in the transit work- . 
ers’ agreement until he had 
obtained a copy, of the pro- 
• posed’ contract— a document! 
that the Transit Authority said' 
did not yet exist in final form. 

A spokesman for the Transit . 
Authority said that legal spe- 
cialists were working hard to 
produce the final .document, 
but that there was no way ' 
'of saying when it would bej 
ready. 

In the past, this has taken 
as much as three months, one 
official said. 

Stephen Berger, the staff di : 
rector of the state's Emergency 
Financial Control Board, which 
is studying the agreement, said! 
he might try to deal with this 
latest snag in the transit issue 
by producing pertinent wage 
language in the existing con- 
tract as an alternative for the 
Attorney General. But Mr. Lef- 
kowitz said he could only issue 
a ruling on the basis of the 
actual new contract. [ 

The Attorney General has 
been thrust into a prominent 
position in the labor controver- 
sy by Governor Carey’s call 
on him for a legal opinion 
on whether the cost-of-living 
provision in the agreement was 
legally permissible in the city's 
.fiscal emergency. The emergen- 
cy Jaw generally prohibits wage 
Increases. 

. '.Verbal Summaries Out j 
The Attorney General saidt 
He had declined to offer an! 
opinion on the basis of verbal 
summaries of the pact by way 
of the Control Board. Mr. Lef- 
kowitz put it this way*. “I said. 
•Lefs have that contract" T 
want to study both the cost-af- 
ILvtSg language and the produc-j 
tirity provisions.” ' 

‘The latter point referred to; 
the agreement’s understanding 
that the money to pay for; 
the. wage rise was to come; 
ftpm increased productivity by: 
workers. • 

The issue is particularly sen-; 
skive — as the politicians in-] 
volved have indicated— since | 
rejection of the agreement 
could trigger a strike by the 
Transport Workers Union in, 
Jhilv. At the same time. Mayor 
Beame has cautioned that the 
wage rise proposed for transit 
workers could ruin the city's 
alterity plan if other unions 
sought to make a pattern of 
the. settlement. . 

’Governor Carey, as chairman 
of. the Control Board, which 
now- supervises the city’s^ fiscal | 
responsibilities, has said he 
hopes to have the board's con-] 
^.deration of the transit con-' 
tract comrleted bv May 1. 

-Mr. Berger said he was work-! 
frig to meet that deadline. Mr. 
Leflsowitz’s desire to see the 
attual contract language is 
"Trot unreasonable," Mr. Berger 
raid. And while the Transit 
Authority's need for time to 
Complete the intricate work on 
the contract was understandab- 
le. "it cannot become the basis 
for endless rocrastination," he 
said. 

O’Dwyer Criticizes Board 

Meanwhile. City Council 
Resident Paul O’Dwyer criti- 
cised the Control Board, con 
tending that its refusal to be 
part of the collective-bargain 
mg process on the transit 
agreement was impractical anc 
“quite mischievous," since the 
board has the power to rejec 
the pact. 

/"The real party and in teres 
which wields the financial pow- 
er is nowhere around the bjr 
gaining table," Mr. O'Dwyer 
asserted. Mr. Berger has sak 
consistently that the state 
emergency law provided for 
the Control Board to rule on 
thfe/ overall fiscal implications 
of.- contracts, but not to get 
involved in the detailed bar 
gaining. 

• The city's Corporation Coun 
lei and the Control Board’s 
labor counsel both feel tha 
the transit agreement’s cost-of- 
livi n g provision is not perrais 
sible under the emergency I 
- wage freeze. The law provides 
lor cost-of-living increases to 
"certain unions that cooperatec 
last year with the city in defer- 
'ring' regular salary increase, 
.until after the emergency eases. 

' ■* The proposed transit agree 
merit would increase the exist- 
; • !|ng living-cost factor by 25 
percent, providing one cent 

■ more an hour for each increas 
of. three- tenths of a point in 
the Consumer Price Index. The 
-rroposed agreement makes no 
inention of 'a wage deferral. 

* * — . . 

; federal Agency to Revise 
i 200 to 250 Safety Rules 

WASHINGTON, April 20 (API 
— The Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration said yes- 
terday that it was going to 
revise from 200 to 250 stan- 
dards adopted when ~it was 
'. founded in 1970. It said it 
would -hold public hearings 
around the country to provide 
business, labor and the general 

■ public a chance to comment 
jin how to improve the rules. 

Dr. Morton Corn, an Assistant: 
Secretary of Labor who directs] 
the agency, acknowledged thatj 
niany regulations had proved i 
.to be nuisances, irrelevant or; 

■ "of- marginal value. ' 






























->■ 








WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21 , 197s 



33 


W Study : Brain Casts in Old Skull 




v HENSBERGER 
loway cradled the 
ill in his hands, 
upside down as 
through a hole 
pty cranial vault. 

■ between two and 
in -years ago it 
: - living brain of 
nn q J human be- 

L vay; then a visit- 
;jat the National 
. -Kenya in Nairo- 
j^ng. the famous 
il - that Richard 
din the wilds of 
3)ya. He turned 
£ brownish bone 
light against the 
.on the inside 

fepresslon on the 
)f the skull. Dr. 
new, there was 
ting bulge on the 
i- of the bumps 
j.on the brain 
to mark regions 
in specific men- 
viorai functions, 
day was hoping 
jChis long-buried 
?}ng of how its 
Organized. From 
u studies of ath- 
ajlls of extinct 
of modem man, 
ting to look be- 
ny remains to 
1 nr not just of 
icestors looked 
-w they behaved 
ft they thought. 


Ralph L. Hollowav Jr., a 
soft - spoken. full - bearded 
professor of anthropology at 
Columbia University, special- 
izes in a form of ’research 
so new — and to some so seem- 


Scientists at Work 

This is another in a ae- 
ries of articles describing 
the creative process of 
scientific research. 


jngly unprofitable — that he 
may be the only scientist 
doing it He makes rubber 
latex casts of the insides 
of skulls of early man and, 
from the external features 
of the brain-shaped casts, 
tries to deduce something 
about the evolution of the 
human brain. 

Dr. Holloways work has 
sometimes been compared 
with phrenology, the long 
discredited pseudoscience 
linking the outer shape of 
the skull to individual per- 
sonality. In fact, his work 
represents a very recent ap- 
plication of modem neurolog- 
ical concepts, topographic 
analysis and evolutionary 
theory to the newly discov- 
ered wealth of fossil skull; 
from East Africa. 

Much of the work is done 
on the Columbia campus in 
a cluttered laboratory lined 
with books, casts and leering 


skulls of various monkeys, 
apes and early human beings. 
A gorilla skeleton stares 
from its glass case across 
a table stacked with comput- 
er printouts at a human 
skeleton near the opposite 
wall. 

About once a year Dr. Hol- 
loway goes to Africa and 
sometimes Asia' to examine 
new finds and to join expedi- 
tions, trudging along .dusty 
hillsides looking for fossils. 

The most remarkable thing 
that Dr. Holloway found on 
a cast he made inside the 
1470 skull was evidence that 
the individual who possessed 
it more than two million 
years ago (the exact age is 
in doubt) was capable of- 
some kind of human lan- 
guage. 

The evidence is a bulge 
known as Broca's area that 
is lacking in apes but present 
M man and is considered 
a speech center. This 
evidence is far from conclu- 1 
sive, but the implication is 
revolutionary. Untii this.dis- . 
cover)' the oldest accepted 
evidence of linguistic ability - 
in man dated back only' a- 
few tens of thousands "of 
years. 

Dr. Holloway has made 
scores of other" casts of ex- 
tant ape species, extinct fore- 
runners of man and modem 
human beings. His analysis 

Zontinued on Page 74, Column I 




* 


m 




a- 


- ’TteJlWN'fwk'lVHiesSPau) tiostfru 

Ralph L. Holloway Jr.meas- 
*■ oring the brain-shaped cast 
.'he made of the inside of 
'the. skuH of an extinct an- 
cestor of modern man for 
dues to the evolution of 
the- human brain. Above is 
■a brain cast, formed nat- 
urally' during fossilization 
in the. skull of an extinct 
relative of man who Hved 
over a million years ago. 






-mT- 




i That Set on the Empire 
asts a Shadow on Gurkhas 





Culver Pictures 

:’s rendering of Gurkha infantrymen during a Katfte early, in their 150- 
ioriation with the British Army. At the end ' of World War II, the 
of theGurkha battalions stood at 5D;B0Q, but now there are less than 
6,500 of the legendary Nepalese soldiers, in the British. Anny, 


By WILLIAM BORDERS 

Special to The New Tort. TUati 

KATMANDU, Nepal— Lance cpI. Dhyan Rai, 
a tough little soldier from tbe eastern Himalayas, 
is serving in a Jong and proud tradition that he 
fears may be fading away. 

A Gurkha infantryman in the British Army, 
Corporal Rai is as steadfast a warrior as the 
others in the long line of men that stretches back 
150 years. But he knows that the steady decline 
in the number of Gurkha troops raises doubts 
about the future of this legendary fighting force. 

“You hear some talk that the British don't 
need us any more," said Corporal Rai. who was 
in Katmandu on leave from Hong Kong, where 
he patrols the Chinese border. 

"Maybe it's true, and they won’t need us for- 
ever. But certainly it is a service that I am proud 
to do.” 

Corporal Rai is one of 6,500 Nepalese men 
serving in the British Army under an agreement 
that dates front the early 19th century, when 
the British Army in India recruited the mountain 
troops of this independent kingdom on India's 
northern border. 

According to colonial historians, the British 
decided they wanted the Gurkhas on their side 
after the Gurkhas had -very nearly beaten them 
in a crucial mountain battle. They have been 
fighting for Britain ever since, from Ypres to El 
Alamein from the Persian desert to the jungles 
of Borneo. 

2 Beheaded, 2 Unharmed 

The word Gurkha, the name of a province of 
Nepal in which members of the radical group had 
settled, became the name of the force, arid It sub- 
sequently acquired world. renown for valor and 
sometimes ruthlessness in battle. In a typical 
appraisal, a British commander in World War I 
wrote: . 

"The soldier from Nepal has a big heart in a 
small body. He will return if he can to a trench 
from which he has been driven, and it will not 
be easy to turn him out a second time. Taciturn 
by nature, brave and loyal, the Gurkhas ended, 
as 1 knew they would, second to none.” 

Over the years, legends have followed- the 
Gurkhas through the world's battlefields,, such - 
as the story of a patrol , that- came upon four 


German soldiers sleeping in a foxhole in Italy 
during World War EL Drawing their kukris, the 
traditional curved daggers that they still wear 
as standard equipment, the Gurkhas beheaded 
two of the Germans but left the other two un- 
harmed, to spread terror. 

At tbe end of the World War n. the strength 
of the Gurkha battalions stood at 50,000. But 
postwar demobilization coincided with the In- 
dependence of India' and the end of the old Brit- 
ish Army there, and the Gurkha force serving 
Britain was gradually, reduced. 

Now it is to be cut again. 6,000 men, in a 
total British Anny of .170,000. Some people in 


v< 


.All’ \ 




TIM Hew Yarik Times/MIHai* twiMe 

Lance Cpl. Dhyan Rai, a Gurkha infantry-., 
man who serves the British in Hong Konjr. 
where he patrols the Chinese border. 

Britain are pressing for an abandonment of the 
Gurkha recruiting altogether. 

“It’s a relic of our past, when we had our 
imperial fingers in pies all over the world,” said 
one Englishman. "But those days are over.” 
There is also uneasiness in some circles about 
the view of the Gurkhas as mercenary soldiers. 
Nepalese and British- here are still indignant 
about- a remark made a ' few months ago by 
Daniel P. Moynihan, then the chief United States 
delegate to the United Nations, who referred to 
tbe Cuban troops fighting in Angola as the Soviet 
Union-!® “Gurkha soldiers.” 

The' Nepalese Government is generally happy 


to have its citizens serving with the British and 
is distressed that the recruiting has dwindled to 
300 men a year, who are chosen from several 
thousand applicants. 

The principal reason for this official attitude 
is Nepal's poverty. The $5 million a year in 
salaries and pensions paid the Gurkhas was 
Nepal’s largest source of foreign exchange until 
just a couple of years ago, when tourism sur-j 
passed it. 

Not Used in Ulster 

With the empire all but gone, there is. of! 
course, much less for the five remaining Gurkhaf 
infantry battalions to do. Presumably for do- 
mestic political reasons, the Gurkhas are not sent 
to Northern Ireland, Britain's major milit 
theater now. And some of their officers 
privately that a settlement in Ulster would, by 
releasing British troops there, bring even, mot 
pressure to disband the Gurkhas. 

Like Corporal Rai, a member of the 
Princess Mary’s own Gurkha Rifles, most Gurfei;! 
has are serving in Hong Kong, doing border**^ 
patrol duty and security work, for which they 
are paid considerably less than native British 
troops would receive. 

Corporal Rai, who has been in the Gurkhas 
for 12 years, earns $72 a month, a very substan- 
tial wage by Nepalese standards, and he sends a 
• good part of it home to his village, Ratanchha, 
which is eight days' walk from the nearest road. 

In -a few, more years, when he is about 35. : . 
he thinks he will probably take his pension and 
go back to Ratanchha, which is 100 miles south- 
east of Mount Everest, to grow rice on the care- 
fully terraced Himalayan slopes. 

Some Gurkhas have found it difficult to re- 
adjust to the mean mountain villages that most 
of them come from. But Corporal Rai, whose '• 
father and older brother are both veterans, says 
that they are quiLe happy back at home with 
their, pensions and their memories, and he can 
be top. - 

"WeMI sit around sometime*, the way my 
father does now, and recall our days serving in 
the Gurkha regiments, fighting the enemy and 
seeing the world,” he said with a fond smile. 
“We'll be so proud to have made it, and glad 
for those memories which we won't soon forget." 


S? - 



•t Breeze 
and Routs 
y Wedtherl 


it began, 'to give 
springlikCweath- 
ir as a. at of 
m the, northwest 
d the New. York 

■titan region to 
Hires do^n from 
leaking tevels. 
if the -front's ar- 
ational Weather 
xpected it to ar* 
night Yr giye the 

e sultry r summer 
V\ri&-ia-high of 
corded Central 
5 P.M. .:$3iat' was- 
■ort of -fto record 
late : hf- 3327: and 
•the 90-phis read 1 . 
evioHs three' days, 
the forecasters 

lperatuz&g. in : the 
r 60’s .-for North 
;chesttir County, 
inty and Long 1s- 
ugn of about 70 
t CHy; /with in- 
udiness: Normal 
mapera tores for 

year would be irf 

forest fires' con- 
;ue sections of the 
rro 

1 New / Engfand 
■ding tpYtbe Na- 
Seryice, the 
outbreaks re- 
relief is ex- 
arrival of rain 
Northeast, 


RKING • 

will be able to 
ars today and to- 
both sides of- 
. ; where alternate- 
treet regulations 
y in '.effect. The 
have been sus- 
ause of the last 
f Passover. How- 
r parking., .and 
restrictions ' still 


A 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1976 


. The Major Events of the Day 


International 

Portugal- is caught up in another frenzy of 
rallies, marches, and interparty violence with', 
the approach oa Sunday, on the second anni-. 
vers ary. of the revolution that threw but.thie 
old right-wing dictatorship, of the vote -for 
the first freely - elected Parliament in- half a 
century. Only four parties are expected to. 
obtain a significant vote. -The! SociaKsts -are - 
believed to. be m first place, hbout equal to . 
the liberal Popular Democrats .and '.con- 
servative Centralists combined, - with - the 
. Communists forming a strong . 'minority. 
[Page lViCohaiins 1-3.2 

' Queen . Elizabeth it who celebrates her 
.$0th birthday today, remains a/ symbol of . 
stability after the' .decline . of Britain ; as a': 
-world power nnd the erosion of its» econqniiC ' 
strength; Criticism is- tow-keyed, birt tbere .is- 
discussion of the foie 'and relevance _ of the 
-royal family. The recent breakup of Prin cessr 
■ Margaret's > marriage underlined the blurred 
problems of the monarchy. ■- E 1:3-4 - V . 

National 

The Supreme Court ruled in a Chicago: 
case that Federal courts can order the cre- 
ation of low-cost public housing for minori- 
ties in a city’s white suburbs to relieve 
racial segregation in housing in the city. It 
said courts can- do this even if the suburbs 
Involved are clear of discriminatory housing 
practices. The decision was viewed as a land- 
mark victory for civil rights groups. [1:8.3 

The White House announced that Presi- 
dent Ford paid more than $94,000 in Federal 
income taxes for 1975 and received a refund 
of $11,600. Press secretary Ron Nessen sug- 
gested that Mr. Ford’s challenger for the 
Republican nomination, Ronald Reagan, and 
tbe Democratic contenders, match tbe scope 
of his disclosures. 11:4.] 

. Contradictory accounts about the final ill- 
ness of the late Howard R. Hughes include 
some evidence that the reclusive billionaire 
resisted or refused treatment that could have 
prolonged his life. The question whether he 
. was competent to manage his affairs or was 
under the control of others could become 
important if a court battle develops over the 
disposition of his $L5 billion estate. [1:1-2.] 

This year’s Democratic voters — at least 
the small minority who Tiave turned out in 
early primary- elections — appear to have a 


more conseiyative.hueihftn they did in 1972 
jn'.Lbe absence of : auch a. galvanizing political 
issue as- the war 'in' Vietnam. A series’ of 
surveys of primary voters suggests that, the 
still inconclusive Presidential^ race has- been 
shaped mostly by economic and' other do-, 
mestie issues and' an Bi-id efined yearning for- 
new Labes.- [1:3.2 ’ r ._ 

' ABC News-has offered Barbara Walters a' 
five'-year contract- at $2, million a year to 
become co-anchor . of.’. ‘ ‘The Evening News- 
with Harry Rea sober.” She, said she would . 

■ decide this *week^^ethpr;to accept the ABC; 
pffer ■ oc - sign a^rrew ,c on tract with NBC,, 
the network -where she .xbse to. stardom in. 
television- jouftfalism. . 

Metropolitan. 7 •; . .; . • ^7..; 

District Attorricy. Robert \t-'Morgoi'th9U' 
of ^qhdrt^^bunc^Ainajbr. restructur-: 
,iitg of his . offic^ undec .whlth. a‘jsing]e:lawy er . 
would' be>respdn&aife for . a case 14 ‘from -the : 
complaih t -room- to the defendant's. finaL-day- 
■in'cotrrL ,, • He’ said, the: lawyers would .'db.'^-v 
better job than underthe present “conveyon-., 
belt” system in, whidh ■ seven dr 
handle a criminal prosecutions [1-.-6-7.] ■ ' 

The Board of Education is considering the 
return of all fifth-grade and sixth-grade 
classes to the elementary schools, possible 
cutting- costs by nearly $8.2 million. a year.' 
This would end a 10-year trend toward what 
is now called the intermediate school cover- 
ing the fifth through the eighth grade and 
replacing the traditional junior high school. 
Many teachers might be "bumped.” L1-.5.3 

The Beame administration is studying the 
possibility of removing from rent control all 
apartments in the city that rent for $300 a 
month or more. There are about 15,000 such 
apartments in the city. Real estate interests 
are planning a legal effort to compel the 
dty to consider removing from the separate 
rent stabilization program tens of thousands 
of additional apartments, renting for $300 
or more. 11:6-7.3 

Next month Mayor Beame will formally 
open the three-building Forest Hills Coopera- 
tive, a project that drew angry protests from 
residents of the Queens neighborhood when 
work began. It aimed at bringing poor people 
into a raddle-class area. Some who protested 
are now residents— a reflection of compro- 
mises that made it a cooperative instead of 
& traditional low-rent project [1:5-8.] 




c^-.C 



1 The Other jtfews' 

International - 
Israeli forces .wtitind two in 
West Bank clash. Page 2- 
Rhodesia. tightening 'security - 
after .killings. ■ . Page 2 
U.S. - has informed ‘Cuba of 
inquiry on raid.- ^ Page 3 
•U-.S. urged to adopt'slrategy 
. in -UsN.- Page 3 . 

Soviet Jewish teen-ager says 
she is happy.:' Page 3. 
Strike causes chaos jn Japan's 
! . public -transport. Page 3 
XLS. 'wariis. Chileans: on rights 
: issue. . Page 5 

r 3?uKng parties ahead in Cg- 
■ Jombia voting. . Page 4 
-Shaky, new truce starts -in 
-..Beirut: Page6 

‘Syrian troops in-Lebanon put' 
' at 3,000 to 4,000. Page 7 
Economy big issue in Por- 
, J r 'tuguese etectionl Page 14 

. ~ f Goyernment. and Politics { 
•; -Moynihan be^ns . statewid e ~ 

• poTiiical' to'UT- • 1.2 •; 

■Ha rtke terra a African t^ : in 

J ’74-. -jus tiff ed. ‘ : ' '"Page 16 ' 

Philadelphia' lab'or lefuJefeh- 
s . dorses Jackson': . Page IS - 

v Ford’ considers vetoing cam-! 

' pargn bill! .. Page-18 ‘ 

Carter is emerging as Indiana. 

• favorite. • Page 18 

Udall still thinks he has a' 

chance. Page 18 

Lefkowitz needs more time 
- for transit opinion. Page 38 
Court ruling on housing suits 
Carterfine. Page 73 

Supreme Court bars wider 
rights for convicts. Page 73 

General 

White man is beaten by 
blacks in Boston. Page 9 
Jury told of lunch with Di- 
Lorenzo. Page 30 

Autopsy finds interior decor- 
ator was murdered. Page 34 
Hollis boy, 12, is found shot 
dead. Page 34 

Funeral inspectors oppose 
Federal rules. Page 40 
Metropolitan Briefs. Page 41 
Why City U. applications 
have declined. Page 41 
Beame to ignore subpoena on 

• police-fire cuts. Page 41 
School name-change vote 
.cited "yoke.” Page 41 

Police confrontation avoided 
at Fordham sit-in. Page 41 

3 


Quotation 0 / the Day 

■ ‘She has kept an almost perfect balance between 
stability and change .” — John Ciigg,'a British historian, 
speaking about Queen Elisabeth n, whose 50th birthday 
is today. [10:4.] 


Jet airliner ana' small plane 
almost collide. Page 73 

Industry and Labor. . 
General Electric opens union 

- eonttiict Jaiks... Page 15 
Rubber negotiations pressed 

at deadline. Page 17 

Industrial enclaves are urged 
. by Post Authority. Page 19 

Education and Welfare 
Saiidis are expanding Riyadh 

- University. 1 Page 8 

City - schools face new cuts 

in U.S. money. Page 32 
More demands .made on col- 
lege trustees. . Page 33 

Health and Sc fen ce - 
Stare ■ faces [ loss of TLS. men- 
■ tai-aidJundS: . ■ Page 29 

Amuieihents-and tbe Arts 
Technocratic composer writes 
. -".-ligsh rmlsic. 1 / . . Page 20 
-Whitney showing silent “Fe- 
-lix” cartoons. Page 21 
"The Heiress.”' James adapta- 
tion, on Broadway. Page 22 ■ 
Jens Nygaard leads early 
Mozart works. Page 22 
Harry Levin book on Shake- 
speare reviewed. Page 35 
A fine "Afterschool Special" 
on TV today. Page 74 

Going Out Guide Page 20 
About New York Page 31 

Family / Style/ Food Day 
An adventurous cook began 
in the fine arts. Page 24 
“Mary Hartman” actress has 
press conference. Page 25 
Gadgets for cooks to play 
with. Page 26 

3 craftsmen view reality and 
appearance. Page 27 

Qualified enthusiasm for ’75 
Bordeaux wines. Page 30 

Consumer Notes Page 28 

Obituaries 
Dr. Frank J. Keller, 
ai educator. 

George McCauley, 

Palomar disk. 

\ 

A 


vocation- 
Page40 
designed 
Page 40 


Business and Financial 
Stocks rise 15.35 to end at 
1 ,003.46. Page 49 

Kodak shows instant-picture 
system. Page 49 

Gulf first -quarter net up 1.5 
percent Page 49 

Xerox net climbs 11.1% to 
■ record high. Page 49 

S.E.C. chief urges exchange 
tospur integrity. Page 49 

Real Estate: Nassau office 
building resumes. Page 63 

P»S* i Page 

AdnrleJng New 58 ; Grata* . ..51 

Amer. Bctauw .. 60 : Market Indicators SO 
Bund Sales ... 56 , Market Place .. 50 

Business Bnri «...58 , Unrry S 7 

Business Records . 63 ■ Mutual Funds.. 61 

Dumnodlllei . 51 N.Y. Slock Each. JO 

Dividends 62 i Oui-o'-Tovra . 55 

Foreign Exchange £ j Over the CoMer 61. 

Sports 

Marathon proves fun event 
' for tennis pro. Page 42 

Pele’s leg' in a cast with 
- minor sprain. • Page 42 

Islanders go up by 3-2 on 

4-3 victory. Page 43 

Yanks overcome White Sox 
and their ‘‘blouses.” Page 43 
Sarafan hits back at critics 
of racing board. Page 43 

After the ball is over, Mets 
beat Cards. Page 43 

Maple rides four winners at 
Aqueduct Page 44 

Roundup: Schmidt homers. 

ties another mark. Page 45 

Flyers and Bruins capture 

5th games, 7-1. Page 48 

Notes on People Page 29 

Editorials and Comment 
Editorials and Letters. Page 36 
James Reston on Rockefeller’s 
current role. Page 37 

C. L. Sulzberger on French 
Student unrest. Page 37 

Reza Baraheni describes Iran- 
ian torture cells. Page 37 

Harrison Goldin discusses 
N.Y.C. budget Page 37 

News Analysis 
William Borders on Indian 
diplomatic moves. Page 4 - 
Leonard Silk on economists’ 
new approach. Page 49 


A 


Pilots Bid U. S. Bern 
Smoking inCockpit 
AsAviationHazard 

WASHINGTON. April 20 (AP) 

I — A group of commercial air- 
line pitots and two organiza- 
tions concerned with the public 
interest petitioned the Federal 
Government today to ban smok- 
ing in the cockpit as a "partic- 
ular hazard in aviation.” 

The petition to the Federal 
Aviation Administration .also 
requested a Government rule 
prohibiting smoking by any 
member of the flight crew 
within eight hours of takeoff. 

A report accompanying . the 
petition said that smoking in 
the cockpit, by the pilot or. any 
other crew member, “signifi- 
cantly interferes with the phys- 
ical and mental abilities airline 
pilots, need to operate at max- 
imum performance levels." 

"An airline pilot who smokes 
during or before a flight thus 
is not merely choosing to poi- 
son hiraseif, but he is also- 
endangering the lives of possi- 
bly hundreds of other people,” 
the report said. 

The petition was submitted 
by Ralph Nader's Health Re- 
search Group, the Aviation 
Consumer Action Project and 
the Airline Pilots Committee of 
76, representing 76 pilots from 
Eastern, United, Continental, 
Delta, Braniff, Pan American 
and National Airlines. 

The 52-page report, "Smok* 
ing: Its Adverse Effects on Air? 
line Pilot Performance,” waS 
prepared by the Health Ra- 
search Group. 

Carbon monoxide in tobacCa 
smoke, magnified by high-alti* 
tude flying, impairs ‘the perfor- 
mance of crew members, the 
report said. 

"The major impaired abilities* 
include visual acuity, visual 
brightness threshhold, reaction 
time to visual and auditory 
stimuli, vigilance, psychomotor 
coordination, manual dexterity] 
and ability to make judgments 
and take action under stress,'* 
it said. 

Even the pilot who does not 
smoke may experience eye and 
throat irritation, headaches and 
nausea if others around hint' 
smoke, the report said. 


S’jFP ® 4 


"HE NEW YORK TIMES , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21 , 1976 


Industry Calls Proposed Rules 
Blow at‘the American Funeral ’ 


By WILL XJ55NER 

Funeral directors vesterdayjout some of the elaborate ex- 

. «ec. 


out against a proposed ^ 

Federal regulation for their in- ^ of state Con- 

dustry as "an effort of a small ^ m p r protection Board, and 
group of people out to change Elinor C. Guggenheimer, City 
the' nature of 'the American Consumer Affairs Commission- 
funeral.’" as their general er, strongly supported the pro- 
eouSel nut it. posed Federal rule as needed 

»un»l, Thomas H. to make up for dehaenaes 
Clark, speaking for the Nation- in state-regulation of the funer- 
al Funeral Directors Associa- al mdurtry. 
tion, testified as the Federal The State and City Health 
Trade Commission opened a Departments, which have been 
series of hearings at 26 Federal criticized as^usby'Oriented. 
Plaza here into trade practices ^ ave jurisdiction over the in- 
of the funeral industry. The dustry. ] 



Dr. Franklin j. Keller', 88 , Dies; ] 
Pioneer in Vocational Educationl 


j . . a/ . ^ 




SraJT 


SELKJK-RahW Or. SHst TJw . Officers Una, EUn IT. JltowW, tocMta a 
*rt Mroetora of tte Union of Orftcdat Marlin. «■■"»-« " 

Jwhft Cccsnonthm of America ■ mn» WUBrSWiMt . TV®., 

their deepest sorrow at Hit p**i«g of Bloom, BtUa . Messier, Robert T. 

Sriw wbSmwu te Jm . 

M 11$ grawti* tatt one of H» world's Cairtfc Jaws' MHnrf. Chutes 


Dr. Franklin J. Keller, a In World War E he was active! smieu jwsu eaxatioui insttimhn. ca | rtBj »,awvji 
cueer in New York vocational in the creation of training facil-i m carter, so«n x. . 


m world's CairAb Jaws' ' Mmrf.Chutes 
“*^5°^; caiisriw*, Sb« vn. Mwrtw Mwm - 

rf s hutou t s Carter, Susan J. • , OrithbJotm 
i^sSrtv Q> * K ' Oscar 'J. - \ PaffKX James C. '■ 
noofly will CsiMaUr* Jaynes Y. BMiboM, Harnlatte 

Craig, Beatrice Stools "RKJcman. Thaodore 
daGolmbennu Victors Ry«n,Grac*R. - . 


Ftodi, Jem N. 


. Camara Press 
William Sansom - 


pioneer in New York vocational in the creation of training facii-j ^iSwdiwMs StemmS » | onw.sosanj. . 
education,, died Monday at ides for trades essential to: awcosorj. 5 

Riverside Hospital, Columbus, national defense- and was dirsc-l A»anc*“ oriiwdat jw hh Cdnaamfly win cmwaiJr, Janus y. 
Ohio. He was 88 yearsold andj tor 0 f ^ 0 f Education’s; nS* /^^"Saatea^m ^TaraSi crau, Bcdrta ara 
, residenl: of Worttoagton. emeIsency pr0SI ain ior) ^ 

ET€T- 

aty school system before world — an eduratiooa) rana-- 35 -*™-**^ saram. wu profound Fwa ' JWn "' 

War -T. vocational 'education eawanonai capa «d «w e* aAnUMniftn rosm Gd».J««itT. 

, c Clty. in the American zone or XtaWw. raoiltr .And sh W of Y«s».va Boh«wk,AdoWi 
was a small thing, known “ amanv r -' :>'.■■■ umwrsity. hi* sctaob. naohutut ro»° . • 

continuation schools. As Iate.as >-■ • . GoWn *?' “■ ~ 

1930, the local school system £ ; Active. in Museum satnwi B«afa- Ha^ wSSi ©««►«»» ~ 

had only four . vocational ■ es- Dr. keller;w&s-also active liij Sdh£ -SkS^ta D 

tablishments. Ae affairs of .the American; 

When he left the system aft^TapJseuiji -of Natural History, to .. w*S*SS 
51 years of service . at the Old wjnch'he donated, in 1964,' a !7*liu a oAviD weikbach, p««*mr p 

of J957/ vocational' education collection ' of ' 220 sea shells! r*w george fihkeistew. - 

r . .vt , .--a t.. ALVIN -RAPP. AdwSftalW Xtftor, FTaUffn J. 


{was a small thing, known 


GrafeMiflon 
Cnar, MlchWl 


had grown to 31 schools, and he 


ALVIN -RAPP, AdMS 


Hntea, Homnf 
Jebmntr,- Luthtr R, 
Ksflar, Fluriflii J;' 


! SEUON— sanmri. 7I»- AomricMi ScpbanQl Knhs. QmnM A. 


wS »d h£e on . Clark sought to.know WEam Sansom to 31 scbootand he gthejfed ^late^ ^«fe. 

““ “ ^ wtft 1 7 ^ iN 7 n „ SUSS* 

The ^ oroM^ed regulation that no other industry had been WILLIAM SANSOM, 64, SSalTeatari. ' " • ‘ ogy dealing with mollusks- . 1^2! 

SS PBOUST M&ypBER . «oieh,Artssc ■sszusjrrAX 

he if it.were requiK stock ^ He P io n ee^ ; n^c,adUca; g »h Ssas onto Ms^lsion; 


Stfatrd, Ateffr 
.'SaUndoMslUg . . 
Salotv SMrirf 
ScttMdv.Abrist . 
Sn, Ljvfo* J, 
nmr,Tiin« 

Sam. BUOttb 
SpHngBr, Kdblnn - 
Sttmrt, Dtborab P. 
State*, Jota J. 
Sriumiy JasMh ■ ; .- 
'TcmbEimwi F.‘ 
.VrnttavdnfW S. 

WidnalHi, Louie* 
Warrun, iCrtbtrlnQ E.. 
WUmr, - - - 

Vhdlf, Rabara 


RUndUN-ThMdtr* Zali. '/» ' 
m 'Bwth.' F«tw nsL’ .* 

* H* «s a Kowsraal pm 
35 tht» lor M.GjML— N 
Scdtsi 'PuWtartlm. 5qb> 

- W MMSTMl .WXk m 
mpMiw, tt* nrinl of 
litehwtf, NJ^ In phr 
RMUarr of Ewbw win 
R. Murrow, In I960 bo - 

. modi* Bnfenka nan 

Kllkbm tlary which b 
«I3 • HW II MJiv Hi 
F«to sarvfm la On Ei 
thma of war. Sorvtw 
dora J. RHShm, orandf 
or of HoNn. Jons. Ser 
If Hm R^erteofe- Ft 

M MatJhrd- Atm, f 
Friday at HJO -AM . 
Snutdira- CemtJonr. Co. 

- Tttmdnr. iW -Md 7-9 p 
RYAN-firan fUof Now . 

Mb, WL WHa of (tan 
PrtrWo. MWn.Mrs. Bi 


pBfaui.vonw, a.r. » 

AmoMloti « iMa, 5 m 
md FonBMndr HI Uta 

'SL Rmnnrs COanW 
■w an at-ftn hikhuv 
-S rnHt Mote SI.IIm Q 
Ttnrsdrr SO «d 7-n F 
SALftHB-Moffla, bahraw 
;■ iw, W«fM mottw Of 

I slrior at Don O'Aiq. 

AJL, RBsnk* A ftucbtrf 
I. rtdB^ Ctanoi,-^« Q, 

fVFJ* 1 ”*- 01 

NosnHol for OmtHc Sh 
SALMD-Molty. » m 
row ffw MSM Of tfao 
Medical Start ProsMonr, 
Doomt- nmualtir to tin 


Umort, Bertram W. 


before their services were en 


gaged, to display and seU some cheaper coffins. 


LONDON, April 20 ^AP) — Itidn.at the high' school- level Be.' /appeared ' in : . 1952 as the; - mk. uuahe i_ yi NH, Pm ramb 


HERTZS ETO—Abri ham. On Artlf It Wi 
Artbaod at Jnn. FWNr oTtoW, Joan* 


balming 


vS Washington, attorney of regulation was applied on an blitz in 1940-41 began W® the establishment in .1948 Of was. the author^ six books.} to Aij 


Truslao. Abe Herttboro. - KM MMRswl, 
matsbiM -and dew conunl/mtnt to Mi 
falHw tiunna beta? will bo sandy missed, 
(m haortftdt. condoMnon In hb famfhv 
MARTIN J. FREUND, Prastemt 
LOU 15 - BE RXOWTTZ,' PhJJ., Exec D1T.-. 


funmls 3 wavT the 6 tidri-iargest ' Y ork State * Funerhl of City P Dr^^T^rvd^i 

SJS. iShrnd ,«rt:hase g oflAssociation. John J. Cuiran, Rutt i Grundy, an actress, ana ^ K( jg* York UniveP , princp^ of Jfc^Utan vpca-| ^ 

homes and acquisition of a a Rochester funeral director, sity, took -one year out from tonal Hig Sch^. is. survived; ^ IS!i ^a r ^ En * Cotta9 “ - jEMMOTT-u»n»«r r. n » Haw y«h tims 'S , *g? i *r: ^7 ** 

car?that confronted most fami- argued that proMsed rule Sansom’s most je- teaching in. 1918 to work as ia by a ^danggjJban >^-^ p s S rd. j>m^ - BS ASiL -ZSAffS salo£S it 

lies. was unnwessaiy as are t book was a hiography general assignment reporter, for a son, Groffrey, and. three j ° r 0 ^ etor «m.m> >rijra- * 

"Our studies conducted! mnumerable and completely rf Marcel ..proust and The New York Times- - grandchildren. . •• ■ _ _} £* I LHL St . *“ fon*rir -rt 


. prehensive High School,” lSw-i ^^0-9. “gSiSE?J ,, 2S 

y Dr Keller, who .retired asj «Lwsp 

t- principal of Metropolitan Voca- abe hau^ert. S£„ aecm emsm . . jggF ww i*i!a SSSp 

n tonal Hieh School is survived sam KUEia, stem Ort tm *!**ZL*T 


Sflripaw- of Hm%i r- 
LnMoraa of 5** it 
w. r^m nHy -^t ~ Androw 
2#IW Ttamas LoMon 
.5U«W E. .O-Donaoti c 
AN l p-OooneTl of B« 


of Komfrfl £ tt» ' 4J*atrftr of fa 


O'Dwvioll whose many 


fStaftd to tt» -sv 
LDmHV. Tfa- fandlr hi 


fw Wtaan Crtctoria. 


uur siuuim — -- — i of Marcel rroust, rroust anu 

throughout New York State re- adequate Jj^uto. rules ana ^ Wottdf » m 1974 . AnatoJe — ^7 

vealed that some of the worst regulations Broyard wrote in The New /^TiATinn Hfl/IXITTIIV 

3g?sSi JSsr-J is-ojssss GEORGE M’CAULEYj 
dignified ^ ^ . PHYSICIST. DEAD! 

adenuate services should cost available inexpxensive ___ IciuA nKeprvatinn are the nrinci-l A J - 


■ .. . . ; baudwi of Bar SB& oeofwry. _■ • ■ I KELLER— Frankfln Jrflorwa, fbrmrir - of 

: : n j RABBI TZVl MARX. Nft> York Oh*, m AkiTw. Int, .*» «a . 2**" J5. d S**l fc OT 5i? 

. , . I ■ First Hein* Com. of Peeks*!}}, MY. SB, Hi ahmten, Ofjla DwM hNtairt ' »*' » */ 

would require 400 million years ibeuCIN— SU blU Dr. Somael. ConaraHanm Of H» Ui* Evelyn. Sunrfrod by danahtar. Hcsn, i - At 

to reach the earth. • i LfH", JP^ 7 ? JfifP 9MBw.aa4.fcm RICflAeo nii 


tn reach the -earth - i Oradi Cfcslia nrooms wlib nmfawd sor-l Joan Hatzbera, son, Stoffray . aqA lfcra» 

row lk« »ui DO of a Bnnt Jwrtd. 5d»l*r ■hmfcUtdrtt. •' •* .... ' 

Dr. McCauley was in charge- tn j Luder. . , khebs— osb*w A .--00 Awfl 2 fc 'ini swiiw,- mix n 

of malting other major mirror; *- *??» Jfujg?- Jfq^»Md. if. Bh cnMmanf 'SS^iEl-S^iiwK, 

blanks that became. the “eyes" j dwond ^forts' mate ■ » o2J5a jcVrtte nM^Am 


RICHARD THU 
drtw,' Mix ts 


:BELK1B— Samwri. My merod Rcbbi, whcsel lOstn FrtMr of Mrs. Mtu Moortwr ?• »«**■» of Hi* M 

! d«0Mtf oHorls made ' » rPOrthto JBr« OvaU JL ICrtlS. QfMsrAm 5*ST. SK*« n '- **> 


CARET AMONG 2,000 Policeman Killed in Clash storiKft 


stories for children, song lyric? 
and'light music- 


Greenwicn in England vztrPiKmr, tt. Pw* iw'tejl' wi ». 6ltijE fl&9 

at Harvard University, Cam- SjiT m •m»cnio^i^*U/?^f i. j. ma laviw wotwr of pbvWs Frortmow, ; 5fe * JjW- ' 


s'Ann Senior Partner. Bor too 

Ftmrai Manly "Wi fa «nrty n> 

Wuie -Flams. • SAWifc-iunisreui 
mart private. SCHLElDEIt-Alartas. . BNI 
.Y- on 5*«*-iIMvoJod Mbcr-o 
bo 1 id* Komliidikf. Bndtwr of 
Mraor v srow«a»er. fa. fly* ddl 
Airtfan Blao Manorfa 
FnunS Asrii J3, 1976 at * JO A 
- SEE— MBS' LAVIHA J.', K. 


By MORRIS KAPLAN 


AT BELKIN FUNERAL ln S outh-West Afr ica cit > - George Vest McCauley, a bridge. 

— JOHANNESBURG, April 20 Face of Innocence," ‘'The Loy- Corning Glass Works research _ aD 


idge. Mass. j - 

Taught at North west «n caVrmS— J ames. The Bond of Tnnfaet PTA. Dmzi. Funwal senfon who faw Tow- \ 

Graduated from Northwest-; awSl f^iiv, swt .and stvam t* of t?’ ,‘ , ™» w 

„ Unh'ersity witb a fecMor) JSS‘JSS VT* '*** ^ »SSyS« 

Science degree. Dr. McCau-* iinranr. h* *b • ^tnsrsared Mdu loewehsteih— uoten <n» wool, on Aorii 


irtcroKrt VMhnod Cmntonr, Ptnefawn, 

Li- _ - 


SI- HcmpateML] adortoo orondmoMirt . of Lirnr, JtrrY~»irt|' , H2 ^ * m " 


Kaon. Dovoted- oW» at- HisJ Kim Uv-i ?w«jYocfc,Mtto Sm 
ram. lAs. Ulliin Cobon and Mrs. Jor{- Swvfw. 


Governor Carey and who rf was ^ 7SS3S 

Attoraey General Louis J- Lef-j^ ot t0 death and another was A Bed ot IRotes" and A Touch the design and casting of ^the| of science degrwf Dr. McCau- 
kowitz were among 2,000;„ rrtir 


among 


wounded in a clash last night 


of the Sun." 


giant mirror disk for the 20&- i e y obtained fusPh-D. degree in: 

: .i h/auhI . - . ■ mu r . i-.i ! 


oodemy far OW 20 YUrs and «M fa ”l», )f76, wifa 0 t- LmH Loowowtrin. 7 of 
fcjicty nlsKd. Wo ortond dotfart wtpoflnr js 9 AswowMi- Rd« . ElUits -.POrk. Pa., 


. P r ; territory of South-West Afri- of 4 Dentistiy'in 1921 and its 93 years old. fin Washington durinj 

ffiaESSF* ^ y ca. president from 1938 to 1940, The completion of the glass period of World War I. 


versity of Wisconsin. He taught, ^burton r. rubin. Fn». of Board' . 
physics at Northwestern before i a Trustees of woodme™ Acad* nr. 

Tninintr thp R,r-pai! of Standards ’ LXAG HA,t — &nel v. O, Jn far 93d fa. 

joining tne sur^u or aianaarus ^ lvoa UasKmi U wa. east wmw. i»J. 
in Washington Q unrig the; Died Sonaav af Maadwe Lakes. Befatoa 


Ms wife. Mary, Ufa cWWrwi awf W* moffter of -LBOtt K-'-.lfawrasMih sMor ot. 
^tfilldren. " _ • , WHllaa B. Kfee* M III K. Sefaflrst, 


Wimaa B. Kfea'and Ju K. SWnflrsf, H 

also survived hr hio orandcMMiw- 

RrtativK and friends era Imrtfad fa sew- *?“ Sn,0 ” ,,r «"« ' 

hx Tbnrwttr, 3:30 PAL. Joseph Larin# SMITH— Qlwbefh IwiII/m ■;■ 
Jiqd San Mmadal Cbapeb, Marfan Broad Hamian. H.H., April 2 


rt- Wd-* Bites, Mis. -Dr 
Port HW»». fl Family .- 
fa raado fa Omar sock 
faM hr Nahonl Cranal' . ' 

wbceu 

Morton Stwr, and Annef 
toned midflHifber and - 


at the age of 64. 


president from 


toiia ef me law Naetn Lailasban. 
loved jRMser u Mrs. Marion* C H 


Nathan Lan 
the univerri 
Amsterdam 


MS, east tomosor, NJ. and San Mamcdal Chapeft, Norfa Broad Hamwi H.fl— April Z 
loMtow Lakes. Betotoa si. tlnve 71st An. PWedafaMa, Pa. dorar, B.H . FWtaoriy a 
snpBen UiUStwn. be- interment private. - j#" - «•» 

Jr**? MAIDMENT— Borfnai W. of Ptoffajel Park, 

“ NJ. on Aortl 19. 197&. Husband of ” fwBapttst Qo 

sarr^srsa? »?*!% j ssw 

t Hw F«wtol *jo«e. Sfaria B.^Brotte Tfafa. i£ Manrarlai stnricxs were 
HlBWlWfa,. H J. Irtw- | W< romU and Daeld Maldnent, *A«. har^bowa oa. Bit Fro 


Imcrorriom Avonrip nr Jo^nhi”* 0 — ’ — * — Ur. unase. wno wg» H^.-icai engineering ana glass cecn-|«“‘— 1 ip-w .a^ im .. HCTer Batavia. m.y» b rotter ot Arfaiir. Jacfc.i namiai nmcB m 

Amsteroam Avenue# Ui, josepe perflnpfl J A. _f »u_ nistrirt Den- ■ n^lnm; TU 0 i,. pff0 J- 1_ I ^ foof ito supervise the making of BJ\ 7LZ stocktcn Sx HlWtfSJown, NJ. Inlfr-I ^iqou ugf Vlavfif Mildment, MTS. I br bOiM on Bit Fres 

^1 Police official. ..Id they be- iTs^ot St York in 1930lS > 'S^e? ^nd more Jta?J jsjeteoH .dtak for the ffitt ftek ttU3»i5LlfSJf 


T ,im„H «rh« riaik-PTMl thA pu-t tai aocieiy oi nw iwu u, *wv m mameter ana more man 4 : «- — - — 

nr 'Sflin « 5 ? A ‘lieved that the two men be- am j 19331 , was a member of f^t thick, weighed 20 tons ;obser\-atory. 

s'j C 5 “; a™?: ^ 


CAK t tn-Susan -L. FohmL Tfa OHjaw 1 * v*\ ^ £, 11 X 1 samMt. s«r of Mr*. Mwfa on Easter San Sat. Anri I 1 


ffTto dreamtof TlenerStfon “ MriSSy MntffS ?■ “ 

of young American Jews who rin^r lca ? nf a telescope with a mirror 236- _ rfanohic 


George P* rgt ? a ^ ■ * * Uaw dCg rebral Piisv ac- Saratov 'at Calwrv Prosbyfarian affe'pf Da rid KL Stmar 

r ***? orora. FlortiaB park on FrWav, April 23 of Am Cllmor Stewart f 


aara ™ys si ask unity -g * “ of bt-s f? wot™** s 


» ra M, «-* - £££— 0 

lent Torah education with par- the inP ,„de his wife 

oriffi\JSriran S ^e^ !y Memorial for Mrs. Caulkins Olga; 5 .sons. Paul, Henr] 
Others among the mourners A memorial service for Kath- *l£ eraidchil 

included Rep. Bella Abzug, arine White Caulkins of Wash- sister, Olive, and 14 grandchil 

Mmihattan Democrat; Percy E. ington and formerly of Bedford drea - • • - . 

Sutton, Manhattan borough Village, N.Y., wfll be held at • n^WAI D A KREBS . 


ley of Ithaca and; Sasaa l*f.A miia.m 

of Evansville, Ini; I _ lurnry o. CMW Sr^ la many Kfiriltes t?J 4l 5? r 1 


rt 1! A.M. Friends may call at Bwrouofts - Stewart. Memorial sarato 
and Kotor F antral Hama. 106 Main Strest, 23rd at 11 AJA„ fa S 
Madison. NJ., 7 fa 9 P.M„ Wednesday, CtooeL Madison Are. an 
2ri and 7-9 PJA. Thursday. Interment -private. Id - 

MANDEL-Ludlte a on April 19, devoted oo^ftoulfaia to Hw Lw 
orattwr of Richard and Henry, tetowd FalrfHHd Qm» 

sramtewtnsr ot Jastee afaBrasorv. Mf- im fartav toon. faa2fl _ 
modal sarvico will, be hold at Cirjyla Stood Health. P.D, Bob - 

Hotel. Madteoa Am. and 76 St. on Wed: MHnon Pawn aleaso 
April 21 at H AJR. Family . Wiu to receto- STOKES— John J. On April 
Ira friends at tte hom* of Mr.- and Mrs. Hlehmod Ads., Midland 


WILLIAM C. C0S1 

- Special to The Ken York 

WASHINGTON, 1 Ap 
William Giimor Cost 
backer of Broadway 1 
theatrical enterprises, 


Among his investments were 
"Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.” wa - 
He directed and acted in the 
Guild Hall Players at the John w 
Drew Theater in East Hampton, A 
L.I., and was founder and di- held 
rector of the Middleburg (Va.) on I 
Players. ture 


t0 7;> h V ^ ,/ wife, the ffifSKSisr mnwu 

£ie, £ and Petlr, l son.’died. in 196 6. . JouKr?oS3J 4&TA 

r\li v o rthfifl 14 orandchil- about a y Gar to make, thes - rv \ mai tf« Board of Directors - a ond l no frietills it tbo jw*ra*_ of Mra. HlohMod A#e. r Midland 

«er, Olive end gran task ofcreatingltbegan.even -CHARLES MINOFF . I .. PJjjBTU.TL'Sp"!? 8?B Stg ’XT* ™ . SSJE*aJ 3* A 

oren - years earlier with-a series ot Charles JJinoff. an inventor S.>S^SLnSS SX2 <Xl 

' OSWALD A. KREBS ■' «periments. that pwceded the tni died y«ter-! 3 Sti'BfSJ’TSE SS^SfVS 

Oswald a. Krebs, who *M?™SSSUt aswpLs«s.ww 4 * } 

tirerl in 1962 as general agent 9 iW ™A munioes KOroiiai, uceansia^ elewrtwl toflmr of Irara Solltein, . Jamas v.; at ‘Tte Rtoromdte" 76 Bi and Amstordon SUS5MAH— Jaert. Died I Tt 

« ea « ASfm. 2 ’ 1934 > and Its removal from jj. He was .82 years-old and wa l an Edward il. w«d aw. i» Mtomi mmim. 

for New York City for • Aetna ^ annealing oven on Dec. 8 , lived at 490 Atlantic Avenue,' *r * « £ ^ Wg , „i' , n S ? MAgnw— sawwi «. Adrn wk Bfaowd Jjl w l * ,f ® 2 , ' 

L ^? h c „r,^™d^ l N d ? r 1935 - ■ ai« 

ftWwn * N ' V ' The minor was cleaned -with* Mr. Miooff, who retired, to !SS?b5I ifi££X%SS *£ SSk. Ki! iSt.‘tJ 

^fi 1094 omduRtp nf utmoa S c F e ^^re ‘J was crat- 1970 as owner of the jdemin «», 2 fa s a* 7 fa-t. _ S> Kiroiiiy. sS»£s ifandn. fcis tong-ebuw f. mw aa«i 

Mr. Krebs, a 1924 graauaie or ed an( j dipped to the Califor- Manufacturing Comnanv in CRAiw-B*airico abas. o» fail u, m pj*., aphi 22 . n» RiwroWa. 7«h sfraoi 20 . 197 a wu« 01 «w im 

the University ■ Of Wisconsin, Tertinnlnov- Manuraciunng company ui rtior a Iona dh^Witow ri I Qw 1« i and Amsterdam Amu. taved iMlfar of Murloi 

J: r- ihp f nrtrn p r rils ma JDstitute or Tecnnoiogv. Brooklyn after more than haL tts. h}b Jom, wntot . samuel galtfof, Prwshtent o. mocboohii. Rufa « 

leaves his wire, tne rormera.ua Dr _ McCauley estimated its * centurv as' a New York busi- psal >L Es, ®[ to - ■“jS"; ben b. throfp, soerefarr ffa# granddiiidran and «ie 

^SL ^her a frei B ht car J ? a f value ? S 250 '' nessSi^ i^n first prize at the i 

Stef^uirl iSl Smid m - V'v l oUow ^ Nationai E *p° iition ° f inven : ^"a^sirviwsns ssa’isa^ffisAjafii 'ss&ijs.'ns. 

6 year task of grinding the disk tions in the now-gone Grandi msu i«i fafa e ta SI/kSi iTSSSm 

children. ... _ before it was thinly coated with Central Palace in 1923. His !^.^ u %E2Fl ED " M0 «■» 


paol o. D'Esteriusr. RawMra' rt The) 


loved nwlfar of Murloi 
D. MKOnaell. Rath M 
Rvp granddiiidran and rte 


children. 


T. SI. and Amsterdam. 


WmtoMdar Ht3IV 77»rjd»- 
Sorvicn Hursdar, B PJd. 
Mu Knolls Cemetery. 


EDWARD OSTROFF, CC VYVERBER6— Game Stout, 
r- an Aarif 19, 1976. of Eltatefb Smith. «» 73 


wife, the 
four so 
children. 


partment, died on March 25. .■ |of John Malcolm, an actor. ‘eiing 6.000 billion mile3-a yearlchildren. 


The Forest Hills Co-op Project, From Anger to Acceptance 


UI Irt fS bS FiSril Horn. wesmda NJ.. a»«L Husband of Jraraite Wfa. tell « G* 

to-iteVM Tfaar, w oS'SEEmTi nSSriE" 

and 7-9 JAL. wham the luwral *wvl« fa ' uLfau uto Wfalfataii 

«■(! be field on Wednesday at 2 PJi. Funer*} Home. 3 JS E. Broad St- WevnebJ. j™ . vrotisnail Houtevaro, 

IELAHRT-— JaaiS aTSawH 19^7 976. VUIMiw. Ttairadar, 7 to 9 Pjfc. In lieu t«w btewt, Wednesday, Ao 

teloyal teobaml Of tte fate Maria M. rf Rowen, kindly mate contrlbaftons fa Tfa Vrwbaros ara sun, 
roesMcH^tuTDaar falter «r Edward E-, H“ Mranrial Fund of., tin First Baptist jawMer. Joan Jansen. In 
CmTsuV j£«3i ™ SfaMJ OI1HW, WtertfaW, rantrftuttoos maybe mate 

Masefield end tte lato Jams A. Jr. and MEtZNER— John J. On April TO. 1976. Ba- ^ Ofa*. ft 

Martin H. Fond brother at John, Patrick, loved Iwstend ofCarofyn A. I nee Sctoutz}. nr^uic^n'wi^; 

William, Mary Aim Murehr ate tte late devoted falter, of Maraarrt M. Dondoro, jj 0rlr B °" * K ‘^« 

Wldwlas, Michael, Thomas wd, Edward. Ann M. Snail, RJchanf A. fad John ’ J. ™ w , Care 

•Also sum red to> .oioW grandchildren ami Mobnor, Jr^ dear . hrottior rf- Lucy Lora, WACHSM1TH— Louise on Art 
throe rtBsi-eranddiildreo. Mass of Iht Marwret Deimney, . Madriro Bucto, Caro- MIHord, Com Bolorod wi 
. RasurrecHon Thunday, 10:30 AJA. Hrtv lino Pfahlnun end: Adam 'Metzrar. Also Frank- C. W actum Hh. me 
Innoceois R.C. Clmrch. Keraslra attte survived fa tWrtowi erandctiMdran and lfal*e..Hat|pr an d, put 1 

dural of Josaob C. Doth, 9hi Slrarf, am arHUrandcbltd. Revoslna it tte «ral Maras at. St. Cfaft»rfnB 


between dfl. and SHi Awnoe, BraokfiOL. Madtm' Mortuary, 32 CMntofl Are- Rock-] - Glefl Rocfc, ^-Friday 9: 


Continued From Page 1, Col. 8 leras “0 W - We 6 et some ^ 
tomers frwn over there and 


larly/’ Mr. WaJderman said. • 
"I don't deny it. But we’ve 
cojjie -to a happy conclusion 
here, a very happy conclu- 
sion." 

What turned Mr. Walder- 
man . and many other op- 
ponents of the plan around 
was. a series of compromises 
wotked out in 1972 by 
city officials, the Federal 
Government and local lead- 
ers. They cot the size of the 
buddings from 24 stories and 
840 apartments to 12 stories 
and 430 apartments: they in- 
creased the maximum allow- 
able income for apartment 
applicants, and they changed 
th& complex from a -tradi- 
tional low-rent project into a 
cooperative — the first public 
boosing cooperative in the 
natioxi, according to the New 

York City- Housing Authority. 

This meant that the com- 
position of the residents was 
altered as radically as the 
siz& of the buildings. There 
would be no room for the 
truly poor, the people for 
whom scat±ar-slte housing 
first was conceived. 

And the project that neigh- 
bo?? .once feared would de- 
stroy the area is now con- 
sidered by many to be. its 
chief hope- for remaining a 
desirable place to live. 

"It's ' lovely here." said 
M^fiam A her. a co-op resi- 
dent who lived less than a 
bldck away during the height 
of the opposition to the pro- 
posal. !1 didn't care what 
anyone said," she added. “I 
wanted to move in as soon as 
the place opened." 

- *No Problems Now* 

'-You heard a lot about 
how terrible it would be." 
said Haibert Wagshul, who 
operates a liquor store on 
108 th Street, four blocks 
from the cooperative, “but 
there are certainly no profa- 


is now. We get some cus- were afraid to come into 
lers frwn over there and a project" 
y are a nice class of “Since then," Mrs. Berstein 
►pie-" went on, “this facility has 

What happened was this,” been a very stabilizing inr. 
i one city official familiar fl ue hce on the community, 
h the situation: ‘ A lot m V en the people in 

the wealthier middle-class ^ community a chance to 
>pe — those wno could ar- know the people in the coop, 
1 it— panicked when tne - to realize that they are the 
ject was first proposed same kinds of people, with 


they are a nice class of 
people." 

"What happened was this,” 
said one city official familiar 
with the situation: "A lot 
of the wealthier middle-class 
people — those who could af- 
ford it— panicked when the 
project was first proposed 
and moved away. Then the 
landlords panicked and 
brought in some pretty unde- 
sirable tenants. Other old- 
time Forest Hills people be- 
came convinced the area 
really was going to pot, and 
they went, too.” 

"There is still some bitter- 
ness in the- area," said James 
Drinane, director- of -the 
Forest Hills Community Cen- 
ter, "but it's mostly among 
people who are angry be- 
cause the fear of the co-op 
caused such a vacancy prob-. 
2 era in the surrounding area. 

"But there is no doubt 
about it far from being a 


$14,820, for a family of three 
or ' four it is $13,610 and 
for a couple or single person 
it is $11,790. ln calculating 
income, the Department of 


promise. It is not scatter-site 
and it’s not for - the really 
poor. 

"I had to compromise. I 
wanted a higher percentage 
of blacks. But if you killed 


DOW- MM. > on Suniar, April 18. Betovto vil |c Cantrs. U. Mass ot tte RBurradtan, ««« Caly*ra Cematera. N 

nri tort rf Doris Curia <ml fiNmn Ora s j. Aoms Cathedral, Friday. Aortl B, al . "*►►:'*■*« .»"£ ^ totes 

FcKCTL— Jatav «■• Llred ei MarM» 10 Ajfl_ intonranl, Cemetery o f tte Holy ««► (Maaisl Homo, ?Wi 


Iriand Rwd. WpnwUI Vormmit. Dted ^ wesftmrv, U. Fanllr tell ratslra 
Sunday, April II. ..197fc_ jn . Cfaanrater, frlnmi 2-S and 7^9 PAIL 


Road. Fair Lawn, N-L; Tb 
7-9 P.M. In lieu of flower 
American Rod Cross. . 


Wfejy -jy .^™? n MIKOFF— Qwrios. Ufa wed testate of Ida, 

bJfaP'ra Ms^faT SSL* T« falter of Philip, Martha Shankman 

F H ^)«,ruv T M wd Lra, chortshed brathfa of LHllan Saff- 

m&JTKSfttra Ssr.g 

Ulcuinri MoiMirtil IHVIM will s,ol ' u - KBtW'l" 


Boach a* ftrar- 


12.30 F.-M. In Hat) <rt flo 


Housing arid Urban -Develop- £e' ^ entirtly, Sen Rb %A£ 

ment allows deductions for yt>u’d be saying what Jimmy G ^J^rSote tefh^STfat i^T? ^ 


common interests and .com- 
mon backgrounds." 

One of the reasons for 
the .commonality of which 
Mrs. Berstein spoke was the 
way residents for the project 
were selected. 

"We accepted applications 
only from the five postal 
zones 1 surrounding the co-op 
site," said John Simon, gen- 
eral manager of the New 


York City Housing Authority. 
'Thus, most of the tenants 


pension and -Social Security, 
payments, union. dues, some, 
work-related expenses, the' 
earnings "df minors and up 
to $2,000 for secondary adult - 
workers. 

Thus, ' a family may earn 
more than ■ $20,000- « a year 
and still remain eligible .-for. 
what -is technically- a. low -in-- 
come housing project! . 

This is. an essential element, 
of the compromises' .that' 
paved the way for the- 
project. When first an- 
nounced in 1967, the project 
was 'an integral part of May- 
or John V. Lindsay’s "scat- 


Carter is saying— that no one 
is going to defile the ethnic 
punty of these neighbor- 


*‘l regard Forest Hills as 
a victory for rationality. 


the current inactivity in the 
field of. public housing, and 
they still believe that Forest 
Hills may serve as- a model 


loogllmo Mote and uiatobw. W B -extol rf EliMWfa fan Koufaun arid. Edith Elson, 

hoartfBtt amdatencos to tab tete, Marita - g*. totoo r and orMUrraiufawi 

i m , Smater.. Rraaslra. at Frank E, CamoMb ■•p jT * Watt." ns vr 7Wi 

EDWARD A. HIRSCti, President »» «> S tS Rf* - "' ' M TM P.M. 

MARTIH L. CQHN, Soo-dary ' AM- Serai ca p»VTto»y, 10 AM.- ' • WOLLY — Rrtecoi. m Aw» ' 

GOLDBERG— Mol Ml. Tin affloara and Mom-. OftKlN-Jote. It j* tett graatat raw ted land «it. of lUdoro. tart 
bon of Tte Brooklyn Chaster, Amarican * tte- Board a f Tntens. Adntoirtranon B Seymoor, devoted -sister. of Z 
fnsfifato of AreMtoefs otoww wlffc deep Mdfca)8a»rtJ of Bett JsraW Atedkrf. Con- Leo Kara, dsarasf eiwrtmrft 
rasrat tbe passim rf our highly esteemed Iw rate Ito iseulte rf John (Mdd, .ratter trandmoltar. Sarakas, J r rM 
Trouble is Forest Hills ms* wasutenf and. colleaww. DMoest irm- . rf oar rfstfagutstod oirador rf Urology A 10:30 A.M., at reatteiy 

li-ZZZ !"...’ „ _rr . . £lu ; 5 pannes are extended to his fimlb. Fararal ^narnwl collwwia, Uzaras-A, Oten, M.D. J art dm Torralka Vh mild oa 

frightened everybody to serafew will to fiald Tbursdar, Aarll 2*. To Dr. 1 Mis. Dtldji -A to thalr'-ftmily Oyster Bay Expressway.), Wi 

rip9t-h Tfapv noupr rnnlr an- W6. it 1 FJH. at Rlvarslde Memorial aw extend aw .stoceresf s n miaHil I an 

V in ^ ne 22Lf, “ CteAl. Ctew .Island -Ave. and Omn toe ttaf.lte warm m™ort« ttanrTfarish 1 me 

Other Step after tfert.” Parteuay. ■ hrioa lb«w Ujnrfort.at tWs trying HnSr JtS jM^itUETtl 

fK,f WILBUR A. LUFO, Preslidnf ofiRLESH-SILVER..PrW-Bd. ofTrWtfai ... . - 

Housing-officials insist that GaL 0 B£RG-AtfaMi. Wt sorrowfully record RAY E. TRUSSEIL. J.5. San. Director O'MEARA— Manure! Ardfa. 
money, -not fear,-, is behind hw .da aKi rf. rar d i Mrarf ited fo under , ■. a lbe rt m. sch wartz; mjl, ju» win u» offered at st. 

mentor and devoted Inond. Our afto. Ptodarf MfaRal Board Fairfield, caan^ an Thai 

' from which he retired » roars no, raUlfa . Betti.lsnrf MfrfRal Canter. April 22 ot.l PAL, In mensr 

to too matiesr wotessiooal , srenaam or B- r-o^ Horae. 234 ttti Awi. 22d 

ser cSk.-ie« a «ff- ! - nr 50. Itew Yorit Ote. Friends ran C3« « RELIGIOUS SERV1C 


Jnsfifuto of Architects otaww vlth deep AWtafl BoM rf Bett IsraH Madia 
resret tbe passlra rf our highly esteemed lor rate Ito faultd rf John Odd*,-: 
post ■resident and. calleamie. Oeaesf irm- . rf oer dlstfawfatod Director at Urol 
pathtas are extended to his fimlb. Funeral esteairad colleague. Lauras -A. Orun, 
servfces will to fiald Tbursdar, Aarll 2 i. To Dr. * Mrs. Oridji -A to . their';: 
1976. it 1 P-M. af Riverside Memorial m extend our stocerest sWBia l l i t . 


trandmoltar. Sandras. It l* 
10:30 A.M., el "SottWT 
Jaridn Toraalke mite to 
Oyster Bay Expressway.), Wi 


In HlFttonii 


iIp, his intavttv and his total dadicatton 
ma hWiest nrofassloMl , standards rf 


for. new directions in low-in- a^{ 


have always lived in Quee^ — ^ . ^^fpro^n, 
or Brooklyn, if not in the meant emuns of noor 


problem, the co-op is rapidly 
becoming an asset to the 
neigh borne 


same neighborhood - as the 
co-op.” 

Few Are on Welfare 


neighborhood. 

' Mr. Drinane's center Is 
literally in the center of the 
project, and while it serves 
the entire community, most 
of the people who use it 
come from the 430 families" 
in the cooperative. 

40 Percent Are Elderly 

This is even more the case 
with the Forest Hills Senior 
Center, which is in the Com- 
munity Center building .be- 
cause about 40 percent of 
the coop residents are elder- 
ly. 

“The Senior Center pro- 
gram used to be conducted 
at Forest Hills High' School.” 
said Sylvia Berstein, the di- 
rector. "When we announced 
we were moving here, right 
in the center of the co-op. 
a lot of our members said 
they were quitting, .that they 


About 70 percent of- the 
residents are white and 30 
percent are black -or Hispan- 
ic, with blacks outnumber- 


raeant to "take groups of poor 
people out of the slums and 
house them in stable neigh*. 
borboods into which, theore- 
tically, they eventually 
would be absorbed. 

The project’s residents 
clearly ; do ■ not come from- 


come housing. 

, But some black community 
leaders remain convinced 
that the Forest Hill com- 


KHEIHGOLD— Henrtolfir. balarad Alfa' -of JEWISI 

^hJ£2h5 D SIJS^LS^TpJ 1 - ^ fa"** iratBor rf William s, ; = : 

Iromrt —* mrtfiW -fiv-lgtt -rf RRoda, dwHM .- ■-*** 

2Br*x* , ita?-TVte Emamt-SI 

Wtotknn nay to sort to ArowteM Canrar -wit™ C«i«y tetefa . * : *T* 

Sodrfv and Tta hrfnstrlal Horn* for Ito Are. at. AvamteH. Bfoaktyn. , SKI via 


tnai uie rarest run com- soawv *m t» numsmai nm w raa Are. rt. Aramte H. BreaMm. . SSRViass 

promises went too far. m ^[SSuw-nji. Moved wim of uratom m. siism: s 

ignoring the poor- of the city ^aSErjiww hotter rf Murw H«ai; '• -™ &£?S 52 g«™ Sp 


Adored sister « Mlrate Ktotarf te. jte ra-[ 
k» Friday, 10 AM., of Sdnreric Brofltera, \ 
"Forost Park Chapels." Otoeons BM. and 
76 Rd- Fdrrsl Hills. ^ - - 

GRAFF— Ml Kan, Aortl 19, 1976- Doarfr to- 
lovad tunband of Sybil, dovuted lalhcr ol 
Jorf and Oonlrf, brfovtf son rf - Body. 


ing Hispanlcs by about two .the slums; indeed, asked if 
to one. There axe, - according, they were poor or had pro- 


to Louis Mucciolo, resident 
manager at Forest Hills, "on- 
ly half a dozen, or. so” wel- . 
fare . families in the C0:0p. ■’ 

The income level of most 
of the residents is often high- 
er than it is in other public 
housing. The Federal Govern- 
ment permitted a 10 percent 
increase in allowable income 
when the plan to turn the 
project into -a cooperative 
was formulated. 

Each tenant must make 
a one-time payment of SI 50 
a room. This is his equity 
in the co-op. Monthly, carry- 
ing charges are about $3 5 
a room. 

The maximum Income for 
a family of .five or six' is 


vlously lived in a slum, some 
residents were indignant. 

*TJo we look like bums?” 
one elderly man replied an- 
grily. 

Mario M. Cuomo, the 
State's Secretary of State 
who served as mediator in 
the Forest Mil's controversy 
in 1972^ probably- 'had more 
to do with the. eventual sue* 
cess of the project than Any- 
one . in the city. Bnt even 
he admits that the original 
plan— huge buildings tower- 
ing over others in the neigh- 
borhood — was wrong. 

"The original project was 
not the way," he said the 
other, day. “and the. ultimate, 
solution was only a corn- 


ignoring the poor- of the city Jacob. Dome mrftor rf MurteJ Kesjoi;l 
Kmrnc- Roto Frantal and Martlre - Rfaten, <joir- 

Slums. ess BrandmaUw nod BraxT-eraretaotto.] 

Vernon Es Jordan Jr., exec- Adored dstar of Mlnnla Kfatarfte. jarv - 

utiye director of the Nation- SS^ffWc S^ bSITSS 

tortt 19, lira Doarfr to 

the- Cuomo compromise was l0VBd husband rf . Sybil derated laito oi 

adopted: • Joel and Daniel, toloVM son rf-Bcdnr> 

.:“So.lo ng as local officials. J X sl 5i.SJlSJ«Sr M J SSTsSS 

«■& ^L 5t> i e A lil if I H «s sus tt a A 

as in New York, have sole qwob bm.. Fpresi huis. h.y. 
control over low -income *'g 

housing Sites, antiblack pres- esteemed mmto and extorts deepest 
sures will prevail. Lost in »«« «nr fa ^ N ^ lLl5TC1Hj RabU ! 

the charade over Forest Hills lucy k. bank, pireident 

is the hasir nuoetioiv Where GREER — Micfucl. Tta New York M*rfro- 
J5 uie dbsic question, w nere . Chapter el the American Society 

do poor . people who need of Interior Dnlsm Is daerty uddemd. 
decent housiriH po?" ?'.«» *■“ * 4 dfatltouHbed leeder and 

— ' ■■ — ■ - . i ' LLOYD BELL. FAS ID, President. 1 

GREER— Michael. The American Society ef, 
jTfn.-r+U-r- Interior Deslonere, mourns Ito lass af a 

33"cUlj5 Fellow and Ufa Mamber, whore leadenhln 1 

helped adunra Hie Interior Duion Ofa- 
* DAMS— Ellen Walters# widow ot Frederick los-ilon, 

Baldwin Adams, on Aorll 17. Unrated HANTMAN— Anna D. (nee Goldstein) rf Eastl 
mother rf Frederick B. Adams. Jr. and Oranae. HJ. tarmerly of Newirit and 


w rare &s» MMmooe JswrtO Carter mourns 
the psulite rf -Henrietta RtoUmwL to 
Jm^krffa rf our.. esteemed member .Loute 

• ' . * JOSEPH MANDEL, PrasWerf 


T&Ia Morttln? at 10:: 
lUemortoI Semrat 
RABBI RONALD B. SO 
“A DEATBUSS FXOF 


ANROUMCEMEkrt 




i-wrishto. ^lW ofSyMa CU«r fad n Ttfl? ^foLI^TTS * )*WK?? E 

to 5- °^AS^'22^f w-wa; soffolk co. tsm. wi4 S>nwEcnc5r 


. -tjz Scfnrertr Scot. Memorial Oumel, H«3 

l . have sole qwob im.. fo®si huiv h.y. 

low -income GRAFF-Mllian. Temple Israrf of Jamalra 
i= u V records with sorrow the passi ng o* to 

tlOIaCK pres- esteemed member and extorts deepest 

>>[ t in srmMffir to fta family. 

LMl in RONALD MILL5TE1N, Ratal 

Forest Hills lucy k. bank, president 


decent housing go?'' 


Bratlfs 


ADAMS— Ellen Walters, whhyw of Frodoridcj 


Frank E. Campbell 

“TheFuneral Chapel,’^ 


Mrs. John Eastman. Jr. Also svnrtnd fa Brooklyn on Aorll anti, 1976. Funeral from J 
4 grandchildren and 5 great-wamktiildren. ttm S'Aurban Cha-iei of PWlto A?ter ftii 


4 orondchiliiren and 5 areat-wimKtillsren. fin S' Durban Cra.m>i of Finite Asrtw « 
Funeral nrvlcs II AM.. WWrnsday. Anri I Son, WOT Springfield Avenue, Maplewood, 
21. al St. James Erttcnoel Chnrch. Madhon NJ. on Tbursdar. Aortl 22, 1778 at 1 P.M. 


Aw. at 71 St. In lieu of Mowers, conlrl- Infarmenr Kira soMmon CMnolarv. Cllfion.) . ,.v 

billions nay b* swl Id diltdrcn's Aid ti» ooriod rf moumira will he nbrenradi inTc lLTarl'erm Aw. (rr. Slat Street! . N.Y.. N.Y. 
Sodrfy, ftemsmrter San-lee. ISO E. 49 at tta tome rf Mis* A nine Harfmai., 434 *«JO JaaaiBOH.*Y& "***» 

Sf.. N.Y.t Westminster Avfam, Elbabofit, Art. 7C, i BU 8-3500 



\-pJ& 




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*5PV* «*>.:**■ **>*;'•. 

,*J?^SWS * 

^Wirk ijiau. a--'- **1*4* 

.W£4Mm, -'••■• 

SSr- fej-K 

! W!.« >*“;* 

• mHna r . j.,. » 

' «M *«**-•.■-< 

3 *« 

gV?S*%* 

»Vdfc-. » fig*. 

gap 1 **- 


gg-_4# „ 1 



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■>;■ i 


«»rr., 
C ' : L L, 


1 1 ii 

pe to Ignore Subpoena 
;i Police-Fire Cutbacksl 


41 - 




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tft- 

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tlliffci* >- -, a 

swr"-- , 

wfcsi*i«w5- 

„ ** *** «• 
-£5^sr Jr-- 

;»? «. 

W* .■arou-.- 

i*;%sW 




By EDWARD RANZAL 
J’iame’said yesterday 
-I-ld ignore a subpoe- 
?#d not testify today 
Vinate subcommittee 
/■■ n legislation to 
M:e and Fire Depart- 
V.s from cuts. 

*,</■ the Mayor said. 

a political charade 
£•, of responsible ieg- 
Jv'mittee action.’* 

^e’ second day yes- 
£;-eedays of hearings 
•A office building at 
,-my, . Senator John 
ftibcommitlee chair- 
‘ «? tka k;;t 


.-VBIf 

T- * 


V. 




-'■tt- 



tion of $18 million to the Fire 
Department’s budget and be- 
tween S20 million and $25 mil- 
lion to the Police Department. 
, La f t t wee t Mr. Caiandra in- 
vtted the Mayor by letter to 
testify’. Mr. Beame ignored the 
letter and was then served on 
Monday with a subpoena to 
appear before the subcommit- 
tee today. 

The Mayor decided to reject 
the subpoena after he had been 
advised by the city’s Corpora- 
tion Counsel, w. Bernard Rich- 
* and - that the subpoena was 
vxmsor of the biil, not valid because it had not 

j -hat Mayor -Beame | been voted by the full Senate. 
>i. subpoenaed andi Mayor Beame. contending 
v>. "lead-off witness" ( that he would not be “party 
to this kind of polidcs-as-usual 
game." said: 

“Senator Caiandra is intro- 
ducing legislation that would 
protect Police and Fire Depart- 
ment budgets from cuts. That 
protection would have been af- 
forded our line agencies if the 
Senator had supported' the 
Governor’s veto of the Stavi;- 
ky-Goodma.n bill, which re- 
quires stripping city agencies 
of funds to restore money to 
education." 


ater that the Mayor 
* 1 would , not appear 
1 ; * ^subcommittee. Mr. 

Republican of the 
• ed: 

' ■ •-■ing to personally 
/ he be held in con- 

■*' -- Senate.’’ 

‘ . 

;> e by Caiandra 

’ - .... Calandra’s bill. 
=i >;■ of the city’s next 
/ get would be set 
v : basis of -the per- 
ated for police and 
: - '-on over the last 


Still J later. Senator Caiandra 
said: 



Fewer Apply at City U., 
Fewer Still Will Get In 


By DAVID VIDAL 

Ronald Simpson had al- It was a big rise in applica-. 
ways been encouraged by tions from such schools that 
his parents in Harlem to at- ~ contributed the largest share 
tend college. But “the prcb- of the increase during the 


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(feSiiiiT.'a- .«• * 

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’ Vition is amilar to 
v - Goodman bill, 
L ’ /'recently enacted 
' - Governor Carey’s 
* --^ded’tbat a specific 
t . ? the city’s budget 
* -‘ated for education 
X ^hat Mayor Beame 
-v . asserted would 
- 'an ad^tional $150 
.'eking the three- 
-r the a’ty to ba- 

> .y, ‘Mr. Caiandra 
his bill became 
^ Imean the restora- 


Wayor Beame has shown 
himself less concerned with the 
safety of New .Yorkers and 
their property than he is con- 
cerned in playing politics to 
hide his own ineptness and 
Jack of candor. He is the prime 
reason for passage of the Sta- 
visky bill in that he failed 
to act responsibly in dealing 
with the problem. He chose 
to sit on the fence, as normal, 
as normal, and hope that it 
would Wow away. He is again 
taking a fence-sitting attitude 
on the bih for police and fire- 
as be did on the Stavisky 


PAL HOLDS EASTER WEEK TOURNAMENT; The Police 
Athletic League yesterday began a weeklong program 
of athletic competitions for boys and girls in the city. 
At St Albans, Queens yesterday, Estella Blake and Nash 


JflLMUhr ' 

't'oi ■ 


cted Slayer Enters 
ty Plea in 2d Murder 


By MARCIA CHAMBERS 
~tl, who went to,"! had an mge to loll." He 


u _ ***•'■ 




r&ps-,- . 

Ste 




r: 


■ , 'e than five years 
fcf of a young 
. ; ' idy> was paroled 
‘use be was 
.-." pleaded guilty 
’ -he nearly identi- 
an aspiring ac- 
: hi ago. 

. ;‘)lea to the murder 
- 4 Karen Sehlegel, 
Treeawfch Village. 
- opening day of 

• n in Mr.'C Yukl’s 

owed a decision 
nit Justice Joseph 
of State Supreme 
.. r the current iury 
mce gathered in 
, tier "because of 
. . . similarities” be- 
slayings. 
icame clear that 
; decided to plead 
murder indict- 
Ice dismissed the 
urors from his 
l asked Mr. Yuki. 
' former vocal 
1 , - nist T to describe 
. r 3is.own words. 

■ . ; a soft voice. 

-d he had lured 
. - .-to his apartment 
... -wspaper ad he 
bkmg an actress 
graphed. He said 
. - .wda: an appoint- 
19, 1974, with 
^ ' V to photograph 
:,ad.. 

/arrived' at his 

• •• :-220 Waverly 
ktold the judge. 


said he picked up a gray neck- 
tie. put it around her neck 
and strangled her. 

"Did you take hei- body up 
to the roof that night?’ Justice 
Martinis asked. 

’’No,” said the slightly built 
and bearded defendant ‘That 
night I put the body under 
the bed. The next day I took 
it to the roof.” 

According to Mr. Yuki’s at- 
torney, Lawrence Feitell, Mr. 
Yuki wanted to plead guilty 
because he sought psychiatric 
treatment. Justice Martinis, 
who set May 26 for sentencing, 
said he would recommend, but 
could not guarantee, that Mr. 
Yuki be sent for psychiatric 
care at a state facility. 

Yesterday afternoon Justice 
Martinis -told Mr. Yuki in open 
court that he would sentence 
him to from 15 years to Itfe 
in prison. The justice could 
have sentenced him to from 
25 years to life in prison. ■ 

This means that Mr. Yuki 
will be eligible for parole in 
15 years, but Robert Tanen- 
baum, the assistant district at- 
torney handling the case, told 
the justice: ' “I am asking 
the court and I will personally 
write to the parole authorities 
that this defendant never be 
paroed again, never be able 
to walk the streets again.” 

The justice is expected to 
consider Mr. Tanenbaura’s rec- 
ommendation when he im- 
poses sentence. 



The Hew York TIbk/FwI Kosafm 

and Debby Garrett won the Double-Dutch rope jumping 
event in the 10 to 12-year-old age group. Below, Tony 
Prendergrass, 10, scored high in foul shooting stoking 19 
of 25 attempts. Four age categories cover ages nine to 18. 

[School Name-Change Vote 
Cited U.S. Colonial ‘Yoke’ 


By PETER KIHSS 

The school bard in Manhat-.the the attainment of educa- 


Police Action Avoided 
At Fordham Hospital 


tan that voted to rename j 
school for Pedro Albizu Cam 
pos, the revolutionary Puerto 
Rican nationalist, ated in its 
decision his fight against a 
United States “yoke” and work- 
er exploitation. 

Minutes of the board meet- 
ling. disclosed yesterday, said 
that “the youngsters at Public 
School 161, particularly the 
Hispanic youngsters, would he 
inspired by the unselfish de- 
votion of Mr. Campos to the 
cause of liberation of the island 
of Puerto Rico from the yoke 
of American colonialism.” 

The 13-year-old school at 499 
West 133d Street is currently 
□amer for Fiorello H. La Guar- 
dia. who had three terms as 
Mayor. Mr. Aibizu Campos 
served about 20 years in prison 
between 1936 and 1964 for his 
leadership of the Nationalist 
Party, whose members staged 
a brief bloody revolt in 1950, 
including the attempted assas- 
sinations of President Harry S. 
Truman and Gov. Luis Mufloz 
Marin, and shot five Congress- 
men in Washington in 1354. 

The resolution to change the 
name, fay Community School 
Board 5 was voted on Feb. 26 
by - the five members of the 
nine-member board present at 
the meeting. The resolution 
reatL 

“Whereas Don Pedro Albizu 
Campos served for several 
years as president of the Na- 
tionalist Party of Puerto Rico, 
and whereas, in that capacity 
he fought against the exploita- 
tion of Puerto Rican workers, 
and 

•Whereas Don Pedro Albizu 
Campos became a symbol of 


tional excellence through his 
studies at the University of 
Verm cw and the Harvard Uni- 
versity School of Law, where 
he earned his law degree, and 
Whereas the Fiorello H. La 
Guardia School, Public School 
161, has a majority Hispanic 
student population, 

“Be it therefore resolved that 
the name of Public School 161 
be, and hereby is. changed to 
the Don Pedro Albizu Campos 
School. 

“And be it further resolved 
that an appropriate ceremony 
be planned to mark the 
change.” 

The minutes said that the 
motion to adopt was made by 
John F. Davis and seconded by 
Louise Gaither. The other mem- 
bers present supporting it on a 
roll-call were Delia Ortiz, Val- 
erie Jordan and Charles Gads- 
den. 

Mr. Davis- has been deputy 
executive director of the De 
partment of City Planning since 
August 1964. Mrs. GaitheT is a 
retired teacher. Mrs. Ortiz is 
the board's chairman and its 
only Hispanic member. 

While the school is in a 
largely black neighborhood, it 
has become 76 percent His- 
panic in enrollment, according 
to Mrs. Ortiz. 

A 1973 policy of the Board of 
Education established the right 
of decentralized school districts 
to name the schools under their 
jurisdiction. It provided that 
“no action may be taken by 
the Community School Board” 
until 30 days after a proposed 
name change had been sub- 
mitted to the Division of Com- 
munity School District Affairs, 
which Board 5 has yet to do. 


college. 

iems of the City University 
helped me change my mind.” 
and instead of applying be 
has decided to join the Army. 

A Haaren High School 
classmate from East Harlem, 
Marcos Ramos, knows his 
chances of getting into the 
City University this fall are 
as uncertain as the future 
of the open-admissions poli- 
cy, which — because of his 
low grades— offers him the 
only chance of getting in. 

Nonetheless, the 18-year- 
old Puerto Rican youth, who 
like Ronald is in the College 
Bound program at Haaren, 
has applied to five City Uni- 
versity schooTsyQueensbor- 
ough Community. Hunter, 
York, Lehman and City. He 
sees his only alternatives as 
"joining the Marines for a 
couple of years” or moving 
back to Puerto Rico. 

In a year of profound 
chknge for the City Universi- 
ty, many high school seniors 
throughout, the city have had 
to decide whether to follow 
the example of Ronald, who 
pragmatically saved $20 on 
an application he thought 
futile, or that of Marcos, 
who has submitted an appli- 
cation with little more than 
hope on which to base it. 

Factors in Decision 

Ronald’s path has ap- 
parently prevailed, because 
of uncertainty, the inhibiting 
effect of a doubled applica- 
tion fee, a new March l 
deadline for filing, a shift 
in demographic patterns and 
a decline in . the numbers 
of graduating seniors. Re- 
duced high school guidance 
staffs have also made them- 
selves felt. • 

Applications to the univer- 
sity fell 20 percent this year. 
This accounts in part for 
the 40 percent drop in the 


By DAVID BIRD 

A confrontation between iheiment of agreement within the 
police and com-“un , r r r-'-t^’s.next 24-hour period.” said Dr. 
who have been sitting is at John L. S. Holloman Jr., the 
Fordham Hcspjt:: was . president of the Health and 
yesterday when hospital offi- Hospitals Corporation, • after 


Metropolitan Briefs 


open admissions years, which'' 
began in 1970. 

In 1974, for example, 46 
percent of all applications 
were submitted by students' 
with academic averages of 
75 percent or less. 

The current loss contrasts' 
starkly with the 14 percent' 
rise in applications recorded ■ 
as recently as 1974. 

Spot checks at city high 
schools and interviews with.' 
seniors disclosed the follow- 
ing explanations for the' 
drop: 

$A doubling of the appli- . 
cation fee to- $26— for which- 
a student, can apply to up 
to six schools— has tended-- 
to discourage applicants 
from schools as varied as 
the Bronx High School of 
Science and Haaren. The »> 
lect Bronx school sends 6 • 
quarter of its seniors to city 
colleges each year, although 
6Q. percent of an estimated 
class of 1,100 has steadily 
applied in recent years. This 
year, some students thought ' 
twice before applying and 
a counselor there said “I 
get the feeling our students' 
would rather go elsewhere 
and they apply to the City- 
Uwversity as a sort of last 
resort.’’ 

9Tbe impositicnof a March 
1 deadline for applications; 
later extended but differing - 
from past policy of almost 
year-round applications, has- 
tended to eliminate the unde- 
cided. 

qin a manifestation of _■ 
shifting demographic and 
birth patterns, the population • , 
of graduating high school, 
seniors has been declining.'- 
While 36,116 students grad- 
uated from academic high • 
schools in 1971, 34,276 grad- 
uated in 1975. 

, . .a, - - . qStaff reductions among 

size of next falls freshman guidance counselors, who '■ 
rifles that nppn nrmnrfPd bear heavier loads, has re-'. 


class that has been projected 
by City University — a drop 
to 25.000 from the 42.000 
who entered in September 
1975- The decline . in the num- 
ber of applications is. : n turn, 
largely a result of the curtail- 
ment of open admissions un- 
der the new admissions stan- 
dards prooosed by the chen- 
cellor, Robert J. Kibbee, and 
approved by the Board of 
Higher Education earlier this 
month. 

More than a quarter of 
those who did not apply, 
but who might have done 
so before the changes’ are 
likely to be pocr and depen- 
dent on open admissions for 
entry to college. A counselor 
?t Hc.aren s- ; d that it w s 
hard to say what they would 
do but that it was safe to 
assume that many would 
simplv not go to college. 

Data indicate the sharpest 
drop in applications, nearly 
27 percent, was among pros- 
pective applicants like Ron- 
ald, who attend “low acade- 
mic” high schools. 


duced their strong influence 
on potential applicants. - 

There are, nevertheless, 
schools such as Flushing - 
High School in Queens, 
where the college counselor, 
raid there had been no no- 
ticeable decline in applica-. 
tens.” After all, what alterna- 
tive do the students have?” 
the counselor said. 1 

A study by the City Univer- 
sity cf applications received.' 
through Feb. I indicates that 
those from “low academic” 
schools fell most. 26.S per- ' 
cent, while those from 
“middle academic” range,' 
schools fell by less than half- 
that 11.4 percent, and ac-' 
count for the lov/est de- 
crease. 

Parochial and private! 
school applications also fell 
sharply. 25.1 percent, reflect-' 
ing changing housing and 
educational patterns in (be* 
middle class, while the “high 
academic” schccls supplied- 
13.5 percent fewer appli- ■ 
canto. 


i : 




rials agreed to further discus-] 
sions. 

“We hope to have a state- 


Jersey Grant Saves Tenafly Palisades Tract 




VJXt 








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usr= riv 
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vTi" : 

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>4 , ...... Th» New Yert TlMsSEdnrd fiamner 

/ '*‘&jxaa walking with Nadine Freiman, a natnralist, ttro^ 1 the wooded tract 
■■■■'* rad. from development atop the Palisades near Tenafly, NJ, yesterday. 

that the new money, together owned unspoiled woodland in 
tt«fSSSSd by fte the New York metropolitan 

borough and other contribu- area, from commercial ex- 




>Nb* Vert Time* 

N. j;, April 20- 
act of Palisades 
gbjy prized by 
sts was pri-’ 
| ’when Governor 
that an.ad- 
of state funds 

r e this Bergen : 

■.Jgb to buy the 
til owner. • . 
lor, flying in by- 
make the an- 
aaid that - the 
add $350,000 in 
unds to an ear- 
$2.6 million and 


tions, would meet a reduced 
price of $9^50,000 agreed to 
by •: Centex Homes Inc. of 
Texas, the owner of the prop~ 
erty. 

The Governor’s appearance 
at the Municipal Center, 
where he was greeted by lo- 
cal officials, state legislators 
and more than 100 residents, 
ended a decade-long effort by 
conservationists to safeguard 
the so-chHed East H3I prop^ 
erty, the largest privately 


ploitation. 

Tenafly has sought since 
1974. to buy the East Hill 
.property, setting its financial 

sights initially on a price of. 
S6.6 million fixed by a three 
member condemnation com- 
mission. The efort suffered 
a setback last January, how- 
ever, when Judge Harvey 
Smith- of Supreme Court 
raised the price, on an 1 ap- 
peal by Centex Homes, to 
S8J5 million. ^ 


meeting with community Tepre- 
sentatves at his 125 Worth 
Street headquarters. 

On Monday the corporation 
had set a deadline of yesterday 
noon for the protesters to get 
out of the hospicai’s offices, 
which they have been holding 
for a week in protest over 
the corporation’s plan to shut 
down the aging Bronx hospital 

Community leaders, who in- 
sist the hospital must remain 
open, reacted angrily to the 
threat that the police would 
be called in and there were 
warnings of severe disruptions 1 
if that happened. 

Representative Peter A. 
Peyser and City CounciJwoman 
AQeen B. Ryan met with com- 
munity leaders and corporation 
officials yesterday and urged 
further negotiations. 

No Sign of Yielding 

Neither side, however, gave 
[any indication of backing off 
from its position. Residents in- 
sist that the hospital stay open 
and the corporation says it 
must be closed for economy 
(reasons. 

The corporation had accepted 
I the sit-in for the first few days 
because the occupiers were not 
disrupting patient care. As the 
sit-in continued, however, offi- 
cials asserted that administra- 
tive functions were being se- 
riously hampered. 

Brother Patrick Lothraae, ex- 
ecutive director of the Coalition 
to Save Fordham and one of 
the occupiers, said the protest- 
ers were making some admin- 
istrative derisions on their own. 
bills were being sent out be- 

He told a community meeting 
at the hospital that no patient 
bills were being sent out be- 
cause “we’re not going to let 
the corporation make money 
while they are killing us.” He 
also said the personnel depart- 
ment had been ordered to send 
out no more layoff notices be- 
cause “we’re going, to save 
[the hospital and mose jobs 
i will be saved.” 


LOTTERY NUMBER 
April 20,. 1976 . 


N. J. Pick-It— 113 


Californian on Trial for L.I. Robbery 

Gaylord Anguish, a 33-year-old Californian who alleg- 
edly commuted to New York to commit five Long Island 
bank robberies, went on trial in Federal court in Brooklyn 
on charges of taking $8,400 at gunpoint from a Bankers 
Trust Company branch in Commack, LI. The defendant’s 
lawyer, John Corbett, argued before the jury that Mr. 
Anguish was not responsible for any criminal conduct be- 
cause he was mentally ill at the time, and now has amnesia 
which blocks off any memory of the event. 

Writ Issued on Sydenham Closing 

A group of Harlem residents, seeking to prevent the 
closing of Sydenham Hospital on May 21, for economy 
reasons, were granted a .show-cause order yesterday in 
State Supreme Court. The city, the state and the Health 
and Hospitals Corporation must explain in court next Mon- 
day why the hospital, at 123d Street and Manhattan Ave- 
nue in central Harlem, must be closed. 

3 Boys Held in Setting of School Fires 

Three boys, two of them II years old and the other 
8, have been charged with setting two separate fires in the 
girls’ gymnasium at the Glen Cove High School on Long 
Island. The interior of the gym was destroyed and the dam- 
age was estimated at $500,000. The boys, charged with 
juvenile delinquency, will be arraigned in Nassau County 
Court. 

Format of Colossus Lottery in Doubt 

A decision handed down. in State Supreme Court has 
left in doubt the format of the state’s Colossus Lottery, 
scheduled for Oct 31, in which more than $1 million left 
over from previous lotteries was to be distributed. Justice 
Abraham J. Gellinoff upheld an injunction ‘‘limiting win- 
ning numbers to the numbers on sold tickets. The Colos- 
sus Lottery was to use seven random numbers to deter- 
mine the winners. 

4 Firemen Hurt in Queens Blaze 

Four firemen were injured in fighting a three-alarm 
fire that spread through nine stores in one-story buildings 
on 43d Avenue, from 48th to 49th Streets; in Long Island 
City, Queens. Two of the firemen were treated at the 
scene and the others were taken to the City Hospital 
Center at Elmhurst, suffering from heat, exhaustion and 
smoke inhalation. Their condition was described as not 
serious. 

From the Police Blotter: 

Two men wearing red ski masks entered the office of 
a diamond dealer at 15 West<47th Street, handcuffed the 
dealer, Stanley Nathanson, 56. years old, to a table, and 
made off with an estimated $200,000 worth of loose cut 
and uncut' diamonds. The armed robbers entered the offjpe 
with a key. . . . <JTwo branches of Citibank were held up — 
one at 686 Broadway at 2:15 PM. and another at 2100 
Grand Concourse, the Bronx, at 2:43 P.M_ in neither case 
was the amount of money taken known. . . . q Alvin 
Forser, 28, was shot twice by two unidentified men during 
a- dispute at West 135th Street and Lenox Avenue. Mr. 
Forser was taken to Harlem Hospital in serious condition. 
His assailants fled. ^ 


*36.* 

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■V 


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Tfca New York Tltnes/Wllltan E. Stun 

DUTCH CARRY TORCH FOR BICENTENNIAL; A Dutch 
relay runner carrying a torch, symbolizing friendship I 
between Europeans and Americans, on Van Wyck Ex- 
pressway. Yesterday was the first leg of a 266-mHe ■ 
course the 30 runners will run in relay from John Tv - 
Kennedy Airport to Washington. 

•5 k 


gj^rau-l ■ -rr 

- 



By TONY KORNHETSER tender and his sides ached 
sptdii to Th* ycrt TtnMB a bit. But. he woke up this 
BOSTON, April 20 — -The . morning, feeling far less stiff 
inual madness is past; the than he had expected, and 
jston Marathon is run, and he went out on the tennis 


Jim McManus 


annual madness is past; the 
Boston Marathon is run, and 
the city is back to normal. 
Traffic flows over the street*, 
of the 26 mile -385-yard 
course again. People have 
put down their garden hoses 
and returned to work, be- 
cause there are no more 
overheated runners to cool 
off. The runners are gone. 

Jim McManus was one of 
the first to leave. The 35- 
year-old former world class 
tennis player caught the 6:30 
plane last night to San Fran- 
cisco, and was home in Berk- 
eley, Calif., in time for a 
late supper. His feet were 


tender and his sides ached And he ran well, finlslj-^ As^atiqnjtf.T^ 
a bit. But he woke up this ing in 2 hours 55 minutes sionals. "Boston . has the . • - . 

morning. feeling far less stiff 16 seconds. Never mind that name and the, prestige. Td T Q;Pj 1 Cn^/J ,, 
than he had expected, and he placed 308th. He was only like to come back. My God, x o , ^ 7 : V . 
he went out on the tennis 35 minutes behind, the wta~ if was a lot of fun, having MEK3GO' CITY, April" 20 
courts to practice his strokes, ner, Jack Fultz, -and he ill the . people cheering for (Reuters) — At least la-coun- 
Because tennis is still his ished ahead of almost- 2,60ft, me when -they-didn’t eves tries .will join Mexico i» Wzto- 
business, his only business, other runners who started/ know who t was. But Fd ’-drawing from top Davis Caj> 
*T enjoy running,' " he said. ■■ the race. 1 never take it -up seriously, unless ‘'Sotrth " Africa is ex- 


*T enjoy running, ’’ he said. 
“But rd rather' get paid for 
my tennis, than not get paid 
for my running. Amateur ath- 
letes don’t get paid, you 
know. The only thing I - got 
was a promise from [televi- 
sion commentator] Bud Col- 
lins that he'd give me 28 
cents a mile and a can of 
beaus." 

McManus ran his first Bos- 
ton Marathon yesterday, the 
second marathon he had ever 


the race. 

It was a noteworthy 
achievement considering that 
McManus is a rank, amateur 


never take £t-jop seriously. 
noteworthy 1 could never iyna: this. Just pelled, the Mexican- Tennis 
daring that the same, it was a thrill. ” Federation said today. 
ik amateur .... McManus was invited to Migilef Osufia," federation 
•..Me has .s run at Boston— ^lijioagh his president, said' he had re~ 
ao : training ,--;best. time.df ^iD 6 r /'.did not edved amfirnxaiionfrom the 
is what he quality him' to Compete — by countries/ ^incliidthg' Sos - 
lg-distance ,'^race voffi&al.v Jock. Semple, viefc TTnitm add ‘seVenti in 
ding Run- . Semple. waS the. masseur for EastemEurope. ‘ ihht they 
one. the ^eunis pros whenever the would follow Mexican's with-' 

experience "pro circuit stepped in. Boston, - drawaL / 

fanus, who and. ‘over.-- tlj»- years Semple South- Africa’s presence id 
ournament - iad' always bumped up the the- competition^ & to he disy 
icer. in -the ' .. Boston Marathon to Me- cussed at the annual meeting 
Manus. .X;.- of- the- Davis ■ Cup Nations 

- .McManus applied for and in-London in July. The meet- 
riijeived an Amateur Athletic ing wfH-vdsa. consider a- reo-. 
Uvll lE^^oh.card, alkming him to onmmndation from the -Da.- 
*■ ' . tSiinpirte as an amateur run- vis' Gap- management cqm-i 

ip o park ,qh. And on Saturday, after mittee that pe- sus-r 

objections - packing a pair ofgfoves that pended, .for IwcviaE jefosai *■ 
s .spoil the he wtHUd . not. ’need in the to-. - play* South - Africa - this 

is, cut into blisteriiig hai^.'lS!; flew to yean.- >* - :r - - = . - ■■ > 

-for those - iSOstoo. Tfce-day CbefOre,-. jas The federation staid. it bad . 
mits from . -a framing »edsiEre,--.be' iin based it* decision -pot to -play/ 
nd create 20 miles. i ■-'*-» South Africa on ins tru ctions 

ion profe- - ■ , -"Pretty: drmah -ntovet .luiS?' from- =. the Jtfexicjan-. iSoverp-. - 
Board 7ft ' ment, ki linewifcba United* 

o vote on And yesterday morning af- Nations resolution calling for 
r. a ter eating no~breaHast be- the end of 'ail 'sports^Cies'* 

Park, also., cause- jtc,-xlidJio£ J kno w th e ^with SPHt b .Afrigt in^rotes^ 


- -7; 

^ *X*BIG& BEAimFUL'VS^ ^ 

V* Itefow^Our n^.stoaft'^ • £ l c 

: in butter-soft genuine feather. Black or Brown, j 




as a marathoner. .Me has. j; run at Bcsfon-^-akhongh his 
no coach, follows no : traiamg .'-best. t imedf 3x06 did not 
regimen and learns what he r qualify him to compete — by 
knows -about long-distance; .'/race ^ official.- ’Jock Semple, 
running from, reading Run- .. Semple v^ tbe masseur for 
neris World magazine. the fennis pros whenever the 

“It was a. great experience pro circuit stopped in. Boston, 
for me,” said McManus, who iand over - the - yeara Semple 
is active as a tournament - iad always Jxniiped up the 
player and an .officer, in -the '...-Boston Marathon to Me- 


?. Clay- Court Tourney Adds a Golden Touch 


By CHARLES FRIEDMAN 
: : With the outdoor season 

S under way, there are changes 
-' on the tournament scene. 

For the first time in its 
■ long history, the New York 
State men's clay-court cham- 
pionships will offer prize 
money, ft is one of the most 
^popular tournaments in the 
\_Edst, drawing about 200 
‘,/players each year at the 
«,l$rDrth Shore Tennis and Rac- 

* duets Club in. Bayside, 
'•.Queens, where Bill Tilden, 
Xytnnie Richards, Frank Hunt- 
^ er and other old-time stars 

* .Vised to compete. 

^ "Larry- Rosenthal, tour- 
■■ hament chairman, says en- 
‘ .tries for singles and doubles 
l ;dose on May 22 and play 
; '.begins June 4. Last year. 

f ■ On Nearby Courts 

- 4 - Butch Seewagen, the CoJum- 
. .bia coach who grew up on 
c.ifhe North Shore's courts, 
v .took the singles title for the 
fourth time by beating Herb 
FitzGibbon. 

,- But while this tournament 
a -has gained in stature, anoth- 
i fir - equally popular one has 
5 been lost. Players and fans 
were unhappy to learn that 
v ‘the national clay champion- 
•ships for men 35 years and 
r jover will not be held at the 
Shelter Rock Club in Man- 
hasset, UL 

After many years there, 
t - ‘during which the event be- 
t came established as a season 
’^highlight, it has now been 
moved to Austin, Tex. One 
^reason was that out-of-state 
r^players had complained that 
'^delays in scheduling matches 
.-had made the tournament 
•-"too expensive and inconven- 
' ieht. 

■ 

Another 'Tirst” is the 
switch of the Stevens Cup 
international senior team 
-matches to Fred Bobir’s Ten- 
nisport in Queens in August 
'Title United States has domi- 
nated the series. In which the 
ilbesta men players 45 years 
l-nhd older, compete. 

-* Tennisport is also holding 
; the Eastern senior champion- 
ships In July for the second 


straight time. And in an ef- 
fort to involve more women 
in tournaments, it is setting 


2 at the Roosevelt Field T.C. 
in Garden- City,- LX - Men’s 
entries close on Friday and 


up a series of round-robin . women's April 29. 


doubles Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days from 10 AM. to noon 
for beginners and experi- 
enced players, starting May 
4, open to anyone. 


Meanwhile, the Concord 
Hotel at Kiamesha Lake, 
N.Y., - which had been host 
to the Stevens Cup. has be- 
come part of the American 
Express Card Challengers 
Circuit, a new prize-money 
tour with a total of six tour- 
naments in July and August 
Hy Zausner of the Port 
Washington (LX) Tennis 
Academy is chairman of the 
circuit's Eastern Division.. 


The honor of staging the 
first big event of the outdoor 
season has been shared the 
last few years by the West- 
chester County clay cham- 
pionships at the Armonk 
Club and the Eastern hard- 
court tourney at the Wood- 
bury (L.I.) Club. Now the 
Eastern has gone indoors 
with an increase in prize 
money, thanks to sponsor- 
ship by Hankey Bannister 
and Blue Max. It starts May 


Sports Today 


BASEBALL 

Yankees vs. Chicago White Sox, 
at Yankee Stadium, River 
Avenue and 161st Street, the 
Bronx, 2 P.2VL 
(Radio — WMCA, 1:55 PM.) 
Meta vs. Cardinals, at SL Louis. 

Radio— WNYC, 1:25 PJVL) 
Wagner at St. John’s, 3 PAL; 
Bloomfield at John Jay, 3 
P.M.; Niagara at Seton Kail, 2 
P.M. (Radio— WSOU-FM, 2 
P.M.) 

BASKETBALL. 

Nets vs. Spurs, AJLA. playoff, 
at San Antonio. 

(Television — Channel 9, 840 
V.M.) (Radio— WMCA, 8:15 
pja.) 

HARNESS RACING 
Yonkers Raceway, Central and 
Yonkers Avenues, 8 PM, 
Freehold (N. J.) Raceway. 1 PJH. 
Montlcello (N.Y.) Raceway, .8 

THOROUGHBRED RACING 


;• Ent? LtfaCern sciHOf cnaiTipfon- Aqueduct (Queens) iUco Track, 
ships In July for the second itao Pm. 

iJPele’s Leg in Cast 
With Minor Sprain 


By ALEX Y ANNIS 

Pele, the Cosmos' star, will Coast bas brought about the 


- have his left foot in a soft 

• cast for several days after 
.tests on Monday disclosed 

• *that he had sprained the foot 

rduring the game against the 
ip • . Toros on Sunday 


y -. Toros on Sunday 

' r News m Miami. Pele 

was limping 
... _ w Slightly on Sun- 
Soccer day night and the 

{ limp was more 

1 "noticeable after arriving at 

^^^XaGuardia Airport Monday. 
Pele told a concerned team- 


formation of the Pacific Con- 
ference or The Super 10. 
Coaches from northern and 
southern California have 
formed the conference to 
provide competition among 
colleges in that area. This 
should set the pattern for 
other regions to form confer- 
ences. 

The members of the Pacific 
Conference are the University 
of California, Los Angeles, 
San Diego State, Southern 


:; 3 nate, flfs nothing, it will- California, Fullerton State, 

•/ha rt V •• Cfn«F n») Ijnrhnldi. Can Tru-s 


;5 be O.K.” 

‘J With Keith Eddy’s right 
;>arm wrapped round Feie’s « 
.»■ shoulders, the Brazilian as- 1 
sored Eddy that it was noth- 
* a mg serious. “No problem, no 
f^problem,” Pele kept telling 
•;Eddy, the Cosmos’ captain 
i]who had dominated the raid- 
t.dle of the defense in the 1-0 
[i victory over the Toros. 

* it 5 Dr. Jeff Minkoff, the team 
f]doctor, examined Pele on 
'^Monday and found the^slight 
i; sprain. He ordered Pele to 
: f Immobilize' the foot for -sev- 
'■I'leral days. 

Eddy will leave for Eng- 
.J-land tonight to bring his 
^family to the United States. 

;N He wiM miss practice for the 
'(•(rest of the week 1 and. so yriH. 
rlPele. Ken Furphy, tie Cos- 
■ Arnos' coach, is also leaving 
[“for England tmiighL Furphy 
N and Eddy will- return to New 
J York on Sunday night to pife- 
’pare for the Cosmos’ home- 

* opener on May 2 against ■ 

* Chicago. 

< Cosnao officials said yester- 
:*day that Pele would use 
t. crutches in order not to. tire 
f; the leg. . 

). Pain could be seen on Pele’s 
5 1 face on the plane ride to New 
ri York from Miami, He said 
he was very unhappy with ■ 

■' his performance ana that the 
|2 field vms not' to this- liking. 

Sand got into' bis eyes sev- 
ri eral times and at one point 


Stanford, Berkeley; San Jose 
State, 5 an Francisco and 
Santa Barbara. 




TROIAN 36’ SPORT 

fisherman 


• *5*sta*iuHiit»aofli. 
TwhuSaut. 





75CHRYS22,TKfl«- 


O'DAY SAILS 


the game was momentarily 


held up. The most damage 
the sand caused Pele, ' how- 
.» ever, was when he missed a 
■ kick and - his toe hit . the 


n+*amai 38 

SAIUNG INSTRUCTORS 
UPTOSKJWlmds 


ground. 

*'i Fortunately for the Cosmos, 
Vi the game against Boston oil 
1 i Saturday night has been post- 
?'• poned because the Minixte- 
i.; men have yet to agree on a 
contract with Schaefer Sta- 
dium in Foxboro, Mass. Pele 
y can use the time to recover 
f£ and be ready for the Chicago 
r Sting at Yankee Stadium on 
<is3tey.-2=: -- ... 

The growth of soccer at the 
, collegiate level on the West 



YORK SAM 
teOfVWYCM 


fi Mt Properties 



Steve Siegel, who has been 
playing in Spain, will be 'on 
the seeded list ' The West- 
chester opens May 8. 


While many airdomes or meeting Monday' to vote on 
"bubbles" for ' indoor >jflay the ESssena' matter. ' a 
are : being taken r down-' and . - -^--In-Cunningham Park, also, 
stored, a battle has broken in Queens, the bubWe opera- 
out over ah -attempt by a tor has stirred up much an- 


- wotftewwwsatist. 


mmm 


Manus. 

« m - -f . ' -McManus applied for and 

iPf) / h^eived an Amateur Athletic 

ivii JL UU Uli lE^toh.cand, aHownng him to 
‘ <*mpkfce as an tenateur run- 

Wes have gone up o park .qb. And on Saturday, after 


courts. The mam .directions ■ packing s pair of^ 'gfoves that 
are tbat the bubbles .qjofl the he would not'.’nMd in the 
beauty of the parks, cut into blistering: be flew to 

the' playing season- for those . iSOstoo. The-day Ojetore,-. jas 
who- purchase- - permits from .-a traardug medsm^ -.oe- .rin 
tbe department and create 20 miles.'.'- V' 
traffic and poOution prob- ,-^Prrtty dImihlInav«.hn5? , ’ 
lems. Community Board 7 ft i 

meeting Monday' to vote on And yesterday morning af- 
the Kissena matter. ' ' “ ter eating no“breaHast be- 


" 7 tr WEST^STH 5rREET«E^R FlffTH AVENUE N 
..." l .\, 76 DnANCEY,NYC * 2:W'tikAN’OCONCOUKi£. C 


out over ah -attempt by a 
private operator to lease the 
Kissena Park courts for a 
bubble next winter. And the 
hard-pressed Parks Depart- 
ment is in no. man’s land. 
It wants to get the income 
from the lease, but would 
rather not arouse the' ire 
of residents in the area in 
Flushing, Queens: " 

Similar situations have 
arisen elsewhere 'where bub- 


tpr has stirred up much an- 
ger by refusing, to -remove 
his' clubhouse after the„ in- 
door season. It is considered 
.an eyesore by the residents- 
The department has prom- 
ised to look into the issue. - 
It should be mentioned that 
thousands ’of persons who 
otherwise would -keep their 
racquets in closets during 
the winter make use of the 
bubbles. 


proper breakfast 'to 
Manus picked,. up. iii 
race number. It was 
•fThe .*R* is 
be said. 


c. Me-" agal 


Roflrng Hills Country Club 

. 1 ’ r ‘iomteHy ■ 

Tho Englewood CountryClub 


T '■ Olympic^ Eatry Agre^ 
LONDON;. April: 20 goi- 
ters) ~~ ' The Tnlenjabosal 




But less than three hours- Lawn Tennis Federation bad 
iater, 'aftar covering- more applied- to the Intematkmal 


l - \ shduldi befriade to: 

ILthini 


tVipn . 26 rnflpas w jj b ffn g 
cheered by more than 100 ,- 


Olympit: . Ct^imittee to haye 
tennis reinstated as an Olym- 


000 people along: the way. - pic sport, the - federatioru sec- 
he was smllrng and exhdarat- . ; reiery, Basil: 5eay,‘ said: to- 
ed. And now- thT ‘% n stood . daj. "It .has. :freq?iested -that 
for- "ready.” Ready to: come the sport be .introduced, at 
back and do it-again. ; . - thelSSO "Games ip Moscow. 


. ; . . ^ . Chaimtari^|hd'Ci^ cwiMetritjersh 
- , -V 1 . ;'.f |lo#ng HiiteCounhy^lub 

■' - i - " y ■* V'i\: - >■; - Jones Road ?-f; f - : . •- 


>• r. ! r 




RESORTS 

CARIBBEAN 





RBORTS 

JUbSBEAtT 


RESOBW 
URtBpEAl^ Jtj 



n : " V . 






’’ /&?: ^ ^ ' ' - ■ 

. - . - ‘fer-.-.C : . 

: .. ‘ : v-. 

• ■ ■ ■ • m .* . .. - 
s' - . m v '•.■■■»'( ■ ' . • • ■ A > • 

: - .*.,•■ fb J r - ■ * Ji •- ' j. . m 

-j /•. - 1 * - » » » »■>. > 


"We'll toil you 
where fogef the best buys." 


Vida Mitchell 


How’d you like to spend your next Gjrii^bean'vcKxition , Visitr^frrentfe ,, ? : ; ' 
Thats just what you will be doing when you come to Jamaica . . v : lr v' 

— especially if you're carrying your new. Friend of Jamaica tard; ;v Z ; 

it's your persona! way of saying " I m a friended jarnaiedr Arid 
our islands brand^pankingn^ way of being nelgrtxH’lyv;; 

Here's how it works. p: y . ■ : A .V - 

. . You've got your card, it s free (your travel agent will help " 

you get. one) and you come fo Jamaica.- From now or>, no 
matter which of bur four resort areas you visit, you're tf 
Very I mporfant Visitor. 

Everyone likes to make friends. Flash your card, and a 
smile. You’ll find you’ve opened the door to Jamaican 




v . ' rm- •, 


•< s >y *> . 



^ j 




r 


"VMj'M show you 
wfwre.ffw good times ore." 

. Jonathan Gresnstreef 


gift, a free drink or the kind of specidl attentidn friends ' ■ ' 
deserve. Pjck.up thephpneord^rbp by the HospitcdityDeskat 
any Tourist Hoardoff ice. You'll find out 

whats going on and vyfrere. And they'lf go out 
of their way to be hel pfulany way they can. . . 

-. But listen to this. Every ti me. you show 

your card at a cooperating hotel;, tour operator, car 

rental agency, or at Trans- Jamaica Airlines, you have dchanceto 
s win a free seven-day, sixmlaht return vacatron for tyw> (inciudina t 
\v breakfasts and dinners) ? There'll be 1 0 M ~jbke Me Back To 

ft . ’ Jamaica", prizes awarded . to our Frijends every rnonth. (A feast you with special treats 

Fv\- • booklet- listing. c41:particip>anfs is avadaBle at Jamaica W^ywr Sarah Bank: 

nHfeV: Tourist Board Atrport Centers/hotels. U-briye and 

And, as a Friend of Jamaica, you'll be 
getting our special N^vsietter; crammed 
• • with- juicy. Jamaica tidbits and the-i nside . 

. -i sebop.’an bargains, dockage tours, etc*- ■; 

• - IjH • • (Be prepared, rrKike ybuv^^ . 

Wm - - \> $ee your tfc^ef'agent aboutigetting youreard (pteas^ allow . 1 > / 

about 2 weeks)and^ ^ydu'H- enjoy-Jamoica in d.brgninew;way: ' j - t ... ' 

'■ ■ • ; s ' . . Afterall, wfiptdte^ friei^s.tpr?; ; ... .* 'r..;- 

; v ®I976— Jarriaicdlburist : Sbaffe Y<xk; Philadelphia,; - .'.a . - v . • .. \ 

Ghi&sgo, Detroit, ZMIas r ^ORif ( Atlanta .tbrdhtOr . - *y\\ I ' : C^-.. 


Hr J -~ 




E 



D’4E BS7 4:^*3 a 500 
r***S&Zl S l . 79 


See your ASIA Travel Agent for your Friend of Jamaica card. He is your professional travel-expert. 

• r '- • : l :V 
















V WEDNESDAY. APRIL 21, ms 


SPORTS 


State Racing Board Head 
Declares Charges Phony’ 


TTrihb* & recent weeks Sarafan’s agency has 
I l/LC 1 i e“ sharply criticized by two state 
I l\rr , «ftil' re5tI 8atJve groups for ailegediy fail- 
. , IVlK to monitor the financial dealings of 

"WoseveJt and- Yonkers Raceways. The 
■^ts'cks have been accused of camouflag- 
their true condition by permitting 
^^^^^^anselves to be "financially drained" 
parent corporations. 

- - Separate reports by the State Com- 

~ ^ ssion of Investigation and the Office 

Legislative Oversight and Review 
9 f iinSrS ir ? <JH est i°“ ed whether New York is 
w , .. -filing its fair share of pari-mu(uel tax 

1 r * SnsW^’ 01116 from Roosevelt and Yonkers. 

his board issued its annual report 


\V. By STEVE CADY 

ViVf Governor Carey’s .advisers are mis- for 197 
V^A Khn? him with “viciously phony in- ures so 
‘ *r=^mia£ion about New York harness Thev 
ads, the chairman of thcState Racing receive* 
id Wagering Board charged yesterday, in ppri- 
Gove rnor has been grossly mis- in 1975 
d Bertram D. Sarafan, “f can’t million 
Extent while he and others continue lion for 
wntack theJntegrity and competence revenue 
lfia''boari.” ■•ah , 




■was 


for 1975. Sarafan said the revenue fie-' 
ures spoke for themselves. 

They showed that New York State 
received a record sum of $183.4 million 
in Pgn-mutael tax revenue from racing 
,n .„ 1 .® 75 -. Offtrack revenue totaling $64 
million for New York City and $9 mil- 
lion for other localities lifted the overall 
revenue for government to $256 million. . 

about , the state getting 
snortcnanged is nonsense." said Sarafan. 
■New York squeezes racing harder than 
any other state. We take-out three 
tunes as much tax revenue as the next 
biggest producer, California." . 

to Sarafan, government’s 
laxeout from racing averages' 7.5 per- 
cent °f the betting handle nationally. 

In New York, he said, the average for 
tnoroughbred racing was 9.4, for har- 
ness racing 9.8 and for Roosevelt unfl 
ronkers, the two 1 tracks accused of 
shortchanging the state, II. 

Of the $85.2 million in on track tawy ■ 
produced for New York State by its 

Continued on Page 44, Column 5 



Islanders Win by 4-3 
For 3-2 Playoff Lead 


TJ» Haw York Tlnas/EAnitf H fustier 

Bertram D. Sarafan: State is not shortchanged 


Yanks Top White Sox , 5-4 , 
As Shirt Dispute Flares 



CA 



imer. White Sox second taseman, stumbling . . . 


&'V-- J 




- TW Hew Yark Thnai/Rpbart mibu- 

faUing to the ground as he got off a late throw 
on Jim Mason’s single in the seventh inning, 
icky Dent, shortstop, backed up the play. 


By WILLIAM N. WALLACE 
It was merely the eighth 
of 162 . games the Yankees 
will play this season, but 
Tippy Martinez will remem- 
ber it. 

His five innings of runless 
.relief pitching at the Stadium 
yesterday helped the home 
team’s 5-4 victory over the 
Chicago White Sox. It whs 
the sixth triumph of the cam- 
paign for first-place New 
York. 

Otherwise the contest will 
be remembered as the start 
of the blouse controversy, 
featuring Billy Martin and 
George Steinbrenner 3d of 
the Yankees versus Paul 
Richards, Bill Veeck. Mary 
Frances Veeck et al of Chica- 
go- 

The White sox, down from 
Boston where they beat the 
American League champions 
in two of three games last 
weekend, wore their new-de- 
parture road uniforms, de- 
signed by Veeck, the dub 
president, and his wife, Maiy 
Frances. 

The navy-blue ensemble, 
which Veeck describes as 
handsome, has a top that 
is open at the neck and a 
bottom that does not conven- 
tionally tuck into the pants 
but lays flat around the hips 
with a scalloped trim. Hence, 
it is a blouse. 

In Martin’s opinion; it vio- 
lates baseball rules because 
it is too loose, and the Yan- 
kee manager said it had to go. 

Furthermore, the , shirt 
worn under the blouse by 
the White Sox pitchers is 
white, and according to 
Steinbrenner, the Yankee 
principal owner, this also is 
a violation. He sent word to 
Richards, the Chicago mana- 
ger, that the game would 


be protested if another White 
Sox pitcher came out of the 
bull pen with white under- 
shirt sleeves, which he con- 
tended - helped to disguise 
where the baseball was com- 
ing from. 

The complaint . about the 
undershirt brought a result 
Clay Carroll changed from 
white to black. But the 
Yankees still could not hit 
the 34-year reliever who re- 
placed. Bart Johnson after 
they had scored all five runs 
in the second and third in- 
nings. 

The Veecks were not on 
hand to take a position in 


Richards spoke for the dub 
when he said, “They stay 
out" He meant the shirttails 
remain untucked. 

Martin’s point is that a 
loose shirt can be puffed 
out into the strike zone and 
then be hit by a pitch, which 
would entitle a batter to first 
base.. He used to . do that 
when he played for the 
Yankees. “It’s cheating," he 
said. 

That Steinbrenner would 
threaten to protest a game 
to Lee MacPhail. president 
of the American League, did 
not sit well with the 67-year- 


controversy, although Continued on Page 45, Column 1 


By ROBIN KERMAN 

Special to Tie Near Yark Time] 

BUFFALO, April 20 — Bert 
Marshall, an Islander de- 
fenseman, scored his first 
goal of the season with 19 
seconds remaining tonight to 
give New York a 4-3 victory 
over the Buffalo Sabres. The 
goal came on a shot from 
. just inside the blue line and 
enabled the Islanders to gain 
a 3-2 lead in their foor- 
of-seven-games Stanley Cup 
quarterfinal series. 

The next game will be 
played Thursday at Nassau 
Coliseum. Should a seventh 
game prove necessary, it will 
be held here on Sunday. 

Islanders Catch lip 

Buffalo had taken a two- 
goal lead on its second and 
third shots of the game but 
Andre St- Laurent finished 
off a nice goalmouth pass by 
Garry Howatt and J. P. 
Parise scored during a two- 
man Islander * advantage to 
even the score at- 2-2 later 
in the first period. 

From that paint the game 
became a rough, physical 
contest filled with hard hits, 
both legitimate and illegal. 

The first altercation came 
at 18:20 If the first period. 
Dave Lewis, an Islander de- 
fenseman, had slammed 
Craig Ramsay into the boards 
behind the Islander net and 
Ramsay lay on ‘ the ice. 
Danny Gare moved in to 
push Lewis and then Lee 
Figolin rushed in, and both 
Sabres punched away at 
Lewis. Then Fogolin jumped 
on Lewis and the two players 
were entangled at the back 
of the net. 

Lewis and Fogolin received 
five-minute penalties for 
fighting and 1 0-minute mis- 
conducts for prolonging the 
grappling. In addition, Lewis 
received a gross misconduct 
for hair pulling. Referee 
Andy Van Hellemond award- 


ed no minor penalties, thus 
implying that Lewis's original 
check was legal. 

Jim Schoenfeld, the Sabres' 
captain and best defense- 
map, left the ice late in the 
opening period. He com- 
plained of pain in his left 
ankle, which has been both- 
ering him since the final 
game of the regular season. 

McIntosh, Howatt in Fight 

Schoenf eld's replacement 
from the thin Buffalo defen- 
sive corps was Paul McIn- 
tosh. The rookie soon found 
himself embroiled in a fight 
with Howatt after elbowing 
the Islander left wing. 

Bill Sim th brought a degree 
of physical play to his tend- 
ing of the Islander net in the 
first period when he went 30 
feet out of the net to fell 
Rene -Robert. The crowd 
screamed as Robert's weak 
shot slid just wide of the 
net 

Rick Martin had opened 
the -Buffalo scoring. Billy 
Harris, Clark Gillies and Bry- 
an Trottier had just caused 
a lot of commotion around 
Gerry Desjardins in the Buf- 
falo goal, and Gillies and 
Trottier were caught in the 
comer. The puck squirted 
out to Martin. Harris’s stick 
check at midice was inef- 
fective and Martin passed to 
Gil Perreault A stiff check 
by. Denis Potvin dislodged 
Perreault from the puck but 
Martin picked it up again 
and beat Smith on the glove 
side. 

Gare scored Buffalo’s sec- 
ond goal as he and Jean Pot- 
•vin tried to catch a pass 
from Don Luce "in midflight. 
Their sticks met and Pot- 
vin’s actually directed the 
puck past Smith. 

St. Lourent’s goal made it 
2-1 and then the Islanders 
got a break— at 1:36 of a 
two-man advantage — and 


tied the score. Parise swatted 
in his second rebound after 
Denis Potvin had worked the 
puck into the goal area. 

Buffalo broke the tie with 
less than 10 minutes remain- 
ing. A loose puck came to 
Jim Lorentz and Bill Smith 
kneeled as he tried to sweep 
the disk away. But be pushed 
the puck into bis right thigh 
and it slithered in. 

The game became bruising 
and frantic in the final min- 
utes. Denis Potvin and the 
Islanders' two dutch players 
acquired last season From the 
Minnesota North Stars, Pa- 
rise and Jude Drouin, com- 
bined to knot the score at 
3-3. Potvin slapped a pass 
from Drouin into the right 
side of the Buffalo net. 

Campbell Scores 
Ontario Changes 

MONTREAL, April 20 (AF) 
— Clarence Campbell, presi- 
dent of the National Hockev 
League, said today he found 
it odd that Roy 'McMurtiy, 
Ontario’s Attorney General, 
saw fit to issue charges 
against only Philadelphia Fly- 
ers after last Thursday's 
brawl-filled playoff game in 
Toronto. 

"After all, Toronto set the 
standard of conduct for the 
game, bringing that Kurt 
Walker up;’’ Campbell said. 
“Before the game was -a cou- 
ple of minutes old. Walker 
went out of his way to cross- 
check [Dave] Schuitz. So 
Toronto's intentions of how 
they were going to play were 
quite obvious." 

Three members of the Fly- 
ers were charged after the 
game, in which Dave Newell, 
the referee, assessed 173 
minutes in penalties. Camp- 
bell said the films he saw of 
Thursday night’s game* did 
not support MmMurtry's 
drastic action. 


Mets, Behind Matlaek, Brush Back Cardinals, 8-0 


By PARTON KEESE 

Special to The Kew Tort Turn* 

ST. LOUIS, April 20 — Ap- 12:30 this morning, the Meta' 


parently frustrated by their 
17-inning loss to the New 
York Mets early this jnom- 
ing, and aggravated by three 
Met home runs in the first 
two inings tonight, the St. 
Louis Cardinals started 
plunking their opponents 
with fastballs. 

Though' the teams came to' 
Wows over the beanballs, Jon 
Matlaek weathered the battle 
and hurled the Mets to an 8-9 
victory, their second in a row 
over the dispirited Cards. 

Lynn. McGIothen. who 
by hitting Matlaek and . Del 
Unser with pitches, was 
ejected in the fourth burning 
after both dugouts emptied 
and clashed on the infield. 

For the benefit of those 
fans who went to bed before 
Del Unser hit his I7th-inning 
game-winning homer at about 


Smith 


few ■* 


Mostly About Home Run Hitters 












n Mike Schmidt hit four consecutive home runs 
• the Phillies win a pitcher’s battle with the 
„ other day, 18-16 in 10 innings, the papers duti- 
. v^‘- id precedents: Only nine other batters .had ever 
. to fence four times in one game, only three of 
/ ! it on consecutive times at bat; only two besides 

had four homers in an extra-inning game. One' of 
• r was Chuck Klein, of sainted memory in Phila- 
Kcause the had two comings. In the fall of 1933 
after Chuck had batted .368 for the Phillies, 
18 Gerry Nugent sold him to the Cubs for 
$65,000 — a gang of money then — plus Marie 
nea Koenig, the old Yankee shortstop; Ted 
Kleanhans, a pitcher, and Gink Hendricks, 
,<■. •••- an outfielder who had once hit .354 for 
r and was famous in literary circles for the im- 
*>dger battle. cry: “From now os. it’s every man 
s^f” Two seasons later the Cubs paid Nugent 
to. take. Klein back' along with Fabian Kowalik, 
er, in exchange for Curt Davis, pitcher, and Ethan 
iffielder. 

loqg after Chuck’s second coming, on July IO, 
bit a line drive on his first time, at bat that Paul 
aught against the wall. In Pittsburgh's Forbes 
nost 400 feet from the plate. He then hit four 
wall, surprising neither his t e a mm ates nor his 
at did surprise the fans was the fact that the 
’on, 9-6, for in those days the Philadelphia papers 
ad standing in type: “Klein bits 2 as Phils Bow." 
stories about Schmidt’s big day mentioned that 
Ig had hit four consecutive home runs against 
tics in Philadelphia but did- not go into details. 

be remembered that throughout his first 10 
h the Yankees, Gehrig .was always in the shadow 
luth. Only once in their years together did Lou 
lance to beat Ruth for the team hbme-run cham- 
Lafce in the 1931 season. Lou hit into the bleach- 
iffith Stadium in Washington with two out and 
on second base. 

The Mahaffey Technique 
ball bounced beck toward the field and Lary, 
over his shoulder as he rounded third, saw Sam 
h it. Thinkin g the side was retired, he trotted 
lugout for a drink of water while Gehrig, tooling 
his -home-run glide, proceeded on to the plate, 
q. did -Lou discover he had passed Lary on the 
^retiring himself and expunging his home run 
. rbbx score. He finished the season with 46, tied 

JJjf sfon June 3.- 1932, Gehrig hit a home nm off 
SB mrishaw in the first inning. In the fourth inning 
if jtber and ia th 0 h ® bit a third. Connie Mack 

jL j Shis , sc_pre card and Roy Mahaffey strode in from 

[I#Jpen. Mahaffey was a right-hander with nothing 
f" r jtMtaw’s blazing stuff, but be was pretty cute. 

^^ Vt^-George, 1 ’ Connie said as Earnshaw started for 
jSftf&use, “i want you to see how Mahaffey pitches to 

jSiSe seventh inning Mahaffey threw, his high hard 
Kw 3ehrig hit it over the walL 
^ e," Earnshaw said. “May l go now?" 


Babe Ruth had never hit four borne runs in a game, 
and Ruth was the biggest name in baseball — with the pos- 
sible exception of John J. McGrow, The day Gehrig hit four 
in Philadelphia, it rained in New York. Tom Meany, cover- 
ing the Giants for the World-Telegram, dropped into the 
Polo Grounds and found a -notice on the clubhouse wall: 
McGrow had resigned and Bill Terry was the new manager. 
Once again, Gehrig got second billing in the headlines. 

Mention of McGrow recalls a letter from John Mc- 
Cormack of Dallas, who wonders how McGrow’s Giants 
managed to lose the 1927 pennant. He points out that three- 
fourths of the infield — Bill Terry, Rogers Hornsby and Fred 
Lindstrom — are in the Hall of Fame and perhaps the fourth 
member, Travis Jackson, ought to be. Two outfielders on 
that club— Edd Roush and Mel Ott — also made it to Coop- 
erstown, but in 1927 Ott was an 18 -year-old who played 
little. Burleigh Grimes, a 19-game winner that year, was the 
team's sixth certified immortal. 

“So,” Mr. McCormack asks, "What happened ra the 
way to the pennant?” 

Trials erf Mr. McGraw 

The answer is that after winning their fourth straight 
championship in 1924, the Giants began to wear out The 
1926 infield was great — George Kelly, Frank Frisch, Jack- 
son and Lindstrom, with young Terry filling in at first and 
in the outfield. However, Ross Youngs, the peerless out- 
fielder,- came down with Bright’s disease; Art Nehf had 
neuritis and couldn’t pitch; Heinie Groh was finished. As 
the club floundered, McGraw raged at Frisch, the captain, 
until Frank could take no more. In St. Louis, he jumped 
the team and went home. The Giants finished fifth as 
Hornsby led the Cardinals to the World Championship. 

' That was 192K By 1927 Terry was the regular at first 
base, Jackson and Lindstrom were at the top of their game, 
and what may have been the most sensational trade ever 
made had brought Hornsby East in exchange for Frisch. 
Hornsby played second base, was. the team captain and 
when McGraw was ill or absent for other reasons, he man , 
aged the club. 

For the first time in his Hfe, McGraw was absent a 
good deaL He was in. a- three-sided quarrel with Charles 
Stoneham and Francis X. McQuade, .the owners. He was 
plagued by a sinus condition, Grimes and Fred Fitzsimmons 
were his only reliable pitchers and only Edd Roush kept 
the outfield off the burlesque circuit. As acting manager 
on the last Western trip, Hornsby got -the Giants up to 
challenge Pittsburgh, but they hung in the stretch and fin-, 
ished third. 

‘The 1927 Pirates weren’t memorable,” writes Mr. Mc- 
Cormack. “except, maybe, for being the first team to lose ' 
tour straight to- the Yankees.” 

Maybe not, but this was the lineup: Lloyd Waner, c X, • 
.355; Clyde Barnhart, Lf„ 319; Paul Waner, r.f., .380; Glenn 
Wright, sjs., 281; Pie Traynor, 3b, .342; George Grantham, 
2b, .305; Joe Harris, lb,.-326; Earl Smith.. .270, and Johnny. 
Gooch, .258, catchers. On the mound, Specs Hill won 22 
games, Ray Kroner and Lee Meadows 19 each, and Vic 
Aldridge 15. Those were the bums the Yankees swept in 
the World Series. 


sir center fielder repeated the 
w chore at 7:45 tonight in the 
n- first inning. Unser walloped 
se the ball to virtually the iden- 
st tical spot in the right-field 
•t. stands for his second home 
sd run of the season and his 
ts sixth against the Cardinals in 
a little over a year. 
xj . ■ Unser's homer, with Ed 
a Kranepool on second base 
le after a double, a two-run 
■9 homer by Felix Millan, with 
w Wayne Barrett on first. Be- 
fore the Cards came, to bat, 
0 the Mets were ahead, 4-0. 

,[ - It didn’t seem to be Mc- 

a Glothen’s night. He struck 

3 out Dave Kingman not a rare 
feat, then needed two splen- 
did fielding plays for the 
_ other two out in the first 
inning. 

A bit of bad luck and an- 
I other home run by John Mil- 
ner on a three-ball, no-strike 
count with Matlaek on base 
via Vic Harris’s error at sec- 
ond brought 2 unearned runs 
home and gave the. explosive 
Mets, a 6-0 lead. 

For the short-stroking Mil- 
lan, who has hit only 20 hom- 
. ers in 1,251 games, it was his 
four-base blow that put the 
Met home-run streak at nine 
straight games, just one from 
their club record. 

Too Close For Comfort 

When Unser came up ' in 
the second, McGIothen hit 
him with a pitch. An inning 
later, a near-riot emptied 
both dugouts with several 
fights ensuing. 

Matlaek threw close to 
McGIothen when the Cardinal 
' batted in tbe bottom of the 
third. Bruce Froemming, the 
plate umpire, immediately 
warned Matlaek and spoke to j 
both managers. This amount- 
ed to an automatic $50 fine 
for Matlaek and automatic 
% ejection from the game for 
another warning. 

After one more pitch, a 
'strike, someone in the Met 
dugout began razzing Froem- 
ming, who immediately or- 
dered the culprit to leave the 
grounds. It turned out to be 
Bud HarreJsra, a nonstarter 
tonight, who raced out and 
argued nose to nose with 
the umpire before leaving. 

When Matlaek led off the 
Met fourth, McGIothen threw 
the first pitch , behind him,, 
causing the umpire to offi- 
cially warn him also and 
bringing out Manager Joe 
Frazier from the Met dug- 
out, who complained the 
Can! pitcher should be 
thrown out. 

He lost that argument, but 
he didn't , have to wait long 
for McGlothen’s ejection, 
which came two pitches later 
when he plunked Matlaek in 
the back. The Cardinal pitch- 
er, knowing he would be 
thrown out, started to walk 
off, but Dave Kmgman came 
roaring out of the dugout 
trying to get at McGIothen. 
Though blocked by another 
player, he was followed by 
all the rest of the Mets, as 
well as ail of tbe Cardinals, 
the armies clashing violently 
near the pitcherVinound. 

Several players on both . 
sides pushed, shoved and 
threw punches, but order pre- 

ContinuedonPage45, Column 1 



Onltod Press Intanuflonil 

Players from Mets' and Cardinals’ dugouts converging in fourth-inning melee. Ca rdinals * 
starter, Lynn McGIothen, hit Del Unser on the shoulder with a pitch in the third i nning. 
McGIothen was narrowly missed by a Jon Matlaek pitch In the bottom of tbe third who 
in turn was hit by McGIothen In the top of the fourth. McGIothen was then ejected.' 


Of all filter kings: 

Nobody! 

lower than 
Carbon. 

Look at the latest U.S. Government figures for 
other top brands that call themselves t iow”in tar. 


tar, 

mg/cig. 


nicotine, 

mg/cig. 


Brand D (Filter) 14 1.0 

Brand D (Menthol) 13 1.0 

BrandV (Fitter) 11 0.7 

Brand T (Menthol) 11 0.6 

Brand V (Menthol) 1 1 0.7 

BrandT (Filter) 11 0.6 A 

Carlton Filter *2 . 0.2 

' Carlton Menthol *2 0.2 MB 

Carlton 70’s (lowest of all brands)— 

*1 mg. tar, 0.1 rag. nicotine 

•Av. per cigarette by FTC method 

No wonder Carlton is 
fastest grcnving of the top 25. 

Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined 
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health. 


fitor and Manhct 2 n 3. *t»", 02 ng. tiiatme w. per tipiEtiB. by FTC method. 


Carlton / 
2 


f Carlton 
Menthol 
2 mg. 










■m wmm 


JsM.. 




Eddie Maple r «^%aif> 4 te gtfta Dream oP Stay S^ fflSs. "+S 
ners yesterday*^ «■? Sfri l ag 

including Qitiefcj'mfc ;TawW ^'^yfi^Jhadbee»syflfica»ed for b Kn -. --^r 
the 11-10 '■■■SPfcjOrted ■ *41 at ’n Tired 


v''’>io3iTO'by 3Wiiaf*» PnuUculoBs. toe. rrtr MW tauHtx mm) • 

^ Ajxrp- 20 . 88 th day. Weather dear, trafck fait '- 

C/ FiRSjLiloine, : 'ii iific»*. '? 2 S, 0 »S 20 . 00 a, SIXTH— 5 l 5 . 000 , allow.,- 3 Y 0 artd BP. - 7 F 

ss^^^SirZS I? srst is^-issr* e. %s- 
a, Mi* xsisss stt ”~*»*~<* 

V*? foTB • Sfcrtttft 7 PP Ur~-!4 Fin. Odls 0TB .Sfarfert - PP K ft f»n. Odds. 


PP UtV-ft 

'r v ' V 
1 . 1 * 


AtUie . SparfK 5 &:. b a’fl. } h£go ti ated the 4 ucoupim rammt ^vc-^ie^nfc. 

T . WT-h «d» lx z 3 

Tracks feajjed ■ Balancer ’itaiffijnr^TI&e: association said n>th»Jm. .... .:.-(aw» .. <■« 

bv 3 % lengths in' "M 0 of %g>^sh£res had beep.- ots MwSfviGv * w, s.w,- c« 

the ste-furlong^^e-and^AKr' ' retain^,; by.’ the .trotters *g^gLjg-g: '■'.:' ' ,.- — 

S 4 J 0 ’for 52 to 'win--. ■„ former owner, Leo Soehnleg.-- SE eo«D— m.wo, ci.-wic*?, w^oo-^roo. 

Maple, wh*^i£p. aerpn «; **& k SS£ 

SiLS* titles the holder to to, .!»* -«, - g 

$?*?!35 - 

and Crab Grass. (SS. 40 * .in die . N.Y. Rugby Union . |STS 1 . :: s j“ S j!i Mj 

Sixth/; ..... c‘: . .STAWIKG OF THE TEAMS .... J 5 S Uu 13 ^ 

. ' „ . - Dlytstait L-Ust Tango ....9 S* 7 W J'fc l*« 

il f Pflnn A 7 a tifinsti league all. b-biiiv piMsura ...2 7*. 6 * 7 * li^o 

rirr « dut/Qai— •■ --.-. games : games e-T^'TfeLowr t 1 t b ?.-» 

Lawrence Edward "Reynolds 0 - 4 srL-* '....'. 3 ' 0 0 ‘ 1,0 

Jr - a ,i° cke y fr _ om .SfStar«;:.' ?!“ v« s.oM?a* -■wkse! *■* HS IS 


■ft Fin. OdHs 0 T B .Starter* ■ PP B ft fin- 
S3 i»ai s.tfl B-Crab Grass ! 4 i 3 ‘ I* 3 .T 0 

j» r* 3 t 3 JO D-PrwIHSfd On# V. 3 1 ** 1 “ 2*11 13-30 

it 3 <S SJ 0 F-SWtaiTImo .■.-..‘3 3 “ i 1 ' 33 » 50,30 

1 % 4 ^i 3 V 0 G-Fiddl# Me . ...i.Sl S‘fe . 2 .^ 

73 SUl 1.90 E JflEadaw Shar# . . * / 7 5 * 

^ fi* 5./0 H^toyai Honore* . 7 2»14 2 > 4 *lt- -W 

6 » n 3.00 C-Locfc Qul Liz ... 2 V 6 > 7 13.411 

* 8 gff Crab Grass CEJtoriaJ , 5 J» 3 M 

e Bant Promised, On# .'. . . .' .-(Veter) ... H-M &M 

I 9 JS WO 4^0 Stoten-TInw ..--■ UMartlnl 7 l«B 

.... JJ 0 7.49 0Ti ^yoHj, |M . TjS AM, XaoPtDJ 
4 ” I M 0 , f 4 B| (FJ 7 JO. . . - 


SEVENTH— SO^tOQ, d. orias, Sl5,bi»- ' 
SI 3 AW. 3 YO>. 7 F (dnrfe;. Winnw. fAar-Ocn 


’Sjarl m ‘ PP Vz 


and Crab Grass. (S 5.40 in the 
sixth/; _>.-. 


..040 

-biwiuai( : ir 

.:.: ,.tu 

...-._.! 0 O 

i b o 


0 2 0 

- 'Division III . 

'.. :,. 2 0 0 
’■ ...... 200 

.... .110 

...i i .o 
-0 2 « 
... .: 0 2 0 
NEW JERSEY 


At Penn National... . . 

Lawrence Edward "Reynolds 0 . 4 B ,^ ‘ a ■ o o 

Jr., a jockey from Williams- Eaa« •.••• ■••■•»} g 
port, Md.. was suspended for/ $«£"?!& i.'.o 

life by the Pennsylvania Stale Manwun o 2 0 

HorseiRacing Commission for »r v . Y>Tt . ■••■ ■ jy . ; ,? ... . 
allegedly fixing an exacts- Plilni - ..„ : UB V B t 

race on which there was un- ewbaM 0 0 

usual : betting on Feb, 20 ,.;.^^ : : v;; ;; \ \ g 
1975 , at the Harrisburg track. * cci-jium bu-* sctr. ...0 : 0 
Reynolds -reportedly bribed s*wn Han umw. ... . 0 . d 
another jockey,'- Ronald ' ^ ' -Division in 

Barnes, to pun" the favorite, -B'' 2 0 0 

Cut The Deck, near the .-fin- wmt - ' J ° 
ish, causing him -to finish ^twS 5 f B r‘.. y..\l -o -2 a 
third. As a consequence, both v.’ei*ctw*t#r ''s'' ... .:0 2 0 
drew indefinite suspensions. ■; • .new jersey 

Reynolds was also prosectit-- ;; a‘o S 

ed, but was acouitted for d™* univ. 1 1 0 - 

lack of sufficient Evidence. . F*'H*>«hOfe 9 ir»n u. :.o 2 0 
Nevertheless, the corhrrfissioh p.jiwrs uW."! a 10 
said that the “evidence was ..... new yorx . 
sufficient enough for dijsbar- f**M« V 1 ^-; •'■ ■:'■ * g g 
meat for life." Sf*.:::..: ? ? 8 

Barnes wasn't promted.- SSSS cSSK'JK:^::* s o- : 
because he cooperated ‘with wavr«r cmievs ..... :.-o s o 
authorities, and has since ap- ^ long jsland 

PM*' a aegg*: : 

“ 8 *“-; Plwades ' I 1 0 

A „ _ , Si Franrls Ptw .... 0 0 0 

A 1 7 /.C T A -- . -f-* Lons Island - •- 0 . 2 O ', 

rxz KJ.O.l.S 1. . Jgfjj.je-. ; Do«nstalt 7 JlK;k»l .... 0 2 . 0 . 

At i Columbus, Ohidi?;:-th’e last week's results 

MW st»i.«, ( Tra«idrJ^ iSr^.'^AX^! 3 -- 

sociation said it had learned iwwy mwiSr coii 6 «i- 23 .T)rra'i 

i Broiicdjie ifc.Les Vl#ui 9 . • 

" *• * t- New Yortj "p ’ 1 7 , Columbia PHy. 

, ■ _ , ; C-aluiphl* 6 w. Sch. 3 ?. e.W. Pod- 

JnondilV s Fl&ht “ VJKirwnanh li Old Blue 4 . 

Jtt £?S?L s J^i\ aat-wj?- : l 

1 -'t J p0U ^ ,■ S* w Av^Jp?* v/lnged Foot "B" 34 , Hibernians 
knocked out Jose Duran, W j . , to . -««.«» -rniiBNMin 

Spain. 10 rounds lo retain the JVY. lea&uETOORnamct 

U.S. middleweight 


D-LeadariMnti . 
G-master Scon . 
F-Monso Leader 
H-PosilivB ROIar 
l-Ar durian 

L-Last Tango . . 


3 oy ]= 
6 1 “ 2 * 

5 9 S> 

7 4“ 3“ 

B 3 >Ti 4 'h 
9 8 *» 74 i 


A-Hnldlnb On ...I 21 ^ 2 = 1 %- oSO 

!• l.-D L-Flne-BS Wlqd _-.‘.IO - 7&'.4“' MSVH.M 
2 -v 9.00 D-Luchanla .'.... 4 H i>^ 3 >- 30 . 40 . 

3*14 14.70 E-HesMe Bedlam . 5 8i BUj 4-’i 3.:u 

43 * 3^0 &-|f Y-v Kn'ursusle r 2!4 - - S- ' «U0 

Sn A I3.a> K-Fundy 9 10> 9» dift J.tJL 


ALL. Br-BIlly Plemajr# ...2 5. 

' GAMES E-TreB; Tfe LOWr .4 fr 
W-l-D. A-Walarscm ...... 1 - SI* 

4 I 1 1 "BrrXe Ojwn. 


73 ft d'h l&M f/ MoilKC GIlHws 12 Pft ' i'x ■ 7** 

A> 7» 1640 H-SMteustt*B-d I 4*^ ]M 

S 8 9.JO C-Spec‘1 Compound 3 S'- 5> ft 9**1 

• 3.10 M-Tack Lady 1U1* 10ft IIP 

■ F-Mamani OvOta . 6 Aft- JI 4 - 1 IF 
. ■ STS-SjSl B^htmtiy Watery .2 12 12 12 


'--4 3 olLeaderbaotz ...tVataHW*! S.40 3J0 2 40 B-Oititw Waiem 2.12 1 2 — U ~S0. 

i ft Mas* Suit. ..j.jlmwratol ... 7 .W 5 .M Holding On ... .(VWasquvz) 14^0 ago S.M 

7 - >■ T!«wigo tMiBr : ....: (HoWJ 7^0 One as Wlno ...(Maftcm). ..-. 16.0® Mn, 


4 ; V TiMumobaaer : ....■•(HoWl 7.40 HneasWlM ..IMattWBj. ..-. 1AJ» 9 JOi 

1 6 C DOUBLE (Ml PAH) S 71 .< 0 . LgdMQfa . (J Jfartlfll 

• - 0 TB # 4 T*tfb CO) SJOa. 3 - 40 , Ul; «G) EXACT A ( 1 - 10 ) PAID »U 5 ^»>. 

6 4 0 TX/ttt; IF) 7 JBB. DouM# (G-D) Mid OTB poyoHs. IA 113 .K, JJO. 4 ^ 0 ; . lU 
3 I 0; US. 4 7X20, 3.60; (0) 1510. Botfa lA-L) wM, 1 

-2 -2 pi _ .. -rzn- ;— : — ,- — - «S 7 . • ' . ' ■ ! 

1 2 «■ THi RD — 'tUW. cl. trios, S 9 .SQO-SB.iOO, — — - : 1 

5 4 0>3 abd iYO. INI idmte). - Wnnar. R. N. EIGHTH— SI 5 JID 0 . aHc*., 3 YCi and up. fiF.! 


(RD— WJXKl. cl. wkes, S 9 .SOO-SB.iOO, 


0 2 0 i Webster's b. 1 .. 4, fir Sir Ivor— Prjplie*s Winner, MMfiedrtijrrs V. s', 3, by Mr.' 

. I. Bell.- Trainer. ULaurln. Net, S 3 -aOO. Time*— Leader— Grey table. Trainer, P _G. Julviwn.;. 


22 J/j; 4 S I Si 1 : 1015 .; 
> ft ft Fin. Oils'; 
Is J» 1 « 3 ^ ..TO ' 


• • ' j 23 3.-5; 46 2/5; F: II 1/5; 1:371/5. Net, S9.D00. Tlrnes-22 2/ii 4S I Si J:I0I 5 .; 

7 0 Sj bfa Starters PP ft ft Fin. Qd3 s PTB Martars PP ft ft Fin. Oirt j 

4.2 .Olc-sir Altrifi- „ .3 ift 1 ft l«ft ' -»J 0 D-Qulet Lime T hl# : 4 *. 1**4 ■.'O' 

$.1 -fra-CasinoVims 2 5 *ft 5 » 3 * ■> 3 J C-flalancer 3 3 “ 2 ft 2 “ *.20 

1 2 £|E : C<Aod 'ir-Evll .. 5 3 ft 3 ft 3 ‘ft 3 W F-Ncpaiito . ...6 1 * ”ft 3 " 7 . 10 . 

0 4 OjQ.Prwnerit 4 2 ft V 4 » 23 ?0 E-Potllical-CDveruB 5 5 » • 4 'ft 2 JO 

(C-CdnteNI tl . .. 7 4 » ** tfi 2 10 o-Yoeman .. . 7 4 * d 4 5 “ W 40 - 

. r -JA^PIHIfiee'sGnai, I 6* 11.70 B-Tey 17-7 N.I9! 

| * ^I F-Fatf Forward .. h 7 1 7 U. 7 B A- F.oman Consul ., 1 3 * 3 * 7 a.ap , 

7.2 O SIr Aliced .... IWWtl**) 10 l «0 SJO 2 .W Qolet U Wfi Table (EJAaPlel 4.20 3.00 

t ;J a .Casino Kin* ....(Velanuez) ... 4 .W JJO Balancer .. .. (Venwlaj 4 J 0 2 .M 

D . a 0 1 Good n.Evll • <VM«) Nawlllo (Holei 4 X 0 

0 2 0 pyatta (ui paid * 45 ^i rvT* m^nSU im .i m. ran. ?.io.- TC) 


"ft 3 - 
5* • 41ft 

d 4 5 - 


. NEW VOKK . 
Fonitam Unlv. 4 0 D 

CoiumfiTa Coiieg# ... . 3 0 0 
Columbia P *5 i 2 0 


>> ! 

4. 3 0 ' 


Evil 2 M HBMilto (Holei A M' 

EXACTA t »21 PAID S 4 X 40 . OTB Mtufts. ( 0 ) 3 .B 0 , 2 -W, 2 .W; TO ! 

wyoffs... TCi iOJJO. Ud.LBi 181 3 9a 3 -^ ; <F) 4J0 _ ! 

AO; (E> 2 - 40 . EnwJ. tC- 8 > Mid rl SU-OOD-SKUH#.! 

J and 4 YD, 6 F. Y. 1 nr.«r. C. P'aikin's tY T .: 


..kA»s PrfnMiSMMA i.. 2'0 *0 ' 3..-0 

Pleiades' 110 2 3 

SI Franrls Preo .... 0 0 0 2 0 

Long Island - 1 0 . 2 O' *. rl’.-J 
Dowisjal* 'Medkal ... 0 2 0 . 0 ,4 

' LAST WEEK'S RESULTS 
. MonlnMJ Iris,! 16 , New York J 3 . . • 
.KifiQilan . 21 . Gblemfila. Bus. Sen. "B“. 9 . ‘ 


l j Wj? J.*CasWnbre’» b. 'I. 1 
0 5 01 Girl. Train*-; R.-J. Sartsa 
limes— 3 ; 483 /S; W. 

Ar 0 ft ore r-S^artB» - PP- d 

Vi IlC-NeantS V 3 I* 

* l 2 A-Breach ol Fallh . 1 3 “ 


PUMA Mint.. 1 YQ, 5 F. Winner, J JR.. 0 "- a t • =“■ ! 
ore’s t. 'I. by Nwrdic— H«live H»«Un*. Net. > 4 . 200 . Tlmes -72 4 5 . . . 

R.-J. SarHeverfnn. Net. SSLAJO. t' 3 -. , I 


*fc fin. 
I»ft l «6 

s- p 


A-Breach of Fallh . 1 3 “ 2 ft 2 l l 
« B-Salln Sable . .. 2 6 *ft 5 * 3 “ 

iJF-Sunaanit '6 aft 4 a» 4 ft 

E-Proud teB# HTiHb 5 ■ 2 ‘ 3 ‘ft 5 * 
G-Spl undid Ule . . 7 5 4 4 * t«!, 

D-Go Go Mouse. 4 7 7 7 


OTB Starters PP ft 

fin. Oflm f-k tele May . . .a «* 

I 43 & 3.30 L-Fledalng « 3 = 

2 *.^, | 0 . 3 O D-Jan Jlmlny » l M 


iiUsium.-ii rai «" uid . g , i . jin . o •. 7 . . bhiim ... r .. 

Jersey Medical College ' 23 .T 3 rM-Umv.- 70 . Breach dT FalWi 
BrooltdJie ’rv.Les Vlrur 9 . •• , Sal In Sable .. 


G -Splendid Ut# . . 7 5* 6fl O'i 19.W 

D-Go OaMmae . 4 7 7 7 >.20 

Re«t» . (.^.(Imparato) 140 4.W 3J0 
Breach tf FalWi .. (V*Im) ... «.» 2.40 
Satin Sable ... .(VelaMWiI 1*0 


yM l-Aboul • I 

~ Z-Jo>lv Maid .. 3 S“ 


S* r i • I- •i.’flj: 
1 “ . !‘'i 3.20 . 
2 ft • i <" 4 . 30 ! 

Tn : 4**4 17.23-- 
4 “ J =#* 6 .K 7 ( 

^ . 61*4 I 9 30 : 

Sft 7*4 31.401 

3a ja* 0031 
9 9 J 60 j 


AM ^3 WnleMer (RHnn).JMO 7,“ ** 

yJn Fledging ... . (Moutoyrt » . -5:00 3^0. 


Pro Transactions. 


■ : i FOOTB^L-i-- ••• ' ' ^Brty.-n 25 . Columbia 

DENVER TiU r Cl-slsnedi^-i-ai ( ^,''.^ tortmoulh j. Primel 
reodver, -and Brace *Scai 7 iA 0 ;.''fi«eniiw -v Other! 

wot# fretf ds^nts. TO ’ , , - Harvard in, va/# A 

W fSSK T ? N * jTueli B.Pm 12 . 

JiOTiacter, free agent., .. ' v ' . JjwwitWa 30 Penn a 

• A - ? i;-’;. 


rAannatten 19 , Sud. Americano 13 . 

Old Maroon 14 , Army *.• 

W.mwd Eoof 26 , .-AJlentwn o: 
ijvmerlictit Yankees M. Yale Unty -'B" 0 . 
Winged Foot "B" 34 , Hibernians 0 . 

• JVY. LEAGUE tournament- • 

■ --- PTrtel - 1 ■■ 

Bra-an " 4 . Dartmouth 13 . 

ConoUdlon- . - 

-Xol-jmblj.) 6 ,.Pfiii«»fcn , 6 .-"_ . ' . 

4 * .- Semillnais 

-Brcr.-n 25 . Columbia 7 . 
partwjulh J. Pri melon 0 (dpi. q'I). 

■ v Other Resulls 

- Harvard 70 . Yale 4 . 


, v - ^ gfinau-...- « •?•«; 

5 jTiaraa**'^^ w • 

. FIFTH — SI 1 , 000 . d. Prices, S 25 JS»-S 2 IW)Ca, ! O/B I 

; fYQ aud ap. 1\9U. mutter, Alice J} M ’ lD) 3 - B - Tl1,ll# ^ w ‘ a| 

, * - ir. 'S. IW NaHva Diarupv— Maid of Iron 1 SI 65 - 4 U. . . ; . 


NewYorfc "P" 7 , Columbia Phy. A Sw.rA ,j r ~ 

ChluijibJ* Bib. Sch. 37 , C.W, Pod"Coile«fc 7 C S 300 ‘ 

Wtfitenunh 12 , Old Blue. * 8 - 00 . 3 J 0 ; IB) R 30 . • 

^d n ^wn l ’ 4 S AimT '".' an0 ..FIFTH-MI, 000 , d. Mtces, S 25400 -S 20 . 

Wntged Eoof 26 , .-AJlenlwn - o: ‘ ‘ au !* mu. Wimor, Alva Vaj 

Cwir#flicut Yankees 66 . Tile Unf/.-'-'B" 0 .«- ?i, 5 - W NatW# C^er-Ma'O I 
Winged Foot "B" 34 , H.bernians 0 . TraSpr. Jacobs. _ 

' I VY-'LEMHIE TOURNAMENT- • ^ - pp — - 


Attendance, IB^UR. 

Track parl-mulutl handle, SI. 528 , 429 ._ 
OTB handle, Sl. 64 l. 124 . 


C-Klnndlke Owreer 3 4 » 4 * I- 2 .B 0 | —————— 

B-Vanlslcrlo 2 2 “ 2 ft 2 ='i 2^0 . , , 

A'SaBhn Tdn .!.... 1 1 * )*ft 33 i 7 .E 0 AoUGdUCt } 

E-AH Our Hopes .. S 3 *. 3 'h 4 i li.BQ n.quGVUi .1 J 

D-KeHno 4-7 7 5 ’ 12.10 _ _ „ •*?. 

f.Roval Book .... 6 6 * 6 * 411A 1.00 Ron Turcoltr ............ Jl. 

G-Canclonero :...-7 F 5 * 7 19 00 Jorge Velasnugj 39 ! 

Khmdlkn Charger (EJMopte) 7 .M 3 A 0 2 . So Angel Cordero Jr. <£ 

Vanlslorta . . . (A.ContaraJr j ... 3 A 0 3 jg George Marlens A-l' 

Sail on Top (Inmaratel 4 . 0 Q M.kaVengzIa 39 ' 

EXACTA ( 3-11 PAID gfjB. M.fce Hole 411 

OTB NyOffs. (O 7 J 0 . 3 . 40 , 2 A 0 ; IB) Jow Amv 2 ffl 

2 - 40 . 3 J»; <Ai 3 . 80 . Exada (C-B) paid Anwi San Haw 34 E 

i 22 Jf>- Jo# Imnaralo 2 H 6 


19 OOjjorw Veiasnvea 


MS." 

157 


j 1 

. J 13 

.98 

85 . 

■Kh 

399 

'eo' 

63 

711 

..433 

77 

74 

63 l 

.443 

62 

51 

65 j 

.394 

45 

49 

4 ?! 

.. 4 IB 

3 t 

53 '. 

44 i 

..207 

- 33 

'35 

23 r 

..346 

32 

40 

4 ff| 

.246 

29 

34 

26 J 


Pr-t t i J * -f —A < . 3 - 40 . 3 JO; (A) 3 . 80 . Exada (C-B) paid [Angel San Haro 346 « 

Today^&.Brttr^s at Atpieduci *** *v , . JW,mMrB, ° 2,4 

Letter 1 ' 1 JesignalSf 5 fB B *Hstin^ ,0BS ' ‘ YrtflkfirS R 3 CEW 3 V ElltXlCS 

FIRST— S&OOO, d., 4fQ.jnd y?, 61. ' , SlCTH-llSuttBL* Allow.. 3YO .... 7f X UliliClD AdWCWdy .EdiU-lCp 


A-Nonle VI. 
S-I’m a Dame 


wt. Jodaro: 

117 Day - 
(17 Vercftwc 


C-GJorious.Ruier -iu Mah&K 
r ‘ 0, ‘ -112 Vtiiis. . 


D-BII o Ihc Sba 
E-Parlance 
F-Hear Bell. 
G-Double S)p? 


US Amy. 

117 ^ 

U 7 r/omsva 


. . J ilCTH-SlMOfc; Allow.. JYO and up, 71 . 

PTOb-lAJJanc#- Sfed ..-JIB Cru<to*t J- 1 , 

P**M-<*iV6 Veto 5-1 - •- 

■■.tf\tH£ 36 irKzl 0 n . 1.10 C-USrinos S-l cir , r ~ „ , 

S-ijD-BIft'Fact Beau 121 J.ftfasauez 2M FIRST— J54WI, p 

Vic’ • 121 Hole ..-.. ...... 30-1 “ .- • f- 

ic. Lead 110 A. fordgro- Jr«’.. 1-7 , „ b . : _h»- in- 

r NO i Martens ... 8-1 .r 

ll-^iTSSr--- -Eas^i PMMnf-Charlesfon. ifZfSSjfi - 

'j'lhuhds.^' --5 


- - Horses listed In order of. oust positions. 
Lettv designates OTB lining. 
FIRST— {5,50(7, poo, d ., mile. 


SEVtTW-il^iP/i. AUaw., 3Yft I 


FOURTH— S 10 , 


112 *-J; VaMUK 


4 'r<V-s-ff--tt i im 


N I NTH -&1 0-000, ihdns., 3 ' and 4 yo, 71, 
imte). t r- . 

A-u-MArls Mona *H77 Martens '... S-l 

S-Joudi 'Me . *107 i Martin. 5-1 

C-fiace DauohnuvtW ,J. 6-1 

D-Regallta 20'1 

F-’irn^tt? Ml \ FOURTH— 39JJQ0,. Ifol'. .Class B-2, 


f! -Garden DrtSp’UT-.-E.. kSapim'J^:.: 8-1 
L-Sangay ..7^WP^Marlenf^,'4s^.;.15- 
»Apprenlici' 4 ll^jamrf^iiB«fe^ ' 



,Penske Enters Andretti at Indy 


u HOW DA Y NIGHT 

NINTH— SfcflW, peer. mile. ... a .s . w 

l-mstson H over (B.Siealli 5.40 3 00 3 *0 
I —Paramount H'ovw (Abb.) ....'• 3 -iB 1 t.HP 
8 — . ... .(L.Fonialne) .. T . J.oO 
PTB ie)!*« 4 ^ 0 . a, H Time— 7:01 ;- 5 . 

D 0"; I jr Vou. Chuoalad. Rlghi Baron. H.gu- 
i»nd Trcalr-and Hrren So .41 also Marled. 

TriliJe (Henson . Hanavgr. ParamounL Han. 
ever dnd Kosi paid- S 9 I. 50 ; - r ■ 
Attendance— 13 , 929 . ' '• * 

Hand.'e— $ 2 . 007 , 1 15 . ‘ 

OTB— SB 36 i 687 . 




Spedkl to Tit W 

' 'feEADlSTG, Pa.. April 20 —' 
Mario Andretti; who -had said 
he wouldn't .be there this 
£fme;'tt 3 f return to "the scene' 
of his greatest auto racing 
. triumph, .Indianapolis Motor 
' Speedway, it was announced! 
today' * ’ 

- The" 36-year-old driver, who 
■ wants to concentrate on- For- • 
mula One grand pqx racing, 
will drive a McLaren for Ro- 
ger Penske in the Indianapo- 
lis ’500 on -‘May. 30 instead 
- of - a Lotus- .-in the Grand ■ 
prix ■ of -Monaco . that day. 

In.- -Landw, r iit was an- 
nounced that Andretti had 
signed to drive for Colin 
Chapman’siotus team in the. , . 
remaining Formula One races 
this year, replacing Bob. 
Evans of England. But An- 


Iww York Tinea ... 

dretti will- skip Monte Carlo 
to drive for the I 2 th consecu- 
tive year at' Indianapolis. 

At Indianapolis, he will 
be reunited . with his chidF 
mechanic, ! Jiin' McGee, 'who 
helped him win the 1969 . 
Indy 500 . Andretti's contract 
with Penske is just for In- 
dianapolis, but a. team spokes- 
man said if the . driver's 
schedule permitted, he would , 
also drive in the Pocono 500 
on J.une 27 . 

Andretti started The seasorT 
driving for the Vels-PamelH 
team in Formula One. lack 
Of : funds . forced that team 
last month to cancel its 
. grand prix plans. However, 
the team did enter two cars, 
with AI JJnser listed as the 
driver! for Indianapolis! 


i **ft r* . . '. ; ' * » r 

) l ■ (^ntto^ 'Prpni Page 39 r.. • 

eight harness tracks last year, abpt£$ 0 v 
-’percent came from Roosevelt and/Yoa- 
kers. The statewide -total amounted Jsi: 
nearly half tbe tax revenue collected 
by all the country's harness tracks. ■ ■ 
part of ihe present controversy .^)- 
wives 1973 legislation that permitted 
Roosevelt and Yonkers to retain a larger 
sbare of the takeout on exotic bets .such, 
as the triple. Critics say that the extra 
cut /ias* produced a * i boxius" of about 
$7 million for the two tracks, and that 
millions of dollars in income have been 
funneled to Madison Square Garden, 
yowner of Roosevelt Raceway, and 
Ruanaldh Associates, tbe Rooney family 
corporation- that owns -Yonkers. 

-Stfrafan called the charges an ‘‘ersatz 
controversy ^ 1 designed to ctiscredit the 
board. •-■■■•• 

"t can understand - the pohtfcal after- 
- tfikth of a change in adn^istration,*' 
the 63 -year-oM Republican said. “But 
these investigations are giving the pub- 
lic .the impression that Roosevelt and 
Yonkers are.’ getting- away with murder.. 
It’S just not true.”, • 

; He said the money allegedly Tun- 
neled** to corporate .parents represented. 
‘ mortgage payments. . 

’"Nobody buys, .a r business .or even a 
house for cash,” he said. "These tracks 
were- bought with the help of large 
borrowing. The money.supposedly being 
funneled. out* is being used. to service 
these debts and pay .off the'-iriortgages." 

Sarafan, s.ftovpng. ' uncharacteristic, 
contempt for ‘his. critics,' was particu- 
larly scornful of the so-called Haddad 
report put out. by the pffice of Legis- 
lative Oversight and. Analysis. That leg- 
islative group is directed by William ¥. 
Haddad. . 

“Mr. Hadchtd- has displayed incompe- 
tence and irr^ponsibiHty,'’ said Sarafan. ■ 
“His criticisrti is' devoid of any knowl- 


sSnce lS 3 r 7 <- the year after his gradua- : ; “"NOW btta -;’attec 

HarvardLaw School H»s slate ' ‘jSjnfwjuj^ £ 
jobs have included service as an as- IRdSl toejgtm»m ^ quit. Bt 
-ffistrict attorney . for Thomas^ way our stafT^P hemg. S 

' Deww and Frank Hogan, and chafeban, di(ficnlt, to opiate,' UjxaM tj 
of; the State Liquor Authority.' He was- trying to It /undesirable for. 

- also counselor for the old State Harness stay here, . ' 

. Racing Ctmuhissioa hxm 1959 to 1373 . • Saimaa 
■.-When: the StateRatSng «ad Wage^teg described ^ 3 -year^ld «,eid m g 

- ’ - 1 -’.' 5 : *■.” • 

[ ferje xwri^*Ii;ii 623 proSS^igTS^roS 

tin 1974 ) resulted in a record $ 183 , 497 , 645 w 
' die state. iTbm: tijtal included vebe state's aljaze-fron oft-tsaci 
[betting, cbi efLy in^the City of-lSew Yoric. .-.4... -V 

1 ' Add to tife $l»-^Lliiaa the CfTB pwvided 1 

f t be City of Be» York' gad die slightly undfsr .^^UicirL t hat OI S 
■ 'provided to other bacalities and ra ci n g's reven^to-gpry^^ 

| rxital.b ecnpRs 'S256r ^m , vlTitti - . Ty 1 *.;* : . 

| ‘ Ho statej^t s evat a third 1 as fi^hptse racir^ 

An. extract bina B^ ^festate Racing and Waxing Board's annual r 


Board was created by then Gov. Nelson 
RqckjsfeUer in July 1973 , Sarafan setyed 
as its temporary Tanurman until the 
appointment of Emil (Bus) Mosbacher. 
The following April Sarafan .was named 
bv the newGbvernor, Malcolm Wilson, 
lb succeed Mosbadier. His tenn+uns..to 
February, 1 M 0 . . 

Under state law. Governor Car^- 
could remove Sarafan as dutirman. afiy*' 
time he chose. However, tbe chairman' 
could remain as a member of the board 
unless charges of incompetence or il- 
legal conduct were proved, or the board 
was abolished by legislative action. The 


said layoffs this year and last ha 
tbe staff in half to about . 40 , with 
key perrohd'disnifesed. r - : * ^ 

• "V£e've been cut twice," he said, 
the cutbacks <have reached a, dang 
point. W^re; suppryjgigg, a- legal *■ 
bliog rtenterprisa: ihat tUd 4 > 2 , 6 . 6 
worth of business f Jast year." 

jwas asked 5 ;-ffi the state 
tfceram tfie- trabks-'Stself . 

•- c*Nbt with- New'- York's trsditic 
inefficiency in state and city go 
nient, p . he, answered- -jfhe tracks. y 
go broke if the state tried to bp 
them at present- tax -fates." ■ - - 1 



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THE NEW YORK TIMES, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1975 


Schmidt Connects, 
Ties Another Mark 


45 


Tin New York Timas/ Robert Walker 

Met, Cleon Jones, now of the White Sox, in the dugout at Yankee Stadium 


ikees Win , 5-4, 

! a Shirt Battle 


From Page 39 

is who was in 
ars in organized 

einbrennar had a 
; in raising any 
* because "he's 
on a pass." The 
; to Commission- 
thn's recent par- 
nbrenner follow- 
viction in court 
lade illegal Pres- 

lpaign contribu- 

of nonsense that 
to do with the 
chards added, 
lplaining like ba- 
se protests were 
Martin to Marty 
the chief um- 
jold Martin he 
he blouse matter 
for a ruling, 
having enough 
the commission- 
question of the 
msion to Wash- 
hardly needed 
the Veecks and 

? Lou PinieUa's 


Give 

inals 

rush 

imipres ejected 
Schcendienst of 
> well as his 
h is standard 
bean-ball war. 
Danny PriseKa 
for the Card- 
was batting fcr 
i everyone act- 
ing eftraordin- 
ened. 
v NIGHT 
. ST. LOUIS IN.) 

1 ab r.ft bl. 

Bnx», If 7 0 0 0 
Knsinnv. ss 8 0 2 0 
McBridfl, d 0 15 0 
.Simmon;, c 6 10 0 
B. Smith, if 6 OT 2 

K. Hranfc. lb 7 0 0 0 
H. Cniz. 3b 7 0 0 0. 
Harris,® 6 12 0 
Falcone, p 0 00 01 
W-CrawH.rii 1 a 0 0 
Rasmusn, o 0 0 0 0 
Fairly, Mi 10 11 

L. ftidHrd. pr. 0 0 0 0 
HrHwsky, p 0 0 0 0 

M. Anflrjn, oh 10 0 0 
Curtis, P 0 0 0 0 
Mpipndaz. ph 1 non 
Proly. p D 0 0 0 
Pi/nldl, Ph 10 0 0 
•WnlltCf, p 0 0 P 0 
t Filial la, p 0 0 0 0 


double and Thurman Mun- 
sons single were key hits 
m the Yankee runs off John- 
son. Doc Ellis, the home 
side’s starter, couldn’t get 
his pitches down, and after 
41 of them he was removed 
in the third inning in favor 
of Martinez, who became the 
winning pitcher. 

Martinez, who pitched two 
innings against Army at 
West Point on Monday, lost 
his keen control in the eighth 
and Dick Tidrow, his relief, 
got the side out when Chet 
Lemon hit into a double play. 
Similarly, Sparky Lyle re- 
lieved Tidrow in the ninth 
and got a double play that 
ended a Chicago rally. 

Pat Kelly, the White Sox 
right fielder who had hit 
a home run in the third, 
struck out on a high pitch 

About the Yankees 


Yankee Box. Score 

CHICAGO (A.; YANKEES IA.J 
... „ ah r n bl sartibl 

Pkelfy rf 5 111 Fiver: cf 4 0 10 
C-air If 5 M 0 EYY.Me If 4 110 

Orta 3b 4 14 0 Wuns-w c 4 111' 

CMdy <JH 3 0 0 0 Oiam bils lb 4 0 1 1 
.•S renew lb 3.1 I 2 Gambia rf 4 110 
Clones ph 0 0 0 O G Ur (lies 3b 7 10 0 

Uohrvson lb 0 0 0 0 P.nlclli dh 3 12 1 

BOwflina c. 4 0 2 1 RatwSolo\ 2b 2 0 0 1 

Prohamr 2b 3 0 0 3 Muon ss 2 0 M 

Bradford . Ph 0 0 0 0 Caseins pr 0 0 0 0 

WSteln :b 0 0 0 0 Fannin :s O 0 O 0 

L*ircn Cf 3 D 0 0 HEIIIS P 0 0 0 0 

Cent ss 4 0 1 0 FMarfnez p 0 0 0 0 

B lohnson a 0 D 0 0 Tidrs* p 0 0 0 0 
Carroll p 0 0 0 0 Lyle p 3000 


Trial 
Oilcan 
New York 
E— Orta, 
Chicago I. 


54 4 JO 4 


Tnfal 29 5 9 5 

004 DS0 oOO— 4 

032 000 BQr— 5 
B. Dooming, Oiambliis. DP- 
New Verb 3. LOB -Ghicapo 7, 
New York 3. . 2B— Plnlelia. Garr, 

J Secncer. HR— P.Keily l". SB— Orta. 
P. While, Munson, Rivers. SF— Randolph. 
Massn. 

IP H RERBBSO 
BJohnson (L.MJ 2 5 5 5 11 

C. Carrol I & 3 0 0 0 1 

D Ellis MO 6 -4 4 1 0 

FMarlncz fW,1-0) 5 3 0 0 3 1 

Tidrow Z-3 I & 0 0 0 

Lsle 1-3 3 0 0 0 1 

Save-Lylt (21 T-M6. A-23J37. 


and Munson caught Bucky 
Dent trying to steal second. 

Those were "little things,'* 
according to Richards, but 
they cost the game. 


By XL HARVIN 
“I didn't even know they 
kept records for that," said 
Mike Schmidt, when told yes- 
terday that his sixth home 
run in threfe games had 
earned him another line in 
baseball’s annals. It also 
helped the Philadelphia Phil- 
lies defeat the Pirates, 5-1, in 
Pittsburgh. 

" Schmidt tied one record on 
Saturday in Chicago with 
four successive home runs 
and tied another one on Sun- 
day with his fifth in two 
games. Then he matched a 
record held by five other 
players with his clout off 
John Candelaria yesterday. 

It came on the first pitch in 
the fourth inning and gave 
the Phils a 3-0 lead. 

The five others who hit six 
home runs in three games 
were Tony Lazzeri of the 
Yankees in 1936; Ralph Kiner 
of the Pirates, twice in 1 947; 

Gus Zemial of the Philadel- 
phia A’s in 1951; Frank 
Thomas of the Mets in 1962, 
and Lee May of the 5 Cincin- 
nati Reds in 1969. Schmidt 
would need two today to 
match the four-game record 
of eight set by Kiner in 1947 
with Pittsburgh. 

“The records don't faze me 
in the least," said Schmidt, 
who has seven homers for 
the season. 'Tin just trying 
to swing the bat and make 
contact. Id rather have a 
couple of line-drive singles 
any day than another home 
run tomorrow." 

His slugging overshadowed 
Jim Kaat's six-hitter. The 
left-handed pitcher-also drove 
in two runs with a double in 
the sixth, as he picked up his 
first victory in the National 
League. 

"That’s the first hit I’ve 
had in three years,” said 
Kaat, who spent that period 
with the -designated-hitter 
rule in the American League. 

One of the fastest working 
pitchers, he helped to com- 
plete the game in I hour 47 
minutes, holding the Pirates 
to three singles and giving no 
walks for seven innings.. The 
Pirates finally broke through 
in the eighth on a double 
by a pinch-hitter, Duffy Dyer, 


single by Frank 


and a 
Taverns. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Red Sox 12, Twins 3 
AT BOSTON— The defend- 
ing American League cham- 
pions exploded for. seven 
runs in the third, their big- 
gest inning of tbe season. 
Dwight Evans knocked in 
three of the third-inning runs 
with his second homer and 
extended his hitting streak 
■ to five games after a slow 
start He also bad a run- 
scoring' double in the second 
to give him four runs batted 
in. Jim Rice, Carl Yastrzem- 
ski and Carlton Fisk also 
homered for Boston. 

Indians 9, Rangers 1 
AT CLEVELAND— The In- 
dians, silent with their bats 
most of the young season, 
awoke against their old team- 
mate,- Gaylord Perry. They 
unleashed a 14-bit barrage, 
routing Perry during a seven- 
run seventh inning, it wasl 
Cleveland’s second straight 
victory and Perry's first de- 
feat in three decisions. 

Perry, once the star of the 
Cleveland staff, was sent to 
Texas last June for Jim Bib- 
by, Jackie Brown and Rick 
Waits, pitchers. Bibby got 
the victory, his first against 
no defeats. He gave up just 
three hits in the first five 
innings, but left after Texas 
had scored on three straight 
singles in the sixth. 

Jim Kern came in and end- 
ed the threat, getting Jeff 
Burroughs to hit into a dou- 
ble play and striking out Roy 
HowelL Alan Ashby’s two- 
run single and Frank Duffy's 
two-run double marked the 
Indians' seventh-inning up- 
rising. 

Soviet Wrestlers Excel 
MOSCOW. April 20 (UPD 
— The Soviet Union domi- 
nated the European freestyle 
wrestling championships to- 
day in Leningrad, capturing 
gold medals in six of the the 
10 weight classes. The re- 
maining titles went to Ru- 
mania. Hungary, West Ger- 
many and Czechoslovakia, 
according to Tass, the Soviet 
press agency. 


When Cleon Jones, discarded by the Mets, came up to 
pinch hit for .the White Sox yesterday at the Stadium, the 
crowd expressed itself. The "yeas” were predominant. 
Jones’s bat did not leave his shoulder as six pitches zipped 
by, and he went to first with a walk. He starts in left field 
against left-handed pitching. . . . The attendance was a 

robust 20,337 Oscar Gamble's shorn Afro haircut was 

growing out so fully the right fielder might soon face an- 
other confrontation with management But his batting aver- 
age, .348, was in his favor. . . . Lou Piniella, at .550, has 
hit safely In every game he's - been in. . . . Joe McCarthy, 
the former Yankee manager, will have a plaque dedicated 
in his honor at today's game. Phil Rizzuto will represent 
McCarthy, who at 89 years of age is unable to leave his* 
home at Tonawanda, N.Y. 

About the Mets . . . 

Del Unseris 17th- inning homer kept the Mets* heme 
run streak alive. They have hit at least one in eight 
straight games and are two away from tying the chio 
mark set irr 1970 and 1975. . , . The team batting average 
has zoomed to .286 after dipping to .230 in the first two 
games of the season. . . . Tbe pitching staffs earned-run 
average of 3.22 is also one of the best in the majors. . . . 
John Milner, who has reached base 23 times in his 41 
trips to tbe plate and is batting .471, hurt bis left leg 
stretching for a base and was a doubtful starter last 
night . . . After failing to hit safely in his first 15 times 
at bat, Waype Garrett has gone 9 for 21, a .429 clip. . . - 
Jerry Grote. who wound up in left field when Milner was 
hurt, last played the outfield in 1972. He’s hitting .464. 


Kuhn Repeats Expansion Stand 

Commissioner Bowie Kuhn has reaffirmed his posi- 
.tion that the American League carmot expand to Toronto 
without his consent and that major league baseball will 
return to Washington, D. C. in 1977. in an interview taped 
for ABC-TVs "Monday Night Baseball,” Kuhn stated, "in 
a position where there’s a clear-cut disagreement between 
the commissioner and either league, the system is going 
to prevail and I think the leagues will go along with the 
commissioners' judgment.” 

In a statement issued last week, the American League 
president, Lee MacPhail, differed with the commissioner’s 
ruling and defended the league's proposed expansion move 
to Toronto, saying the league would place a franchise in 
the Canadian city regardless of what Kuhn says. Kuhn 
also said that Washington would receive a franchise in 
the near future. 

Poland 5-4 Victor in Title Hockey 

KATOWICE, Poland, April 20 (UPI) — Poland scored 
four goals in the third period today to beat East Germany, 
5-4, in the first match of tbe final Group B round in the 
World Hockey championships. Poland went into the round 
with a I -paint lead over the other three countries in the 
group— East Germany, West Germany and Finland. The 
four are competing for fifth through eighth places in the 
final standing. 

The four top teams — undefeated Czechoslovakia, the 
Soviet Union, Sweden and the United States— open their 
final round tomorrow. 


' T-*J| MI 31’ 3 

5 « mo m m— 4 
J ion mo mo 00-3 
iSf' h * | bh’. Kess'nwG 
fw Knr Yurie IB, Sf. 
IIJi- ftarris, S*iriv, H|r- 
m— Unsw MJ. *3— 
Mi I Ian, Harrehcn. 


I®. 

•A 

4 
2 
3 

5 
2 
2 
3 

. 4 
• =5 


■ V* 0 

TLT- 


Fn.r 

3 3 6 

0 0 ’ 
0 2 0 
2 2 
4 7 

1 
0 
1 
0 
0 
0 


Major League Box Scores and Standings 


PHILADELPHIA Dig. 


PITTSBURGH (M.) 

ab r n bi ao : h hi 

DCash 2b 4 110 Tareras ss 4 0 2 1 

GMaddaic cl 4 0 2 1 Sanaullln c 4 0 9 0 

QBrown rf 2 0 10 GJuslI b 0 P 0 0 

Lurinsti If 3 8 1 1 ‘ WRwrm cf 4 0 0 0 

1 0 3.0 Sla.-gsll lb 3 010 
5 0 0 0 Zi;fc If 4 0 10 
0 0 D O DParier rf 4 0 10 
4 111 Stennytt 2b 4 0 0 0 
3 12 0 Halms 3b 3 0 0 0 
3 110 Candida v I J 0 0 

3 112 Takuiwe p 10 0 0 

Klson p 0 0 0 0 

Oyer c 1110 


Martin II 
R Allen lb 
Hirtlen 1b . 
Sclunldt 3b 
Boona e 
Harmcn » 
Kaat P 


Total 


33 1 i 1 


Tntil t 32 5 10 5 r 

Philadelphia • 5! 2S SSS“ 5 

PtthbufVh . ... • CC0 CM DIP- 1 

E— Schmidt. DP — PHilidalahla I. Pitts- 
burgh ?. LOB — Philadelphia 9. PUisbwtli 
?B— G.Madtax 


HR— Sclwilfl 
ziiuLi. 


n. 


Boons. Kaat. Over. 
5— Harmm. S. — Lu- 


TEXA5 TA.1 CLEVELAND TA-3 

ab r h br an r h bl 

Randle If * 5 0 0 0 AHaimlnj cf 4 1 f 3 
Benlnaz cf 4 12 0 Sniper m 3 12 0 

Hararcve lb 4 D I 0 BBell 3h 4 12 7 

Crave d-*i 4 0 3 1 Carl/ dn 41 M 

Bu-cptu rf 4 0 0 0 Waifs pt 0 0 0 0 

3 0 0 0 LovmiJin dh J 0 0 3 
3 0 0 0 Hendrick If /4 1 0 0 
3 0 2 0 Ashby e <-22 

2 0 0 D Soikn rt 4 2 3 2 

1010 Hee-ard !b 4 0 10 
0 3 0 0 Duffy ss 4 0 2 3 

0 0 0 0 Bfeby p 0 0 0 0 

0000 Kemp 0000 

0003 


MONDAY NIGHT 
BALTIMORE (A) CALIFORNIA (A.) 


2 Kaal fWl-li 
3 ■ Candelaria fLO-11 
Tekutw 
KTsDfl 
Giuctl 

T— 1:47. A-HJOO. 


IP 

9 

4 


'■■1a. a— M59. 


MINNESOTA fA.1 

. art r h bl 


= i 







, 5 


iyer of Year 
April 20 CAP) 
ra, a center for 
hia Flyers, has 
the National 
u e’s player of 
the third time 
s by Sporting 
Tro trier, a New 

.its center, was 
, LH.L. rooMe- of 


V 1 ;- CINCINNATI.. , 
: J* . a : > r h W 

ft 0 Rosa 3b 3 0 0 0 
DGnittay rf 4 0 12 
. ■ 3 Momn ?b 3 0 10 
r*- 0 T Perez 1b • A 0 0 8 

0 G Foster If 4 17 0 
- Cncpdon a 3 '00 

1 Gwwlnw cf 4 1 2 0 
•0 Plummer c 2 ® 0 - 

t J Beach c T I 0 1 
0 BHIIngbm p- 1-0410 
it ,? Lum ph I 00 J 
’0 Zaehry p 0 <1 O 0 
.0 Dnessci pit 117 2 
0 Bor b tm p -J 0 O O 
0 McEnanv o 0 0 0 0 
0 Eeshricfc- *> 0 0i*J 
YumblM . ph 1 O O O 
Alcala a 0 0 0 0 



0 0 0 0 Cdrin dh 
2 10 9 Dillard dh 
10 0-0 Dovle ?b 
0 3 0 0 Lvnn cf 
4 1 2 8 Rh» If 


H HER BB SO 

6 117 

4 2 2 6 0 
4 3 3 0 2 
I 0 00 2 

10 0 11 


BOSTON (A.) 

ab r h bl | 


Newell 3b 
Cubbage 2b 
Smal.'e 1 / as 
Sundbers c 
MoriM oh 
Fahey c 
P Perry p 
H oemer - o 

Hergan p 

TW .33 10 1 Trial MP14 9 

Tata 000 001 K®-- 7 

Cleveland 010 700 70x — 9 

LOB— leva 9, Cleveland B. 7B-Cu1y. 
AsMrr. Spikes. Duffy. SB— Ku'Per. 5— 

KU,Mr ’ IP H 9 ER-8B SO 

fi. Perry (L2-1J 6 7-3 II « 6 2 5 

Hoemer 9 1 2 2 j 0 

Hergan I 2-3 2 I 1 11 

Bibby {W.10-1 S 6 1 12 3 

Kftn ■ l 2 0 3 2 7 

Saw-Kern. ID. WP-Harwn. Balk— 
Kern. T— 2:52. A-9.2S3. 


ab r h bl 

Hamer on 4 0 0 0 RTomu cf 
Blair cf 4 0 0 0 Remv 2b 
Grlch 2b 2 2 2 0 Bonds if 
Mora If 3 2 12 Me Mon dh 
Singleton rf A 0 O 0 BccMt lb 
ODunean c 4 0 2 2 LSIanton If 
DaCInces 1b 3 0 0 0 Chalk 3b 
BRobinsn 3b 3 0 O D Eichbrm c 
Belanger ss 3 0 0 0 Ramirez ss 
Cuellar p 0 0 0 0 Tanara p 
Garland p 0 0 0 0 


ab r h bi 
5,1 1 01 
5'2 2 0 
5 2 3 0 
4 112 

3 2 3 2 

4 0 11 
4 113 
3 0 10 
2 0 00 
000 


MONDAY NIGHT 
DETROIT (A.) | OAKLAND (A 

'.r.n.hL 


Trial 

I BaHimwe 
[ California 
E—D. Duncan. 


forma L 
LSIanton. 
SB— Bonds, 
on. 


Cuellar CL0-2J I 
Garland 

Tanana (W.M) 
K»P— by Tanana 
-14,201. 


30 4 5 4 Trial 35 9 13 

200 200000-4 

. .302 000 40x — 9 

LOB— Baltimore Z Call- 


2B — Grlch,* Me Itnr. Bochte 2. 
3 B— Chalk. HR-Mora I2». 

Ramirez. S— Ramirez, Melt. 


IP. H RERBBSO 
1-3 8 5 5 0 2 

5 2-3 4 4 3 2 1 

9 5 4 4 2 !2t3iYlW. S. 

(Grlch), by Garland- 


ab. .. 

OglMe, cf 5 0 2 0 
Manuel, 2b 0 0 0 0 
Meyer, lb 4 2 ID 
Norton, dh 5 1 2 1 

Staub, it 4 111 
AJohnson, If 5 I 3 3 
MMer, c 5 0 0 0 
ARodraez, 3b 4 s id 
V' oryzer, ss 2 0 O O 
Frrehan, ph l 0 0 0 
Scrivener, ss I 0 0 0 
Efhrlnd, 2b 4 i | 0 
MStanlsv, cf‘ 0 0 0 0 
Ruhia, p oooo 
Grill!, a 0 0 9 0 
Hiller, p 0 0 0 0 i 


ab.r.h.bl 
Nprlh, d 2 3 10 
CWsnghi, rf 4 1 1 1 
Rudl. n 5 0 3 3 
MAIsndr, pr 0 0 0 0 
Tovar, If 0 0 0 0 
Baylor, lb 5iio 
Banda, 3b 5 0 10 
Terser- c 3 0 0 0 
BWillmi. dh 4 0 1 0 
Lintz, or 0 0 0 0 
McMIlfi, Ph 0 1 0 0 
Cmorvis, ss 4 0 I 0 
Garner# 2b 4 0-21 
Bahnson. P 4 0 2 1 
Norris, p 0 0 0 0 
Fingers. P 0 0 0 0 
Tndd, p 0 0 0 0 


3 1 I 
10 0 0 

4 0 0 1 

3 111 

4 11' 


American League National League 


3 0 11 Yslrmskl lb 3 2 11 

4 C 0 0 Frsfc e • 4331 

4 0 0 0 DCvans rf 3 3 2 4 
4 0 0 0 Petrocelll 3b 4 0 I 
4010 Burleson ss 3 I 1 I 

4 12 0 WlM P 0 3 0 0| 



Trial 34 3 * 2 TW0I ■ BW 

Mlmissria . T01 DflO j 

nnvS ij • 027 010 OBt— 12 

E— Wynasar, Flat DP — Mireysoti 7. 
Boston 1. LOB— Minnesota «. Brn^n - 
- B— Braun. ^jrew. D.EipPu. SB— Fj^- 
L-.nn. HR— Rica CD- YsJramsk, 11 ), 
D.Ews P). FUfc t?1. SB— Caw. SF— 
Dovle. Burlescn. |p h RERBBSrt 
21-3 7 B T 1 7 

4 2-3 4 4 4 3 2 

I 0 0 0 0 0 

9 8 3 2 2 


J 


6 Trial » s 6 5 

awnowj-T 

. PHJOM5O0— 5 
■IB— San Diego 5, Cln- 
3avls. Gtwlmo, Mor- 
S— Fueirtas 2. 

I IP H R FR BB S' 

3 3 1! 



Go I It (LO-1) 

Lncbbar 
Albury 

WlM IV9.1-11 
T— 2 :23. A— 22.147. 

Sudzina Captures 
Penn Marathon 

PWTT.AnFT.PHlA. April 20 
(UPI)— Marty Sudzina, a 29- 
-year-old unemployed steel 
worker from Duqueshe, Pa., 
today won .the marathon 
that is the firet event of this 
weekend’s S2d annual Penn 
Relays; 

Despite temperatures in 
the high SO's and a blazing 
suii, Sudzina won with a.time 
of 2 hours 28 minutes 20 sec- 
onds, just over a minute 
more than the record set in 
last year’s event 

A 


YESTERDAY'S GAMES 
New York 5. Chicago 4. 
Baltimore at California (n.). 
Boston 12, Minnesota 3. 
Cleveland 9. Texas 1. 

Detroit at Oakland (n.). 

Kansas City at MDwankee (n.). 
MONDAY NIGHT 
California 9, Baltimore 4. 
Oakland S, Detroit 5 (10 inn.). 


STANDING OF THE TEAMS 
Eastern Division 

W. L. Pel. GJL 
New Yoik ..6 2 .750 — 
Milwaukee ..4 2 .667 1 

Boston 5 5 .500 2 

Detroit 3 3 .500 

Cleveland ... 3 4 .429 
Baltimore ... 3 5 .375 3 

Western Division 
- W. L. Pet. G.B. 

Texas 6 4 .600 — „ 

Chicago 4 3 .571 }i 

Oakland .... 5 4 556 Vi 
Kansas City . 3 4 .429 1 ft 

California ... 4 6 .400 2 

Minnesota ... 3 7 300 3 

(Lut nlahi't hub not Included .1 


YESTERDAY'S GAMES 
New York at St- Louis (n.1. 

Los Angeles at Houston (n.). 

Montreal at Chicago (ram). 
Philadelphia 5, Httsfemrgh 1. 

San Diego at Cincdnati (a.). 

San Francisco at Atlanta (n.). 

MONDAY NIGHT 
New York 4, St Lotds 3 (17 inn.). 

Houston 8, Los Angeles 3/ 

STANDING OF THE TEAMS 
Eastern Division 

W. L. Pet. CJL 
Pittsburgh ..6 2 .750 — 

Phlla. 4 3 J71 ift 

New York ..5 5 J00 2 

Chicago .... 4 5 .444 3 

Montreal 3 5 .375 3 

SL Louis '3 5 .375 3 


Houston . 
Atlanta . . 
Cincinnati 
San Fran. 
San 'Diego 
Los Angeles 


Western Division 
W. L. Pet. 
7 4 .636 
S 3 .625 
5 3 .625 
4 4 .500 
4 5- .444 
1 7 .125 


GJB. 


(Last night's «na art included.) 


rhv*s n . . 

Hamilton (0-0) v$. May (0-0). 
are at California (n.) — 


Baltimore 

Palmer 

( 0 - 1 ). 


(2-1) vs. Kirkwood 


TODAY’S PROBABLE PITCHERS 
at New York (2 P-M-Hr New York at Sc. Louis — Lolich 
•• ' ' (0-21 vs. Forsch (0^). 

Los Angeles at Houston (n.) — 
JohnTo-1) vs. Richard ( 2 - 1 ). 
Montreal at. Chicago— Renko 
(0-0) vs. Stone (0-0). 
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh— 
Carlton (0-1) vs. Medich (T-0), 
San Diego at Cincinnati — Wehr- 
meister (0-1) vs. Norman (241). 
San Francisco at Atlanta (n.)— 
Hahckl (0-2) vs. Ruthven (2-0). 


Trial 40 5 II 5 1 Total 36 fi 11 S 
Ony ori when winning rwi scored. 

Driralf 300 D00 Oil 0—5 

Oakland 101 030 001 1—4 

E— Me»ar, Veryur, Gamer, DP— Oakland 
LOB — Detroit 9 , Oakland 2B-Sfaub, 
A. Johnson, C Wasblnoton. Rudi 2. Gamer, 
Horton. HR-A. Johnson <1>. SB-North, 
Nerth, C. Washlntrton. 

■ , IP. H. R- ER.BBiO. 

GriMi 4 4 0 0 1 

Hiller CL, C-2) 1)4 2 2 2 3 1 

Bahnwn 3 7 3 3 I 1 

Wonts 4!4 2 1 J 2 ? 

Fimws 1% 2 Y ' 1 0 1 

Todd (MT. 147) .... | 0 0 0 0 

HBP — by Batmen (Verrev). T-3:03. 


LOS ANGELES CM.) 

ab r ti bl 

HOdmer If 
Slmnore 2b 
Bafcar rf 
Gareev lb 
Car 3b 
Yeager c 
A Owning n 
HCruz oh 
Hough o 
GoKban oh 
wen o 
Mota oh 
Hale rf 
Dejesus ss 
Sutton o 
Fereuson c 


Horton eads dh’s Again 
Willie Horton, the Detroit 
Tigers’ designated hitter who 
led the American League’s 
dh batters in 1975, is in front ' 
again. Through Monday's 
games. - Horton batted .333 
with eight hits in 24 times at 
bat and had one home run 
and five runs batted in. 


High Tides Around New York 


SflfeHttk miMs Sbfnoecock Fire Island 
Rgdawdv liUel Prim Canal Inlet 
S.M PJU LH, PM. AJU. P.M. A.M. PJYL , 

2;05 2.-JS 6!35 7:17 4:3T 7:07 \-JO 2^7. 

3:95 3:45 7:31 8:13 7:31 7 : p 3:27 ):07 

4:03 4:36 W3 9:00 B:2A 8:50 3rB 3-.SI 

5- & 6:22 10:13 10:36 10.-19 10:3> 5:17 5:44 

6- 44 7:04 10:5711:12 10:5911:14 6:06 6:26 

7:24 7: JO 11:3611:44 11:34 11:47 6:46 7:02 

For Uafi Hda :i Album Park and Brimar. dedud 34 imin. 
Far Mgh tide ll Atorflt City (Stael Ptarl, dedset 26 ain. 
For high Hda al Jonu Mat (Pi. Lookout), dwtori if min. 


Aar 23 
Asr. 23. 
Asr 24 
Aw. 25 
Aw. K 
Agr. 27 


Moriiuk Mv 
Print u»d 

AJW..P.M. AJH. I 
2:49-3:31 4:02 
3^2- 4:27 5M 
4:47 5:14 6:00 i 
6:33- 6zS2 7:46 i 
7:13 7:28 1:26 
7.58 .#-.01 9:03 
from sandy Hook t 
from Sandy Heek t 
Own Sandy Hook ( 



“Before we found Vat 69 Gold, 
we used to go on hikes. 

Now we explore in s1jde,and 
call it safarir w. 



“Wd say, ‘Adventure! Discovery!’ 
Our friends would say, ‘Poison 
ivy! Sore feet!’ Vfe’d say, ‘Those 
talks around the campfire!’ 
They’d say, ‘The drinks are 
better at home.’ They had a 
point. But the Scotch we used 
was all we thought we could 
afford. Then we discovered 
Vat 69 Gold. Impressive label 
on the outside. Impressive 
Scotch on the inside. It was 
such good Scotch we decided 
to upscale everything. 

VJe still go on hikes, but 
now we pack W Gold, 
wear safari togs, and 
we plan to paint zebra 
stripes on the station 
wagon.” 

Vat 69 Gold. 

The upwardly 
mobile Scotch. 



Blended Scotth Whisky. 86 Proof. Sole US.finporta: National Distillers Pnxlucts Co., New York . 


HOUSTON (ft.) 

- ab r h br 

5 0 a J (Ulilborns 2b 4 l 1 1 
sera Caboii 3b * : i i 
4 111 Catena tf . 3 17 0 
4 1 1 B Wafcon 1b 2 11. 
3 0 11 CJriWKOn c 4 I I 1 
3 0 D D JCruy If 4 0 13 

0 0 0 0 Grass rf 4 I I o 

10 0 0 RMrizger as 3 1 I 0 
3 D 0 0 PJerirar P 2 0 0 0 

0 0 0 0 Hanty » 0 0 0 0 

0 0 0 0 Barks* v 10 0 0 
10 0 0 

3 0 2 0 

4 3 10 

1 0 0 0 t 

2 10 0 


Trial 

Lot Anaoles 
Hourion 
E— Cabell, 


35 3 7 2 Trial 


31 8 9 a 

.. cm 000 021— 3 
. 400 400 OOx— 3 
DP— Los Anodes 


, RJUrtgar. _ 

2. LOB— Los Angeles ’12. Houston 4. 2B— 
Genre*, Codono. 3B-:j.Cna- SB— Cabell 

3. Cesfeno 2. S— Dlerksr. 

IP H 

Sutton fUW) 3 2-3 8 

A. Downing 21-3D 

Hough ! 1 

wail, 1 o 

Darker fW«2-J) 7 4 

HertJv 13 2 

Barlow 7 2-3 1 

HBP— by Dlerksr (Nala). 

Harty. T— 2:41. A-9,121 


R EH BB SO 
8 0 3 2 


10 3 1 

rcfc_Dler'7W 


Detroit at Oakland (a.) — Roberts 

(1-2). 


(1-0) vs. Torreii . 

Kans as City at Milwaukee (a.)— 

Fttaraoms (3-0) vs. Colbora 
(1-0). . . 

Texas « CTevelaad (ran.)— 

Umbareer (1-1) vs. Peterson 
(0-1). 

Oilier, {earns not scheduled. . 

I Figures bi gsrentlMSB am aeasarii wm-lost reoorts) 


More News 
Of Sports 
On Page 48 


“Lipsyte ... has probably written the best book 
yet about sports and its role in our society. 
Miraculously, he has managed to do all this 
without the inclusion of a single dull line.” 

—TOM FITZPATRICK, 

Chicago Sun-Times 


SportsWorld 

B An American Dreamland 

Robert lipsyte 


$10.00 


Watch Robert Lipsyte 
on THE TODAY 
SHOW, April 22, on NBC. 





think Sports Work! is the best and most important 
book ever written about sporte.” — HOWARD COSELL 

1 found it exciting, on target, and welt written.” 

* —JAMES A. MtCHENER 

'This is a devil's advocate kind of book and, baby, we could 
use a few of those ... not the whining, carping ride-with-the-fa- 
shi orva nd-l ay-i t-on-the-j oc ks kind of criticism but a clean, clear 
look at sports and what it does to all of us, from player to coach 
to owner to fan.” —JERRY iZENBERG, '| 

Newark Sfar Ledger 

This book may not stop you from participating in such national 
orgies as the Super Bowl or the Indianapolis '500'— but 
thanks to Lipsyte's no-nonsense perspective, you wflJ attend 
them with your head screwed on a little stralghter.” 

—SUDD SCHULSERG 

0 Quadrangle/The New York Times Book Co, Inc. 

10 E 53rd St, New York, N.Y. 10022 

\ A 




3912 


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■ lupf. pw r a&r. U")-.u lut \«il ml 

i coed. w;. Ifcetf 145 leitep. Sic-- Mo 

Fifrioian pupc - . ..$5599 

"7# CHEV Cocnr-e Ewe « d» au- 

war :.ii3*le. M* ^* 5. r.1 

run lU'Wqe w." r«S'»l V.v: Wi, », 
rod, »« Use* i8S o-4k S'oo Mo. 

Reedtr.vi puce . $5499 

■75 CURTS Ceidolu HI roe . »uta. HO 
■mt Akt-FU tui l .m, I ten!. e>r esnrt . 
Ale UsrO 15.C83 ii*— v Sice* Ho. 61-0. 

S?" ..$4999 

■75 CHEV VKJ Ha-.-rvr" T dr ft-jn . « 
i;d AkJ-FM tudOAoe '*0. a* eon- . 
«: toi 15.414 r>ie* Mo 67Cc 

IT”” ' $2699 

'75 IV Rjittrl 4 (Jr 4 sj»J . »»JT OfeC- 
nar. 'i Jial Wen. r'-: Used C5.42S re^eo. 
Stark Md 2991. (OCQQ 

Heed (r^n pn:o . • 

'75 CHEVELL8 Mcoau 2,(5. □».. aula 
Mr! PS. -.mil icni. *c ihr.i. r,354 
mJr. SWiMutiSi (9900 

Re-dnvii, or^re ■■ - Jdu39 

1* CAD Fieefwi'rd 4 at Brou?haiE. A 
w*t |ui . rear drlooser. ilrw. un,S 
itxA. aa (.vftS, (!P 43.9CD mJ»*. 5iocK 
no rera rCQQQ 

Retidiran pn-a .. - . f J393 

'7* UNC ConmcVa 1 4 d> am,- crni . 
Mt wN . sea due 1. we*?. vntr> loot, w 
■eend. tX. J6 251 e*!m. SEOuk Mo. 

Recdman pr»:*i. . . $5499 

'74 JEEP J26 V7. aulo Vani. 

dU per.. J util drive. AM -P4. aiurmnun 
ti'id,- Trsapet. or ccnd.. <:e 22.731 nlas. 

Rtedtnjn jZ- ‘$3199 


*74 CtBV Mpnre r Jrt " Landau 7 dr. 

cw . auic- . dW i»r . OucAer seats, con- 

ioi». stars ran roof, a» cond. etc. 
J.\ 188 nWrs So* f) 7(1(1 

Ua 52,"3 Reedran cnee .... I g«] 

T4 JE9 CJ5 Unvv mill metal mo. WB. 
s'S Hans . D*f . stasina * am* a I re 
fc'fhmq Into. LVser mdrauU *tvy fe 
snciiuclca »m !»CITK. ousli tsumOcr. 4>r • 
cn :*.rr.' mtea 5IKk ZHOB 
fto. 104T Reedman once }0 t3sJ 

*74 CHEV tnwata 1 neater wyi . auto 
^irl rwr . lujgjse rack, air cond . etc 
3.1435 mites Suet Mo ronnn 
4761 Rcedman once J 0493 

'74 CHEV Snoala Cucem HT coe . ouro ' 
dble per . smyt root, air coal. etc. 
31.205 miles Stock Mordona 
5462 Headman pnee . 

■74 ennui Uoktu CUtmac 7 dr 
coe . mao mm . SOI (or bail 

vrrrl roof. ** rent , etc. 28.731 mien. 
Slock Ml G4 77. (9100 

Meedman p>«.e . . . . | 33 

•74 PIT SaWSie Setama HT cm . auio. 
P3. wort root, nr card . 18742 mden 
Side* No 5334 (9000 

MeeSrsan pree |1333 

"74 CM* fapH* 4 dr HT auto riel 
c»*.. *r cond . eld 31.061 odes Slock 
Wc 5387. (9000 

HKdmanottte - . . . |£g«]j 

•74 Ctutv Vesa CT KWcMiick cse. 4 
sod bud>r! seats, eta 28172 miles 
Slock No. 6729 (1000 

Reedman price .. . . . f 1 393 

•74 AMO Gremlin ' * ‘ 4 tUSS coe . 6 
cyl kiafl** rack. kM-FM. etc. 25.924 
mten. Steck Ho. SOW ri QQQ 
Prcdman per . . .. - J | jgg 

'74 CHEV Ves* 2 dr «ul0 Imra.. b-scr- 
r! coat, CK. 24.774 rr.ie; Slock No. 

Peedmsn once — 51899 


. '75 DOUCE Adventure* KM Power Wan 
ptkriD. V» aula, dt nil., 4 whl (Olio, 
lodwifl hubs. AM-FM. bodv Mw«r. etc 
JI.4C8*«MB Stack Aid. 4427^4 QAfl 
Reedman price . . . -}0033 

■73 HP LeB.iron HT epo . 4 way 
pnr . stereo, roar delossor. vtnyl 
rod. a* cond. etc 40.917 ones. 
Stock No. 5836. rnjnn 

nee<bnan pnoe fJtdd 

■7a Pons LTD Br ourjtum HT cpe.. UdO. 
OA per., elec irmdo<«. slereo, tear 
' delogaer wrryi root, a* cond.. etc 
46.63* mien. Stack No 4441 (0QQQ 
Rsednssti price ^4939 

*73 OLD Della 88 4 rh HT. into, dal 
pwc.. mini foot. a*r cond , ate. 47 £S9 
miles. Stock No- 4197 . (9QD0 

Reedman price. . - ^ZOdlt 

■73 PLV Vs Sant Scamp HT coe. ookr, 
PS. WKl root. AM-FU. A* coni. etc. 
50.OK BAM Stack tin 68?8.(qnQQ 
Keeatnan pnee... . 1£(93 

*73 DOOM Dart 2 dr. Vfl. auto, re. 
eta 37.812 rries Stack No. (10011 
6?i0. Reedman price } 1 033 

*73 MASUk RK3 4 dr we" . auto tarn. 
PB. Wt*l root, ktopace rack. RAH. 
35.605 noira Stack No 5766(7 TQQ 
Reedman prtco .. . — - 11(93 


$1999 

m.. b*scr- 
Siocv No. 

$1899 


•73 0AT5UN 2482 ? dr . 6 cl. aula 
trees . PQ. rear f’muti , AU FM. y*. 
26.74 7 m*-i. Sw-.* r*>. (111)9 

4642. Reedman pn.;* .. ^4133 


maec.StockNo.4IS7 . (00 QQ 

Reedman price. . - - 4^09*1 

73 PLV VsSant Scamp HT CDf. ookr, 
PS. »nvl root. AA4FW. A* cond. etc. 
50.OH odes Stack tto 6878. (OOQQ 
Rarooan pnee... }£433 

*73 DODGE Dart 2 dr. Vfl. auto, re. 
eta 37.812 dries Stack No. (1 BQQ 
6210. Reedman price ^ 1 033 

*73 MASUk RK3 4 dr t»en . auto trwta. 
PC. Vtayl root, kropece rack. RAH. 
35.60S mlies Stack No 5766(1 Tflll 
Reedman prlco .. . -- - ^1(33 

*72 PLY Fwv Gr.m Che 5 * . aoto. dUe 
purr, deny! root, an cond.. etc- 55.Q55 
Wes Stack NO. 57S8- (i Ann 
Reedman price . - -(1933 

■72 GW BrotAmmod 4 dr wun.. auto: 
dU par.. logeaM rack. etc. 44.762 mleL 
Stock Nft 3037. r 1000 

Reedman price — - 4 1 933 

■71 AUDI 100LS 2 dr . 4 spd . P9. AM- 
FU. ew. 4 1 4117 nates. Slock Mo 61*3. 

SS~”. $1993 

*71 CHEV (meat* 4 dr. HT, mta. dU 
pun . «imri tod. *M-Fk). art cond. eta. 
61.993 mica Stack Ko. 4262(4 enn 
Reedman taloe — ... . -(1339 ■ 


SALES oar. OPEN WEEKDAYS S AJ8. to 10 PJC. SATURDAY 9 AM to 7P.M. CLOSED SUNDAYS. __ 

IF YOU BILL OWE PAYMBfTS ON TOUR PRESENT NEW OR USED CAR OR TRUCK. REEDMAN WIX PAT Off THE 
BALANCE AM) TRY TO WORK OUT A DEAL ON ANOTHER CAR OR TRUCK— Oft ItSJ. PAT SPOT CASH. 


THESE CARS MET THE 
CHALLENGE IN 1975 —AND 
THEY'RE REPEATING THE 
PERFORMANCE IN 1976 — 

GRANADA i MONARCH 



CADILLAC ELDOSADO 
C0NVBH18LES 

ITTTs k 1976'5 


4U.Q001OSH.C0B 

Dreisbach & Sons Cadillac 

Offroll. Mid* ' ai3)S3l-2M0 


EASY TO FIND 

EASY TO DEAL WITH 



(BETWEEN 10th AND lltji. AVENUES) 

OVER 3 ACRES DEVOTED TO 
SALES, SERVICE AND PARTS - 
ALL UNDER ONE ROOF 



COME SEE THE COMPLETE LINE OF 

1976 OLDSMOBILES 

READY FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

Choose from sub-compacts to luxury 
models — Be assured of complete ser- 
vice when you need it by our staff of 
qualified mechanics. Oldsmobiie is 
dedicated to retaining No. 3 spot in the 
industry — and we're helping by offer- 
ing values like — 


CUTLASS ”S” $ 

HARDTOP COUPE G37 for only 


s 4222 


Del in NYC. 

Before you buy any car — visit 


■Off OLDSMOBILE 

. 537 WEST 57lh STREET 
(Betwean TOlh and 11 Ih Avenues) 
SERVICE ENTRANCE ON Soth ST. 
SALES: 397-MOO - SERVICE: 397-9595 
PARTS: 397-S58S 



WeBe&ve... M08QDY...BUT NOBODY... UNDERSELLS 


Brim! New 
1*76 
CADILLAC 
COOK 

IMMEDIATE 

DELIVERY 

GOLDSMITH 
PRICED 
AT ONLY 


fy \ :• ,L.' f - . ' Li 

.'.'IffllflMUK -*. v '>•; 

COS^EKVUES 
0»K«T(M® e«B : 

Mwtfcufrmxfy driwm by : 
our own execufivH 

tmiMwm s 

on eadi or ' 

CJ&tertGnan&BRddDi 

MaHHeaAe 
HrariiMdft —a Akdria ■ ' 


■cwacWe s^-jArg 
dwSrsrrp. ard 
rfpstn.Hir» ctatnes 


Vie Have a United number oi . 
- vEiy desiraHe used 1976 
Sevittts mcSufeg some axs- 
uxrj oc men cars tto! nma 
teen dr toen try -our . oarn, 


Sahtprlcod. 


kworanck l. 
Malnta oa ncaAvwMte 


QgS-GDLGSFAiTH CADILLACS NEW MILLION DOLLAR R A R TS» 3 E R ViC E CENTER 

• V : SPRJNGSERVICE SPfeClALSrN^W- IN. EFFECT*' ' V; . ; 

138-49 Hillside Ave , Jamaica, N.Y. 212-526-8100 

• ’ 1 blc-ck-East of Van Vvy dk Expressway neartiaeRns. B]vd. 


■m THEi 

east mk\_ 

QF ^ANHAT^j r 


imm# 


\mwm 

7TK%tn 3 .; 


SAIKA50VIC 

OKiOjUTlO 


CIRCLE E< 
BUKK-OI 


1118 1st Ave Cor. t 

• PHONE 644-16 


CAD1LU ; } 

■ BRING ITT. t 


IF YOU PRICE 
A BU8CK AT 
CIRCLE BUICK 

YOU’LL BUY A 
BUiCKAT 



C mw g wCari. 



lift Aw. *155 SIK 


Imortci 6 Sports Can 


" AUDI 19744DRSE 

Maroon, Mareen tostterbit. 


{AOILLM-NEW POCH 


ConpactCas-tomsSB 37M 


Fart PMe Ruoebaut. whi'.t airtvmtrtlc. >0 
ert cmUtioi. Cail tvrs & vkmds 


Manabfla Wasted 


Cars Wanted 

WE BUY ANY MAKE, YEAR 

AMERICAN FOREIGN K SPORTS CARS 

OVER BOOK PRICES PAID 

Mer cades, Joguars, Porsche* 
compacts, Cadilkxa, Lincolns 
Roils, Benlieys, BMW'S 
SAVE HUNDREDS OF SS 

BEFORE YOU SELL. TRADE PHONE 
US, WE SEND BUYER WITH MSH 70 
YOUR HOME (IF QUALIFIED) 

Embassy Auto Sales . 

247-6887 

1721 BROADWAY, N.Y.C. 

BETWEEN 54 1 55 STS 



6 MONTH SUMMER LEASE 

2 DOOR & 4 DOOR SEDANS « jngn 

6 ^ -A3?s R r Z-J-zr.T ■%. A JT7»- A IB HI pef . 

i-c Tn=xPUK F;*«r. s«Kr-;. A?/. month 

K32o. Trr; W-sshei V.*>: irtny T lofiaB for 
ci3 =•*?■:.• -s:rP3:*«;s. only |AP Wp 6 months 

or 5249 per mortn sndix»ng 
>nF maintenance and insurance 
- . Other fine cars also available 

21 2 MU 2-5630 
914 SC 5-3500 

* NATIONWIDE SERVICE LEASING AU TYPES OF EQUIPMENT 


Ana-OriBFL7tiiimpb-P<wsdf - - 

DIRECTFACTOmieJEfR : 

FREE ONE YEAR GUAR- 

PARTS & LABOR 

74 Alfa GiV m'mf ..... . . .$6295 

72 Alfa GTVeqpt... $4595' 
74 Audi 10QLS air, odl$4395 74 

260Z2+2 iwn# !:S5895 

74 26QZ Silver, air A-I . .. $5195 • 

72 240Z air, spotless $4295 

74 Fkrt 124 Sedan. Mint . . .$2395 
74 Honda Gw: mini . $2295'. 

74 Hondo Civic aukxn i . . :$2445 . 
'73 Jog X112 loaded, mint ..$7995. 

73 Jag XJ loaded mint ... -.57395 ’ 

72 Mercedes 280SE $6595 

75 MGB Stereo, 12000 mi .$4995 

74 MGB-GT Stereo A-l . . . $3895 
74 MGB 2-fops, mint ... .$3895 
74 Opel Cpeoirtom mint. .$2695 
74 OpeiWog^OM miles . . $2695 
72 Peugeof 504 Q ir/aut . . .$2895 
74 Peuge0t Wag, air. out . $4495 
.72- Peugeot Wag airtam . . . $2995 
72 Soab£ Autom, R&H. . .$2295 

74 TR6 Stereo 14000 mi., .$4495. 

’72 TR6 Stereo, A-i $3195 

75 Rabbit Cusi 5000 mi . . $3295 ' 

& Man? nurerSsHayed Imten * , 

Cors Wanted- Premium Prices 

Sportscar Salon . 

164-24 N fhn Blvd, Flushing . 
358-670D 


SAVEUPTa«n- 

'on new nria Inaii ^ # 1 


SELL YOUR 



2000 CARS 
:k 

NEED CARS FOR EXPORT 
1964 s to 1976‘s 
Pay Premium Prices 

435-3800 

Brooklyn Auto Sales 

45 5t corner 18 Ave. Bldyn 


Top Cash 

We Buy Everything 
from o Chevy taoRblb 
Cdl 731-4300 or 583-1580 
Queens Ofcft: 212-225-2220 


TI4-W-5ni j G/6 CAR CORP.. 1745 toramt Ave- B« 

BYRNEBROS. CHEVROLET 
OFWW7EPU/NS • 



BROUN NEW 1974 




Coat'donFonowmBP^ 









































































. H 

! i 1 I 





I atoms B-210 glvBS you 
Je. Unusual luxury and 
, jfort at an economy 

I B * 

mrer-assist front 


Introducing 
The Beginner’s Lease. 


■ ° 3-yeor lease. with of! the Avis advantages. Plus one extra special 
| advantage: You con end the lease after only 90 days. And your only 

■ obligation would be to buy the car at a price you've agreed to in advance. _ 

m <flkvis Beginner s Lease. The beginning of a beautiful friendship. | 

ma 1 976 plyrrfoyth Fury 

| 1976 Chevrolet Malibu y1 

1 1976 Ford Torino monthly 

I Sian^rdfo^y eguipmonr plus: V/fl engine, oowmotic Jronsinissidn. power 
siecrmg. radio.whiie wad radial tire*, olr condiiiemog. timed gla>», 

M ®°5ed on 36 month net equiry leoie. not including foxcv Insuram:eo«oilobleoiaddilional charge. 


95* 


| AViS CAR LEASING 

'1 In New York 977-3300 Open Sot. ID-2 

| I.ongisiondf516) 364-0900 Phito.(215) 724-3400 £«tcfl(6l7) 245-4884 

M'_ Aws rents Ond leases dl mol, es... features cars engineered by Chrysler. 


tV& 
12& 
* 




rtjV 


oecfflfc 


II j 1 ^! hi, 1 1 ^GOperm 

- Pinto Pony MPG 

It’s a 36 month lease with a twist. If you don’t go for 
Hertz’s super services after 120 days, at your request, we 
will cancel the lease and sell you the car at a priejs you 
agree to when you sign the lease. It’s a great deal. 

Cal] Mike Flax or Vic Gambino at (212) 557-0790. 

(212)557-0790 NY (609) 448-37 00 N.J. 

( 617 ) 890 - 1220 Boston |B*rV 

’Monthly price based on 36 month equity f Hertz m 
lease. Insurance and maintenance avail- S 

able at additional cost. Car equipped ? 

ttith 4-cyL engine, 4-speed manual trans- Hertz leases Fords and other fine cars 
missioa mdiu and widtewaUs. There isn’t a car lease we can’t write. 





2 one of the 58 NY, 
N| or Fairfield 
roun ty,. Conn, 
latsun Dealers 



-MHATTAN 


Jo*! Before The 
nrlageSetsIn 

*">5195 


rweseuMdc Manet 
SDortstoo and dealer prep. 

ismmmsm 

73 Lafayette St. 

•JEW Of PRINCE STREET 
~yn Lex. to Spring Si. 

<7 to Pn net Si. or (NO 

2) 226-4664 


Pick up this great Landa 
in Europe and save over $500.* 

Lancia is one of Europe's ouWandha luxury performance cars 
that's reafistlcaflv priced. Order the Landa Beta Qxipe, 4-door 
Sedan or HPE Estate Wagon. Ary one of them wi make your 
European trip more enjoyable and your friends beck home 
envious. For more nJbrrnetion write to: 

Overseas Defivery Plan, 

Landa rtf America, Division of Rat Distributors, Inc, 

155 Chestnut Ridge Road. Manhole, New Jersey 07645. 


The epitome of automotive elegance 

gua 




SALES • LEASING 
SERVICE • PARTS 

Authorized Dealer for 
JAGUAR - ^ 

tnUMPH jUk 

MG „ 


\'L»i 


F 


MANHATTAN! 


The most advanced V12 
with fuel infection 


plus: XJ6L 

, XJ12L 

F3? XJ66 
X JI26 

Ilcvlamo Prices start 
at $12,400 

427 E. 60 St 

Bat. lit & York Ares. 

(212)593-2500 


ERCEDES* 


W CARS 

E-OM 

IrSEJ 

me 

tOPi 

tNEDCARS 

PLANS 

E 

EANDHJVERY 

€0 


an 

mMIb 

%*■ 

JittST. 7SHSK 

HBUlltUmnuSM 


JAMAICA: 

153-26 Hillside Ave. Tel: 291-9700 
REGO PARK: j 

97-77 Queens Blvd. Tel: 459-1 077 A 


Why rent somebody 
else’s car in Europe 
when you can 
he driving your own? 

Buy a Fiat here and pick it / — 

i in Europe. Instead of . • • 


put yout money into a 
car you can bring 

mfomiariorv write to: Overeea^^®^ 

Delivery Dept. 1 FiatDistrihttors 1 lnc,l55QiestnucRidge 
Road, Montvale, New Jersey 07645.- 

Name Address 

Gty State 7i p 


If lease prices 
have you 
in a state of shock 
you're in 
the wrong state. 

Cheek 

ALLSTATE 

Call 212-937-7500 

Inquire about our very' special 
6 month summer lease. 

Leasing Chevrolets and Other Fine Cars 


Lease a 

1976 CHEVROLET 

Monte Carlo 

CUSTOM LANDAU ROOF 


*129 

a month 

ON 36 MONTH EQUITY LEASE 

THIS MONTE CARLO INCLUDES;- 

• FACTORY AIR CONDITIONING • 

• V-8 ENGINE 

• AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION 

• POWER DISC BRAKES 

• TINTED GLASS 

• DELUXE WHEEL COVERS 

• VINYL INTERIOR 

• WW STEEL BELTED RADIALS 

• REAR DEFOGGER 

• BODY SIDE MOLDING 

• PUSH BUTTON RADIO 

• POWER STEERING ■ 

• FLOOR MATS 



LEASING 

11th Ave. at 55th St. 
(212) 399-0890 


6 MONTH 

SUMMER LEASE 
SPECIAL! 

BRAND NEW FROM COftCpER 

1976 Quick Reaals JS* 

1976 Oldsmobllc Cutlass ^ w w mu. 

Sup tames lncludinp: Fully Equipped Air 

1976 Chevrolet Monte Cailos Cons.. Landau Roof. Radial 
1876 Ford Granadas Tuts. l*smne». IlilMtrinn. 

1976 Pontiac.La Mans ticww Pines, eic. 

^0 Nationwide! Auto Leasing 
^07 Specialist * lot 76 years 

'ZZTVB/VEBr 

Call: ( 212 ) 895-0690 or ( 516 ) 938-0500 i 


SALES •LEASES 


“dr!*" ‘ ' S 


AJotofcnNotripcofoMCF 

For fhr mrar of your nramr Xrnr York, 

Nrw- Jrrsry.Conn. Fiat dralrr, Srr Voer YelloU- Faerr 


jEHgfc* A cars performance 
“■MB - on lhe show room floor in 
no wav suggests how it will »o 
y once i he' tires get dirty. So" 

* people who think demand a • 
test drive. 

This year, a Volvo test drive 
can take many forms because we 
have six Vblv os to choose from. 

Two sedans and a wagon in our 
luxurious new 260 series. Plus three 
Volvos In our basic 240 series. 

So come in. Inspect our multiple 
choice. Then lea 1. Or 6.0r 5. 

Or 2, 3 or 4. ^^QJJVO 

The car for people who think. 

See your giea lec New York 
Metropolitan Voko dealer soon. 



SAVE 

HOW! 

s-Sr— 

SSssss, 


BMW NOT AVAIL IN BRONX 

MANHATTAN 
2nd Av. {67 5L) 249-6708 
lit* hr. (49 StJ 586-0789 
1965 JEROME, BI 731-5790 


Aum 


For Elegance. Performance . 
and Tops In SERVICE. 

We have the All NEW 

PEUGEO 

RA/L Sedan or 
Station Wagon 

now with power steering 

GAS or DIESEL 

35 MPG Highway 
27 MPG Gfcy 

SJULES/SERVKr/UttlM 

0PEH 7^9 AJK. 

270 lafoyette St. 226-1982 
417E.6MU. 5n-2500 


3720 | IraportaU Sports Care 3720 I haperted & Sports Can 3720 


m 224-61 


DAT5UN-1 976, MIRACLE SALE 
UP TO MAY 10-TRY US 
SEE HOW MUCH YOU SAVE 
OPEN SUNDAYS 











































THE NEW YORK TIMES, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21 r 1976 


Flyers, : 

Bruins 

GqUp,3-2 

PHILADELPHIA* April 20 
AP) — Three goals, two by 
Jon'-Saleski, in a l-minute- 
3-second span of the sec- 
*hiladelphia Flyers to a 7-1 
"ictory over the Toronto Ma- 
rie Leafs tonight fn a Na- 
tural oHckey League quar- 
erfalal playoff game, Saleski 
lad three goals. 

The victory sent the Fly- 
rs ahead, 3-2, in the four- 
.f-seven-game series with a 
hance to eliminate the Leafs 

1 Toronto Thursday night 
Philadelphia grabbed a 1-0 

sad at 3:55 of the first pe- 
iod when Bill Barber poked 
five-footer past Wayne 
sxnas, who was partly 
greened on the shot. 

The game then settled 
awn to some close, hard- 
ought play. But suddenly the 
Ivers erupted, starting with 
■aleski’s first goal at 10:04 
.f the second period. 
Twenty-eight seconds later, 
'oronto’s Bob Neely took a 
lass from Claire Alexander 
md scored over Bernie Pa- . 
ent’s shoulder from about 

2 feet and it was 2-1. 

Bruins-7, Kings I 
BOSTON, April 20 (UPD— 
wb'*Schmautz scored one 
oat and -set up two others 
5 night to pace the Boston 
ruins to a 7-1' triumph over 
,ie Los Angeles Kings and a 
-2 advantage in their Stan- 
*y Cup quarterfinal series, 
’rad Park added two goafs,- 
ne a short-handed effort. 
len Hodge and Jean Ratelle 
ad power-play scores in the 
ecoad period, and Don Mar- 
otte and Terry O’Reilly had 
je other Boston goals. 
Marcelle Dionne scored 
ie Kings' only goal on a 
ower play at 6:39 of the 
irst period to give Los An- 
eles its only lead. 

Hank Nowak of the Bruins 
u/fered-a 25-stitch cut on his 
•ft hand in' the second per- 
3d, apparently cut by a 
kate. Andre Savard also re- 
uired stitches— six— to stop- 
cut above his nose. Both 
'turned to the ice for the 
Vtrd period. However, a third 
ruin, Joe Zanussi hurt his 
rft knee in the second peri- 
d and was taken to Massa- 
husetts General Hospital for 
bservation. 

*m 1 4 2 ~ 7 

irst Period—). L« Angeles. Diomw 6 
Ginns), <: 3 *. 2 . BosJai. Mar- 
ta 3 •(Sctimautz. ZaniMij. I 7 :fL P«nal- 
■ — Ml I bury. Bos. 6 : 24 ; Murtoch. LA. 
1 : Schmaulz. Bos. Tna»r. 7 : 5 ). WI- 
SH. LA. 3 : 00 ; Doafc. Bos B; 0 D; Nw,n. 

12 : 43 ; Nowak. Bes. 17 : 54 ; Lonu- 
fel. UW 17 : 54 . 

earn*- WoW, Britan, Schmaute I 
ilette), : 11 . 4 , Boston. Hods* ? 

hnwufc Part). 6 : 31 . S. Boston. Park 2 
yard. ■: Marco tte). • 13 : 57 . 6. BcUan. Ra- 
ff 5 tBuCYk, HmJseJ, 15 .- 12 . PenalHw- 
Mk, LA, ' 1 : 06 ; MHbury. Bos. 1 :J 6 » Ve- ■ 
A,; bSTd: 04 ; O'RwMv. Bes. 7 : 12 . MU- 
v. Bes. 9 : 34 ; Corrigan, LA. tj 36 : 
.hman, Brs. 11 : 56 ; V/Hson. LA. IS 17 . 
tilrd 4 «riod— 7 , Boston, Park 3 (Bunk. 
Vila), 9 : 03 . P, Boston. O'Reilly 1 
irfcl, 10:44 Penalties— Wilson. Lfi. 8 :? 4 . 
trhlson- LA. 11 : 27 ; Komadad’L U. 
27 ; Srtimautj. Bes. 12 : 56 ; Ksia'«. LA. 
19 ; Park. Bos, 15 : 19 ; KomadosAI. LA, 
29 ; Edotrant. Bos. 16 : 20 ; Hutailsir- 
. 16 : 43 . 

hots on seal by; Los Anjeles 6 - 1 IM— 
Boston 18 - 8 - 14 - 40 . 

foal**: Us Angelos, Edwards. Boston, 
mars.. 

»: 13452 . 




and Hire Nissalk , s O e 


• 4 MritMWin 

Kings’ Gary Edwards making a save on shot by Brains’ Wayne Cashman (12) in the 
first period of game at Boston. Brains’ Gregg Sheppard waits invaha for the rebound. 

Playoff Results’ “’nSS?”* 

, CbBages - 

N.BJL. Playoffs A.B.A. Playoffs JSSS 8: LcSS- f££ I! St2 ? 

Boston v*. Buffalo Nets vs. San Antonio B “ lD V l Sn l i3L 5 

^pril 21— At Boston, 7:30 P.M. April 9— Nets 116, S. Ant 101. fSiwctSni 4 .' l 

Vpril 23 — At Boston, 7:30 P.M. April 11— S. Ant. 1Q5, Nets 79. CW.Posi 4 . S». fMft 

Lpril 25— At Buffalo. 1:40 P.M. April 14— S. Ant; 111. Nets 103. EJteM 9 '■ iSSE* ? 

Lpril 28— At Buffalo. 7J0 P.M. - April 18— Nets HO, S. Ant. 108. 6 

Lprfl 30 — At Boston, 7:30 P.M. - April 18 — Nets ! 10, S. Ant. 108. Forman 6 (1st) Richmond 5 

flay 2— At Buffalo (time to be April 21 — At San Antonio, 8:30 Richmond 2 (Ml Fuman o 

PAT Hartford 5 Cist) Trinity 3 


N.B* 4. Playoffs 

Boston vs. Buffalo 
April 21 — At Boston, 7:30 P.M. 
April 23— At Boston, 7:30 P.M. 
April 25— At Buffalo. 1:40 P.M. 
April 28 — At Buffalo. 7 JO P.M. - 
April 30— At Boston, 7:30 P.M. - 
May 2 — At Buffalo (time to be 
announced) * 

May 5— At Boston, 7 JO PM.* 

Golden State vs. Detroit 
April 20— At Golden State. 10 JO 
P.M. 

April 22— At Golden State. 10:30 
P.M. 

April 24 — At Detroit, 2 PM. 
April 26— At Detroit, 8 PA f. 
April 28 — At Golden State, 10:30 
P.M* 

April 30— At Detroit. 8 PAI.* 
May 2 — At Golden Stats (time 
to be announced) - 

Cleveland vs. Washington 
April 13—’ Wash. 100, Cleve. 95. 
April 15— Cleve. 80. Wash. 79. 
April 17— Cleve. 88. Wash. 76. 
April 21 — At Washington. S PJH. 
April 22— At Cleveland. S P.M 
April 26— At Washington, 8 
P.M.* 

April 29— At Cleveland, 8 P.M.* 
SeaKle vs. Phoenix 

April 13 — Sea. 102, Phoenix 99. 
April 15— Phoenix 116, Sea. 111. 
April 18 — Phoenix 103, Sea. 91. 
April 20—i At Phoenix, 9J0 P.M. 
April 25 — At Seattle. 3:40 P.M. 
April 27 — At Phoenix. 9J0 

P.M.* 

April 30 — At Seattle (time to be 
announced).* 

(All times are Eastern Standard 
time.) 

"If necessary. 

W.H.A. Playoffs 

New England vs. Indianapolis 
April 16 — N. Eng. 4. Ind. I. 

April 17 — Ind. 4. N. Eng. 0. 

April 21 — At New England. 
April 23— At New England. 
April 24— At Indianapolis. 

April 27— At New England.* 
April 29 — At Indianapolis.* 

- If necessary. 

Calgary vs. Winnipeg 

April 23 — At Winnipeg. 

April 25 — At Winnipeg. 

April 28— At Calgary. 

Abril 30 — At Calgary. 

May 2 — At Winnipeg* 

May 4— At Calgary.* 

May 5 — At Winnipeg.* 

Bouston vs. San Diego 

April 21— At Houston. 

April 23— At Houston 
April 25 — At San Diego. 

April 27— At San Diego. 

April 28 — At Houston." 

April 30— At San Diego.* 

May I — At Houston.* 


A.B.A. Playoffs 

Nets vs.. San Antonio 
April 9— Nets' 116. S. Ant 101. 
April 11— S. Ant. 105, Nets 79. 
April 14— S. Ant; 111. Nets 103. 
April 18— Nets HO, S. Ant. 108. 
April 19— Nets 110, S. Ant. 108. 
April 21 — At San Antonio, 8J0 
P.M. 

. . April 25 — At Nassau Coliseum, 
(time to be announced)* 
Denver vs. Kentucky 
April 15— Den. 110. Kent 107. 
April 17— Kent. 138. Den. 110. 
April 13 — Kent 126. Denver 114. 
April 21 — At Kentucky. 8 P.M. 
April 22— At Denver, 9:30 P.M. 
Aprti 25— At Kentucky, 1:15 
P.M.* 

April 28 — At Denver, 8 JO P.M.* 

J AB times are Eastern Stand- 
time.) 

•If necessary. 

N.H.L. Playoffs 

Islanders vs. Buffalo 
April 11 — Buff. 5, Islanders 3. 
April 13— Buff. 3, Island. 2 (OT). 
April 15 — Islanders -5. Buff. 3. 
April 17 — Islanders 4, Buff. 2. 
April 20 — Islanders 4. Buff. 3. 
April 22 — At Nassau Coliseum. 
April 25 — At Buffalo.* 

Boston vs. Los Angeles 
April 11— Boston 4. L.A. 0. 

April 13 — LA. 3. Boston 2 (OT): 
April 15 — L.A 6. Boston 4. 

April 17 — Boston 3, L.A. 0. 

April 20 — Boston 7, L. A. 1. 

April 22— At Los Angeles. 

April 25— At Boston.* 

Philadelphia vs. Toronto 
April 12 — Pnila. 4. Toronto 1. 
April 13 — Pbila. 3. Toronto 1. 
April 15— Toronto 5. Phila. 4. 
April 17 — Toronto 4. Phila. 3. 
April 20 — Phila 7, Toronto 1. 

April 22 — At Toronto. 

April 25— At Philadelphia.* 

*lf necessary. 

British Football 

27 Realm 
ENGLISH LEAGUE 
First Division 

Leicester City 2, Leeds United 1. 

Second Division 
BUckmol 1. Sunder l end 0. 

Bristol Gty 1, Portsmciult* 0. 

Carlisle United 0. Hull City 0. . 

Nottingham Forest I, Blackburn Rovers 0. 
Orient 0. West Bromwich Albion 0. 

Third Division 

Crystal Palace 0, Aldershot 0. 

Port Vale 2. Manyidd Town 3. * 

Pol tier ham United 1. Preslon North =nd 1. 
Shell fold Wednesday I. Kalita ( Town 0. 
Swindon Town 0. MIlfwall Z. 

Fourth Division 
Oerlington 4. Rochdale 0. 

Hartieoool 0, Workington 2. 

Nev/oort County I, Norttumnlon Town I. 
Scunthoroe United 1. Barnsley 0. 

Swunsea City I, BournemwHi i, 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
First Dlvsrm 
Huddersfield ». Leeds 28. 

RUGBY UNION 
Tour Match 
Newport 43. Barbarians 0. 

CLUB MATCHES 
Exeter !0, Nottingham 15. 

Harrogate 3. Leicester 1 T. 

Peruance and Hewim 23, St. Mary’s He> 
olta I |4. 


By SAM GOLDAPER 
- Following the theory that 
it’s always easier tol dismiss 
the cbach, rather than the 
players* : the ' ; financially- 
troubled Houston Rockets 
discharged John Egan yester- 
day and replaced 

About him with Tom 
Nissalke. The 36- . 
year - old 

Basketball once the' young- 
est and shortest 
- (6 feet) coach in the Na- 
tional Basketball Associa- 
tion, is the second pilot of a 
team fading to make tbe 
playoffs to lose his job. The 
Atlanta Hawks dismissed 
Cotton Fitzsimmons before 
the end of the season. More 
coaching changes me ex- 
pected among teams that 
were shut out of the . play- 
offs. 

“We do not wish to .pin-' 
point the lack of ' progress 
solely to the coaching staff,” ' 
said Ray Peterson, the Rock-, 
ets p residen t and general 
manager, “or exclusively to 
the players, but we feel that 
a coaching change; at this 
time can work to our advan- 
tage in order to maintain a 
positive progressive ap- 
proach.” 

Nissalke, 41, is the fifth 


coach in the history of the 
franchise that began as the ' 
expansion San Diego Rockets 
for the 1967-58 season. ’ v 

Egan* who played II seg- 
sons in.the NRJU’ includm^.. 
a stint with- the Kmcks, !®- - 
placed Tex Winter _as «»ch - 
on Jan. 21, 2872, soon after 
the frarahise moved to Hous- 
ton. Egan’s teams won' 129 
games and- lost 132, includ- 
ing a 40-42 won-lost record 
tins reason." The^ Rodfets-- 
made the playoffs once-un- - 
der Egan, finishing second 
hrfifnd 'the ’Washington -Bui-, 
lets in the Central Division 
last season. 

This is NissaTke’s fifth head 
coaching job since the 1971- 
72 season with either- KB A. 
or Am erican Basketball Asso- : 
datioo teams. Although .he, 
has been succe^fui in some ■ 
of his jbte. he has been 
dogged bv controversy. Nis- 
; salke began. last reason eh 
"coach of the; Utah Stars of 
the ARA. but the franduse - 
folded after 16 games.- He 
has been- scouting for [tbe- 
Milwaukee Bucks and was; 
recently named head coach 
of the Puerto Rican Olympic 
team He wUl carry out that 
assignment-- 

Nissalke began.. Jus _ .pro. 


coachmg in 396S .as the- as- 
sistant to Larry CosteHo of , 
jib’ Bucks. Affe&ht&ree seasons 
. in ' : Milwaukee . hfe-." became'' 
coach of the Dallas Chapar- 
rals. ’ He y tetf rtbevCh aps ? ^ 
\sr42r42 ■ mark andwax named 
the coach of ■ the" year.- He ' 
began the 1972-73 reason ‘as 
the head coach df tbd Seattle ; 
SuperS onics but ipstjed only '. 
45 games, the Soaks losing; 
32 of them. * ~ ; * ' •>'; 

At- Seattle he xan dn to, 
problems wth Joto Bfis^iH^ 
Jim M«©axiieis -axidi SpefOT 
Haywood. He .predic^. rhflt 
none . woiiId ; ; help the Sbnic- 
fraDciHse and • to;propfaec3r-. 
came true (all itoee players- 
were traded or drbpped^'He 
b ecatpg coach, -of die San 

Antonio Spnrs for Ihe 
75 season find aft&r lea sing 
. them into the^plaxpffs; te. 

was -dismissed' .early Ihfe If ol-; 
. louring season. .after 
wtth^dj officials-'. f . : ■ ■ ■ 

'Mssalke, wiCb"*reputatidG 


abtfdefen 

the Rocket^- one of ‘the-top i 
: shooting teams 'm the N3A H ' 
could ilearn to -ptay defense. 
The Rockets average 106,2 
potats a^game, but were thfe; 
fworst ^Cenni‘ ’in;rthe iraEGfc 1 
defensivieftr.; -; 

. -jPattefeon,- way , coached, - 


. Nissalke in hi^i scbooy ft^ 
Wisconsin, .red^tly* ,*» 
cusred vscdae^(rf""ltis ffir 
pii^Pi SoacSing problems. 

.“For severai seasoiK l-. s * 
-.got caught. up with owr‘ 

: ! and =gA«ai manners 
wanted to coach,” said ; r . 
'"terson,“Tta^ caiLipc^en' ■Cf'i 
. of some of- Egan’s gi' 
Strategy thfslast season, 

.". timre Tom overraaded 
: put himself in the- KmeS ". 
i think -he .did get pfej V ■■ 
.' ^whom he could. 'coercb 
I: think since , then ,he- 
"Vmatufed ; and Igpwh _ 

rgreat deaL ,v v - 

- ' M Johnsbiu^Se yo : “ 
est coach iii .the . NJ 
-; was , Tehired yesterday, - 
'' though the. > Kansas. , 

: -\gxngs failed,' to ipake . 

-; playoffs. He was ’give) ; 

. v^mfiryear contract .kt a r 
'jfe salaiy' . . The Boi 
;-42gltfcs. are expected to 5 
;-,*kul Silis . : to .counter' J "' 
i-^SiamateJin-the fiist g: .-' 
the;.Eastem .Confer* 
"laemifinal fidnigbt gga'mst 
, -rffiiffalo Braves in Boston; -’ . 
J’las is .fhe'. .Celticijs’ .best. 
I'^undAr .and . Coach ;’r 
^Seinsbhn ^baj.'beeh brih^j 
f. ?-him in. daityr; in ’ the. :. ■ "" 

• : T Quarter.;/'-' 



..’WchinBnd 5 
. ..Fuman D 

Trinitv 3 


Harttort 5 (lit) Trinilv 3 

Trinity ifl (2d) Hartford 8 

Ithaca 6 c»«ll 

toMril 6 Clart 0 

Manhattan 5 L.I.U. 3 

Mass. 7 (1st) Darfma-jth 2 

Mass. 6 (3d) Dsrhmwth I 

Miami 10 (1st) Indtana 9 

Miami 12 (2d) Indiana 4 

Miss. U. 4 ...(Isn.. . S. Miss. 0 

Miss S». II . (20) ... Sl Miss. IB 
Korttrsestaro 12 ........ Metre Dana J 

Pjcb 6 F.D.U.. Madison 2 

Purrtuv 9 ....(»*) ...S*. ioswh’s. Ind. 0 
Pont in 5.. (2nd). ..St. Jcsesstt 1 *. Ind. 9 

Ramaoo 9 (Isi).. . Nrev< o 

Raman 10 (W) N?ac» 3 

Rutsers 6 (10 Hta.) L«W«h 5 

Seton Han 9 Latarfftte 0 

51 Peter's. NJ. 9 Mentcfair Sf. 6 

St. John'*, N.V. 10 Oriumata S 

S.E. Mass 10 . ... (1st) .. StenaMM 0 

S. E. Mass. 4 Pd) . . Stroll t 

Stantord 9 SL Mary's Cilrt. 4 

T. C.U. 4 ... (1st).... SO. tlclhoaist 1 

T.CU. 5 .. (20) So. Methodist t 

WKllam Palenon 5 . Jvser CHr St. J 


Need a car full-time this sumriier? 



. -(• - 






Yalo 4 (ti 

Brovsn 6 1 

York 14 

SdM 

Ha:Hffv 7 

lmN>n 5 

Nacarftli 5 

Ny«< 0 »n 7 

Po-*r B ... 

Boty Prm> 1 

St. Francis Prao 25 


.... Brown 7 

.John Jar 

..Col'nt*** ’ 
.. Cathedra' 2 
So. Sttsre * 
.. Bowt^ 4 
... V»**(n*i 5 
. N.YM 4. 2 
.... Adams 6 


LACROSSE 

Cnltaws 

F.D.U. 7 Montclair St * I 

tthasa U *’hvd 4 j 

TENNIS j 

Collms ! 

AdelnH S Siam Brsnk 3 ■ 

^..uun 6 Mv&iusum • I 

FarOham 3 Prart ) | 

Htrvard ° oil hams 0 I 

Kinjs Point « N.Y. Maritime 0 | 

TRACK AND FIELD 
■ Coll was 

AdHnM B8 CKf. PfSt t9 

p.O.U. IIS Montclair 9. *5Vs 

Harvard tli . .. Vila rlt 

Kings Pt. 77 H. .Haven 5a . Lehman 39 
Musrtngum S3 . . . Marieid M 

Trertnn 9. 9 Prince on 4 

Atkinson Is Aquitted 
SAN FRANCISCO. April 20 
(AP) — George Atkinson, an 
Oakland Raiders’ defensive 
back, was acquitted today of 
bank embezzlement - larceny 
charges by a Federal jury. A 
first trial had ended last July 
23 with a hung jury. 

W.H.A. Pilot Reinstated 
CALGARY, Alberta, April 
20— The suspension imposed 
last week on Coach Joe Cra- 
zier of the Calgary Cowboys 
was lifted today by the World 
Hockey Association president, 
Ben Hatskin. 




Sl. t - -* ’ 


Now the Superstar will rent you a brand-new , 
air-conditioned car for a 3-month term, ‘ 
beginning June 10 through September 10. 
That s just when you need it most! 


Reserve yours now. There is only a 
limited number of these cars avail- 
able and reservations cannot be ac- 
cepted after May 13. 

Choose from Ford Elites and 
Granadas and Mercury Cougars and 
Monarchs, at a special new, low rate 
with no charge for mileage! You pay 
gas. All cars are fully equipped with 
power steering, power brakes, power 
windows and AM/FM stereo, as well 


as air-conditioning. And all are 
available at any of the 8 convenient 
Hertz locations in Manhattan.. - 
“The All-Sommer Rental.” Its one 
of the many reasons why Herts is 
the Superstar in rent-a-car. Like . 
having more cars, more kinds of 
cars, more locations, more people to 
serve you better, just to name a few. 

So call Hertz now. Or whenever you 

need a car. The Superstar in rent-arai: 

HERTZ REMTS FORDS AND OTHB) FINE CARS 


mss 


Call 557-0800 

Adn Joan Maggapinlo or Grace ^ Torre for fufi details. 














































r 



and Hir . 


SSfe^r-:. 

' Jfr:^ V; 

£Ncii s r .\ 
tr* ■ *■'-- - ' 

***& 


Hi 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2l , I97B 


*?*. . ;.■- 





■SSj*, 








business/finance 


AT 


w&SSZ'-*' 




ii'^-nge Is Seen 
-S^-hairman— 

mppm-y- 


vgssrs. ■" 

=.i 

-' . 

■JfW tj’ 

:*a**~r^ *■ -<* 

^Wta* . IfJ,; - 
A** *ft3* .- _'.' 


*7;’ 



Credibility NeedmMM URGED 

;to spur integrity 


JJcJAmK D. SMITH ; 

VjJ^lie Kew.Tcrt Tines 

. Gfl, April 20— The 
#a 'of the Gulf Oil 
*• c^said today that the 
gm -‘ j>JJenge. facing the 
.s “to. restore our 
■■’o. ourselves and our 
^^credibility witlj 
r r.;'. .;■ tethers.” The chairs 
•I ^iman, Jerry Me-' 
Ceo Afee,. Was alluding 
Pi-J’&JO Gulf's involve- 
S> ■"«, ■« bent in illegal 
foreign political 
ae.'? Vt led to the ouster 
ago of his prede- 
Dorey, and two 
officials. 


;-7 * ompany officials. 
l-^s, announed that 
'earnings rose 1.5 


earnings 

„ LJ * ? .« million, or $1.02 
1 $195 million, or 
f the year-ago pe- 
s increased 8 per- 
biilion from $4 


summer? 




meeting in- the 
sic flail was at- 
406 shareholders. 

. undergo n-i the 
lensive ir.vestiga- 
1 ever conducted,” 
lid, "and as a re- 
that for all prac- 
irid purposes tills 
>w closed. Some? 
ite investigations 
arid some shore- 
tare not yet re- 
the best of our 
new evidence is 
isets to be un- 



Chief of S.E.C. Asks Rules), 
Requiring More Scrutiny 
for Listed Companies ...j 


• was referring 
r report on the 
' ; foreign- .-and 
ticai activities. 


to, m njr.r .. . . Tfw New York TTmot 

Jerry McAfee, the chairman of Gulf, conducting his first 
shareholders meeting yesterday in Pittsburgh. 


MS tS&sps&ss 

yer who wais not a director. 

In announcing .the earnings 
Mr. McAfee said: ‘This relative- 
ly flat- performance masks some 
significant shifts in our earn- 
ings base and in ' the trends 


and Exchange Commission. It 
chronicled the expenditure of 
more than $12. million in com- 
pany money, much of it illegal 
and most of it through a secret 
fund in the Bahamas. 


The report was prepared by. 

la committee consisting of twol Continued on Page 62, Column 1 


: Net Climbs 1 1 .1% to a Record High 


ML RECKERT 

r 

Corporation, the 
copier industry, 
itiay that first- 
income climbed 
i reach a record 
. $1.03 per share, 
fed net of $73.8 
. cents a share, 
i three months! 


idler figure was 
Billion loss from 
nned computer 
.‘Cations. 

its deduction, the 
ter net wss-.nnty, 
sad of the $7ft5r ' 
cents a -share, 
•go. 

ncy transactions 
int influence on 
arisons, accord- 
ter McCoIough; 
Archie. R. Mc- 
int, who report- 
of $8.7 million, 
i share, in last 
rter earnings, 
said it was diffi- 
te -ail economic 
1 by. . currency 
had they been 
976 income from 
erations would 
it 5 percent less 


profits Scoreboard ** . v 

"= =(Some of Major Corporations reporting Yesterday* ’ 


CORPORATION 


", JAN.-MARCH 
r EARNINGS 
1376 


PERCENT 
CHANGE 
FROM 1375 


Avon Products 

523.200,000 

+37.3 

Burlington Indus 

23,800,000 

+561.1 

Dow Chemical 

141.600,000 

+28.7* 

General Telephone 

87.000.000 

+ 10.1 

Gulf Oii 

•198,000,000 

+1.5 

-Pfizer ; 

37,900.000’ 

+ 10.2 

'Republic Steel 

■ 13,600,000 

— 59.6 

R. Js Reynolds 

75,800.000 

+32.1* 

Trans World Airlines... 

(4 5 BOO. 000) 

— 

.Union Carbide. 

f 01 .500,000 

-11.4* 

United Brands 

-2.600.000' 

** 

Xerox 

82,000,000 

+11.1*** 


*1976 and 1975 earnings reHalcd foraccounlmg changes. 
**1975 net loss. 

***1975 earnings restated lor accounting changes. 

(loss) 


Th» Hbw Vort Times/ April 21, 1976 


tided that March 
Xergx 9200 du- 
avwe the high- 
onth since they 


•eynolds 

is Industries Inc. 



Tort State ' 

jWwwrias 


1FFER . . . 

tfrind Chinn » price" 

NEW YORK 


% 


E 107.966 

tons; 



reported yesterday- that first- 
quarter _ net fricome rose 32.1 
percent to a record $75.8 mil- 
lion. or $1.60 a share from the 
year-ago net of $57.4 million, 
or $1.27 a share. 

Sales were also reported at 
a new -high of $1,305 billion, 
up IS percent from $1,103 bil- 
lion. 

The net income is after for- 
eign currency losses of $6.4 
million this year and $8.4 mil- 
lion a year ago, but iaterest 
costs were down by 30 percent, 
the report'noted. 

Sales and revenues were, 
higher for all diversified opera- 


tions, but earnings -were up 19 
percent for tobacco, but little 
changed for transportation and 
petroleum lines. 

Foods, beverages, aluminum 
products and packaging and 
operating earnings were up 46 
percent on a sales gain of 29 
percent 

_ Almost all of the company’s 
cigarette brands contributed to 
the unit volume -increase of 21 
percent. About .two-thirds, of 
the $155 million increase came 
from worldwide unit volume in- 
creases. A major factor was an 


By ROBERT D. HERSHEY Jr. 

Special Id The New Tori Tluiw 

WASHINGTON, April 20— 
The Securities and Exchange 
Comnussien is urging the New 
York Stock Exchange to adopt 
rules requiring companies to 
[submit to greater supervision 
by independent directors as a 
condition of listing their securi- 
tics. 

Roderick M. HiUs, the S.E.C. 
chairman, told a public citizens' 
forum sponsored by Ralph Na- 
[der here today that he consi- 
dered it “quite probable” the 
exchange would take such ac- 
tion. 

■ Mr. Hills disclosed his discus- 
SI u?VY It *\_ tiie B *S Board, about 
which he had hinted in general 
terms in a speech last week 
in Los Angeles, in presenting 
alternatives to more radical 
steps to insure the integrity of 
American business enterprise. 

His . remarks dealt mainly 
with questionable foreign pay- 
ments but he was referring 
to other management problems 
as well. 

Among otber solutions pro- 
posed have been broad criminal 
laws, public participation such 
as that found in European com- 
panies or Federal chartering 
for multinational corporations. 
This called for each newly list- 
ed company to have at least 
three outside dierctors and an 
audit committee of three to 
five directors not a part of 
management. 

An exchange spokesman said 
that, since the 1950's-, the Big 
Board has required that new 
companies have two such direc- 
tors. 

“The question as I see it 
is whether the efficacy of our 
system of self-regulation can 
survive,” Mr. Hills declared. 

He added that the commis- 
sion would seek to set rules 
• itself if the nation’s stock ex- 
cnemges aid no. act to insist on 
stronger audit procedures and 
to remove conflicts of interest 
cr a “lullabye effect” that he 
said often occurred when, for 
example, a company’s securi- 
ties iawyer cr investment bunk- 
er rerved cs an "outside" di- 
rector. 

, Mr. Hills also said the com- 
I mission was drafting a bill that 
•would provide stiffer penalties, 
^including jail terms, for those 
who permit false company rec- 
[ords to be kept, 
i On the question of foreign! 
jpxyments, Mr. Hills said that 
the Federal Government must 
Juse its economic power to pre^ 
i vent foreign rivals from taking 
I business away from American 
I companies with bribes. 

Separately, more companies 
disclosed payments in filing 
monthly reports to the ccmrois- 
jsion made public today. 

These were Electronic Asso- 
ciates Inc. of West Long 
Branch, N. J.. $83,000 to minor 
officials of six foreign govern- 
ments; Amax Lie. of Green- 
wich, Conn., political contribu- 
tions of $44,800 iii Canada. 
$20,100 in Australia and $2,375 
in this country; Core Laborato- 
ries Inc., of Dallas, $89,500 
for engineering services, sales 
contracts and a license in one 
foreign country. 



STOCKS ADD15.35; 
DOW AT 1,00a# 




■ 

Increased Economic Activity 
and Declining Inflation 
Ignite the Advance 


6-WEEK PEAK REACHED 


Gainers Top Losing Issues ' 
by Ratio of Nearly 4 to 1 
— Volume Is Up Sharply _ ‘ 


Ti7_i fo _ . „ Th» NwYorkTIpies/Mcal Bowel 

Waiter A- Fallon, pres, dent of Eastman Kodak, with the new camera that was dis- 
piayed for the first time at a news conference in New York yesterday. 


Eastman Kodak Demonstrates 
System for Instant Pictures 


By VICTOR K. McELHENY 
The Eastaan Kodak Company, entering exposed light-sensitive 
the ins taut -picture field after seven years 


By VEKTANIG G. VARTAN 
The combination of rising 
economic activity and a declin-~v 
mg inflation rate ignited a dy-- - 
namic rally in the stock market- 
yesterday and sent the Dow." 
uones industrial average hurtl-”*’ 
jing above the 1.000 barrier 
.with a gain of more than Hr ?’ 
points. 

Once again. Wall Street pro-!. - 
vided the sort of sudden change ' 
in sentiment that makes the r,: ' 
stock market unpredictable and--- 
exciting. On Monday, one bro- r -~ 
ker had described market ac- 
tion as “just plain boring.” - 
Yesterday, however, the blue 
chip Dow raced ahead 15.35 
points to finish at 1,003.40, ;? 


of development work, yesterday displayed 
two low-price instant-picture cameras and 
a bigh-price film for use in both. 

The electronically controlled cameras and 
the dry prints they produce outside the 
camera are technological cousins of the 
system introduced four years ago by the 
Polaroid Corporation, whose dom inan t of 
instant photography is being challenged 
by Kodak. 

The instant-picture system will be in- 
troduced in Canada early in May and in 
the. United tSates late ein June. The cam- 
eras have a suggested list price of $53.50 
and $69.50, and the 10-picture f ilm packs 
are to sell for $7.45. 

The new system differs from Polaroid's 
SX-70 system in the arrangement of cam- 
era components and in the chemistry of 
the film units. In the opinion of many who 
attended yesterday's demonstration, the 
final prints contained more brilliant colors 
than the run of SX-70 prints. 

Introducing the Kodak instant-picture 
system, Walter A. Fallon, president of 
Eastman Kodak, spoke of “remarkable 
color quality” produced by what he called 
‘a fundamentally new imaging chemistry.” 

. 111 aI » interview after the demonstration 
m the grand ballroom of the Pierre Hotel, 
Dr. Albert Sieg, who led development of 
the Kodak system, said that the film’s so-' 
called “reversal emulsions,” in which the 


silver-containing 

molecules are not photographically devel- 
oped, was Kodak’s first "fundamen tal ly 
new technology" in color photography 
since the introduction in 1942 of what 
became in 1946 a sheet Film with the 
trade name of Ektachrome. 

Later yesterday, a spokesman for Pola- 
roid said: "We have had a chance to make 
a brief comparison between the Polaroid 
instant-picture system and the new Kodak 
system. The comparison renews our con- 
fidence that our leadership in the field of 
instant photography remains unchal- 
lenged.” 

Following the judgment of stock market 
analysts that the Kodak instant-picture 
system differed less than had been ex- 
pected from Polaroid s SX-70 film and 
cameras, the price of Eastman Kodak’s 
stock fell 1 *r to 113*4' bv late yesterday 
afternoon, while Polaroid’s rose to 
37%. 

The new Kodak cameras — called EK-4 
and EK-6 — use a focusing system judged 
to be simpler than the SX-70’s. This could 
make it easier for many amateur photog- 
raphers to focus the cameras accurately 
when taking flash pictures indoors. 

The prices of the EK-4 and EK-6 cameras 
bracket those of Polaroid’s recently intro- 
duced Pronto camera, which uses SX-70 


L -F Ha g I 




Tuesday. April 20, 1975 
New York Stock Exchange Issues 
VofaMHK 

N.Y.S.E. 23,500.000 shares 
Other Markets 3,772^80 shares 






ISSUES 

TRADED 

1,908 


351 


Unchanged 


Continued on Page 57, Column 2 


Some Find Keynes Policies Outmoded 


N.Y.S.E. Index 54.76 + 0.80 
S. 4 P. Comp. 102.87 -«• 1.43 
Dow Jones kid. 1,003.46 +15. 35 


. rr. 


The DnrYark Times 


By LEONARD SILK 
Following the first quarter’s 
strong gain, with the real gross 
national product rising at an 
[annual rate of 7.5 percent, the 
United States economy has just 
about made it up the other side 
of the valley into 
. which it began 
Economic sliding during the 
Analysis -fourth quarter of 
1973. This eco- 
.v " ' nomic • recovery, 
provides cause for celebration,! 


'slump began, were correspond- 
ingly greater. 

But Germany and Japan, like 
the United States, are now 
clearly on the mend. These 
three great industrial powers 
will provide the thrust for the 
rest of the Western - world to 
recover in the year ahead. 

_ As welcome as this 1 recovery 
is. however, there remains rea- 
son for concern that the United 
States and the other industrial 
countries are experiencing only 
! a -respite from the combination 




Continued on Page 62- Column 4 > 


Chrysler Still Lags 
Under sharp questioning . 
by shareholders at the Chrys- 
ler Corporation's annual meet- 
ing, John , J. Riccardo, its 
chairman, acknowledged that 
the company’s profit margin 
on higher auto sales was so 
far unsatisfactory. Page 62. 


that this nation and perhaps 
the world, were in danger of 
falling into another great de- 
pression like that erf the 1930's. 

Such fears were probably 
even greater in Western Eu- 
rope and Japan than in the 
United States. The other in- 
dustrial countries had enjoyed 
faster and more stable growth 
than the United States during 
most of the postwar period, 
and thqir worries, when the last 


inant problem of the eariy 
1970's. 

In the case of the United 
States, the slowing of inflation 
to a 3.7 percent annual rate 
in the first quarter of this 
year, is unlikely to last. Even 
the Ford Administration's chief 
economist, Alan Greenspan, has 
warned that so slow a rate 
of inflation looks too good to 
be true. 

The great majority of econ- 


omists in this country still 
expect prices £o rise this year 
at somewhere between a 5 }A 
percent and a 6 percent annual 
rate. The relative optimists be- 
lieve the rate might get down 
as low as 5 percent However, 
jthe impending rise in food and 
energy prices 'makes this look 
like wishful thinking. 

Meanwhile, unemployment is 
hanging on at a 7.5 percent 
rate in the United States— and 
rates abroad, when adjusted 
for different definitions, are 
as high or higher. 

Unemployment threatens to 
persist during the next few 
years both in the United States 
and in many - other industrial 
countries. 

Again, the optimists believe 
that the American unemploy- 
ment rate will get down slight- 
ly below 7 percent by the aid 
of this year and below 6 per- 
cent by the end of next year. 
But if the current recovery 

Continued on Page 53, Column 4 


Ci ticorp ’s Quarter E arnings Up 8%; Chase Chairman Chides Critics 

- 1 .' I-S i iuw 111 1 mi " u 


Wriston Cites Gains 
Abroad ,• U.S. Drop 



-nburg, 

Ti&CoJnc. 


' jnue'New Vtfrli 


By STEVEN RATTNER 
Citicorp officials told share- 
holders at the company's an- 
nual meeting yesterday that 
operating earnings rose by. 8 
percent during the first quarter 
to $90.8 million from $84.3 
million a year earlier. 

• Citicorpi the holding com- 
pany of Citibank (formerly the 
First National City Bank) thus 
became the only major New 
York bank company to " report 
an earnings increase during the 
[first quarter. 

For the rest, which have re- 
ported declines up to 57 per- 
cent, the myriad problem?— 
largely brought on by the reces- 
sion — have included record 
loan losses, increased operating 
costs other than interest ex- 
pense. and a narrowing -of the 
spread, between the cost of 
borrowing money and the in- 
come from Jen ding it 
i. As for- Citicorp, chairman 
Walter B. Wriston told the 350 
stockholders .. and onlookers . 
that "the most significant fac- 
tor in • our earnings Increase *. 
was 01 m. international business- " 
es, where a .combination of 
improved ' volume and higher 
.spreads more than, offset- a de- 
cline in the profitability of our 
activitite in the United States." - 
Mr. Wriston. also, acknowl- 
edged that Citicorp had not 
.escaped the problems of esca- 
lating. loan . losses and . prebaii- 
L ous real estate, Investments., 

' 'The . provision . for . possible 



Rockefeller Asserts 
Banking Is Strong 


Walter B. Wriston, chairman of CStiairp, addressing the 
shareholders yesterday at the bank’s annual meeting. 


loan losses, rose to S76 m:liior. 
during' the first quarter from 
$72 nuition a year ago. Actual 
loan, losses rose to $72.6 million 
from $44.3 million a year ago, 
although the 1976 figures were 

■ '/• , - • t. 


increased by $66 million due 
to an accounting change. 

Of.. Citicorp's $695 million m 
to. real < 


loans 


estate investment 


Continued on Page SS^Cttinxma v 


By TERRY ROBARDS 
David Rockefeller, chairman 
of the Chase Manhattan Cor- 
poration, chided critics of the 
banking system today and reas- 
Jsured shareholders about the 
condition of the Chase Manhat- 
tan Bank, the principal subsi- 
diary of the corporation, 
j Speaking at the Chase annual 
meeting, Mr. Rockefeller said 
recent criticism in .the press 
land from some members of 
Congress "could eventually 
have a serious impact on Chase 
and on the entire banking sys- 
tem.” 

The Chase chairman said cer- 
tain unnamed members of Con- 
gress “seem to be attempting 
|to use the banks as a scapegoat 
for many of the nation’s eco- 
nomic difficulties.” In so doing, 
he added, "they are trying vi- 
gorously to bring about drastic 
and, I think, very unnecessary 
changes In the banking sys- 
tem.” 

Mr. Rockefeller told some 
600 shareholders overflowing 
an auditorium at I Chase Man-* 
hattan Plaza that the condition ' 
of the banking system was 
strong and that Chase expected 
solid earnings gains in the fu- 
Iture. 

"Those . wha are demanding 
'drastic changes are convenient- 
ly ignoring a very salient point 
— that the banlting system is 
coming through the worst re- 
cession in 40 years in very good 
shape, ” Mr. Rockefeller said. 






:\ ' '«* 




scored its best advance in six * 
weeks and once again came' 
within striking distance of its 
38-month high. 

Moreover, the entire market ' 1 
joined in the surge— -gainers 
outpaced losing issues by a 
ratio of nearly 4 to 1 — and 
trading volume boomed from " 
recent depressed levels. 

It marked the fourth time 
since March II that the Dow - 
has crossed above 1,000. Re- - 
peated flurries of profit taking, ;- 
along with nervousness bred 
by the rapid rise of stock prices 
since December, in the past.* 
soon sent the average back ■ ■ 
Ibelow 1,000. 

On March 24, the average- 
closed at 1.009.21 to establish ” 
a 3S-month high, powered by.? 
such "Smokestack America”.!., 
issues as U. S. Steel, Interna-:';' 
tional Paper and du Pont. The -*- 
record closing high of l,051.70i : 7 

[was set on Jan. 11, 1973. 

The key to the market’s fu- 
ture assault on these targets, 
many analysts believe, is the 
action of basic-industry stocks- 
that lately have retraced some \ 
of their gains in a process 
of price consolidation. . ___ 
If any one stock set thq!^ 


Continued on Page 53, Column?" 


euwoc* 

f 


matin) fund foveating is “growth" 

■lories. Ask your dealer for free pros pee. 
tin or write your Mine and address on - 
thm Ad ind mail to • «- 


CALVIN BULLOCK, LTD. — 

Established 1894 ’ 

ONE WALL ST, NEW YOBS IWK-'V_. 


Creative 
investment 
management 
and highly 
personalized 
trust services. 


^ - . _ , . „ Tfw Nbw Tort Timas/ Don H W Owria, 

Dawd Rockefeller, Chase Manhattan chairman, at meeting 


. “Our basic earnings power j soared to record levels in the 
is. intact. ’ he continued. “Re- 1 aftermath of the national. reces 

- - ! Si‘on. 


cent publicity notwithstanding, j 

the future of banking and of fl u Co 5 g7 ?5 sic l? a, L ’ :n ‘l uir:es inl ° 
Chase Manhattan in particular! • ^ ^ ? f the “d 

>5 very brisht indeed ’’ :i ! t0 . tfie disclosure practices 


t 


is very bright indeed. 

Mr. Rockefeller's remarks 
followed a period when Chase 
has experienced sharp earnings 
decanes and when loan tosses 
to the banking system have 

■ . 


- practices 

of the industry ware inspired 
by the publication of lists of 
"problem banks” compiled by 
bank regulatory agencies. 


Continued on Prge 62, Column 1 


For more information 
on our services and 
successful performance 
record,ca!l: 

Harry S. Stotter, 

Senior Vice President, 
at (201) 646-5217. 


I United Jersey Bank 


investment Management Division 
210 Main 5treet 
Hackensack, N.J. 07602. 
TqW assets: S12 billion 







OJ 


THE NEW'YORK TmES, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1976-'- 




* - 


Institution-Sized Discounts 
For Individual Investors 

Institutions are now getting great commis- 
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Manager-Employment ft Placement 
Wisconsin Electric Power Company 
231 W. Michigan, Milwaukee, Wl 53201 
An Eauai Opportunity Employer M/P 





Market Place 

Most Mutual Funds Trail Inflation 


By ROBERT METZ 


A tabulation of the perfor- 
mance of leading mutual 
lands over the most "recent 
doublemarket cycle dearly 
indicates that the funds and 
stocks generally have not 
kept pace with inflation. A 
market cycle is the span of 
time over which the stock 
market, as measured by a 
representative market aver- 
age, moves from a peak to 
a trough and back to a peak 
again. 

When this process con- 
tinues through another 
trough to a second peak, 
a double market cycle has 
occurred. 

. Computer Directions Advi- 
sors of Silver Spring Md, 
was asked to chart the per- 
formance of the 285 mutual 
funds which it has data for 
eight years. The peak-to-peak 
double - cycle spans seven 
years and four months. It 
began on Nov. 30, 1968, and 
extends through March 31 
of this year. March 31 hap- 
pens to have marked the 
highest month-end value for 
the Standard & Poor’s 500- 
stock index, which Computer 
Directions uses for compari- 
son purposes. 

Time will determine wheth- 
er the double cycle in fact 
ended on March 31. That 
date is used as the terminal 
point in the study since it 
is the latest month-end avail- 
able and because it offers 
the most favorable compari- 
son for the mutual funds 
for the double-cycle period. 

Even so, only three funds 
kept pace with inflation, 
which, as represented by the 
Consumer Price Index, rose 
by approximately 58 percent. 


The funds that did better 
than that include the Temple- 
ton Growth Fund, which as 
Sts name suggests, invests 
in growth stocks. The fund 
gained 195.5 percent. 

International Investors, 
which invests in gold shares, 
gained 97.9 percent during 
the double-cycle period. In- 
vestors Selective, a fund that 
invests in bonds and pre- 
ferred shares, was up 58.6 
percent. ■ 

None of the biHion-doflar 
mutual funds came close to 
meeting the inflation test' for 
success, and two did only 
as well as the Standard « 
Poor’s 500-stock index. The 
index was up 23 percent dur- 
ing the double-cycle. 

The $1 .4-billion, Affiliated 
Growth and Income Fund 
was up 39.8 percent, and 
the Investment Company of 
America Growth and Income 
Fund was up - 30.4 percent. 

Only 60 of the 285 funds 
monitored by Computer Di- 
rections were able to match 
-or. outdo the Standard & 
Poor’s index. 

Investors who have been 
in mutual funds for the foil 
double-cycle are bound to 
be disappointed that their 
funds have not kept pace 
with inflation, even though 
they have experienced risks 
along the way. But that goes 
for investors generally, since 
the S.&P, index is representa- 
tive of what stocks have 
done overall. 

The following table shows 
the performance of the best 
funds over the double-cycle 
period — regardless o fsize or 
objective: 


Highs and Lows 

Tuesday, April 20, 1970 


Alcan Ain 
AJcu 

AMBAC Ind 
AMP Inc 
Anna Ind 
Ashland Oil - 
AvcvCn rt 
BestProd wf 
Bon Want 
Carllila 
Chain 5jSpF 
ChIMIIw Cp 
CMM/lw pf 
Chrysler 
Con wood Cp 
C rwnZell Pi 
rCuHrr Ham 
I Del Monla 
Delta: Int 
□over Corn 
ElMemM pf 
Evans Pd 
FlnlSanta B 
Flnl Fader 
Fstlni Bcsh 
Ford Mot 
Franklin Ml 
Gefta Oil pt 
GoldWtF pf 

CinnGas El 
CUT Am 
ClWmnm p! 


MEW HIGHS— 87 
Ham Aft Scion Pioh 

Hnllonan Seatraln Un 

HmnHGas n SEDC3 Inc 

Inland Ml Siqnf 2J0rt 

JlmWalt rm Sinter Co pf 

KCPL i Jirt Smith AO 

Lsral Com Smlthtcli™ 

Maer pi a Soo Una 

Aid .car Inc SOS Con 

Mareor pf A Sprints Mill 

McGraw Ed SldOII Cal 

Miss River SldOIII Ind 

MobllOU Stanley Wks 

Motorola Slew War 

Nal Gmtn Slorer Brd 

Hal Preslo Sim Oil 

Norris Ind Super Valu 

NSPw 4. S0 b( Taft Brtfcst 

Northrop Co YransO Fin 

Northrop rt Trioltrtn wl 

Otis Elov UnPart Min 

Owens III unit Tedi 

PPG Ind umtTecb of 

Pub Svc NH Wacfiev Co 

Reeves Bro Wall Murr 

Rodnuof Int WaffMiirr rt 

Rackwlnt of Weis Mfcts 

Rock Int pfB WelliFar Co 

Santa Fe Int WnUn M 

NEW LOWS — 9 
Hunt diem Smuckor J 

vlNoCan Ry Tertl Ind 

Safeway Str ZapatiCo rt 


Assets Fund 

12/31/75 

(millions) 


Ofajectrn Gain 
I 1/30/66- 
3/31/7* 


PEN IN SHARES I PU S TAXI 
SohjKi i» Prior Sab or Prbr Cbuqe 

9ft ADORESSGRPH 10ft AUG. S $13750 
18% ALLIS CHLMR I7.6SSEPT.28 29750 
27ft BABKBWILCOX 28 JUNEZl 225.00 
20ft CAROL. POWR JB.D8JUNE2I 28750 

21 . CHRVSLER 20ft 5 MOS. 350.00 

35ft CITICORP .... 32.74 AUG.30 34250 
?{j CONT'L AIR ....9 SEPT. 13 87.50 

47 CRANE .73% SEPT. 13 38750 

12ft CURT WRGHT IIJOJUNEIO 13750 

31ft DENTSPLT 34ftSEPT.29 13750 

<2ft HUGHS TOOL 44* MAT 28 225.00 
14ft MICROWAVE ..14 4 MOS. 24250 
24i/i MOtyCORP ..27ft M AT 28 175.00 
12ft MONRCH CAP 12ft B MQ5. 250.00 
41ft MOORE MACK 38ft MAT 10 38750 
74 NRFKiYPSTHN 81 JUNE 7 11250 
14ft PNEUMO CORP 15ft JUNE I 
27ft ROSARIO RES .25 JUNE 7 
lift SCM CORP . ;16JM? MOS. 

»ft scorns INC 15ft 4 MOS. 

40 5CHRLNG PUGH 57 JUNE 4 
9ft SEASON ALL ..10 4 MOS. 

71 STAND OIL OH 44ft JUNE 14 48750 
5ft STRUNG PREC .452 8 MOS. 17550 
lift SUNSHNE MIN 11.41 AUG.3I 18750 

17 SWANK I6J0 JUNE 7 13750 

9ft TRE ...10 4 MOS. 14250 

9ft TELEPROMPTER 10 4 MOS. (4250 
7ft UNION CORP ..7 AUG. 31 14250 
US STEEL 82ft SEPT. IS 48750 

THOMAS* HAAB & BOTTS 

_ 269-8100 

50 Bmadmr, H.YX. 


MV,. Pv. A Ca.t DfOken 8- C*»>.VA*v.. 


■750 
28750 
287.50 
13750 
550.0 n 
14250 


•i 

l 


S 19.8 Temptahn 9twrth 1955% 

MO Intivnalbnal Inr Bold 97.9 

159.1 Investors, Setedhra Banda 

fc oret 59.6 

165 Founder? Soeclai vent eartl 

snec situation 53.7 

27.9 Ksyslone B-2 bonds 8 surf 513 

S.l Mctual Stares growth & 

Income 48.4 

2913 Pioneer Fund growth & 

Income 485 

23.1 Centrrtund awressiv* 

growth 47.9 

62 Paramount Mutual growth 
8 income 47.4 

323.1 Keystone B-4 bond 8 

nre* 44.0 

Standard S Poor 560 (in-- 
rom* included, 35 

Consumer price I none (ap- 
prox) 58.0 

The following table shows 
the performance of the 
billion-dollar funds during 
the double-cycle period. They 
are listed alphabetically. 

Assets Fund Objective Cain mloss 
17/31/75 11/30/48^.01/76 

(billions} 

SI .4 Affiliated growth S income +39 8 

15 Dreyfuls growth 8 Income — 3.9 

15 Investment Co of Amer grown 

il nrome ..*30 4 

?.! Investors Mutual balanced +175 

1.0 Investors 5hjck growth 8 income .+ 6.9 
“ :.+12.7 


1.4 Mass, investors Trust growth 
1.1 Price Growth Stocks growth 


.+ 6.4 



Free 

from Federal, State & 
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Income thru 
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/Municipal Bonds 

For more information 
write or call today! 

-Jrtju should get to know us. 

MVS 

yMutti-Hfesf Securities, Inc/ 

Municipal Bond Specialists 

79 HMI St_ Nn Yoric. N.Y. TD006 

(212) 425-0366 

JUTYoodl End Rd.. Ywirirdd, HJ. 07000 

(201) 643-1551 


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Dmcrintkfti 

Coupon 

Maturity 

DoBar Price 

50.000 

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The above securities offer a wide range of yield 
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If you are willing and able to 
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212-964-8100, 201-622-6400. 


Wilson White, Beff, Lake, Rochlin & Co. 
744 Broad Street 
Newark, New Jersey 07102 

Member National Association of Securities Dealers, Inc. 
BAembers of SIPC 

□ Please call me about your municipal bond offerings 
Name : . • 


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(The 


1 1 nr -or ra ihuh CUT Base uwr, row j miu t -V. ~ 1 ^~ ZT - r«..i _ 

inied on tfie New York Slock Sydunce end the Amencm Stock Exchange. The market awragey hwwver. ara tmedoo the 4 New vorh twng orfe 


Towdey.AtrH 20, 177i- 


; N.Y.S£ Index 

High Low Last Cha 

index 5456 5131 54J6 *M> 

Industrial ...5155 40.72 61 5S +0.95 

Transport ...5?^? 3154 3959 +0J7 

UfHItV .....JSJ2 3553 35-72 +OZ7 

Finance ...53.00 53.65 5350 +0.71 


Up-Down Volume ’ 

advanced dt dln ad 
NYSE 1 854451 tofiaras &HZ51flsharCS 
a/aex l549JKsbam snjfOsharcs 


. Odd Lot Trading 

Purchases of 157554 shares; sales of 
350039 shores taducBng159a marts told 
short. 


S&P Averages «.• 

Htflh Law Ocse do- 
435tndWtriBls1t&29 1+U* 11479 +>156 
15 Raflrtads 1S52 4JL57 AU9 + JO 
aOUKKNes 44.42 4S5I 4616 + JS 
jODStoda T0UZ 101.42 10057 +153 


Amexlndex 


Htoh 

KCL07 


• Low 

102.09 


Ctoje 

U3JK 


On. 

+57 


NASDAQ Index 

Week Modi 

Index dose... ChB-. Ago... .Aoo. 

Curoocahe 9051 + 1.82 8856 dosed 

Indust 9751 +1.T6 9SJ3 dosed 

Fmancl 056 +159 ' 86.96 doeed ■ 
fnsurwee 8754 + 053 88.17 cfBSKf 
OSBtas 7352 +051 72.11 dosed 

Banks 83J3 + 0.47 1237 dosad 

Transport M5J« +050 10352 dosed 


39 Industrials 
20 Transport. 
M Utfltties ~ 
65 Stacks 


The Dow Jones Stock Averages 

Open High Loaf Ctose 


ChB 

. 99254 1008.79 9051 700246 +IS-3S 
30751 21226 20MO 2151 + 540 
. 0.0 0.16 86.91 054+277 

. SOUS 30751 301-28 3W-21 + 5.0 


Consolidated Trading 
Am ex Issues 
Most Active 





Net 

rta mo 

vot 

Lart 

Cha 

Syntax Carp 


28% 

- W 

Bell indust 


3% 

+ w 

SambosRst 


WA 

+ ft 

V *ralnc 


9 

- ft 

PartOceanO 


ir.k. 


Cha mo Ha 


5% 

+ V. 

Datanrad. 


10% 

+ % 

Bundy Co ..... 


15 

- % 

lustrum 5vs 


1%. 


Bergen Bru 


17 

+ % 


Market Diary „ . 

PlW. 
Today dav 

Advances 477 351 

Declines 234 263 

Unch a n ged 248 299 

Total issues 979 913 

New 1976 highs 38 13 

N*w 1976 tows ~,.i. 7 8 


O.T.C. Most Active 


Name vo((hd*) 

Bid 

Asked 

Cha 

PnzJOffB 

1936 

11% 

Q% 

+ % 

CwEnv..- 

1347 

4% 

5 - 

+ .4k 

ModUer ... 

WU 

am 

n 

+2% 


70 

2% 

2% 

+ % 


737 

55ft 

55% 

+IW 

AnheusB... 

726 

32% 

32% 

+.ft 

PabrtBr ... 

693 

27% 


+ % 


687 

3 

3% 

+ % 

AUergPh... 

586 

25ft 

26% 

+2% 


O.T.C. Market Diary 


Adrancts 

DeeSnet 

Uncfianped 

Total bttuefc ...... 

Newlddv ... 

Ntwtaws ...... — ». 

Tofal sales (hdsl.... 


402 

247 

.1» 

-25B9 


12 

728S1 


ConsolidatedTrading 
\ . for . 
N.Y.SJE. Issues 


Name 
. 1 vlR«nfo2of 
2 UMETIr 
3CbhroOMfa 
A - ElMemMg 

5 Sanders 

6 LoralOm 

7 wviyCarp 
tPrtarrtd. . 
9 Nalindost 

10 PuerRCem - 
71 Saxcnlnd . 
JZ TedwdCBn - 
UWachortRtt 
U AlKansaest. 
IS AficoMftf 


UPS. 

Lu*' 

14k’. 

.Lift 

-» 

- M: 
109k 
149k 
:'J •. 
JWk 

■ivs 

-4% 

61k 

-llWk, 

; 39k 
. 79k. 


ChB 
+ -.9k 
+ ft 
+. « 
+ ft 
+ 1ft 
+ 1ft 
+ ft 
+ 4ft 
> I- 
+ ft. 
+ ft- 
+.116 
.+ -ft 
+ ft 
+ ‘ft 


PCt. 

Up -375. 
Up .115 
UP ■-■'•IE*’ 

Upr.lM 
Up - 745 
VP. 145 
UP 145 
UD.W-9 
UP 133 
UP . 12.9 
Un 125 
UP .105 
Up TO.7 
Up 105; 
UP -185- 


DOWNS - ; 

: Name Last Ota .Pet. '• 

1 EnwEispr 5ft - ft Off iai 

ZMesaPsrpt 75ft. - 8ft Off «L0 

3 vjNoCaaRv Aft - ft 09 : MJ) 

4-LebVallnd Ift - ft Off - *3 

5 .OGAov 4ft - ft Off T* 

6 summon ift - ft off xi. 

7.GiardRMtT W* - ft Off M_ 

e Conti (JJUfy - - 19b -'ft Off .65, 
VRepMfeln 2 ft Off 55.- 

10 PSIOd+Upf lift — ■ ft Off‘- SJ- 

11 BenowlB 2ft.- ft Off 55? 

.12 .- 'v«6. - . ft OT SJ} 

13 FstPaWo » - ft Off 55 

UjCUK -2ft - ft Off- -45 

UATistartpC 2ft - ft Of .43; 


Volume - 

' 

Exchanges 


Martoeto - 
NTS6 

Padtlc. — 

Mtataast ........... 

NASO 


Ciod 

Detroit 

pbw i.,.....; 

Other 

TOW 


Starts 

*...1,01560 ; 

.158150. 

194.200 




JK3M 

3350 

3737250 



Most Active 


Vrt L«! 

..52230 37 
..32050 21. 
,..31SM0 ZS 

..3S350D 5+ 

;;^ZK70 35 
..33950 . 26' 
.JUIMB SO 
;.'3>Wf» 27. 

..-30450 U' 
. .304500 to 
...U150 J» 
...17450- * 
...1725M: IF 
...HS50 - 4T-. 
...15550 IS 1 


Market 


cirtoarp - - 

Texacofnc . 
AmTW&Tel. 
MerfftB.vn . 
WeaWtCL . 
FortWof" i 
EastKodak . 
EvansPd . 
SdoflCrt . 
AMnProd p 
FtdfUtMtg. 


. To \ ■ 

Advances^; - _ 

Deaines 

Uneharntd' . - 

TOfaf-iSH**. — - 

NewWtMphs 

Nav+1976 lows; ................ 


r'y Dollar ••; 
v; Lea ders - ' . . 

TUroe ' TWfsWCOJ Sh^Wh 
IBM , lf ^CWW aa;’ 
EasfKomk s2E9u W . ■ — 
Potaroafv so ■■ 

XareacCo . +««.ii3573. asa r • 
AmTdlTef, . 113407 231 

EXffidCp - ^.,..-512550 T21 - 

FordMot.-u,.... B230 » - ■ ■ 

JotwonJoHy ;:.-. . ; 5«5« ill.- 

GenMolarsi^-. . ».9*3 1<2 - 

Cfffcam- - M .,.. -0519 Ml " 

GrtttH “ 17 JOS *317 

CetarTrat i,.,, $7,745 0 

DowChem .>..»■ $7562 - « - ; 
.GanEtoc’ .7.... $7352' . .131 ■ 
Burghs $6,770 ^64 



1976 stocks and Div. Sales Net 

High Low In Dollars P/E 100’s High Law Last Chg 


A—B — C — D 


47*1 

37ft AhbftAb .» 

16 410 

45 

44 

44% + 

w 

51’, 

38 ACF in 2A0 

Id 

43 

51ft 

0 

S1W+ 

% 

10‘v* 

8ft AcmeQy JO 


14 

9W 

9 

9 - 

It 

4ft 

2ft AdmDo .(Me 


104 

3% 

3'j 

3ft... 

... 

17W 

W, AdmEx .91e 


164 

-12 

11% 

lift* 

w 

Pi 

4 Adms MJUIs 


1 

5W 

5V. 

5W... 

... 

13ft 

7-; Addressed 

15 

114 

9W 

9% 

' 9^k + 

’.i j 

91m 

7ft Advlnv ,I8e 


64 

9’k 

Ift 


... ' 

a 

7T-, AetnaLf 1JD8 

14 

482 

25% 

25% 

25%+ 

W ' 

44 

3ift AetnaLf of Z 


1 

41ft 

41ft 

4h,+ 

ft. 

9'. 4 

42, Aguirre Co 

93 

1 

IW 

aw 

W- 

... 

14 

9% Ahmans JO 


129 

13% 

13W 

lift + 

% ! 

&-■ 

7ft Alleen Inc 

19 

68 

4W 

4W 

4W- 




TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 1976' 




Sales 

Monday Year Ago 

1976 1973 ’ j 

23 J0.«» 16.50.00026. 120,00 

2.009.676.795 1, 594,293,1m ] 


' 1W6 and TAv/ Sain : - .. 

NVt Low in Dollars ' P/E 400's HiiA Lav 


68ft Air Prd ,20b 
IJ AfrtnPrf 50 
17U Aireolnc 1 
11* AJ IndusIriS 
181h Akzm 1.0 
13' ■ All Gas 138 
89 AtaP Bf9.44 
77i; AtaP 0(838 
ll’i Alashin .I5e 
(4 Afbonyin .49 
Ft AlherfbC 34 
I7i, Albertsn .72 
m AlcanAlu .40 
14'-* AIG05M M 
21ft AlconUb 38 
V-t a taJtdrs 3fle 
71* AHeoCo .9se 
26’* ANoLud 1.0 
33' . AltoLud Of 3 
16-'-. AllgPw 1.60 
9^4 AllenGrp .50 
33ft AlWOl 150 
10 AHdMnt .60 
10ft A> Id Prod M 
AlldStr 1.70 
2'. AIM Svomkt 
IP, AllisOMl .40 
■aft AlIrtAut 56 
6ft AtohaP ind 
38ft Alcoa 1.34 
4lft 31ft AmalSuo 3a 
56ft 47 Amax 1.75 
137ft US Amax ptt.25 
SS 52ft A max pfB3 
17ft lift AMBAC .0 
9 4', Aincord .32 

51ft 16ft Amerce 1.0 
32'* 14 s . A HOTS J8b 
52ft 4F-. A hes pfUO 


82ft 

20ft 

263 

4 

25ft 
IF. 
101ft 
«•* 
17"i 
19ft 
8ft 
23ft 
28’. 
18ft 
28 
9!« 
lift 
4Jft 
4Sft 
20 
16ft 
44’* 
Uft 
14 
59ft 
4ft 
18ft 
9ft 
8 ft 
51' 


29 404 77ft 

14 -77 18ft 17ft 

7 727 25ft 25 

8 9 3 3 

14 155 23ft 23ft 



14ft- 14ft ‘ I4ft 

98 58ft + ft 

M'4t 86ft 

IS 1*ft+ ft 

1 7ft 

7ft+ 14 . , . 

18ft+ ft. )T, 

2?ft+ ift : 
16ft+ ’.« { 
22!a+ " 

7 .. 

fi.. 



... 15 13ft 

8 70 53ft 

... IS 4 

8 748 18ft 

9 11 9 ft 

10 2 8ft 

31 773 S»t 50 

3 5 38ft » 

13 260 5E « 54?, 
... 4 135 135 


IPs AAlrFiH .48 
8ft Am Aii-fin 
U-a A Baker .90 
38", A Bmds 2.0 
I9ft AmBdcst JO 
AmBkJM AO 
30ft Am Can 220 

21 A Can nT JS 
I ft AmCen Mlg 

24ft A Cvan 1J0 
7ft Am DistiH- 
22ft AOISfTel M 
ift AmDualVf 
12ft ADul pf.Bi* 
20ft AmElpw 2 
10 AFamily J8 
2ft AmFIn Sys 
7ft AmFinSv pf 
22ft AGJBfl l.96e 
15 AGenCu 142 
1P.S A Gnlns .60 

22 AGInpU0 
75 A Gl/a pf-W 
13 AmHQist .0 
32ft Am Home 7 

147 a Heme pf 2 
29ft AmHofp .34 
Vn Am invert 
5ft A Medio .12 
SVj A Medlcorp 
PA Am Motors 
37ft 32ft ANaIG 2-64 
12ft Ift AmSeat .20e 
8ft A Stop 1.071 
14ft AmSfand 1 
54ft A Std pf4.75 
Oft AmSteril 40 
26ft Am5frs 1.60 
58ft Mft AmT&T 3.0 
61ft 55 AmTBT pf 4 
48ft 45V, ATT 0(63.74 
47ft 43ft ATT Df A3. 64 

10ft 8ft AWalWk .70 
14 12ft AW prf 1.25 
19ft 16 Ameren 1 
10ft 5ft AmesD -06e 
24ft 19ft Amelrtc 1 
24ft 19 AMF In 144 


21 

12ft 

15ft 

43’* 

01* 

12ft 

36ft 

23ft 

3 

28’ i 

0'i 
0ft 
TV, 
13ft 
73ft 
15 
6ft 
li 
34ft 
17ft 
16ft 
26ft 
77ft 
1B«/4 
3 Vk 
167 
J7* 
4ft 
10>ro 

Vs 

7ft 


14 

27ft 

76ft 

aft 

31ft 


54ft Sift Sift 
18ft 17ft 18ft 
8ft 8ft 
18ft TBft 
J9ft 19 ii 
50ft 49*"* 

14ft 16’A 
10'S 9ft 
lift 14 
42ft 4| ft 
27ft TTm 
iQu* ur- 
33ft 33ft 37ft- 
22ft 22 '<« 22 
1ft 1ft 
25 24!h 

9 'A n 
23ft 23ft 
6ft 6ft 
13ft 13ft 
22ft 22ft 
13 12ft 
3 2ft 
8ft Vm 
23ft 23ft 
17 16ft 
13ft Uft 
23ft 23 
IJPJ 15ft 
16ft 16ft 


17ft* 

IP4- 

ffS*.’!' 

I3ftw ft ; , 
53ft + Ift J | 
j"«- ft! 
18*A+ V. 
9ft. 

8ft+ ft 1 
52 + 2ft 1 : 

38 - ft j 
55ft+ '« 

135 + 1ft ! 
ft f 


1ft 

24ft.:.... 

0ft+ ft 

11 62 23ft 23ft 23ft 

6W 

13ft + ft 
2J'i+ ft 

12ft 

2ft 

8ft - ft 
23ft- ft 
17 + ft 
13ft- ft 

Oft 

J5ft 

16ft 

34ft 34ft*. ft 
1 154 154 154 - 1ft 
24 710 36ft 3Fi 36*+ 7ft 

9 3ft 3ft 3ft 

Ift 9ft + ft 
7ft 7ft + ft 
6 6ft- ft 
34ft 36 + 1ft 
Wh 9ft...... 

12 12ft + ft 
26ft 
72ft 
Oft 


9 69 9ft 

6 3DS 7ft 
... 647 6ft 

7 179 36 

6 17 9ft 

12 45 12ft 

10 10 26ft 
... 26 73ft 

11 48 
A 13 

112316 
... 58 
... H 
... 31 
6 9 

... z3B0 
6 10 
5 Xl 
9 58 

12 10 


26ft + 1ft 
73ft + 2 
6ft..;..- 
Z7ft+ ft 
56ft + ft 
59ft+ 1 
47ft— ft 
46ft 46ft + ft 
lBft 10ft 10ft+ ft 

13ft 13ft 13ft 

ink 16ft 17ft + ft 
6ft 8ft Kk + 

22 'A 21ft 22V* + 

20 ft 30 20ft 


Aft 
27ft 27ft 
56ft 55ft 
59 ft 58ft 
47ft 47V, 



TAftll 
1 * 11 

-4 . ZVW BTMtg JOt 
27 ft W BucyEr J6 - 
14ft 9ft BiXtaCoJO 
54ft 49 BuddCo 0*5 
A ' 5- BudCepf.W 
6ft 4ft Budfrind J4l _ 

26ft' -20ft BuffFo }JQa , 9 
Ift. 6 Butova -05o ..... 

21 ft 19ft BunfcHJl tKV.. 

TV, ift Burt? Ranw .*. 

.16ft .lift "Bunfcr.pfl JB. 

34 27ft Burl Ind '^0 16 27* 29ft 29ft . 

40ft Sift BurfNO JOe 10 430 40 38ft ■ 

7ft Aft BuriNu nUS -..;- 32 7Vk 7 - 

1 '83ft Burrehs'-JR 27 641 Wft HMft . 


Brunwfc +4 15 273 14ft £TlPA 
OnnhW JO - TO 32 17ft 17ft ' 
V..- 13 " 2ft 2ft 
15 253 26ft 25ft 
W 76 15 14Vk< 

230 54ft- 54ft . 
.... .5 5ft 5ft ■" 
■i 2 5ft 5ft, 

. 9 9.23 22ft 

IT 7 . 6ft 
13 11W-21 
77-6- 5ft 

ir uft lift 


4ft 2 CabCab For 
27ft Uft Cabot Cn .92 
5ft 2ft Cadence Jnd 
■3ft Caesare Wrt 
3 Cat Flnanf 
15ft CalPUt.lja 

I Oft OKtaim AOr 
Ift Camrn Bra 

_ _ 18ft QunpRL -60. 
35ft aift Ounsp U6 
« ■ «ft CanSoRv 3a 
13 CdnPac J6e 
lift Canal R 1.10 
42V1 CanCitis .70 
U CapHofd AO 
ft Cart! Mlg 
41ft Carbor 1.0 
2ft Carling DKe 
.. 70ft CarliH* M 
61 ft S3*S CaruCAbtr 5 
. 7 5ft CaroFrp 20 
21ft Wft CarePw LAD 
29ft toft CarP 00.67 
CarTec.lAO 


?i\i C*rrCp. J2 : 43 59 17ft Wk 


... 30 2ft ' 2ft 

... 42 22ft 22ft 

,«. J7 4 .. 3ft - 

0-64- 3ft - r-. 

9 54 Aft Aft 

9 .14 14ft 16ft rsrrr 

If M Tift u 

S . 2ft 2ft ■ 

M 21 22 ft 22 

U 49 JBfc — - 

12x638 79 to 

7 205 17ft 16ft 

9 13 lift lift ^ 

■15 64 4TU 47ft : 

10 23D 18ft M 

.... 4 1ft 1ft . 
9 16 40ft Wft 

... 23 3ft 3ft . 

15 l> TPA IS 

.. 260 54ft 54 

... n * 5ft 

I 424 20ft 20ft 

.. a 2*% aw 

8 10- 31ft 30V4 - 


12ft CarrGn 
21ft CartHawJW 
to CartHw of 2. 
Aft CartWnlf .40 
■ft CasrtiGt.92 
I PA casttcr. .Mb 
Wft Catcrol Z2S 
46ft CBS 1.46- 
iftccrcwb 
1P4 GkbCo I.L5 
42ft .Cgtanse 2.0 
44ft CrtnrtAAJQ 
F, Centex .12 .. 
19ft J7W OrtHurf L72 
18ft 16 CenilILf 1A0 

31ft 27ft cri li pair 
»'* to emu prtA* 
12ft CenllPS- 1 J0 
18ft CenLaE 1.» 
14 CeMNvL-34 
lift CenSOW 1.0 
lift CeaSova .60 
19V. CenTef 1J4 
19% CentrDal AO 
22ft is Cert-feed; AS 
27ft 2lft CessMAAr l 
aft If Champlnt T 
42 55 Chml pf5J0 

28ft .18ft Chrnl pfl JO 

13ft lift ChamSo .M 
5ft 3ft ChartrCO JJ8 
Uft 21ft Chartr NY 2 
8ft. 7 Chase<FdA0 
22ft 76ft ONOeM 2-20 


15 15 
5 34 

9 >58 
1*t«890 
13 101 
41 
4 W 


53ft 

2ft 

14% 


12ft 

17ft 

16ft 

30 


6- 14ft lift 
11.347 2JW 23 
16 « 39% 

7ft 7*4 

Oft 9'4 

17ft- 14% 
toft Mft 
SS 1 * 

2% 

14ft 

10 204 53ft '51ft 
...10 49% 

29 113 13 
7 ■ 23 lift 
0 36 17ft 
... 1750 30ft 
.. . zS08 21ft- 27% 
0 314 /3ft 13 

7 77 19ft. ;im 

9 44 15% 15ft 
. 9 03 Uft- 1P4 

8 43 ,15ft 1416 

10 70 8ft 21% 
19 216 33ft 32% 
13 137 21ft 21 

11 n toft 25ft 
11 >165 24ft 24ft 
... Z210 62ft AT 
... 95 35- 24% 
10 354 124k I2VS 
3 18 3ft 3% 
5 51 34% 23ft 

... » 7ft . 7% 
7 409- 30ft 29 


19»a 

14% Amfac me l 

6 

35 

11 

17% 

18 + 

% 

35V* 

to AMP Inc A1 

47 

335 

35% 

34% 

35% + 

W 

12 

8ft Ampoo .40a 

5 

22 

10ft 

10V, 

10W- 

ft 

6ft 

4W Annex GofP 

28 

165 

7% 

m 

7% + 

% 

3W 

1% Amrep Core 


18 

2W 

aw 

2W... 


44% 

toft Amrtar 2A0 

6 

19 

43 

47% 

43 + 

ft 

8 

7W Amsfr pf AB 

... 

1 

8 

8 

8 + 

w 


41W 36W Amrtwf 
8 5ft AmtM .32 
24% 17ft Anacond A0 
25V* 23ft Anacond wd 
30ft Eft AiKfrH 7-30 
42 3 Pm AndQy 1J0 
8% 6 Angelica .12 
. 10* » 7»4 Aruxter .16 

12ft 9ft AmulCo -53t 
15% 10% Apache JO 
3ft 2 Apeco Coro 
17ft 13% APL Core 1 
84ft 74ft ApPw pfS.12 
7Pd M AOPft pf7A0 ...HOC 
ift 


6 78 34% 38U 
6 39 6ft ' 4% 
.. 18 Uft 24% 


5 

* 73 

7 9 
10 197 
5 29 

41 

8 W 
64 


34W 

6%- V* 
24% - 


3ft Applld Mag 
60ft' 47ft ARA 5v 1.06 
13ft 9% ArcataN .« 


24ft 24ft Uft 
29% »’/( 29V,* 

37ft ,36ft 37 + 

Aft Aft 6ft + 

■% IW IV*- 

10 9ft 10 + 

lift 14% 14ft + 

2ft 2ft 2ft + 

5 59 15 14% 14ft- 

... 220 02ft 0ft 82ft + 

74 74 


74 


ft 

%4 

% 

ft 

W 

% 

ft 

ft 

ft 


-21 10 4% 4ft 

17 336 57% S6% 
8 66 13ft 12ft 


4ft + 
57%+ I 
13 .-. ft 


27ft 

20ft Arch Dan .20 

11 

213 

23% 

22 

2314+ 1ft 

6 

3ft ArcHe Errtr 

20 

55 

4% 

4W 

4ft- 

ft 

3ft 

2 Arirtar 


49 

7% 

Vk 

2%- 

ft 

IP* 

15% ArlzPSv 1 J6 

6 

215 

15% 

15ft 

ISk.. 



no 

103% AriPot 10. TO 


230 797% 

107 

107 - 

r 

8W 

6 ArkBert J9+ 


36 

0 - 

3% 

Tft + 

% 

n't: 

2lft ArkLGs l.TO 

7 

m 

25 

24% 

24W + 

ft 

4W 

2% Arlen RltyD 



55 

3% 

3ft 

3W.. 

... 

5% 

4ft Armada Co 

13 

11 

4% 

4% 

4W* 

ft 

35ft 

26% Armco lAIUs 

9 

192 

32 

31ft 

31% + 

% 

32% 

27 Arm ol 2.10 


10 

31ft 

31 

31ft + 

% 

52 

44 ft -Annr pf4Jl 

... 

{10 

50ft 

49ft 

49ft- 

ft 


32ft 

49ft 

18W 

17 

1PA 

33 

30 

27% 

40 

J4% 

4% 

19% 

73 

Wft 

49 


23ft ArmstCk .0 32 353 30ft 29ft 30ft + ft 
46% AnrnC OT3J5 ... HD 49 49 49+1 

9 10 18 17*1 18 


IS ArmRu AOe 
12% AraCore 1 
9ft Arvin .i3e 
21ft ASA LW JO 
Uft Asarco A0 
19ft AshlOfl 1.70 
33ft ASdDrG 1.0 
8% AtNane .60 
1ft Atico MIO 
17ft AtlCyEI 1 J4 
64 AliCE pKJ7 
II AH Rich 2J0 
44ft AH Re p(3.7S 


145% 137 AHRch pf 3 


65 

54% AtIRc PO.0 


121 

67% 

S”4 

3U Afla* core 

16 

627 

Sft 

11% 

7W ATO Inc J. 


129 

m* 

66 

54 AutDala A0 

31 

71 

64 

Tft 

ift.Autmind JO 

6 

4J 

6% 

17ft 

4ft AvCO Carp 

2 

155 

lift 

»W 

9-16 AvCO Cp v»t 

___ 

sa 

1ft 


18% A voces Df . 


32 

33ft 

29 1 ', 

33% Avervlnl J0 

43 

14 

toft 

lift 

7ft avis me 

7 

as 

10ft 

70"J 

10ft Avnetlnc JO 

? 

40 

18% 

44ft 

32ft AvonPd I J0 

17 1654 

41W 

29% 

-18% BatKkWil I 

8 1010 

27% 


8 7 15ft 15ft 15% + ft 

20 377 15ft' 15ft 15%+ % 
... 203 Uft 24 Uft- ft 
23 287 18% 11% 18ft+ ft 
6 306 28ft 27% 27%+ ft 
12 97 0 37% 38 + ft 

5 US 13% Wft Uft* ft 
... 28 2ft 2ft 2ft* % 
8 26 18ft lift 18ft+ % 
... 4 TO 67% TO +4 

15 40 M 90ft 94 + 4ft 

... X50 47 46ft 47 + ft 
... 5 157% 153 157%* 5% 

60 62 + 2% 

5 5ft + ft 
m 9ft* 44 

62ft 63% ♦ 1% 

6 6 + ft 
10% 11% + % 

Ift 1ft* ft 
33% 33%+ ft 
25ft 26ft + 1 
Oft 10ft+ ft 
17% 18ft + ft 
0 41ft* 1V5 


lift 

17% 

54 

10 % 

25% 

17V, 


4% Bach* .40+ 
8ft Batter In JU 
0w Bahi-Infl .42 
Ift BaldDH A0 
18% Ban Cp' .70 
lift BallyJW joe 


6 217 lift 
9 66 F' t 
13 290 44ft 

6 13 10ft 

7 IS 21V* 
12 121 16% 


27 27V, + 

10 % 11 * 
m 9ft* 
43ft 43% + 
10ft 10ft + 
20ft 20ft- 


,4 


15% 14ft + 1W 
> 



4 

2ft ChaseT .-83d 

10 

. 3' ■ 

" 3 . .• 


11 

7% Chelsea A0 12 

S 

94k 

9% .... 

SO 

52 

317, Chemfn 1 JO S 

to 

42% 

40% ; " 

37ft 

30% OimNY 2.0 S' 

01 

36% 

35ft •- < r ' 

54 

50ft 

to ClmVa 1J0 9 

1 

47ft 

47ft .•» - - 


OieaVa wl ... 

4 

32ft 

lift 

52 

64ft 

56 Chtttog U2 i 20 

49 

59 

51% 

40 

34ft OtesaleZm -f 

M3 

36 

35ft 

SO 

35 

16ft Chi Ei 11 ASa" U 

49 

3<ft- T»W ■ :v 


8% 

4ft ChfMliw Cp ; . ... 

243 

-‘9ft 

8ft - 

48 

1* !. 

8W Q* MHw pf ... 

12 

14% 

14% . ' ^ 

48 

35% 

OllPTKVT 2 10 

0 

3/ft 


3ft 

Jft ChkFuU .101 ... 

17 

3- 

3- V 


9% 

4% Chris Craft ; 

157 

6 

.5ft 

44 

10ft 

8 .Ctasctt pfl' 

• 1 

Oft 

-9ft 1 , 

42 

14U 

914 Cfwwnef ,70 T 

3» 

12% 

12% ‘y.. 5 .. 

' 21ft 

18ft Chrysler - i-3204 

21% 

'Tm ■ — • 

40 

2ft 

4% 

344 Chrysler wt ... 
2% a Rt! Inv ... 

64 7-128 
5 3% 

34A 2j . r ' 
3% 


1975 


1978 


1976 Stocks and Dfv. Sales Net 

Hteb Low in Dollars P/E Ws High Low, Last Ow 


25V. 

22% BaltGE 2-0 

• 

142 

Z3W 22% 

23 .. 


Mft 

SO Balt pfB4J0 


ZIO 

52ft 52ft 

52ft.. 

... 

U ft 

12ft BanCa LMe 

43 

4/ 

15 Mft 

14% + 

ft 

J2W 

24% Bandag J5e 

18 

369 

26ft 26% 

26ft + 

% 

8% 

4ft 8a nor Punt 

4 

U 

7 6% 

7 + 

% 

18% 

12ft BangP Pf 2 


1 

15% 15% 

15W + 

ft 

12ft 

9 BanAptlJS 


5 

13% 12 

12% + 

ft 

33 

»% BkoTNY 2J0 

6 

SI 

32% .32 

32%. .. 


16ft 

lift BkafVa J8 

6 

0 

15% 15% 

15%. .. 

... 


25ft 28% BankTr 3 
28Vk 25ft BnkTpOJO 
30ft 26ft Barbon 1A0 
18 ' 13ft BardCR J2 
31% E Barnes 1 A0 
12% 7ft Basic Inc A0 
25% 22ft BatesMf JO 
39% 29 BauscflL A0 
46ft 38 B«XtUb J1 
20ft 17% BavStG U8 
5ft 4ft BavkClp -24 
28 17 Bearing A0 - 

25% 21ft BeafFdS -76 
toft 22% Btckmn M 
47% 35ft OXtOtdk JO 

14 BeeQiA JO 
12ft Beker JS 
13% BrtcoP AOe 
75ft Bek tan U0 
7 BeidMe .30b 

15 Ball How M 
13ft BwnisCo lb 
40ft BCfKflx nl.72 
to B«xU x pf 3 
17ft BertKo 1JS 


66 33ft 32% 33ft + 
13 3B 27ft 27ft- 
19 27 36ft 26% + 


77 14% lift 14%. 
0 29ft 29ft 29ft + 
13 9ft 9% 9ft* 
32% 23 + 
34V, 35 + 
41 41% 


14 
8 
5 

A 16 23 
13 141- 35 
to 290 41% 
S 10 19% 
25 : 4% 

12 25 25% 

13 142 24 
17 626 24ft 
19 10 38% 


22V, 

17% 

19ft 

20 % 

lift 

25ft 

30 

43ft 

92 

23% 


19ft 19%.:..;. 
4% 4ft- ft 
24% toft* 1 
23% 23%+ ft 
23% U - .ft 
37% 3MS+ % 
102 20ft 20% 20%+ ft 

4 381 14 13ft 13%+ 1 

6 42 II 17% 17%- ft 

9 6 18% MW 1l%+ ft 

9 19 10W 10 » 

... 84 21% 21% 21%+ ft 

12 to 19ft lBft 19 + % 

13 14S 42 41ft 41ft+ % 

a 84ft 04 84ft 

6 136 21% 21ft 21%+ ft 


10 

106 

51 

32 


46ft 

5- 

11% 
15-16 
E ' 
10 % 
42ft 
Uft 
6' 


2ft 45 Benef PT4J0 ....zlOO 48ft 41ft 48ft 


58% 46ft Banet oMJO 
28ft 25ft Bnfl Spf2A0 
1% Benfstd Mlg 
1ft Benguet B 
2% Barkev Pho 
15ft Bert Prod 
16 BcsffYo d wl 
33 BrthSfl 2' 

50 BiflThr -52b 
23 Black Dr A0 
S Blair Jhn .32 
12ft Blismui lb 
20ft' 15ft BIOCkHR JO 
0ft 37% BlueBcfl 1 
6% 2ft Bobbie Brks 
29ft 24% Baelna 1 
30% 23ft BolsaCas AS 
25% 21 BkMont 1.60 
29% to Borden 1.30 
29ft 19% BorWar 1JS. 
2% Bormans 
22% BasEd 2.44 
81 ft Bd&E pHLBS 
10ft BOSE pri.lZ' 
8% Branm M 
IrtA BraunCF JO 
44ft BriogsS 1A0 
66% BrlsiMy 1.0 
4VA 43% BHrtM pf? 
Uft II Bril Pel 

35* BrkwGI 1.20 
16ft BklVUG 1.72 
10ft BrownC .15a 
18% BwnGp 1J0 
5ft BwnShre JO 
5% BnwiFer JO 


4ft 

2% 

5% 

39% 

17% 

A 

81 

28% 

lift 

17% 


4% 

24ft 

91ft 

12 

,14ft 

19% 

57ft 

79 


35ft 

lift 

13% 

26 

1% 

0% 


... 9 55% SPA 

..-2240 27% toft 
... 2 Zft 2ft 

7 97 2ft 2ft 
... 52 4 3% 

17 265 38% 35% 


55ft + ft 
26%+ ft 

2ft 

2W-_ ft 
4 + ft 
38 +3 


205 19ft 18ft T9Vk+ 1ft 
> 392 4T% 41ft 41%+ % 

21 1M 74% >2 74%+ 3ft 

23ft 23W+ ft 

Mft 10%* % 

16% 16% 

16% 16%+ % 

46ft 47 + ft 

5 5VT+ ft 

27ft 27%+ % 

toft 28% 

70 159 29% 28% 29ft + "ft 
13 364 29% 28% 29%+ % 
6 S 3% 3% 3%+ ft, 

9 51 23% 23% 23% . • 

...2U0 87ft 87 87 

61 11% 11% .11%+ % 

11% 10ft lift* .% 

17ft 16ft 17V* + % 

S7ft 56ft S7%+ 1 

Wft 75 76ft + 1% 

toft 45% 46ft + ft 

11% 11% 11% 

30% 30% 30%+ % 

17ft 17% 17%+ ft 

lift lift 11%+ ft 

11 to Uft 23% 23% + ft 

... 10 TV* 7ft 7ft + ft 

K 90 7ft ' 7 7ft+ Ifc 

ft 


to 667 23% 

10 55 10% 
7 S' 16% 

11 10 17 
9 195 47 

. 36 5ft 
a 3*7 27ft 

13 235 28% 
7 1 to 


11 907 

5 56 

20 31 

17 260 
... 6 

18 .61 
I *S 
8 » 

S 


21% 79ft C hi Bell I A0 
Mft 17ft OrmGE 1A4 
99% CMG pf9J2 
97 anGpt9.30 
43ft CbtGE pf 4 
18% CfanMlta 1AQ 
Uft 28% CIT Fin 2J0 
toft 27% Citicorp .96 

38% CJtlesSv 2A0 
1% atzSR JOt 

7 atyinvrt .66 
ft a ty Inv wt 

16ft Citvln pf Bl 

10 otvhpfi-io : 

25ft a«KE.lA0 
9 aarkon -» 
4% CLC Atn J4 
m 4 47 CfwCffffTJB 
30 toft avEIIII- 2J6 
119% 112ft CtavEl Of 12 
86 . 77% ClEllI Pff to 
T4ft 11% aomneca J2 
lift 7% OuefPM A0 
13% 10% CtaettP Ol l 
16ft t CMIIrV Qp 
8% -StoCNAFW 
14 lift CNAPfAI.10 
12ft 11 CNA I IJBa-"' 
1% ' to-CNALATw • 
7 4% CNf pfT.16k 

14ft 7% CMsJSt Gas 
24ft lift CstSG pn JS 
19% - 13ft CstSG Pfl.19 
95% 0 CoCaCQi 2A5 
9%' 7% CocaBRo AS 
17% Ift CoIdwBk AO 
6ft 2% Cotaoo Ind 
31% 25% Colrt*rt ..76' 
15% 11% ColilnAJk Ji 
Ift . 4% Collins Fd 
34ft 20 Cal Penn 30 
25 20% Colonist' 1 AS 

48% 28ft ontlnd 2 
67 ' 47ft Colt p!4 JS 
25% 18ft Colt priAO 
toft 22ft CflIGM 2.14 
59% 56ft CoiGS pfSAZ 
7ft 5% CohlRl Pkd 
25% 21% CoiSQh 2.U 


7 8 20% 20ft : 

10 170 II 17% V 
...710 HRft-lBeft 1C 
... ZlQQ 182 101% K 
... Z520 45% 44ft 4 
13 : » » 29ft 
I 92 33% 32% 

13 2397 3S% Uft 
9 H6 44ft 43ft 
7 2% . 2% 


5>-. 

3' • 


12 172 10ft 9ft 1 

... 2 % ft : .3' 

... 42 -21 20% 2 .1 

... 138 Mft 10% I' - , r . 

12 75 41% 40ft, 4;.-. _- 
14 33 11 10% li ' i 

.7 10 4% 4% * 

U 16 -66 65ft 6! 

V «2 20% to Xv. 

... ISO 117ft 117ft ID E; 

- Z3Q «3 0 «f • ■ 

12 303 12% lift IS - 
f IB 1M lM W. . 

... 2 12% 12% « - « . 
... 254 16% Mft M 
12 41 Tft. Tft 7 
9- 12ft 1236' 12 
... . 13 12% 12ft .12'. 

— -6 1% ■ 1% J~ \ 

... 4 5ft 5ft .S-'\ - - 

41474 Oft. 0%i**.; 

... 36 20% 19>A »-•; ; * 

... 56 15% 15 - ‘.j 

21 5«S 85% Uft 0F;^ : 
14=503 -8ft . Ift 
U- 0 14% 14% Vk . 

513 105 5ft 4%. 51 . 

16 4132 27ft 27 27 1 . . j 

* ■ » 12% 12ft 1» ; 
to. 0- 7ft 7% ■ 71 • 

9 mm 21 a?::.. 

6 6 32% 21% 22V; ; v 7 

* m 42 - . 49% A19 * . — 

... 40 s»ft 04v 

...r it u%'23% ; »k. , : 1 ;4 
0 92 Uft 249 

... 27-Sift 5W6 57* • 

4 72 6% ' A J* - 

T 62 23% ' 23% W. '-- 


108ft 101 COSO on 0-52 ... ZWO 106% 106 lBgf 


4% 1% Cohvef Mlg 

n% 12% Combtf Com 
41ft 37% GombE 1J0 
32 to ComwET2AO 
10% 9% CfllnEdA Wt 
83ft 77 ComE pf7 J4 
31% 29 W CortvE pf2J7 
27 25ft CflQiE Bf2J7 
ar* 21% ComwE Jrf2 . 
2Z% . 20% ComE Pri.W 
21ft ' 19 ComE Pff-42 
I CdmwO 3 . » 
18 Como pfl .72 
18ft Compugra 
4 Coinput set: 
23% Comsat 1 
tft CanApr -nt- 
- 37% ConeMiHAO 
19% 'l»k Conartm JO 
18% lift GonnM.IJO 


11% 

22% 

38% 

31% 

13 

56% 


... 8 2ft 2% SP- 
IT 124 T6H 16 Wf 

10 384 39% 39ft 39% r 

to .375. 21% 28ft »%.- 
... T 9% 9% 9% . 

... 54 81 « W, : ' 

... 732 30% 30ft M% ] 

22 toft -to%-»% 

... « 72% 22% 

::.:'62i%, 21%."%. 
... 106 .'19% 19 -I**-- 
. 308 -9 .8% 9 .* 

3 -«* wft i9% . 

9 50 30ft 29%, 3 . 

1S-99-dft 

6, 337 27% 26% . 

3 4t..U, 11ft j*.' 
e .as sift sow »% T 

11 309 77 MU > 

12 i6 • i6% "isw issr*'; 


■ a™ iraunun.M,. ™ is*, ml,,' . 

25 20 Conrac ,?0 h* 

18 is cwianjoe If* ;{«.• * ;> 


65% Uft ConEdJrf* 

51% 44 coned pcs 

47% 39% CUE OIC4A5 


.. 3 6i% 11 - 
5.49% 49% <9» <r - 
Z 60'46 46 46 *V. 


CoatiaBedmPa&tt 













9 ^\ &s6 


Indii 


>f*iM<IW I » ijt ., 

J a * 

£-*/*•'■• .. 


P ’Vj'.JVJII* U&f A. 

^wfu in 


LONDON METAL M AHKET 

(to nwft ctHitaB w noble tom 


TH£ ffSIF YORK TIMES, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1976 


i ;Z 

mm 


Cr.i^ 

n - - 





v: 






i 

••? r ^m ra i .i,-,-. 

‘ '.«•». s 

*■ * Vv: O r 

.. * TV." 

* Vfjt- 
. 3 >4**.;,,-. 

■ •* ^ 

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* " . 

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• -op^w/r 
’. A frt" • s 

* > - 
— -I*^ 

•• ' - 4 

a— i 

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-V.» -_r. 


, m 
^■^lewsprint Strikes ^ Sjfft 2®%* Is? 5 

j rtrti Resuite fcUrj£ & gf g*g 

. S UELC. JENSEN ' ' & 

!>V no K«v Tcrt TbDa . . . 

■>' (ON. N. C-, April l hould oe m full operation this 
:^. ■ York Times Cam- ?? e „?, sre ®" he said. “The 

. vJ . __ AAraiMro nlo rf » _ j. k 


Pnv. Ctua 

*ff ss 

ssg 


This announcement Is neither an offer to sen nor a sollcttation of an offer to buy these securities. The offer Is made only by the Prospectus. 


New Issue / April 21, 1976 


It *3 Ky f 


■ VV,-~. 
hxzr.i-g*! 


.; WMrt 


m 


mm 


ling fc 




'JWUloay^T 

SKH“- 

12 

1 - •; 


-- 


■*■«**••• 




H-C 


Ei! % • 

f'5* * 


•;> t- * 


#'. ?. zr;; ••■ 

? ? ; - ; 
7 •* •■* ' . 

’*• ■- 


'■*** ,1 V 

:*. -4 -«"* /; 
:■:*.**'• .2- . - 

^ ;;: : 

t;| It i ' r. 

:* ’ i : •* 
r#- •*.; .. 

- ■• ^ . .-.• 

^ 


5 ,*• of 52.7 million, or wUI be “stalled 

' = ii "Z 1 - share, down 28.9 sn 2E“^' 

i the year-earlier T^t company reported that 
= V. ^ or teem** ? e carried 16.65 miUion 
■' :f ;«1 dldated zevenaes adv ®rtising in the first 

^ minion, up 11.7 * F H£ ter \. 1,p E ^ 8 ^ y fpom 16 - 64 
. S95J5 milSon in ”^ 0 “ hoes m the same quar- 
V -ter of 1975. ^ °* } 97S - Weekday cfrcula- 

i_ sulzberea- the ?° n Times averaged 

§ ii ^±S ™ 

> ■’ 

> i! a^Sti^SS 

*i -^company’s major nDd ^. of ^ hourand-a-half 
:•• ;i ^SSt»cta£ 52°y T ™ dominated by 

: : ended in mid- 5, ee l. J ; Jf™ e > of a 

Washington-based organization 
called Accuracy In Media Inc.; 
k for Year by David Brown of New York, 
:ork Times news- ^ho said he was representing 
{ „ tax income in the J °hn and Lewis Gilbert, and by 
1 i-T if $1^ million, up Wilma Soss, who also attends 
t -*>n ii ion in the first the annual meetings of many 
‘ V*. 1 ’ 5 . Affiliated com- companies. 

-i lfc ! ?$** magazines and List of Questions 

j ^ !^TS^, P up h^yin e referred to a fttll- 

-*5 : > ^ionavear b5ore advertisement he had 

^ .;s 5 J?S5 placed “ toda y* s issue o{ The 

--a 'ABttJoimpal^ Wilmington Moraing Star, 

...^ ! : w: the rest ofthis !! hich “ ^ ^ ^“es 

■ i VH w quarter of 1976 Com P any - Tf*» advertisement 

— tie » he cairf -it contained 10 questions ad- 

■ wT^^tteL « w dressed to Mr. Sulzbeiger. 

^ Q TjWcentenmaSfyour T ^ e ** <or **“ 

x,n n ample, was: “Why does The 

^'^ff^nizations Ne ^ York Times accept thon- 

- ni^lv 'tn the ^ds of dollars from the Com- 

The “unist dictator of North Korea, 
®“ D s “& sprint full-page 
- ^•rtrides, andby ^ ““ Propaganda 

v.^ipect to see Oto d f rl y ™lates the adver- 
- “ rations trrvintr a tismg standards of The Tunes?” 
T S ^hergr defended the 
* ■ performance of The Times. He 

' 1 1 ‘ • said he did not wish to debate 

. Mr. Irvine and pointed out that 


$450,000,000 


Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company 

Forty Year 814% Debentures, due April 15, 2016 

Interest payable April 15 and October 15 


Price 99.50% and accrued interest from April 15, 1976 


Copies of the Prospectus may be obtained In any State In which this announcement Is circulated only from such 

of the undersigned as may legally offer these securities In such State, 


Salomon Brothers 


Dillon, Read & Co. Inc. 

Goldman, Sachs & Co. 


• , ijj. pm. uviue axiu jjuuiicu uui tutu, ■ 

£S;J1mes Company^ he had already responded to I n. a Kwi 

; ; ■ ■ executives, only the North Korean question and I * rirst UOStOn Corporation 


Kidder, Peabody & Co. 

incorporated 

Smith Barney, Harris Upham & Co. 

Incorporated 

White, Weld & Co. 

incorporated 


; • ^ executives, only the North Korean question and 
• - -iv shareholders at- dozens of others by letto*. 

meeting, the first Mr. Brown asked what The 
. ‘ ; ;tside New York Times was doing to increase its 
, f ; r sr only about 40 daily circulation. Mr. Sulzberger 
’ "■’-Mr. Sulzberger mentioned a number of pro- 
1 -j. ’Qtloofc for The grams, including a new enter- 
%^ r tainment section that the paper 

■ r j r is progressing; is about to begin publishing in 
. _ k - r.ronic newsroom its Friday issues. 


Reynolds Securities Inc. 


Lehman Brothers 

Incorporated 

Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette 


Bache Halsey Stuart Inc. 


kpjI20,1976 

.BEAT ' 


’ too', Oo» Prw. »•» 

him -1M I?* SL 


f .aswxs% twu 

i64Vi a.57Vi “* 

--• M X 77 fe Ui 17 « 
.Wfi.UTOMniMO ’ 

• . -cow. *2 

. n ■ ZSfrin 2.71V, ■ 

j. TBti ISPk UVA U» 


I COPPER 

Hew Yot CmMNr Bcbenee 
•tor TUI 7150 72.70 7A.0BS 71 JO 

JW 73 JO 75JQ 73J0 14J0i 72JQ 

Sap 74J0 75.90 74.10 7546c 7UD 

Dec 75JO 76.90 75.10 7KJ6* 73 JO 

Jan 7550 77.M 75-JO 76.70s 74.10 

Mar 1 75-70 77 JO 75JO 77.10s 74J9 

Mar 7640 77 JO 76JO 77JBS 74J0 

Sales: adtnatsd 9J65. 
r-icttll/iB- 

GOLD ' 


The First Boston Corporation Lehman Brothers Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Bache Halsey Stuart Inc. 

Incorpor a ted Incorporated 

Blyth Eastman Dillon & Co. Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette Drexel Burnham & Co. Hornblower & Weeks-Hemphill. Noyes 

Incorporated SeemWea Corporation Incorporated Incorporated 

E. F. Hutton & Company Inc. Kuhn, Loeb & Co. Lazard Freres & Co. Loeb, Rhoades & Co. Paine, Webber, Jackson & Curtis 

Incorporated 

Reynolds Securities Inc. Wertheim & Co., Inc. Dean Witter & Co. Warburg Paribas Becker Inc. 

Incorporated 

Bear, Steams & Co. L. F. Rothschild & Co. Shearson Hayden Stone Inc. Shields Model Roland Securities Weeden & Co. 

Incorporated Incorporated 

ABD Securities Corporation Basle Securities Corporation Alex. Brown & Sons Daiwa Securities America Inc. 

F. Eberstadt & Co., Inc. EuroPartners Securities Corporation Robert Fleming Kleinwort, Benson Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co. Inc. 

Incorporated Incorporated 

Moseley, Hallgarten & Esiabrook Inc. New Court Securities Corporation The Nikko Securities Co. 

hrternaUmnl, Inc. 

Nomura Securities international, Inc. Oppenheimer & Co., Inc. Wm. E. Pollock & Co., he. 


Vjttr ZAV 

59% ULSVi l&Vi 2.5fiVk New York Commodity Exduum 

W 2J2 Z74% 2 'JWk MO Inr com contrscts 

1114176% ZTMi 2J7% - uajo 12SJ0 12110 12120s 12 M 0 

Shi ««. IBM. TULL- {“ !»-« 178J0S mja 

rlf 4 1 aS i m2 ApB m7D mj * WJ9 WJ0 » J 29 -® 

*3* {-52 HSZ Or* 130JO. UI.10 13170 WJOs 130J0 

L‘ l-SS B*C 132J0 132J0 131 JO 02-10. 1 32-00 

W 1JBV4 1 Jl% 1 J>» 4Pf U4J0 134J0 13630 134-502 13140 
JEARS . '*■ M5J0 13SJ0 13530 135J0s 125J0 

*■£*. NH. 736J8 137.50 VU40 136JOs 53i80 
Iff- iff sahs'teHmkd l.m 

5J4 4.98% 5J1% MO Mfar 


R. W. Pr essprich & Co. The Robinson-Humphrey Company, Inc. SoGen-Swiss International Corporation 

JoCOfpOfStra 

Thomson & McKinnon Auchincloss Kohlmeyer Inc. Spencer Trask & Co. Tucker, Anthony & R. L Day, Inc. 

Incorporated 

UBS-DB Corporation Wood, Struthers & Winthrop Inc. Yamaichi International (America), Inc. 

Advest Co. American Securities Corporation A. E. Arn es & Co. Amhold and S. Bleichroeder, Inc. J. C. Bradford & Co. 

Incorporated 

Faulkner, Dawkins & Sullivan, Inc. C. E. Unterberg, Towbin Co. Wood Gundy Incorporated Baker, Weeks & Co., Inc. 

Butcher & Singer Domin ick & Dominick, Dominion Securities Harris & Partners Inc. Fahnestock & Co. 

Incorpo rated 

Johnson, Lane, Space, Smith & Co., Inc. Keefe, Bruyetle & Woods, Inc. Legg Mason/Wood Walker McLeod, Young, Weir, Incorporated 

Ote.ol FicslRBOfanalSoouttUM, loo. 

Mitchell, Hutchins Inc. Stuart Brothers William D. Witter, Inc. Adams & Peck Bums Fry and Timmins Inc. Colin, Hochstin Co. 
Shelby Cullom Davis & Co. Doft & Co., Inc. Elkins, Stroud, Supfee & Co. Freeman Securities Company, Inc. 

Greenshields & Co Inc Janney Montgomery Scott Inc. Midland Doherty Inc. - Rand & Co., Inc. Ultrafin International Corporation 
Bell, Gouinlock & Company Bruns, Nordeman, Rea & Co. Evans & Co. Glickenhaus & Co. Herzfeid & Stem Hoppin, Watson Inc. 

htcerporated ' fBoorporated 

Mitchum, Jones & Templeton, Inc. Moore & Schley, Cameron & Co. Nesbitt Thomson Securities, Inc. Richardson Securities, Inc. 
DeHaven & Townsend, Crouter & Bodine First Albany Corporation Kormendi, Byrd Brothers, Inc. Lepercq, de Neuflize & Co. 

Incorporated 

Pftfield, Mackay & Co., Inc. Prinfon, Kane & Co. Silberberg, Rosenthal & Co. Sterling, Grace & Co. Tollner & Bean, Inc. 

Incorporated 

Blaine & Company, Inc. Burgess & Leith C. C. Ceilings and Company, Inc. Daniels & Bell, Inc. First Equity Corporation 

of Florida 

First Harlem Securities Corp. Furman Selz Mager Dietz & Birney Gruntal & Co. Hardy & Co. Heine, Fishbein & Co., Inc. 

Incorporated 

Jesup & Lament Josephthal & Co. Laidlaw-Coggeshall Inc. W. H. Newbold’s Son & Co., Inc. 

Incorporated 

Ross Stebbins Schellbach, Inc. Zuckerman, Smith & Co. 


. rtf* 172 2.74* 2J3ft 

«Vt USA ITHli 2-77* ^ 

-ff 1JS» J 

-.3&1JI I-53V4 umS Sd 

. . 1 -1J814IJPV4 14H4 n« 

•at i mu. i viv. i nu. r*r 


.EARS Jh 

- -I f 4.85* 4.88 4.0*; Ms 

. : 1% 4.94* 4.97 4J» • a 

.. S* 4.98* 5J1% 5J0 sr 

!* SJB2* 5.04* 5Jffc 
1 5.10 5.14* 5.12 , 

• I 5.18* 5J1 5-l»; 

- £ 

' ■ M OIL _ Jim 

V'lMMJD 1172 1«-» Juf 

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- -• 55 17 J8 17.35 17J6 m 

. -> 78 17J3 17-50 17J0 • j, 

. 46 UJ3 17 JO 17JD w 


J. C. Bradford & Co. 


- r'-’Sn§J8 T34J0 «SJ? 


H.Y. SILVER ISMOIroyoz-) 

Opon HU Low dost Piw. 

W 45IJ0 45648 451 J0 451 JO* 449-5D 

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ay 48X70 495-50 48870 487 . 18 s 48X50 

it 495.00 50X50 494-50 49X301 49170 

sites csttnuted 8J80. 

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Om Hlsh Low Class Piw. 

nr 59 JO J9J0 5975 59jffl 5970 

I m.75 61.55 6075 6M5 6 X 0 
P 6X60 6X00 fit 40 66X90 6X50 

M 6 XS 6X85 6X85 66X90 b6X60 

1 64.50 64570 64J0 664J0 664.40 

ir 6675 6535 6575 66670 66 JO 


WOOL 

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^ VwSSffioiaa w J ?’ 76 aj5 4a - 7S fl-M *■« 

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x • ff Iffin * w *3-S5 6X85 6X85 66X90 btfX60 

• ■£•'■' MHS 64-50 64570 64J0 664J0 66470 

® 144.98 144S0 14670 {gjg 65-95 b6570 £6JD 

J,. 5B147 JQ148J0 148 JO fetes 77^ . 

149JB. 149-50 14970 b-Md 

■ ^JfWllEAT ’ ‘ 9aoL 

‘ toitoto* MW l«r Oas. Vrw. 

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" r JW 124 JS 124J8 134J8 6124J8 BOXffl 

• V •‘•£Er* lu Sw> 12X28 12X28 12X28 612378 602178 

■ pat • LIVE BEH* CATTLE 

' tJhL TI ■-'.■• . ^ 4fiJ0 4SJJ0 45-00 *4X80 «4£J0 

JW 4PJ0 4975 4J.W *J0 M9.10 

. ^ P? 1 * AW 48-30 48-50 4875 48 J7 S48J0 

, - Ot*- 46.70 4775 46.70 647-35 46JD 

, '■ <'.^r Lwr'-<Sc»- Pm Dec 4SA5 46.15 ^45 *6-15 45^ 

- ^ ifo 1478 Sates: April 22; Jorw 45; An 72; Od 

^ tSimti April 3 te Jnw 1030; Aw 

'ttPiPulF 1136; Od 353; Dec 306. 

• , . ICED BROILERS 

i : £S SS 2S S3 22 

' rV; « as ss %£ ss £5 

• ' v'gj? ^ ss ss 

... 1 - 8578 tsJBt. 8378 6- Bid; a-Asked/ e-NorolMl. 

■ 2'n ' FEH)E* CATTLE 

■ , ^ 70-^ APT 47 JO CS5 0X0 iOJS a47M 

/I 6934 AN DU lu. 47 JO 4X40 47-25 48-00 47.85 

•_ ^ . JtfJO 4775 46J0 A17 47-« 

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V:?: •«:, . •' Si Ikjs 45.90 45.10 4Sja 

Hav 44.45 45.66 457S 45J0 4 5*5 

^ S«afefcsne Sates! April 6» May 6?; An 9t: Sap 13; 

7 -?/ 5 4XW 4X05 ^OPW* 

■■•' .10 «7Sa45J5 45 JO 346; 5W 11 41 Ot* W38; W»* 2*1.- 

■r-sff .wwwms-- ■ 


NOTICE TO H0LDEH8 OP 

TELEDYNE, IMC. WARRANTS 

AttocfaW to Tsfedrae Xntvnotlwal K.V. 
ea% sawaSmtoi qwi Mom 
DtteBtwnOMOeMwXUn 


; 25 5275 52-40 3X75 
.. .38 5X75 56J0 5X75 far 
V.U ML' Jena 60; Sap j ra 

ti 'ias s Hit 09; jure 


UYE HOGS • ' ' ‘ 

4975 4980 <9« «■« 

SUO 5X20 51.82 53-20 5X45 

jjL55 5X20 50J 2 SX20 S1JB 

065 48J5 47J0 4846 4BJ0 

S«n 4TU 4X65 43-50 ftB 

42M2 4X16 4X00 056 035 

4\ jp 4X40 4170 47^8 41-6® 

40. » 48-40 4DJ0 4 0J2 40M 


- :>■ *7 94t Ok 292. Sri' 4ttt ^.65 ■C^ 4360 
‘ -^1 :*K BELLIES . Ok" • "j® Sff CM 4M0 

: M ;7|7S 79 JD 8070 Ftoh 4UP iue 

» nM -79M 679 JO APT ..JP-S * ?*-£L jS. jS 16707 
r. «. T5M1 7S3D 7685 Safcc April M 6 T. JWT 

> 47- 6X25 666J5 64-50 Aim 692; Od 2)0 OK 

. i 5Xt»a657a 664-00 X - ■ ■ ■ 4575 ; 

/!»« *” »» ™ 

• " 7^ ■* 3* 6 ,- Jnfcr MM; ft6 20; AW»I *- 



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r V?. -TOES 

af’.iWe Pwlwiw 

;■ r- ( y IMS 1M5 

: • ■ 53 

fOS - 6.14 
• ■ s“ £« . 66.22 


. , . ^ aoMifl En*»iJ9a,„ _ ru, 

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7 r-,‘0 6J» 167-SD IS8-70 Sf* . tS 

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.. : XJ40 3J»A3^ Sate:i» 

. .. ■< . "►««. 


raw. * uyj®ER 

Odcaw MereantRp eaefcwwe- 

1035 £1 . tojo 176J0 1W80 174JB WL» 

s? ■-..siaeuafls 

6-85 T*s, tea: INar 47* Jrty BK »P 

1030; Bor 721: JW 146. 

PLYWOOD 

ISM 

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16970 16970 16X60 MB 
n — uiy , . 171 J0 171.50 169JO 169J0 169J0 

ii -"me," 1 -. 

sss ss ss-ss ss 

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J7XO MW 61-92. 615# «•» 

U45 jm - DfiJO «.I0 


nuiitm, xno. 


LOW 

COMMODITY 

COMMISSIONS 

212-674^4029 

The first thing to do is 
check tie Family/ Style 
Page in Thursday's 
New York Times. 

You’ll find a list of 

Amusements for Children 
every Thursday and . 
haveiun with the bids all 
week long. 

^e^citrJJoxkSintiS 


PtlMCHOTlO *■ 

On A«i 8 9. 197X mere was miarad ter flEno 
ratfnrw/adaral Cc nKnunlc M Ions Conua iaalon 
an appfcatton raQuasdno Co nan la t fan con* 
aant to tha trwwter ot control ot Radio Station 
WAO 0. Maur York, Nao Ytet tew Bartel 
lledta Corporation, the paroni ot BanoB 
Braodcaatars of Msar York, tec, 10 Wfton . 
CooanunfcaUonp. Inc. 

Radio Station wado opontaa oo a tnequancjr 
1380 KHZ. 

The officers, dtrectors or 10% stusrehokfan 
o( Bartel Maria Corpora Ikm ara> 

Raymond K. Mason 
JriaiKoraroOd 
GM 3 JQ* Vffison Cniaea 
RusseB Wtoborflsr 
ABert E. Camefon, Jr. 

Francis LoogtAi 
Antfwoy U. Pasquala 
Arltesiy MarteaHos 
Ttawoa X LOmbanB 
Manhafl BemetOta 
A. Ettoard USter 
Roger X BerOnd 
EncU. Jart* 
m ra n ta Lane . 

Ed-wdP.LaiHn 
ArfiairD. Enfi 
W 8 SsnC.Rofite.Jr 

jouauur ■ , 

DoMe CoosMadeadenP. tea. 

The officers. d M rtora or 1048 WwreiKtdera 
ot Bartefi Bioedrastan oi New York. tec. are: 
Raymond K. Mason 
Georgs Wfeon Cro> al 
Mdson G. Lavarano 
I RusdUWKbsrger 
Robert J.Snte 
Monte Jones 

AIb«n E. Cameron. JrJAwMaB BemsMio 
MerK Htisey, Jr. 

The otacers. t&ectors or lOti shereheten 
olWlBonConiniiii 6 cation.inc.ara: 

Geocge Wilson Cnwel 
NateOn & Larcrano 
Boberi J, Smtlti .. 

SkteeySoddi 

A copy at the appficafion is 8 veHtfe tar ptAh 
8 c bKpeeficn during aenuiJbWhnfin hoera at 
206 East 43nd streei, higw, York. New Yerib 


BELPORT&CO. 

Controlled Risk 
Techniques for 
Equity 
Investment 

A discretionary management service for portfolios 
of $100,000. We do not charge an investment fee. 


A.H.Y. 

CorporsliQB 

U.S.A. 


r ^ 

“Gentlemen: 
We had 6 typos 
v in our last 
/ proxy statement.’ 


3 "ThenA 
this year\ 
I think we 
0! should call i 
l i:l!: Appaa \. ,, j 


BELPORT&CO. 

450 Park Ave. 

New York, N.Y. 10022 

(212) 935-9730 


MEMBER 

CHICAGO BOARD OPTIONS EXCHANGE 
BROKER-DEALER 

COMMODITIES FUTURES MERCHANT 
OCC PROIPECTUS PROnDEO 


AFPSLM2 Qt 

130 Cedar SL, N.Y., N.Y. 10006 • 212 964-3033 
Alfred I. duPont Bldg., Miami, Fla. 33101 • 305 379-1661 
TPF affiliates 
EsnUtfirp-tearrafl Printing Co. 

123 N. WKker Drive. Chicago, III. 6c 606 • 312 Financial 64565 
K. F. Merrill CampanT 

1731 University Avenue, SL Paul, Minnesota 55104 ■ 612 6464101 
Craft, nan /Wet Press. 

ipsyalleySt.SEattlB, Wash. 96109 ■ 206 MU 2-6800 
AtwH Fleratez Pristine ca., Ltd. 

31 Princess Street. Toronto, fttx. Can. M5A 2S5 • 416 36U541 


I 



52 


THE NEW YORK TIMES, WEDNESDAY,- APRIL 21, 1976 


This advertisement rV neither an offer to sell nor a solicitation of offers to buy any of these securities. 
The offering is made only by the Prospectus. 


NEW ISSUE 


April 21, 1976 


- 


? 1,500,000 Shares 


Baltimore Gas and Electric Company 


Common Stock 

(Without Fit Value) 


Price $23 per share 


Copies of the Prospectus may be obtained from such of the 
underwriters as are registered dealers in securities in this State. 


The First Boston Corporation 


Blyth Eastman Dillon & Co. 

Incerporated 

Drexel Burnham Sc Co. 

Incorporated 

E. F. Hutton & Company Inc. 


Bache Halsey Stuart Lie. 

Dillon, Read & Co. Inc. 
Goldman, Sachs & Co. 


Alex. Brown & Sons 


Loeb, Rhoades & Co. 


Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette 

Securities Corpor*.tM>n 

Homblower & Weeks-Hemphil!, Noyes 

Incorporated 

Kuhn, Loeb & Co. Lehman Brothers 

incorporated 

Paine, Webber, Jackson & Curtis 


Kidder, Peabody & Co. 

Incorporated 

Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith 

Incorporated Incorporated 

Reynolds Securities Inc. Salomon Brothers Smith Barney, Harris U pham & Co. Wertheim & Co., Inc. 

Incorporated 

White, Weld & Co. Dean Witter & Co. Legg Mason/Wood Walker 

Incorporated Incorporated Div. ot First Regional Sernritira, Inc. 

Baker, Watts & Co. Bear, Stearns & Co. L. F. Rothschild & Co. 


Shearson Hayden Stone Inc. 


Ladenburg, T habnann & Co. Inc. Moseley, Hallgarten & Estabrook Inc. Oppenheimer & Co., lac. 

Tucker, Anthony & R. L. Day, Inc. 


R. W. Pressprich Sc Co. Spencer Trask & Co. 

Incorporated Incorporated 

Wood, Strothers & Winthrop Inc. Advest Co. 


Weeden & Co. 

Incorporated 

Arnhofd and S. Bleichroeder, Inc. 


Fahnestock & Co. Faulkner, Dawkins & Sullivan, Lie. 

Gruntal & Co. Herzfeld & Stem 


Evans & Co. 

Incorporated 

Laidlaw-Coggeshall Inc. 


Pressman, Frohlich Securities 

Division of Piiliju. Appel St WAUou Zac. 


W.H.Reaves & Co., Inc. Adams & Peck 
Hoppin, Watson Inc. Josephthal & Co. 

Zuckerman, Smith & Co. 


It’s nice g@ing to work knowing 
that yesterdays payments will automatically 
he on your kooks today. 


in-the-know comptrollers and 
credit manners are finding that 
trips to work can be a lot more 
pleasant these days-thanks to a 
new service called National 
Check Transmission. 

In essence, National Check 
Transmission (NCT) is a com-* 
puterized way of tmkmgyour 
company with ail its regional ' 
lock-box banks throughout the 
country. Our Computer Center 


collects customer remittance 
information from your banks... 
guarantees confidentialjty...edits 
the input...consolidates it.. .and 
then sends you a single transmis- 
sion that’s customized to your 
specifications. You receive it in 
the exact format needed for direct 
entry to your accounts receivable 
and credit management system. 

NCT dramatically bridges the 
gap between billing and posting, 
with 24-hour reporting on all 


payments received in a company's 
lock-box banks. And being able to 
post at that speed is doubly 
welcome in these days of tight 
money. Besides speeding up cash, 
application, alkwing approval 
of new orders, NCT also saves by’ 
reducing your clerical workload.- 
Tofind out more aboutthis 
timecutting, cost-cutting service, 


give Roy Kelley a calL.at 
(617) 434-3870. 


In New York call 
0X5-2370, Ext 3870. 


ForekTHar-stretcfeirag ideas...weVe the 
first people to talk to The First 

THE FIgST NATION AL BANK OF BOSTON 



Contiraed From Page 58 


IK® Slacks and ON. Gate . ^ -jg? 

Kish Low moouri P/EWffsraohUw LasSChfl 


19» Stedts and Dtw. Sates 

•HW Low In Colters P/E IWs HH& Low Last 0*9 


23* 

fS 

s rat 

29 

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78 

76ft 

75 

85 

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56 

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26% Conwoo a 2s 
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2? Gootw Ind 
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91* CooaTR -60 
12 COOT pfUS 
10% Ccoeind jo 
17% CappRg jus 
3 6% GOPPW 2JI» 
IV, Cardura Co 
43%' CnmG 7.12s 
I' V Cousins MhJ 
28% CoxBdct JS 
41% CPC Int 2J0 
47% Crane 2M 
TA CresHtF At 
21% CrodtN IJ6 
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mi CummEno 1 
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... 6 5K4 

17 272 2Sft 

7 39 26 

8 MS 

..«7» 75ft 
...Z160 75 
...ZUO 76 
...269 73 
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... 3 65ft 

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...ruo 45% 
... 209 7ft 

9 192 28ft 

... W I 
IS 228 49ft 
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7 349 47ft 
U SO 11% 

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11 38? 70ft 
... 5 94 

11 312 13ft 
17 592 34ft 
... xJo 44ft 

8 7 31ft 

35 40 4ft 

10 226 31ft 
21 78 7ft 

A 13 72ft 
... 8 76% 

12 M 15ft 
... 42 24ft 

7 1 47 

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26 215 mk 
... S 2ft 
M -SB 34ft 

9 267 43ft 

S 137 67 

14 10 4ft 
7 191 25 
M 16 14ft 

11 16 20 

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> 419 19ft 
Z3 2B3 43ft 
...ZMO STY, 
14 95 25ft 
9 49 8ft 
... 38 32 
... r230 97% 
9 4 8ft 

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7 135 12ft 
10 92 40ft 
... 7 22ft 

71 79 29ft 


20 21 + ft 

59*5 50ft+ 7* 
34ft 25*+ 1 
25ft 255** ft 

20 7SV. 

75ft 75ft- ft 

75 75 

76 76 

72ft 73 

Bffi 80ft- 1 

65 65 

47ft 47ft* ft 
45 45ft...... 

7ft 7ft + ft 
37% 27ft- ft 
7ft t + ft 
48ft 48ft- ft 
53ft 56 * ft 
47% 47ft* ft 
nft ft 

1ft IT.- la 
69ft 70 + ft 
96 . 94 + Vi 
13ft 13T«+ ft 
24 3*ft+ ft 

44 44 - ft 

Jlft 37ft* ft 

4ft 4ft 

30ft 31%+ ft 
7ft 7ft + ft 
12 12M+ ft 

15ft 16%+ ft 
15ft 15ft- ft 
26ft 34ft+ ft 
47 47 - % 

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68ft 69ft + 1% 

2ft 2% 

3F4 ZSh- 1ft 
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25T, 26 - ft 
69 70 +1 

19 ft 

43 4j*a+ ft 

5719 S7V4+lft 
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92% 97ft 

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tRfc 12FT 

39ft «ft+ 1% 

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29ft 29*4 


42 . 5ft Ac . S6-... 
9 m 15ft WA TSft+ V. 

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9 81 29ft 79 29ft+:ft 

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29ft 26ft 
33% 27 
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19ft 17ft 
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37ft as*., 
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3«ft 23V, 
16ft 16ft 
120ft 106% 
38ft 29*V 
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38 Z4 
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16% ir.k 

3% IV, 
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33ft 15% 
7?« 4ft 
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29ft 26ft 
41ft 36 
50ft 40% 
15 Bft 
28ft 22ft 
5ft 4ft 
14ft 13ft 
6% 5 
6% 4ft 
76 V 
32 22ft 
8 5% 

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28 21ft 
30ft 17% 

29 21ft 
lift 9‘A 
33ft 29ft 
21ft 17% 

31ft 
4ft 
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63ft 39ft 
9ft 5 
20% 14% 
20 18ft 
95ft 85ft 


42 


10 


Damon JO 

DanP.iv .10* 

Dsnacp J4 
Dart Ind JO, 
Darttndof 2 
Data GerW 
Davco .55b 
DavtnHud 1 
EWTtPL. 1 M 
DPLpf 12J0 
DPLpf 7.48 
Dean* 

Deere 1.90 
DelrtwP 1.20 
DeiAlon 1.40 
DetftAir- JO 
Dents inti 
DeHtxi, Cm 
Dennis/ilfp l 
Dennys Xa 
Oetrtsaly .80 
Deseret .25 
DeScIofn Sn 
DetEdEs 1J5 
Del E pt9J2 
DetE pf7JS 
DetE pt7JS 
DetE P»J0 
Dot E 072.75 
DeE tOB3J5 
Dexter J4 
Dial FW jo 
D iamlnt 2 
OiomM 1.729 
DiatnSh 1JK> 
Dia Sh pTC 2 
Dia pT Dl JO 
OidtAB JO 
Dfctatfin JO 
DteftoW M 
DiGtargio 
Oioital East 
DHliaom J8 
DTUottCo .96 
D<snev .12b 
Divwsfd in 
Diversd Mtg 
DrPesor .36 
Dome^v JOB 
DonLuJ J5e 
Donnelly .60 
OorOllv JOe 
Dorsev .10 b 
D over 1 JO 
DowCh l JO 
DPF Inc 
Drava .95 
Dresser 1-50 
DrexBd 1J4 
Dreyfus JOa 
DukeP 1JD 
Duke pfS.70 
Duke pf2J9 
OunBrad 1 
Duolan Co 
duPont 4J2Se 
duPnt pf4JO 
duPnt pf3JD 
DuoLt 1.72 
D»L»«?7 2 
DuqL 072.75 
Dymoln jo 

E- 

E Systems 1 
EaoteP 7.16 
EascoCO .60 
EastAir Un 
EastGsF .80 
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EckndJk J4 
EckdNC J2 
EfflsBro U2 
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EDS JOa. 

El Mem AAa 
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Emery UO 
Emervln JO 
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EnglMM 1 
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Enserdi UO 
Entex UO 
Envkotech 
Equifax 2 
Equitnrk Jt 
EquitGS 2J0 
EqutLI 2J4e 
Esmark lJHt 
Esquire 32 
Esterllne J2 
Ethyl 1 JO 

Efhyt pfZJO 
Evans Prod 
ExCHO 1.10 
Exctsr 1.76e 
Exxon 5 


37*i- % 
58=4+ 2% 


... ZI3B 73 
... 7 53*4 

... 2S 26 


... 99 TA 9 9 

... 92 U 9% TO + ft 

9 71 22% 21*A 22 - % 

11 97 35% 35% 35=4+ *4 

... m 38' 37 

36 379 58ft 56 
5 IS 15% 15ft 15%+ % 

10 72 33% 32ft 33%+ ft 

8 99 78ft 17Ta M 

...Z120T1B 117=4 118 

.. . Z10Q 76 » 76-1 

5 159 16ft 15ft 16ft + Ft 
10 336 63>A 62ft 62%+ ft 

9 244 72ft 121, 12*A+ % 

6 781 26ft 26ft 26ft- V* 
23 7 34 42% J7T, 42* V+ V» 

37 5 Sft 5% 5ft+ ft 

... 702 4ft 4ft 4%+ ft 

9 105 21% 20 21 + 1% 

13 196 23ft 22ft 23ft+ 1ft 

17 9 31ft 31% 31%- % 

18 76 23ft 22% 23ft + ft 

TO 133 lift 10ft 71 + ft 
9 280 14 13ft 13ft 

...1300 91ft 90 90 - 1ft 

...1200 74ft 74ft 74ft- !s 

~ 72 72 

57ft 57ft + ft 

_ 25ft 25% 

11 25% 2SVk 25=4- ft 

12 17 17ft 16ft 17ft + 1 

7 9 11%. 71 H 

9 66 37 36ft 37 + ft 

4 24 20 in* 19ft+ ft 

9 135 66ft 66% 6fift+ 

... 8 76ft 76 76%+ 

... 58 30% 29=2 30 + 

10 16 9ft Eft 9 + 

13 40 9% 9% *%-. 

9 22 12% 72 72 .. 

CO 37 6% 5 6 .. 

38 331 779% 175ft 778**+ Sft 

7 764 9ft 9ft 9ft + ft 
8 33% 33% 33ft- U 

3 537 58% 57 5Eft+ 7ft 
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1ft 1ft 1ft 

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43 39ft 39=j 

4ft 4ft 4ft+ 

11 111 2ffft 20V a 20%- 

5 23 17 Uft 16ft- 

12 29 10ft 9ft 10ft + 

ID 79 <0% 59ft 59ft + ft 

77 695 711ft 109ft 111 + 1% 
16 43 6 Sft 6 + 

8 40 22 21ft 2Tft~ 

70 492 88% 78ft 78ft- 

... 19 ITT* 17ft I7ft+ 

6 8 7ft TV, 7ft + ft 

10 778 19 18ft 18%- ft 

... ZSO 93 93 W .. 

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18 186 28 27>:m 28 + 

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28 296 151ft 148ft 151ft+ 3ft 
... 22 61ft 60ft 67ft + 1 
... 2 49 49 49 +1 

t 71 18% 18ft 18ft- ft 
...2430 23li 23ft 23ft + ft 
... Z*50 28ft 2»ft a=»- ft 
8ft 8ft 


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16' 17 42% 42it <256+ ft 
... 34 MS 9 9%+ ft 

7 TO lift 11% ITtk.w... 

7 16 16 Uft 15ft- ft 

B 68 20ft 20ft 20+ ft 
5 84 5% 4ft »+ -ft 
7 331 SEA Sft 26+ 1ft 

151384 sm S2ft 53% + 1« 

31% 27 GnFood 7JD 11 S99" 20ft OTfc 2«fc+ ft 

20> , 15ft GnGth U9e Vt 4 Wft 7W6 1^+ ft 

- - 4 JOS 10ft VW Wft+ ft 

74 786 lift 11* Tlft+ ft 
M 39 WA 75ft .75%...... 

76 CS 29ft 29 29 + ft 


11% 9ft GAlntf 1 Jfce 
45% 35% GnAOfl JQb 
Ma r+ GeoSanc -8a 
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17ft 13ft GenGd UO 
25% UVs G Chima Jt 
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55% 46 Gen El WO 


VF.a 9ft GenHost JO 
13ft 1% Gen instru 
21 Uft GenAAed JO 
34ft 27ft GenMiRs JB 


72% Sft GnMOt 2JDe 167430 TO* TO 2%+ % 


73% 65 GnMot SW S 
7ft 5 GenPort Inc 
Uft 16>k GPubOt 1 JB 
lift . 7ft GenRefr M 


2 TO 69ft 70 
98 47 7 6ft 6ft- ft 

9 191 17* Kft 17ft + ft 
4 49 9ft 9% 9ft+ ft 


Un* 34% GoSKxiai J4 13 .» 4»fc 41* 41H+ ft 


5=4 3ft Gen Steel 
28% 25ft GTdEI 7 JO 
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S 30 4ft J* 4ft+ * 
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6 71 20ft 3Cfft 20*.- ft 

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26ft 21ft Gerber 7 JO * 2 ,2^ + ^ 

177% iSift GettvOJJOe T1 

nft 17 GettouftjD ... » Jnk. im. m...... 

8* 4ft GF Bum J2 26 TO 6ft 6ft «*+ ft 

73 6 12ft 12 12 ...... 

7 1TO 17ft 16ft 17%+ 1ft 
7 166 TO* 10% 1Qft+ * 

9 TO 13 Wft-TOft 

12 566 32* 32 3Zft+ * 
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12ft »Vi GlafltPC JO 
17* 9% GihrPIn .187 

lift 5ft GfcJdLew .40 
14ft v.% Gmaniti J2 
38ft 31ft Gillette 1 JD 
18 nft Ginas Inc 


14* 6* Gleason Wlc ... 20 WTO WTO loft...... 


11* Sft Global Mar 
3Zft 20ft GtabeUn 1# 
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25% 20% Goodyr 1.111 
Id* 12* GorJvtA 32 
32ft 26* GouUfln \3f> 
23ft WA Gould pn J5 
331, ZT A Grace 1 JO 


17ft 12% Granitvt JO 
. wft 13% GravOrg JO 
I Uft TOV, GtAltPsc 
24Vj 18%t GtLkD U0B 


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5 27 29ft 28 29TO+ 1ft 

8 275 Wft 18 T8ft+ ft 

19% 13ft GokJWTP of V9 19ft TO Wft+ * 

28* W Goodrtl 1.12 )6 231 » 25* 25*+ ft 

91047 21* 26% 2I*+ ft 

6 TO U 72ft 13 + ft 

8 778 30ft 29ft 30ft- ft 

.. 50 22ft 22ft 22ft+ * 

„. m 6 414 29ft 30* 29*+ ft 

33ft 24*a Gralnoa- JO 23 2 32ft 32ft 32%+ * 

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31ft 21=4 GfW-af Unit 1 f » 2ft TO*+ ft 

20V* TBftGWnpnJB ... ® Wtt W 18 - * 
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51 2ft 2ft 2ft 

S 50 Uft Iff* 16%+ % 
13 33 14% 13% 14%+ ft 
.. 29 2 Tft- 7TO-T % 

7 190 9ft 9% 9*- * 

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5 158 18% 17* 17%+ % 

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57, *8Vi GttSU Sf4J0 ...zlOO 52 51. 51 -2 

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9 92% 90% 91%+ 1% 

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30 1816 116ft 713% H3ft- 1ft 
14 86 37=1 37* 37*+ ft 

1* 37 24* TOft 2<ft+ ft 

16 3M 25* 25 TSVi* ft 

11 14 11% 17% 18%+ ft 

9 22 51ft SO Slft+1% 

14 115 15% Uft 15ft+ % 

6 53 3ft 3* 3ft + ft 

11 67 13ft 72* 13ft + 

193 2% 2ft *.+ 

7% 7% 7*+ 

33% 32% 32%- 

PA 6*A 7ft + 

73ft 73% 73ft 

28% 27% 28 + ft 

21 264 37% 37% 37ft + % 

27 220 44 42 44 + 214 

21 50 U% 14 14 

8 256 26% 25ft »%* ft 

U 39 4ft 4% 4%- % 

9 13 14% U'A MW 

...2100 5% 5V, 5V.- % 

... z570 5% 5% 5%+ % 

5 71 13% 13% 13%+ % 

• 345 30ft 29% 30 ft + * 

6 IS 6% 6% 6%+ % 

8 387 22% 22% 22%+ % 

7 29 26ft 26% 26%+ % 

71 WO 25% 25ft 25%.. 

10 4 27 2flft 26ft- 

8 22 I7TO 71% ll%+ 

6 5 32% 31% 32 - 

11 11 21ft 21% 21ft + 

8 122 40% 39% 39*+ 

13 is 6 sft y/«+ 

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7 50 41% 40% 41%+ 1% 

... 29 53% jZfer 53%+ % 

131745 9* 8ft 9%+ % 

7 77 20% 19ft 19%+ % 

... TO TO 19% 20 + % 

. 91314 95% 94% 95%+ 2 


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10ft 

17 
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lift FalrmtF JB 
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9 Fauteel JO 
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9% FinSanB JS 
9% RrOFcd J5r 

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19* FMC 1 
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56% 57%+ % 
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4% 5 

30 30ft + ft 
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7* 7% ....... 

12% 13ft + ft 
14* 14%+ ft 
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T5W 16ft + % 
20 20*+ * 
44* 45%+lYa 
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27ft 29 +1 
32ft 22%+ * 
15* 16 + % 
2* 2TO- ft 
71 11*+ % 

5ft Sft- %. 
20ft 20ft- % 
32 32 - ft 

10 18% 

16% 17ft + % 
18 1B*+ * 

16% 16ft- ft 

10ft 10* 

18* 18ft + ft 
59ft 59ft+ ft 
21% 22*+ 1ft 
13* 14 + ft 
26ft 27%+ ft 
25 2S*+ * 

25 25* 

10 395 33% 32% 33%+ ft 
... 17 80% 80 C0%+ 4% 

8 167 24% 24% TOft+ * 
... 27 35% 34ft 35% + I 
... TO 5% 5ft 5*+ % 
7 4 12% 12ft 12%+ ft 

252048 40* 59ft 60*+ * 
6 118 16 .15% 15* + ft 


13 51 

15 738 
20 479 
U 80 
IB 49 
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14 63 
10 14 
12 » 
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4 38 
60 53 
61553 
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11 TO 

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7 258 
7 254 
5 


18* Uft HaUFB JO 
17% 13* HaUPrt JOa 


12 14 17* 17% T7%- % 
7 5 15ft 15* 15%+ % 


166 las'', HaffibfH IJ8 13 4T4 T57* MS Ml + 4 


51* 48ft HalUbrtn wi 
23-16 16ft Hatnrlp 1 JO 
a* 3* Hammond 


45 50% 49% 50%+ 1% 
9 105 20* 20* 20% 

,. 4 PA 5% 5%+ % 

7* 5 HantflmnJO 13 TO 6% 6% 6ft - % 

30'i 21% HandyHar I S 9 2»ft 2B?k 29ft+ % 

27 14* HstwCd .76 TO 329 26% 25ft 26%+ 1% 

«G% 43* HanfM UO 11 319 5*ft 53ft 53%+ % 

7 18 23V, 23% 23%+ * 

13 26 7* 7% 7%- ft 
5 52 36ft 35 34%+ 1% 


24ft 22% Harfirj 1.32 
9% 6* Hardees 
40% 28 HflfTKSf, I JO 
w 7 , 12*3 Harrah J6a 
47=ti 33* Harris 1.40 
27% 18* Harsco 1.30b 


U 14% 14% 14*- ft 
TO 44* 44ft 44*+ lft 
54 23* 23* 23*+ ft 


14% 8* HartSWx JO 12 TO 13* 13* 13ft+ % 
25 17* HarteHk -45 13 10 TO 23* TO + * 
17* 15* HattSe 1.44a 
24 22ft KawHEf 1.TO 
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12=, TA HazeWne 
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29* 23* HeUerlnt M 9 

40ft 30", HeimerP .35 8 

2 lft Hemlso Cap ... 

7* 6* Hem I ik J6e ... . _ 

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23ft 18% HershVFd 1 8 86 21% 28* 21 ...... 

23% 17* Hesston JO 6 4 21 21 21 - ft 

2 S% 22ft Hestn pfl .60 ... 9 24% 23* 24%+ 1 

59ft 46% HcublHl UO 16 406 50% » 50%+ 1 

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7* 4% High yqlTO n » 7 6% 7 + * 

8 T7 20* 20% 2D*+ % 
13 TO 17% 16% 17ft + ft 
7 


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9 30 23* 23% 23* 

9 44 15% 14* 15%+ % 

7 42 9* 9ft 9*+ % 

10 32 16* 16% 76* 

19 114 16* 16% 16*+ * 

8 100 12 *- 12 12 %+ % 

11 25 48* 48% 48*+ % 

... 1 29* 29* 29*+ ft 

7 39 7* 7* 7*+ ft 

9 57 24* 23* 24ft- % 

8 66 33 31* 33 + lft 

30 1* 1* 1*+ % 

1 7* 7* 7*+ % 


2I'i 17% HflfenM .78. 
T9ft 16 Hilton Hold 
7V» 4V« HMW Hid 

28 SO* Hobart JO 
20* la* HoemW JO 
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30 24 HlidVA I.TOt 

43% 32* HoilyS 3J0a 
44% 32 Homesfk la 


5 5* 5% 5% 

15 48 26* 25* 36ft + * 

9 TO M* 16* 16*+ ft 

7 17 7* 7ft 7*+ * 

13 401 15* 15* 15*+ % 

... 2 25 25 25 + * 

3 31 40 40 40 + * 

..... _ 17 208 36* 36* 36% 

56% 32* Honywrtl UO 13 727 47 ^ 47 +J% 

32ft 21 HOOVUI 1.36 9 55 3D* 29ft TO*+ lft 

T-. 1* Horizon Cp ... W ^ .2* „ 

IP! 12ft HospAff J3t 33 13% T2* 13 - ft 

2B% 20’A HoSPCpA J4 11 » 24+1* 

16 11* Hostlntl J6 ... 253 12* 12 12 - ft 

13* lflft HoudaR JOB 7 106 m. 13% 1TO4+ % 

16% 12ft HougMIf J2 7 9 U* U% TTO6...... 

13* 9* HOUSFab TO 11 TOO IffA 10* TO*+ % 

W* 15* HOUShFJ.TO 7 402 W% 17* 18 + % 

.. 4 33% 33% 3J%- % 

.. 2 39* 39* 39*- % 

81263 24ft 23% 24ft + * 

131042 33 31% 33*+ lft 


36ft SIBAHauFonSO 
44* 35% HOUF pf2J7 
25 20ft HousLP 1-56 
31% 28* HouNG nJO 


17ft 13% HOW John J4 13 546 14* 14% 14*+ % 


14* 11 Hubhrd 1 JO 
22ft 14* HudanA JD 
7* 4% HugfiHaf .40 


52% 38* HutteTt JO 
15ft 11* Humana JO 


15* 12ft Huntch JO 
JSft 17* HuftnEF JO 
17* 12 Huvck JO . 
15 8* Hvdromt J6 


... 32 13* 13ft 13% + ft 
14 2B 20* 20ft 20*+ % 
7 24 7% . 7 7 

12 369 42*. 42 42ft 

9 52 14% 13* 13*+ % 

19 16 12% 12 12 - % 

6 197 20ft Wft S»ft* 1 

TO 60 13% Uft 13ft- % 

7 25 13* 13 13*+ % 


29% TO IdahoP 2.0b 
18% 13* l deal Basic 1 
78* 58 Ideal pU.75 
9% 6% IdoaTov Jfl 
5% 2% IDS Rltv 

27* 22 lllPowr 2J0 


j. j — g — 1_ 

20* 16% iamb 1.30 6 105 19% 18% 19 

92* 75 fCIitds pfd ... 3 W 9* W + 1% 

41% 33% ICIltd pTUB ... 17 40 39% 39%- ft 

Sft 3% ICN Pharm ... 36 4 3* 4 + % 

II X5S 28ft 28 2Bft- ft 

8 49 17 16ft U*+ % 

... 2 76 73% 73%+ % 

6 58 8 7% 8 + % 

... 64 3ft 2ft Sft 

9 286 25ft 25 3Sft 

HPow BI8.94 .. Z2060 51ft 51ft 51ft 

26% TOftllPOWPQJl ... 2200 26% 26% 26%....., 

26 22% IIPCW pT2.lt ... ZSOD TO TO TO 

30 21 1TVI JD 22 27 28* 38ft 28*+ ft 

14* 10* inwICpA .TO 7 219 Mft 13* Mft+ * 

- 16 210 38% 38 38%+ * 

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8 3 22* 22ft 22* 

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... zW 77 77 77 

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8 25 15 14* 15 

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M 139 90ft 89* 90 + ft 

23 5S% 54ft 55%+ ft 

_ 8 11 61 60% 60%- 1 

52* 4! MftldStl 140 12 210 52ft 52% 52%+ % 

12* 7* Inmont M 8 312 12 lift 11*+ * 

7 79 lift 10* 11%+ % 


40* 35* INACDllO 
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6* 4ft income Can 
9* 8* IncCCu .90s 
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112* 102 IndiM pf 12 
81% 67% IndiM PT7J6 
22* 20 imftUPL 1.12 
15ft 12% IndNat 1 JO 
lift 6* Inexco Oil 
90* 70 IrwerR 161 
56 45ft Inoft pf!3S 
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... 12 1* 1* 1* 

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57 37* 37ft 37*+ ft 


19 933 SSI ft 259* 261 ft +2% 

28* 22ft InfRavF J2 42 567 20% 27% 27*+ * 

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79* 57* IMPapar %. 14 771 73* 72 73%+ I* 

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TO* 19% Jartens u»_ 9 77 mfc 22 

41ft 32* JovMfg 1.10- 9 2« Mft 37 

4* 1% Justice JWP ... 3 Zft 2ft 

35%. 27% KaftrAI UO 12 W 32% 31% 
TO "57% KBl SW*-®, •.. ^ “ 

» a .mocea J “ *1 £*• 2* 

30 24 KaiOl pf230 1 A 31 

5% i»-KiSSn3r l .to* i» 

19 14% KaneMIU J4 4 45 T7* 16ft 

31* i9ft Kaneb 'JDb 
27% 35 KCfvPUSJS 
48 48 KCPLPWJS 

23% 15 KCSoutn.lr 


v«H- T - 


Wio* . 

1 ' rint'AfJi 

; I * * " 


7 24 20% 20% 

7 32 26* TO% 
.. 220 48% 48% 

8 32 Z!% 23 


11% 9*. KC Sou pf 1 ...ZM9 71 18% 

19% 18 KanGSI I J« 6 TO 18% IN 

17 - 14* KanNab U2 8 

19% 18 - KanPUl^ 8 

26* TO KaPL pOa .- 

:• 4* 3 icaty Ind , 7 

is* 11% Kfy p!B 1 J6 ... 

lift MKsatmBrd ... 

17% UW Kauf pfl JO ... 

11 7% Kawackl Brt ... 

7% -4* KeeneQ) JO 6 
9ft 5ft iri Ur I JO - 36 

wft 20 Kelloga .90 15 Ml 21% 20* 

m* U KriSSdJO 7 22 IS, TO* 

MA 20% KenamH M IS 19 34% W% 


30 15ft 15% 
TO 19* 19 
2 26* 3»ft 
Ml 4 3% 

12 14* Mft 
35 9% 9ft 
nb 17* 17 
14 9* 9% 
56 7 6* 

6 *R 9 


h 




L+-* 


4 "j 




J- ‘ 

T> #3 




36* '30ft kjnrt U5e 52 396 34*. 34% 


22* » K.VLRJTU0 6 65 22* 21* 

30% U KerrGlS. JO 8 TOO . 17% 17% 

TO* 60* KerrMcGe T TO 234 70% 68* 


5 4 19* W* 

A 230 25% 24ft . 
„ 21 44 43* 


2 46ft ^Sft 


9 197 40ft ... 

> 87 11% 11 
» 43 16* W . *- 
4 43ft 43ft * 


20* Mft KeystCm la 
28* 18% KWdeWl 
47 43 Kkidepf C 4 

49* 41 - KMdeplB 4. 

47% 36* tORAO UO 
12%. 8* KMsOSt JO 
17* 12* IOrschCo.95 
52ft » KUW AJrttn ... . ... 

37% TO* YniOWld jH.US B% 35 
128, 8* KaeMna - .78 TO TO* TO* 

59 35ft Keepers 1J0 9 W « * 

54ft 53 Kopprof 4 — Zto 51% 51% rt - 
6% 3ft Koraap ind - 11 8* «I •* 

46 41% Kraffco 2-Cf 9 227 44ft ^ - 

39* 31ft Krao&M 
Uft TO KroeWer Mf 4.13% 13% 

20* TO* Kraocr 1J& 8 




9 SS% 55% 55ft- % 
7? 50 49* SO + * 

73 34% 33ft -34%+ ft 
TO 55* 55% 55*...;.. 

3 28 27% I + * 

1 73 73 73 + * 

14 25 24ft 24*+ % 

4 11* 11% 11% - Vi 

18 16% 16 16 + % 
58 6% 5* 5ft.. a.. 

42 30 29* 29*+ % 


14* Uft Iowa El I JD 11 72 |4% 13ft 14 


19% IT* lowafiG T.72 
23* 22% lowaPwU 2 
19* 17* Iowa PS 1J0 
5* 3ft iDCO Hasp 


% 


71 Ifft 19 79*4+ ft 

23 23% 23ft 23ft- ft 

34 18% 18* 10ft- % 

S3 5 4* 4%+ % 


2SU 19ft ITE imp JO 12 2» 25 24% 24%- ft 


16% 8ft Itefc Corp 
13% 5% ItetCarp .20 

1J« 9* 1U f/rtl J5 
35 36ft IU Int A 
21 15% IU inf Dfl .25 


93 13* 13 13%+ % 

8 172 13% 12* 12*- ft 
5 S6 10* 10% )0*+ % 

.- 2 17% 77% 27% 

... IS 17% 17% 17%+ % 


111 

8 

26 

2S 

25% - * 

17 

13* JamesF Jp 

11 

33 

16* 

16* 

16*+ % 

. . 

34 

14% 

lift 

14*..,... 

73* 

13ft Janbcn JO 


13 

21% 

21* 

21ft + ft 

13 

71 

35ft 

35 

35ft * ft 

10ft. 

8% JaoanF .91e 


m 

s«* 

8% 

8%+ % 

7 

52 

25 

24* 

24%+ % 

31* 

26* Jeff Pilot .72 

11 

132 

28ft 

TO 

38 - ft 

TO 

I3D 

36ft 

35ft 

36 + ft 

108% 160% JerCeA Pf 11 


320 U7 

107 


15 353 

35% 

33% 

35 +2 

83 

71% Jerce pfs.12 


7TO1 

20 

7V 

80+1% 


132 


26* 

26ft + •% 

80 

69% Jerce pf7J8 


Z450 

7R • 



11 

186 

24 

23 

23%+ 1 

24* 

19% iewdC UO 

9 

TO 

7CT% 

TO* 

22*-' % 


TO2 

..tft 

8* 

8*- % 

8* 

4% Jenrdcar 


St 

7% 

7% 

7%+ % 


9%. 4% KVSOT JO 
19* 37% LacGas US 
15 12 ..LamsScss l". 

15%.- 12% Lanaarv' JT ’ 
11% - 6% Leaisteg 32 
31* 23* Lears UI2J5 


64 19* 19* 
3 7* 7* 


7 8 lift 18% 

12 8 U* 13ft 

8 50 TO* 13*. 
7 116 9% 9% 

3 29ft 29 


34 2S% Ltnmv JWj TO 19 28% 27* 


30 21 14* 14* .. 
.7 21 16* 15* 

34 ‘35 Mft 13ft 
.... 8 1 % 1 * 

73 11* 11* 


... 13 62% 42 
7 29 IS* 15% 
« 11 » * 
._ 5 5% S% 

> 97 34* 33ft 


15* - W* LeedsN JO 
17% 12 Lacuna JO 
16* WA t.ehPCt M 
2 ft LettVal Ind 
13* 10% Lehmn Mo 
W 4% Lennar Cf». 258 27_ 7% 7 
36ft 18* Lenox J4 -11 7 23% "22% 

10% Sft LesFay JOb • 8 38 9* 9% 

To 6ft LevFd Cm N . 5 9% 9 

13* 12 LewFln J5« 4 12ft Cft 

52ft 39% Levistra JO 7 SG 51% 51 
Vfi 4 Levftr Foru .-..739 7% 6* 

5% 3ftJ-FSO> ? 79 JBk ^ 

33ft 21% LOP 1J» TO 177 33* 31* 
Mft 55ft LOf- pf4JS 
17 . 9% UbrtvCP JO 

3* s - J* Lftxiy Loan: 

6* . 4 LffirtvLn BT 
36ft 29% L/QOMV 2J0 - - .. . 

60 ■« LUfydf 1J0 » 340 53% 51% 

TO 26 UncNat UO If 119 26* 26* 

59% 52% UncNtBt J ... 2 53% S3 
TO* M LtncPt 1 JBa ... « 17% 17* 
4ft 1% Lionel Cerp 13 208 4 3% 

17 6% LJttonln .lit 18 886 15% 15% 

22% 9 Uttonpfcpf ... 63 21 20% 

42 27 UttDCV^ 3 ... 2 41% 41 

2186 16* Litton pffi 2 ... 13 19% 19* 

12% 6* LocKhd Ahrc 2 ISO V* 9 

31% 21 Loews UO 

9% 6% LomaFift JO 
T7% 14 LOfnM 2J2e 

19% TO LoneStlnd 1 

18 15% LngisUlJ# 

57 » UL nlffS 

90* 8Z% LTLpf 8JB 
121% 112 ULp<NU 
26* 24ft L1L pfO 2J7 
83 <8% LonoOrg JD 

IS 8% Loral Corp .. 

27% 22 LaLand U2 TO 454 25ft W* 
18 12 LaPadf JO 26 251 M% 16* 
25 21% LOutsGs 1JS 

19% Uft Lowensf JO 
16% 18% LTV Com 
71 13% LTV A 3JQt 

5! 42ft LTVOfOrS 
44* 35ft 




j Cc. 

r- , a 



6 321 TO* 28* 

9 49 7% 7% 

U 14 15% 15% 

TO 54 17* 16* 

7 98 17% 17% 

...■an 55 55 

...MO 89* 86 

.n ZlOO 121% 121%.-. | 
21 36* 26 *n« 
1071% 78 i«ii 


/"I — a f-r. - '••..fTj 

r.vUv - • 


10 402 15% 


erf 


i * jK >. ns 


*v - 


• 65 24* 23* 

... « 17 16% 

13 180 13* 13 

... 1 17% 17% 

... 20 49 47% 

Lutrtzon 17 161 38* 37%,, , V-.-i *■ " v 

17% 14% LuckyS Jib 11 281 15% 15 ) J . -V'.- - 

9 6* Lucflow JO ... a » M 

29* 22 LukenStUO 7 7 26* 26* 

34% 13* LvkesYng I 4 574 23% 23 

47% 28% Lytas pf2J0 ... 104 45% 44% 

7ft 7ft 


i r «, r- 


8* 4 


12 

5ft 

7% 

7% 


LvnCSys jo 17 20 

M-N-O-P 

M MocAF Mb 7. 7 ID* 10 


S 12 4% 4% 
8 9 6% 6% 

7 157 6ft 6V2 

8 36 34% 34 

..Z200 54 53 

.. 483 lift 11% 
7 3 5ft 5* 

.. 65 8% 7% 
64 44 33ft 32% 


2ft MacOoMl 
4% Macke JO 
. _ 4* MacmiN JS 
38% 26* Macy MB 
53 47% Macypf 4JS 

lift 9% MadbFd JO 
6* 4 MadSaGar 
9% 6%Matfcaj2 
31% 21% Mallory 1 
27ft 21% MalHvdO JB 13 16 25% 25% 
9% 4%Manhln JSe 7 7 8% 8% 

39% 29 MfrHan 1J0 
41% 32ft MAPCO JO 
12% 7% Marattw Mf 
52ft 41* Mora tO 1J0 

36 TO Manor 1 

71ft 56* Merer pf A2 

Zlft 16% Maremt jo 
13% 9% Mar Mid JO 
15* 11* MarionL 32 
50* 28% Martov JO 
12* 8% Marqtte JOB 
19% 15 Marrfot J5t 

61ft 52% MrahMC 1 JO 20 74 59 58* 

25% 19ft MarshF 1 M 11 183 22* 21% 

21% 16% MartMa 1 JO 9 20 21 20ft 

27* 17 MrUCUB M 9 78 23% 23 

31% 23* MascoCU JD 34 199 31% 31% 

25* 19 Masonite J4 37 72 24 23% 

32* 16% MassyFsr 1 
11% 9ft MasM 1.17b 
T7ft 14% MasCp UO 
lift 10% Mashi 1 JOe 
21% 19* NlatsuE JBe 
53% 41ft MayOSt ] J8 12 146 52* 51* 
30 16% MayerOsc 1 "TO 2 29* 29ft 

M JWMavsJW : 39 30. 4* 4ft 

39 - 31* Mavte UOa 
15* 10% MBPX JOa 
79% 65 MCA Inc 2 
ztft 14* McCord .1 
49* 37% McDemwt \ 

66 57% McDonalds 

18% 14ft McDonO M 
23ft 21ft McGEd 1J0 


8 <29 38* 36% 
13 257 33* 33 

3 71 31% 10ft 
12 298 52* 51% 

10 STB 36% 36 
... 32 72ft 71ft 

9 27 17ft 17% 
9 3Z7 10* 10% 

11 77 12% If* 
15 TO 47% 46% 

7 20 10% TO* 
32 419 17% 17% 


6 SO 28* 27* 
9 42 11% 10% 
... TO 16* 16* 
... 82 11* 11 
19 95 20% 20* 


_ .S?l!S 

5 27 TO* 14% k' /" •'*1 ~i *"V 

6 61 68% 68* - »i\L 1 

8 15 22 21% ^ w . » v 


TO 69 35* 34ft:»i 


6 389 46% 44% 
391018 62% 61 
8 593 18ft 17% 
13 90 39 27* 


17 12ft MCGTWH J4 10 30 14* 14 


20ft MGHpTtJD 
48% 38ft Mclntyr JOe 
31% 30* McKee UO 
S2 36% McLean jb 
23* 18ft AAcLout 1 JO 
VTU 9% McNeil JO 
31* TO MeedCplJO 
J3* 36ft Men pf82J0 
25% 17 Medusa UO 
5* 3% MEI CP 
35* 17* MeMlle JS 
13* 9* Maine J5r 

64% 52ft MercSir JO 
75* 66 Merck UO 
18* tVA Meredlfh .70 
33* 14% MerrLyn JO 
39 TO Mew Pet .10 
84% 72 AtesPpfUO 
33% 24% MesP nfl.e s 
lift 9* Mesabt l.)5e 
20% 14* MestaM JO 
I5ft 12% AtGM 7r 
23* 15 Metrom JO 
17* n*MGicin.io 

14 lift MldfGs 1.10 

24* 17% MichTube I 
29 24* MtlWf Df2J7 

20 13ft Microwave 

15 12% MCdCTl UB 

16* Mft MktSUt 1 J2 
2 1% MHSnd tm 

25 18% MMRO UO 
29% 22ft MllesLb UB 


2 22% 32% 

9 140 45 45 

7 38 30* 30 

11 70 51% 50* 
20 85 22 21* 

10 21 11 10ft 

8 234 29ft 29% 



a an an : • 

... TO 51* 57 •. 7 

■} insu* 

ti:—.; - 


12 137 22* 22 

4 42 12% 11* 

11 28 40 58* 

24 543 75* 73* 

6 44 17* 16% 
92114 Z7* 26 

18 22B 22 21* 

... I TSMr 75% 

... 9 27 ■ TO* 

9 106 10% 10* 

IS 4 W 18* 
7x111 13% 13 * " 
11 4S9 23* 22* t 
... 337 14% 13* 

5 W 12ft 12% * 
5 Xl7 29% 20* 7- 

... 95 28* 28% I" 
11 14 16ft 16% 

9 33 M* 14* 

9 660 14ft 14ft 
...12 2 

7 86 24 23* 3 

9 19 26% 26* 1 


:U U}]T 

3 r ” f" 

0:.n 

if A 

{ uvifapr 




17* 9* MfltBrad J4 12 242 17* 16% 1. 
65% 54% MlnMM U5 28 834 64 63% 6ji 


20* 18* MfnnPL US 
15* 11% MlrroAJ .96 
12ft 8 MianEd JB- 
36 22* MissRfy UO 

31% 17ft MoPacpf 1 
26% 20% MoPtCft 1J0 
13 9ft MOPSv J84b 
SB* 47% MObffOf 3A0 
7 3* Mobile Ham 


8 74 19* 19* 

TO 5 14% 14* 

8 15 WA 10* 

7 441 36* 35% 1 

... 18 31% 31* J 

7 2 22 21* £ 

7 21 "12* -12% 12 

7 521. 58* 57ft St, 
... 19 6 Sft 


* ^xJ7\^ r 


TO 15% Mohasco .90 15 75 23 . 22% 239 
7% 3 Mahk Data ... 116. 5ft S% Si 


'■0 fort 


24 Mft MoNcRub 1 
28ft 18 Motycrp JO 
23ft M Monti UOa 
}2ft 6ft Atonoor JO 
12ft 8% MonrEq JO 
98* 75 Monsan 2JO 
weft Uft Mens rtzjs 
30* 25% MonDU 2J0 
28 24 ManPwlJO 

23% 21*MMitStU7b li. .16 
9 7ft MONY ,76c W *1 
48% 29* Moor Me J8 
62ft 53* Morgan UO 
26ft 19* MontsKnu 1 


S « 20% .»■» 
12 30 TO% 2Sft 3 m 
4 9 20ft: 20% 

7 J 07 «}*- Mft «i 
30 138 "89k -.-0* .wf* 
11 580 .94% 

-7 

8-7S7-«ft 


.... 8- -fl 

5 94 41* 40% 

12 316 40% TO* 

6 92 23 22* 2? i 


4* 2% AtorseEf pd 23 3, 3 3 

16* 10% MoruSh JO 6 20 Mft 14% W 


4 2ft MfgeTr Am 
19% 13* MorNor .81 


... 9 Jft -3* 

72 87 T7ft 17ft *7V 


51 41* Motorola' JO 351169 52* SOW Sg, 

40ft 30ft MtFuet 1 J2 11 162 39* MA 



23ft 19 MtSfTei UB 9 18 TO" 22* 


II* 7 Muoterd-JD 6 » JD% 1° “ 4 , 

Mursng 1.08 TO 6 Wft }8* IN- 


TO 15* Mureng 
ZS* 16ft MurntiC uo 
21* 16% MurpOH JO 

21 * 12 ft MunrvOft 1 

16* M* MuttOfn 1 JT 
10 7% MyersL. JO 

it* 35% NabtSCB 2J0 ir'.MO 41 


a 22 19* 18% 19*4 

a . a 19* im 19V 

9 47 20% -Iff lg 

,. 40 16 15*. 1» 

.. 19 aft 8% 8* 




,,r. .. — ... 40% 40*1% ^ r & 

36% 30% NaknCh J3 r. Q ^ 

15* 10ft NorcoSd JO 8.4fc Wft TO% ltt '*k 

W5 loftNaatenC JO 48-W g* JJf ^ -V . 

TO* 11 NatAiUJS U IK 16 Iflft Wk 

15* 11% N Avia J7b ... 31 TO W * TO* •* 


. 'lx ; M 

^ e zhh 


Conttooed on Page Si 







1WS.V-.* 





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Haw Issue / April 2t,1978 


,*; £ ^ -■ 

»Jjfc - k. .1 --K ?-. 

* 7 % *■** *' ; 

Jpi _*» jr j* r~- 

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£; * 

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if $10,950,000 

- <*;^k . (F&sUnaMnientofantesoe not to exceed $23,100,000} 

; Norfolk and Western 

fi Railway Company 

- Equipment Trust, Series No. 3 

: Jip f 754% Equipment Trust Certificates 

•■.'■ ■■■ : . ' Non-Callable 

■ OSvfeieiKfe to accroe from May 1,1076. To mataraln 15 araioa# 

, V; ;r‘:; b8taUn>eflJ8of$730j00qn each May 1 from 1S77fc> 1991. 

^ftesaed under the PhiladelphiaPlanwift 20% original cashequl^. 


i ..T:.?,V- ; .'■ 
1 — 


"•. rURITJES AND YIELDS 

: ^ 6 ’°° % 1981 7A5% 1985 7.80% 

6.70 1982 7.60 1986 7.85 1! 

, 7.10 1983 7.65 1987 7.90 .. 1! 

3*; 7.35 1984 7.75 ' 1988 7.90 

; 'i'M ceifificatss are ottered subjwstte prior sale, when, as and If issued and 
'; '.vAl a by as, subject to approval of tfia htsistats Comma rca Commission. 


1989 733% 

1990 8.00 

1991 8 JOO 


W2& J* 


~ 

sF. sap: • ‘-tr '•:■ 4 * •. • . 

15? : 'a , ' 

met.-. ** —4 • i -. ■ • 
s5E« ■■■■■■»» >• 

W? • w • .'■ • ■ 

't :. 

tej; ■■ ^ 7 


• • * !. 


i Easffflan Dillon & Co. 

.M - 


T/ * ,? 

Salomon Brothms ^ 

i&Co. - Drexel Burnham & Co. 


The Common Stock of 

ARRIS BANKCXJRR INC. 

is now traded on the 
:.■?: New York Stock Exchange 
Trading Symbol HBC 


THE rFSW 70JIK T/itffiS, WEDJfKfMT, APRIL 21, 1975 


Economic Analysis: Some Find Keynesian Policies Outmoded 

Continued From Page 49 ca ^ed for increasmgtota] de-Jlution in' economic drinking— I Hiere lias been evidence of j able in an obsolete art: a harm--.- 

^ l manrt fn? OMde nnn tannMoUnnt 4T%*. - - - - - — ^4... % < - 


peters out in late 1977 or 1978 when tnere was bigh un employ- macroeconomic policy beyond the politicians toward the econ- theories and laws are but mere * 
— largely because tight moneta* men * ai *ri for enttiag total de- demand management toward omists. This has been by no puffs of air in face of that ! - 
rv and fiscal policies required man< ^ when there was mflatios. the augmentation of supplies means confined to the United anarchy of banditry, greed and * 
to combat resurgent inflation These increases or decreases and the enhancement of mcen- States. Last week in Britain corruption which holds sway . ■ 
might bring it to an en d a n ™ total demand could be affect- tives. (the cradle of classical and in the pecuniary affairs of the *, 

upswing in unemployment b y changing the level of Future Progress neoclassical economics Tunning real world.” - 

woulrl Hff thp iohiess rate hack government spending or the ^ from Adam Smith through Lord Redeeming their reputation r 

^ve 8 "de of tanat^T^tiier with Keynes) the New Statesman throughout the industrial world • . 

9 oercent. I> befbre the aid S changes in the degree erf mone- awarded a prize for the follow- in the years immediately ahead: • 

Lf^Sde «>e end of orfestreint pro- € S^S^JL m VS ing definition if of^ “economist": will require economists to move * 

mis oecaoe. vided by the monetary author!- “An inhabitant of cloud- on beyond the economics of 

Answers Sought ties.. ™.®S “«*«> land; one knowledge- Smith and Keynes. 

Despite reason for great sat- The new wnditlons of the iff " ' 

SA 2f A£E SKSr' ft-*£ STOCKS 15 35' LTT - PAID S3oojboo '■ 

myttiBgw™, there is * ff? ^iU. resources! ' J irniTAr.V’STAY AtliER 


BS S s %£ ™gg== S g j & ssassjfarss Yrn WimUa to it aly-stax a ides 

wh ^ . JiuW A1 ljUUO.46 Subsidiaries of the Interna- . 

Si onSste SSSw iStlS ** Professor Gorictfs view, tional Telephone and Telegraph 

tbe is70’s. The economic no? f°T abandoning efforts to con- ec .^? 10 ? aic .. Corporation paid about 

SL 1 ^ ^ tS total H emanH, what they to v dev , ote .greater Continned From Page 49 $300,000 to Italian tax agents 

icies that became Jamoar un- ^ jnf Mn^ fnTiTl wav to^v attention to the role of unem- _ — — . . . to “faemtate" negotiationsover 

Sia?* tor^obT^lS StfcTBtt Jdi of 7 tte Sg- lament compensation and So- tone to yesterdays market g e ^ Sved SSS . 

gSl- ■^^2“ “222S gregate supply-demand equl- ** Security, overcoming capi- surge, it was Polaroid, explod- ^ 1972t according to memo- 
now ffloaT ' tal shortages, reducing the mg with a gain of 4% points randums from company audt- * 

either inadequate or obsolete jnon * . . costs of pollution, determining - J finishmp at 3774 the tors y 

toagrowing number of econo- Focus of Policy the appropriate size of the m( ^ lc SS^s^ Copies of these memoren- 

According to this view, eco- governmental secto r, d ec: ding York Stock Exchange. dums were included in docu- 

. Tney contend that the Keynes- name policy should focus on on government programs for jj a dramatic turnabout meats filed yesterday in the 
ian doctrmes were essential- structural economic problems, creating specific types of *iiu- f w Polaroid, which traded last Federal District Court in Wash- 
ly designed to deal with the such as programs to improve man capital” through manpow- week below 32 «nd seemed ington by the Securities and . 
problems of the Depression labor skills and to increase or trai n i ng and through cooper - scarcely to have a friend on Exchange Commission. The 
when, deep unemployment was investment, particularly in re- aliv e pro grams ^ with private wall Street Depressing the S.E.C. went to court in an ef- 
commned with, deflation, rather search and development and industry, methods of replacing ■ was expectation sur- fort to compel I.T.T. to coop- 
iban (as now) with inflation, in production of raw materials, existing welfare arm food r0U nding the introduction of erate with an investigation into 
NeD J. McMullen, an interna- The policy also calls for provid- stamp programs ana the like. a competitive instant-camera questionable foreign and do- 
tional economist with the Na- irig better incentives for pro- Although the 1976 election system by Eastman Kodak. mestic payoffs by the com- 
tkmal Planning Association in ductrve economic activity- campaign in the United Stat e s Yesterdays unveiling of its pany, 

Washington, maintains that it "The purely Keynesian era has been notably weak in the new instant-camera products An LT.T. spokesman said last ' 
is now crucial for economists is over, 1 * says Mr. McMullen, exploration of economic issu es, by Kodak served simultaneous- night, "We cannot comment on . 
to create new solutions to the "The obstacle to economic the politicians have shown a ] y to lift the pressure off Pola- this because we are in Lftiga- 
new problems of the Western progress is no longer secular measure of sensitivity to these raid end to depress the price tion.” 

world. stagnation but supply con- new economic concerns. of Kodak’s stock — it fell 1% Last month, the company dis- 

He considers that the basic straints to full employment and This had led them, by and to 113% — after its recent closed that S3.8 million was 
Keynesian doctrine of “demand growth. large, to ignore the advice of strength. . paid over the last five years - 

man agement” is no longer satis- “What is needed may not the economists, most of whom Volisne rose substantially to an J ultimately received by em- 
factoiy for dealing with stagfla- amount to a revolution in eco- are still focused on the manipu- 23.5 million shares from 16.5 ployees of or persons closely : 
tion. The Keynesian formula nomics but is certainly an evo- la tion of demand. million shares on. Monday. related to foreign customers. 


I - >lv This announcement is neither <m offer to sell nor a solicitation of an offer to buy any of tkesa Securities. 

... The offer is made only by tht Prospectus. 




5,000,000 Shares 


X m . ■ " 


S. S. Kresge Company 


Common Stock 


■ »rjiw£.V- 


($1j 00 par value) 


i.s* * 

f.- -■ 

-7-rV 

.... ® ,* 


jym ^ -*-i -m .="' 


ii *rtE -r - - 

'n^' ► ■ m. 

y£.;z - 

* '-li# 

. -T-i : • 
v «!» ■*«■ 


Jg v«- 

»¥ ' • 

rW* «- 3 ■ 

V 

4*- •’ * 

4* - 

$ •* ■ 

« s » 

.. V 

V V 

- Hr 4 " ' 

*•* . . 
-w .c 


■a* ^ ■ 

m* : 

tm - 

mte ■ . ;. 

■** ' r. 

.» "- V . . . 


wf • Ar ~ 


\ Bmkcorp, Inc. Is the parent company of j 
. Trust and Savings Bank, Chicago. 

S HARRIS 
JBANKC0RP S 

: v&iteorp, inoL. Ill West Monroe Street, Chicago, IIBriote 60690. 


The Travelers Insurance Company 

Hartford, Connecticut 06115 

ispleased to announce that 
Bruce Guttman ' 
has joined with 

Alihan B. Jaeger and Julius Litvack 
of the 

\ JAEGERrUTVACK AGENCY 
to form 


’11. i ! 

*' V 




V ; *B JAEGER 


JUUIB UTVACK 


BRUCE GUTIMAN 




w:* ? 
fer? 1 - ; - 


G ER- LITVACK- GUTTMAN AGENCY 

as General Agents for 

Accident & Health & Group Insurance 
00 Merrick Road • Rockville Centre, New M 11570 
Phones: ( 212 ) 343-7700 and (516) 764-9800 


Z Prize $3616 a Share 

:■ 


V*S : * 


• ^ r 

' V‘ • • . s -“*.-1 iji" .' * -i ’ v'. ’ 

A: . .=:'•■* ***% t/5 


I" 

5w‘ > . - 




TEE FIRST BOSTON CORPORATION 


MORGAN STANLEY & CO. 

toumpvraUd 


GOLDMAN, SACHS & CO. 


LEHMAN BROTHERS MERRILL LYNCH, PIERCE, FENNER & SMITH 

inempmted InterpertdrU 

BACHE HALSEY STUART INC. . . BLYTH EASTMAN DILLON & CO. DILLON, READ & CO. INC. 

JncoTpT vied 

DONALDSON, LUFKIN & JENRETTE DREXEL BURNHAM & CO. 

Securities Corporation lacorponiitd 

HORNBLOWER& WEEKS-HEMPHILL, NOYES E.E HUTTON &COMPANY INC. KIDDER, PEABODY & CO. 

iiitMfand*^ h niw M 

KUmt.WEB&CO. LAZARDFBERES&CO. LOEB, RB0ADES& CO. PAINE, WEBBER, JACKSON & CURTIS 

hmrperwtal 

REYNOLDS SECURITIES INC. SALOMON BROTHERS SMITH BARNEY, HARRIS UPHAM & CO. 

Incorporated 

WERTHEIM & CO., INC. WHITE,WELD&CO. DEAN WITTER & CO. 


WERTHEIM & CO., INC. 
BEAR,STEARNS&CO. ^ ; 

L.E ROTHSCHILD & CO. 

ABD SECURITIES CORPORATION 


WHITE,WELD&CO. 


lacarpanxM 


IncarpwnUd 

OPPENHEIMER & CO* INC. 


■ • ’ SHIELDS MODEL ROLAND SECURITIES 

Iiuxrporattd 

BASLE SECURITIES CORPORATION F. EBERSTADT & CO* INC. 


ROBERT FLEMING KLEINWORT, BENSON MITCHELL, HUTCHINS INC. 

Inmpurau* tnonparated 

MOSELEY, HALLGARTEN & ESTABROOK INC. NEW COURT SECURITIES CORPORATION 

R. W. PKESSPRICH & CO. SOGEN-SWISS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION SPENCER TRASK & CO. 

. /amporaUd ImearporvcUd. 

TUCKER, ANTHONY &R.L. DAY, INC. UBS-DB CORPORATION WOOD, STRUTHERS & WINTHROPINC. 


KLEINWORT, BENSON 

tnegrpanUd 


ADVESTCO. 


AMERICAN SECURITIES CORPORATION 


AKNHOLD AND S. BLEICHROEDER, INC. 


BAKER,WEEKS&CO.,INC. J.C.BRADFORD&CO. DOMINICK&DOMMICK, MWLKNER,DAWK[NS&SULLIVAN,INC. 

laatrpmM Inemrpmtad 

LADENBURG, THALMANN & CO. INC. ALLEN & COMPANY DOMINION SECURITIES HARRIS & PARTNERS INC. 

laenvpauUed 

FAHNESTOCK & CO. NOMURA SECURITIES INTERNATIONAL, INC. WM. E. POLLOCK & CO* INC. 


C. E.UNTERBERG, TOWBIN CO. 
A. E. AMES & CO. 

ImenpanOai 

GREEN SHIELDS &CO INC 
THE NIKKO SECURITIES CO. 

IntematkmeLhtc. 

Aprils!, 1976. 


DOFT&CO*INC. 


WILLIAM D. WITTER, INC. WOOD GUNDY INCORPORATED 

DAIWA SECURITIES AMERICA INC. DOFT&CO*INC. 

HERZFELD & STERN McLEOD, YOUNG, WEIR, INCORPORATED 

YAMAICHI INTERNATIONAL (AMERICA), INC. 



54 


THE NEW YORK TIMES, , WEDNESDAY, APRIL K ff 


This announcement isnotan offer to sell or a soliciiaiion of an offer to buy any of these securities. 
The offering is madeony by iheProspeGtUS, 



NEW ISSTJ5 


April 21,197$ 


$ 75 , 000,000 

Beneficial Finance Co. of New Jersey 


7 %% Guaranteed Debentures Due April 15*1984 

Unconditionally Guaranteed as to Payment of Prmdpal&nd Interest' by 


Beneficial Corporation 


Price 99.50% 

Phw accrued interest from April 27, 1975 


.. j may be obtained from pitch of thciatder** 
[ to ad as dealers vi osamiir* fu tin » Stati\ 


Blyth Eastman Dillon & Co. 

Into nxmted 


The First Boston Corporation 
Bache Halsey Stuart Inc. 
Drexel Burnham & Co. 

Incorporated 

E. E Hutton & Company Inc. 
Lazard Preres & Co. 


Dillon, Read & Co. Inc. 


Paine, Webber, Jackson & Curtis 

Incorporated 

Smith Barney, Harris Upham & Co. 

Incorporated 

Dean Witter & Co. Shearson Hayden Stone Inc. 

Incorporated 

Bear, Stearns & Co. L. E Rothschild & Co. 

ABD Securities Corporation 


Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Salomon Brothers 

Incorporated 

Donalds on, Lu fkin & Jenrette 

Seeffitin CEpp t i lto a 

Hornblowe r & Weeks-H emphiB, Noyes 

Inqiipuinlcil 

Kidder, Peabody & Co. Kuhn, Loeb & Co. 

Turiliwniiil 

Lehman Brothers Loeb, Rhoades & Co. 

iBcorpozatod 

Reynolds Securities Inc. 


Wertheim & Co., Inc. 


White, Weld & Co. 

Incorporated 


Warburg Paribas Becker line. 
Shields Model Roland Securities 

feRQOU 

American Securities Corporation 


Weeden & Co. 

Incorporated 

Basle Securities Corporation Alex. Brown & Sons EuroPartners Securities Corporation 


Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co. Inc. Moseley, HaUgarten & Estabrook Inc. 

Oppenheimer & Co., Inc. Wm. E. Pollock & Co., Inc. R.WPressprich & Co. 

Incorpontcd 

SoGen-Swiss International Corporation Thomson&McKinnon AuchindossKoUmeyer Inc. 
Spencer Trask & Co. Tucker, Anthony & R. L. Day, Inc. UBS-DB Corporation 

Incorporated 

Wood Gundy Incorporated Wood, Struthers & Winthrop Inc. Advest Co. 

J. C. Bradford & Co. Dominion Securities Harris & Partners Inc. 

Faulkner, Dawkins & Sullivan, Inc, GreensMdds & Co Inc 

McLeod, Young, Weir, Incorporated Stuart Brothers 


A. E. Ames & Co. 

Incorporated 

Fahnestock & Co. 


Legg Mason /W ood Walker 

IMv. of First Regional Socuri ties,Inc- 

Suez American Corporation C. E. Unterberg, Towbin Co. Adams & Peck 


First Albany Corporation 


Josephfhal&Cow 


■ ■ NOTICE OF REDEMPTION : 

Republic of Portugal 

7% External Lean Bond* Da* 1970 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Inn terms of tha AuthenUcatinjr 
Agent? Agreement dated Nosombcr 2. 196d. between the Republic of Portugal (tha, 
“Republic") ood Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York (the 'Aulhanticstiiur 
Agent"), the Authenticating Agent hah drawn by kit for redemption on May 15, 1976.- 
ont of moneys to ba paid by the BcpuMte to DiDou, Hoad & Co. (Paying Agent) prior 
to tint date, as and for a Sinking Pond, *613,000 aggregate principal amount of tha 
Republic's 7% External Lou Bonds duo 1975 (the “Bauds*), bearing tho folk win®, j 
serial numbers! 

Bonds Designated (or Redemption 
Coupon Bonds 


S 35 

5043 

3810 

4097 

•4975* 

59(9- 

6692 

73 34 

6585 

■mi 

77332 

12407 

124 

2066 

3066 

4104 

498S- 

8018 

6697 

7335 

8800 

9848 

11360 

12404 

Ibb 

7084 

3073 

4108 

5004 

6046 

6698 

7338 

666/ 

SB66 

11380 

1241ft 

JhB 

2H3 

3164 

4112 

505J 

6060 

17723 

7353 

8873 

9683 

11987 

1249) 

1B7 

21 IB 

3139 

4317 

5084 

6062 

8727 

7356 

87U8 

9886 

11388 

12486 

311 

2126 

3143 

4321 

6082 

BUBS 

8/79 

7390 

8/33 

9738 

11388 

12537 

320 

21/1 

316! 

4334 

5117- 

8073 

6730 

7421 

8764 

9740 

11401 

12548 

336 

21/5 

31/6 

4346 

5123 

BIJB5 

6/3b 

7425 

9942 

9805 

11426 

12550 

485 

2178 

3176 

4357 

5182 

8092 

8/42 

7476 

8945 

10134 

11484 

12556 

4Ub 

2192 

3186 

4380 

5184 

6084 

5746 

7484 

9845 

10188 

11542 

12841 

454 

5204 

3163 

4382 

5199 

6167 

S/48 

7503 

864/ 

10190 

11548 

1284/ 

510 

22.18 

3198 

4432 

6213 

61B7 

6/82 

7519 

8890 

10338 

11580 

12658 

540 

2244 

3213 

4443 

6220 

0190 

6793 

7525 


10433 

11664 

12886 

569 

2262 

3278 

4469 

5233 

6135 

6814 

75/8 

899/ 

10453 

11665 

12724 

644 

22// 

3271 

4485 

5249 

6189 

Bfllb 

7619 

89/1 

10476 

11587 

1274S 

718 

23/2 

32/8 

4477 

6250 

6239 

6825 

7649 

9091 

10481 

11627 

12748 

808 

?42fl 

3278 

4482 

57.72 

6740 

683/ 

7652 

8093 

10489 

11637 

12752 

8Z7 

7473 

3251 

4467 

5277 

8281 

6840 

7876 

9072 

10507 

11678 

127 58 

951 

7AM 

3305 

4502. 

5280 

6268 

6844 

7/1/ 

9149 

10527 

11661 

12772 

1000 

2462 

3309 

4504 

5283 

6267 

6846 

7733 

911ft 

10542 

11733 

12819 

1301 

7628 

3375 

450S 

5288 

6Z75 

8904 

7743 

9198 

10544 

11734 

72847 

1308 

2669 

3352 

4684 

5287 

62/9 

6941 

7744 

9221 

10549 

11747 

12856 

1310 

2660 

3378 

4665 

5327 

6280 

6948 

7745 

9281 

10582 

11805 

12883 

1312 

2E6fi 

3382 

4587 

5353 

B788 

71114 

7/52 

8283 

10831 

11828 

12884 

1313 

26/8 

S3BB 

4684 

6368 

6314 

701b 

7783 

929/ 

1D632 

11868 

12 m 

1332 

2660 

343b 

4824 

5380 

6318 

7038 

7810 

9300 

10888 

11873 

12897 

1338 

2/34 

3480 

4631 

5937 

8329 

/044 

7870 

9303 

10670 

11884 

12904 

1384 

2/41 

3496 

4634 

5402 

6330 

7054 

78/9 

0310 

10743 

11867 

12907 

1395 

275? 

3513 

4R4I 

5430 

6346 

7101 

7684 

932/ 

10803 

11804 

12841 

1406 

2/68 

3616 

4848 

S489 

6359 

7113 

7912 

9330 

10810 

11865 

12953 

1418 

2833 

3577 

4650 

5508 

6333- 

7133 

7858 

8343 

70874 

11858 

72856 

1420 


3820 

4852 

5527 

6367 

7144 

6013 

9348 

10960 

I20B3 

12963 

1495 

2891 


4655 

6628 

6377 

7154 

8121 

8401 

lift 82 

1207! 

12970 

168B 

2801 

3807 

4669 

6541 

8412 

7159 

B231 

8404 

11036 

12078 

12972 

1723 

2906 

3813 

4707 

5782 

6464 

7168 

6766 

8416 

11037 

12119 


1725 

2916 

3917 

4738 

5873 

6474 

7200 

830/ 

3425 

11101 

12208 


1771 

2925 

SRSfi 

4/68 

EB55 

6488 

7209 

9339 

8486 

11116 

.12210 


1815 

2930 

38M 

4769 

5858 

9498 

7233 

8402 

0490 

71187 

72242 


1880 

2937 

4025 

4 in 

5920 

6501 

7251 

8407 

8492 

11187 

12247 


1839 

2834 

4023- 

4//4 

5923 

6531 

7270 

8421 

9502 

11202 

12823 


1902 

2861 

4032 

4606 

5924 

6566 

7276 

8481 

8529 

11214 

12324 


1849 

2S8Q 

4083 

4612 

6925 

6580 

7285 

8520 

8532 

11215 

12335 


1954 

2997 

4088 

48/B 

5933 

6647 

7300 

85511 

9545 

11223 

12347 


1968 

3003 

4088 

4888 

5936 

68 B9 

7322 

8557 

9563 

11238 

123S1 


2013 

3007 

4095 

4868 

5841 

6690 

7329 

8673 

Ktt> 

11241 

12400 



Continued From Page2 


-ms Stodts mtfHv. sues fM 

HMi Lett InDoOteS P/EWsWtfiLow Las* C&o 


u* Witutonjr 5 si a oh Hft— - 

nth 77 NdnenJB * 2PA U* 

4314 28* NOiem J2 » IBB 7JI 39 -31 •*!% 

6% . 9a NOtaiy Un ... 22 6 5& 

S)¥i Sto H«)Oef 2J2 « 73 56* 93 SO- - 1% 

24 tCft NtTDcst Lto TO 434 2 » SK 2S4+.1* 

» C'/f. tiDSt VS MS zM GS'n 68% 

34 27 NMFMZOfr S » Sft B 37%+ ft 

Wh lift (tetGW 1.05 73.375.17 
* 3% Nat Hama ' ... 97 7’ 

lift A* Nattnd JO 4 177 8% 

14 94 NflKndcfJO:„. 8 IW 

Uft lift Nltnd DfUS ... 7 ,1214 

20ft W* I4t MtdCBre U 88 17* 

5 ‘57 n 


1M 17 
45k 7 
TV. M.V 

II iW 

us UK....;. 
UU 17*+ % 

._ _ iop4 n + h 

9 UO Sift 30*' 50*+ * 
341224 50* «« 48%- V 
6 57 121k 1S95 
9 IS 19b W4 Hft...... 

■». a st . avt a + % 

15 am 47 4Cft ftft+ ft 
.. 4 a 45 414..;... 

* VO 2314. 23% 2»4- % 
W 42S 27*4 27 27%+ Vi 

9 47 17% 17 T7 

4 33 29*4- 19* 2M> ft 

L.UM 294 SSSA ZPk* 14 
Z6S> 19 17* 19 

5 4A 20* 20% 3014 

8 34 14 13% 13%- 44 

7 20% 28% !»«... 

W 23. 27ft » ...... 

9 25 14 13Vk 14 + % 

14 344 30*4 2H4 29%-. 'h 

. « KD m* 36% 27%+.% 

NYSE pfBJO ... z3Q W 94 94: * 1 

21 HYSEpO.12 M . 1 2K5 23% 23V1-— . 
VSA (OoMP %» 7W 13% I Sk W&+ % 
9SU KDUBf KUO. — Z42Q VSto VSV, WS54+. % 
72 NtenpOJZ* — ZlDO TPk ‘.79% W*- % 
" NiafiLBf 5J5 .„n» 54% 54% 54%+ 1% 


7% NMed&l 28 
so am, n Pm ijob 
55*4 39 MW Sendai 
.9% NSvelWJ J* 

10 12% N Stand .94 

= 54% 44% N Sfarcti JS 
SPA 37%MH»2SD 
- 5% 4 Nat Tea 
20% 22% Notem* 7 JO 
31% 23% NCRCp J2 
SO 16% Neptune £0 
21% 17% NevPw 1 JO- 
24 Zl% KevPoOJO 
T9 -ri«i NwPunj4 
21 19% NEOCrS IM 

14% 12% NEltGE 1 J2 
39% 26% NEnPpOJV 
30% 25% N EnnT 2JS .11 
14% 11 Newftafl J9 
31 23 NewnMJD 

27% 24 NYSEG24D 


52Va 44%NiBMBf4JS 
14 a ’ Nin9n 1c 
1994 12% 7U_tod;V.. 

21% 15% tttST Q> M 

«% £3%- NorfBOSB S 
10% 14% horfln L2S 
33% 22%Tkrr& U3 
40% 32 HoAQM-JO- 
1% 5V, NoAnMMO - 

33 19% NoAPhi 1J0 

' 4 2% NoCAIr .Ide 

US 13-16 NoCeAir wf 
11 10 NoesOrt 192 

7 4% vfNoOn nr 

24% 22% Ncril&s 2J2 7 


Z0Q 49% 49% 

... 6» 12% » 1»+ * 
10 831 18% 17 18 + 1« 

7 479 79% 19 .~ 

9 34 76 75% 7V 4.2% 

« 59 3794 l«ft 1794+ <94 
9 96 4094.3? 40%+2 

8 72 39 3RSt 3S 
32 131 794-6* 794+ 9& 
TO 40 20% T75k 22%+ ft 

8 94 3ft 3% 3ft- ft 

... 11 '19* 'IK in..*.. 

I 347 M%- 10ft T»+ ft 
2240 4ft * 4ft- ft 

. “ 3Cft 23ft 3* - % 

24V> 2B4Non&oRJD . 1.-24% 34ft 2<ft+ ft 
1994 16% NbnJPS XjO 8 168 W* 18 18ft. M ... 

46% 33% NorNGl 1A 7 1k- 43ft 42ft 42% - ft 

78 78 NoNGpftUO ZIO 78 78 ' 28 

81ft 79 NoNCpEJO ... i£(t 81ft 81ft lift 

WO 2(94 NoSlPw LM 9 125 26% US ft 26 ...... 

TO 107ft MSP pf K U6 ..2(100 TMft 113ft 113ft- 1ft 
91ft 86 NSPW pf7JE4 ... zSO 91 90ft 90%- ft 

71% 77% NSP« pUJO XU 79ft 79ft 79%+ 1ft 

49 45% NSPw pU.U -...2110 4ft 47% 47ft+ ft 

5014 45% NSPw £74.10 .„2500 48 48 48 — ... 

46 41 NSPWBI3A0 ...XlOO 41% 41% 41%+ % 

15 MO "30% 35ft 38 + 2ft 

26 6 4ft 4ft 4ft+ ft 

« 2SS 35% 34 25 +.2* 

... 3 53% S3 53%+ 4% 

14 257 3 27ft 2Pi+ 1 

Tl 80 5Z%, 51ft 5TTi- ft 

5- 27 27% 29% 2954+ ft 

5 9 29 28ft 29 + ft 

4 157 47ft 40% 41 + ft 

M . 15 2054 79% 78ft- ft 

* 92 91ft 92 * ft 
... 4 25ft 2% 25ft..*... 

14 62 10% UPV 10%+ ft 

17 7 33% 22ft 23%+ ft 

9 M 33ft 31% 33%+ % 

101718 20 19ft 20 + ft 

... 1 43ft 43ft 43ft+ ft 

8 47 -27ft 2 T 27ft+ 

7 .50 9 . 8ft «*— 


38% 25% KocTel JO 
6 3ft Norftxjate E 
33*^ 22ft Norfftm I JO 
49% 3Sft Nrtto ofLC 
37% 23 NwstAIrl ^5 
57**: 43% NWfBOC UB 
309a Mi NWtEnrsv 2 
30% 24ft NiMlEir e»2 
45% 3PA Nwlkld L7S 
23ft 14ft NWsTtad wt 
101ft 73 NwtlnpfUO 
26ft 25% TJwtP-0&38 
12% P.k NWSMnN. !• 

28% NWfSfiV Ti20 
25iJ Norton 1JD 
19 NcrSim S£> 

47 NcrfS pTUO 
14% flUCSrCo J2 
7 NVP 2JSX 

7% Oak Ind AO 
121k OakiteP .92 
14 OcddPet 1 
6V. OcddPef wt 120 
48ft OccfQPt Of 4 
46% Oco'P dOJO 
20Ti OcciPptUO . 

25% Opda pflJ7 
16ft OtlioEd 1-66 


24 7 W-'a 914 

9 8 13ft bU T3>ft+ Vi 

6 550 15% 15 15ft ♦ ft 

7 6% 6V«+ % 

7 51 soft 5Sft+ ft 

52 Sift 4? 50+1 

38 23% 23 2 !%+ V« 

4 31ft 31% 5TVa+ >2 
9 191 18ft 18 ft 18ft+ 


35ft 
37 
24% 

54 
30% 

12ft 
11 

14ft 
18 
m 

57 
58*1 

24 

37 

19ft 

111 103 OhE pf 10.76 '...2150 11G% 10R4 109ft...... 

111ft ItmVOhE BtltLOl ...tr»108ftl08 103 - ft 
<8% B0 OtlEtf pfSJO .. zUXO 83 . 88 88 - ft 

Sift 44% OtiEU (44.40 ... 1130 4Trt 4J 47 - 1% 

45 39ft Oh£d 0090 ... 240 43 4Zft 43 + % 

123ft 112% OIlP pf A 14 ... 2490 123 172 123 +114 

123% 116 OlPW pf 14 ...z500 723 123 13 + % 
3P.b 76ftOhPwpfB48 ...2308 857.‘a 84 8S%- ft 

73 69 QhPw pf7.76. ... £» 76ft 75ft %>o- VU 

IP. Pft DKC Cp .SO 5 44 71 nr« 17 

M 2X IW 19ft T9%+ ft 

...2Kfi 10% 10V«+ ft 

7 37 25% 25 25% - ft 

8 

11 
S 
7 

7 

8 

12 
9 


_ _ 19 OWaGE 144 
10ft 10 OkIGE CUO 
26 23% OfclaNG 1.20 

45ft 30% OtinCp IJ2 
36* ■ 25’ a OUnkraH 1 
14 9'., Omark 40 

73ft 9 Oneida .26 
16% IT.i Opelika 1 
15ft 13ft oranRfc -1.78 
15*'a 10% Orange .18b 
43ft 36% OttsEtv 2J0 
36ft 25% OutMtf 1-23 
12ft OutietCo .80 
7? Overoi IT JO 
10% OwerSh JOb 
42 OwensCng l 
51% Owenlll 1.88 
83 Vj Own! I pf4.7S 
16ft oxfrdfntf M 


101 35ft 3? 

77 3Tk 31 
25 12'. a 11% lift— 
I Uft l».l2Vk+ 
3 1S» 15% IS’i- 


3»*b+ V-S 
3T-a+ ir» 
-* 
ft 
Ik 


. NOTICE OF RgEMPTjON . 

.. to thft'Uolden of 

The Japan Development Bank : 

Fifteen Year 6 % Gocranteed Exfemql Loan Bonds 

Doe May lS f 1977 . 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that She Htmdred. Fifty TbdUaamf Dolteta . 
($650,000) principal ecoo un t of The Japan Oevelofaaeat Bade, Fifteen Yaar 
6% Guaranteed Eifemid Loan Bonds Dub May 15, 1577 and bearing tBa-JoIIe-w-, 
tot aerial tw anbmn , faave been drawn Sat a cco un t of tha Sulking Fuad an Hay 15, 
1976 far rudamptkm. 


14ft 12% pa CAS 1-2D8 
zr.-t 20 PacCas 1 M 
16ft IPi Pad. to 1-68 
32ft 26ft PacLunOr I 
32% 2Sft PecPetrl JO 
22ft 20ft PacPw 1.70 
13ft PaCTT 1 J0 
72*> PacTT pf6 ... z30 78 
5>/. Pam ew joe 4 162 9ft 
lZ’.k PaiW pfl JO ... 33 14Vz 
4ft Palm Be JS 6 » 7=4 

SftPamida.we 8 «i £?• 
S’;* PanAm Air ... 838 6 
3K« 29ft PanEP 2-70 
15 8 P2prdt Mb 

lift 12ft Paryas/nc I 
2T.-! 17V* Parker Drill 
31ft 21% ParHan I JO 
16% lift Parkpen 40 
48% 20ft pmco 27c 
23ft lift Payts nw 40 
19ft 14t* PeafcGa .12e 
3la l% Pem Cent 
6ft 4ft PeoOtX J4b 
80% 49ft Penney 1.28 
O 4814 PaCo ptUB 
-21ft ■ 1P.% P8PWU 1J» 

125ft H7ft PaPUpt 73 ... 
lllft 102ft PaPU pfll ...321ft 10? 

94 e^:.paPL f*SJ0 
98ft PaPLOfMO 
89ft ZS’A PaPL Pf840 
86 » PaPl. ptaxo 

53 47 PaPLpMJO 

51% 44ft PaPL P*4A0 *2-8490 
37ft 27ft Penmuft M8 10 75 


30 Uft 14’A Mia. 

76 Hft 1T.» 14 + 

45 43% 4T5 43ft.... 
18 S2D 36 3ft 3%.... 

6 5 17ft lP.k 17ft.... 

II 77 21 r, 27 21ft + 1 
4 55 15% 15% 15%+ % 
15 77 55 54ft Wft+.ft 
9 307 62% 61 Ik 62%+ 1ft 
... 7 96% 9S% 96 +2 

6 3 241. 24 Nft+1% 

... 16 13ft 1» 13%+ 

3 642 29% 20% 23ft + U 

9 136 17ft 17ft 17%. 

18 225 31ft 31ft 3I%+ ft 
11 46 30ft 25ft 30ft+ ft 
10 213 22ft 21ft 21ft- la 
8 46 15ft 15ft 15%. 


78 78 * 1 

8ft Ra+ ; 

14ft U%+ ’ 

7% 7ft + i 

6ft 6ft- 1 

5ft 6 + ’ 

135 33ft 33% 33ft+ : 

8 2? Ml * 14ft Mft + 1 

N 2 11 13 73 ..... 

S 28 2D% 19ft 201%+ 1 

9 25 29% 2? 29ft+ ft 

8 4 13ft 13 13 - ft 

9 1 23ft 23ft 23ft. i 
9 70 18ft 18ft 18ft+ ft 

10 309 16ft 16 16 + ft 

... 14? Ha Ift Ifb..... 
...A 6 5ft 6 + ft 
19 248 SBft 55?k fflft+2% 
... 2 57ft 57% 57%+ ft 

7 IS? 20% 20ft 2Dft+ ft 


run 122ft 121% 122 

- ft 

Z2BO1D0 

100 

100 


ZSO 92 

92 

02 

+ 1 

ZfflO 95 

04 

95 

♦ 1 

,2160 88 

88 

88 

+ % 

230 82* 

82* 

82*- * 

2220 50 

40% 

50 

+ * 


COUPON BONDS 


9 2600 2851 4181 S354 8884 T?S9 

30 1666 3138 4326 6362 6894 TT 78 

44 1675 3142 4241 5376 6900 7521 

63 1687 3178 4394 5438 6913 7830 

137 1707 3132 4238 5496 6932 7989 

153 1743 320G 4305 ,M14 6357 7993 

168 1754 3214 '4313 6520 6963 7999 

19M" 3281’ -«323 6555 $977 0032 


8804 103*9 12324 13388 
8871 1039$ 12594 13994 
8883 20769 L2S03 24004 
8893 10783 126U 34010 
8910 10803 12630 14032 
8923 10832 12884 14028 
8338 1C84S 12639 -14040 
9045 10887 12723 14046 


T4065 

1017 

14133 

14154- 

14161 

14173 

14180 

14150 

14199 

-142X1 

14118 

14262 

14371 

14334 

143M 

14404 

14412 

15785 

15828 


HieM in-rd Banda Without C aa po M 
To ba redeemed fa part I tee principal amount tearmf to be red e eme d 
appearing alter each number) i 

' M. 878,000 R7. S20BJM0 

The Bondi (or portions Uamfl specified a&pre are to be mtaemed and wfll become 
due and payable on Bley 15. 1978 (tee “Redraption Pate") at the rede m ptfan price at 
100ft of tee principal amount to be redeemed, together artth accrued interest to the -f 
Bedemptiea Date. 

Ou tee Redemptfoa Date there will become due and payable upon each Bond or 
portion thereof so to be redeemed, the- principal amount thereof with interest accrued 
Co the Redemption Date in UE. dollars at the office of DDlon. Read & Co.. Faying 
A goat, 48 WaB Street. New York. New York 10000 or. at the option of tea holder at 
the off Ecu of Credit Industrie! d'Abare etde Lorraine. S.A^ LtUBembourg Paying Agent. 
103 Grand* Rue. Laxombconc. upon prcsenlatloa and surrender thereof, together, 
in the cone of coupon Bonds, with all appurtenant coupons nurturing subsequent to the 
Redemption Date. 

In case of redemption of a portion only of a fully i wjW wri Bond, coupon Bonds or 
folly registered Bonds o( authorised denominaUuni ior the unredoemod balance o ( tee 
principal amount at such registered Bends will, without charge to tee balder thereof, 
be delivered in exchange ior such rcgislurcd Bond or. at tec option o( such h older, 
upon prcsenlaikxi 0 f such rogisteTvd Bond tor the purpose, a. noutloa wpl be made 
thereon of the payment of the portion tho reoi so redeemed. 

Tha Bonds (or portions thereon called for redemption In accordance with tee fate- 
going will no longer be deemed outstanding after the Redemption Date, interest 
th areonwfll cease to accrue on th" Redemption Date, and oil rights with respect thereto 
wiDcesso as of the close of busiwrw on tha Redemption Date, except only tie right of 
tin holders thereof to receive the redemption prim- together with accrued interest 
to tee Redemption Dale. 

Republic of Partafil 
Bp: DILLON*. READ A CO, 

April 14, 197E. Paging Agent 



»L~ 

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T.TT. 



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76 ZT Pern* pTUO 
30ft 19% Pewnol U0 
90ft '-3# Pan pfSB 
7ft 5% PeosWo JB 
-3S6 -34ftPE«WeGO-3 
78% 69ft PepsiCo IMI 
27% 20% .Perk Elm JO 
.28 27ft PC# toe 7_S> 
15 M Peltoc pf V 
IS TOkPettacpf 80 

16ft lift PtdtrPI M 
67% PetrieSt wo 
- 2& -20- -Pefroiw JO 
SO 43 Petrol pfU7 
23ft 2Dft PeJrtoi 2J8e 
31 » Pfizer J4 

45ft 38ft PMP0 2JD 
17% 14% PWlaa 1A4 
96% 84% PfiiTE pNJO 
78 . PtiHE pfa.75 


40ft+ 
33ft 33ft+ 


... 2 SKft aft 3fft- 

9 923 2Bft 27% 28%+ ft 
... 1 87ft 87ft 87ft- ft 

•». 17 6% 6% 6%..,. 

7 77 36% 35ft 34%+ ' 
17 111 76 75% 73 * 1 

23 565 25ft 24% 25%+ ' 

7 227 34% 27ft 24%+ ! 

h. 2 Mft M% U%- ' 

... 1 13ft 13% 13ft.... 

9 26 13U 13 13ft+ - 

SO 7S 77% 76 77%+ 2 

8 91 22 21ft 72 + ft 

... 5 43% 43 43 - 1% 

... 15 21% 21% 71% - % 
13 654 S 27% S + % 
20 295 45 44% 44%+ ft 

9 269 16% 16% 16%.... 
... ZTQ0 «ft «% 96V4+ H 

260 88% 88% 80%.. 


81% » PtXiEpf7.es m . 2M0 80% 80% 80% — 
75% 43%PWlaElpf7 «.7300 75 7S_ 75 - 


15943 

16035 

16042 

16055 

16163 

163W 

16336 

16358 

ISM* 

X6E14 

16688 

16709 

16735 

18751 

16786 

16800 

16828 

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36864 

16894' 

17909 


51 41%.mUS P*058 

47 30% PW1E p(L4Q 

40% 36 PMlEpOM 
75% 12%PWteSub^9 
59% 50% PWlMurr 1 
7% 3% Ptitltos Ind 
lift 6% PtiUWDd DC 
SM 49% PhillPef UO 
n% 7% pwrrvw ao 
23ft 14% PkkwiK J4* 
17ft 15 PtadNG L40 
8% 4% Plerl ftnprt 
44% 35% PTUsburv 1 
36% 27ft PtaW L2D 
M 13% PfflWB AS 
23ft 17% PtttPTB JO b 
39% 31 PittStn J0e 
31ft 20ft PizzaHt JDe 
4ft 3 Finn Resrch 
5 2» Plavtxjy .12 

16% 12% Plessev Me 
7% 5% PNB MR J8 
31% Polarottiaz 
9%, Pondera* 
17% PooeTol JO 
15ftPBrtec» 

66 Portr PtSSO 
16% PortGE »A4 


42% 

14 

34% 

32% 

68 

19% 


... 120 48% 48% 48%+ 

... z» 45% 45ft 45%+ 

... ISO 40 40 40 - % 

7 33 Mft W% M%~ ft 

IS 618 57% 56% 57ft + 1% 

... 91 6% 6 6%+ % 

... 2 9ft 9ft 9ft 

13 368 57% 55% 57 + % 

11 52 Tl% 11 11%+ ft 

9 » 19% 18% 19%+ 1 

6 7 16% 16% 16%+ ft 

... 14 6% 6ft 

13 230 30% 38% 30%+ 1 
W 48 30% 30% 30ft* % 

8 262 M% 14% M%- % 
6 2 20% 20% 20%+ % 

7 832 36ft 35% 36ft + 1% 

15 228 29% 28% 29U+ ft 

7 19 3ft 3% 3ft. .. m. 

9 20 3ft 3% 3ft... 

7 3 14% 14% 14%+ % 

23 34 7% 7 7 ... 

20 5222 377a 34 37%+ 4% 

22 13J 10ft 10 10%+ % 

16 51 20% 20ft 20ft + % 

8 2 28% 28% 2S%- U 

...Z110 47 67 67 .. 

8 178 19% 19% 19% 


199* ’ Stott* sfltf -j:-:/ r.- fl JW 
Htt Lew znDomrs p/E«ftH»to8 LaiTChg 


4Sft 


08%+ 7% 


zm PBTOffr Uf a » *4 -37 

sm tz* o*p* '* U 38 ■££*» »«*» 

-S-S8BBS « I I 

.7% 5ftOuatorJ0r « W «% . 

52% 46% RttstanPol U TO 
B% 3% RBnpto tan 131 » . 5ft , .4ft . J «b+ 
H% 


«ft 


«%-. ft 


T Rnafti JO 
x% Rapid Ant ' 

30% 34% RaoAxn pf3 
33% 27 RWhetfUB 
19% 15% Rnyminl A 
5«% 44% Raytheot ) 

79 18% RCA l-.-. . 

68% a RCA Oglf 4 
+J a% RCA Pf 059; 

. -5K 2ft rhmhb lad 
15% m ReeaeOt M 
31% 22 Reeves L*> 

D% 7V% RnkbCh A* 

» 7 ReflnbSt j64 

20% 18 ReftaUEl 1 

80% sift moan-ora 
Sift ' 34 fteQapfLdO 
a». * Reilcn Grj» 

17 Sft RelGrpptC 
» 72 RetGtppm 

9% Sft Republic CO 
7Sto 70 RapPtaS JO t 
3% l ReaMte far .« 

40% 27% RepSJl 1A0 
13% 7% RtsrvOfl » 

48 33% Revcsos JO 

lift 7% never Gepp 
29% 80% Rgtffm 1 j60 
. 6ft 3% Rexhvn M 
33% 2W Resusrd 
o 32% 2ze?i vtue 
68% 58%ReVWtr3« 
sa .& Revm pOJS 
2Jft RevoMet I 
83 55% RayM pttJB 

15% B% ReySec ^)n 
13% ?% RfcaerdKi I 
26% Sft WtWMor At 
14% Uft Rfctonnd JO 
32 19ft RleodT 130 
.24% 15 RKGraadSD 

^ lAk RlSld M , 
an IMRMeaPJW 
23% Oft nobteaw. JO 
-22% 77 -Rcbrtsn 1JQ 
1» W% Robins ^ 

77% W4R0Cf»Giab 
n»T07 ROCbG pfU 
15% 1ZB. RoritTel JO 
lift 10% Roctawr M 
30% 23% RodwdW 2 _ _. _ 

75ft 57 RKIrrt ptL75 IT* 

27% 20ft RKtatpfL3S 
7S* 28 RttanH 1^8 
8% 4ft Rohr lad. 

27% 20% RcdBns JO 
* 4 Roman Co 

2a 16% Roper 123 
25 19% RnterA J4 

28% 23 Rtwrto MO 
29 ft 22ft Rowan JO 
23ft l«k ROfCCd J2 
47ft 4TOROVtD126» 

8% 4% Rovfind ,10t 
9 4ft RTEQ» .14 
29% 24 RobOmJO 
2<ft 16% Rucker JO 
14ft RussTOB JS - - - -- _ 

12% 9 Ryder sys: .1 5-flS? U 

41ft 45 SaUneR 40 If 17 40ft « 
S% z% Snffeord tod H 22 4 3% 

48ft. 421* Sqfewygrg- 
15 8 SaoeCo JJ7e 70 135 T3ft IT 

«% 33% SLtoMin L29 
13% 11 SUoLtP 1.12 
33% 23ft StLSaF 250 . 

12 10ft StPsuBJKa 
'Sllf 34% StfteoP ua 
9% 4ft satatf JA 
13% lift 5&nDGS 120 
lift *% Sandra a so 
91k 7% SJmnR.99t 
39% 30ft SFetnd 140 
10ft aft SFelnd pfJSO 

28ft - 2D% senPelnt jo 
u nkSanjm&jD 
4Vt 3% Soul RtEsf 
rt 8 ^SavElP JOe 
12% 11 SavEl cn jss 
&=s 3% ScvA Slop 
Tb SavOnOr JO 
<5ft SovkiB Mcb 
3ft Soon ind 

2 SCASvc. . . 

3 Schaefer CD 
47% StteroPI 48 
19% SttOOSr 48 
70 Schtamb JO - 
D% SCM Cp JO 
Hik scoa in Jo 

sftscntLsd J* 

18 ScotPet LOB 
IS StartFo r ja 
u% scamp 48 
7ft senttvs .10 
lift ScowlIMfO 1 
scovn pnso 
4ft ScodDUOVt 


_ a3 »ft **%'>ft+ ft 

4 12 30% l 30% 30%+. % 
A 105,17% 16% 17 
Tl 190 53ft S3 51%+- ft 
MTI87 26% 25% .-25%+ ft- 
_ 4 64ft 63ft ,«3ft+ ft 

IZ 3S0-434O 42 ft ,-480+ ft 
« 1 Hh lft tft+ ft 

4 90 .18 - -17ft U + ft 
_ M 4ft 4ft- 4ft+ ft 
II 27 13ft 22ft B%- ft 
-9 41 -Sift -29ft 31%+ 2 ■ 
.7 33 15ft 15% 15ft+ Vtr 
■ «' 9 TO 9ft 10 > ft 
U 15? 28 27ft -27%+- ft 
«„ -UH- -76ft .78 +2 
50 50 90 +1 ; 

182 12ft 72 ■1Sk+ 1 

VZ u i6% ift m. M 

„v 15 2TO 21 aft+ ft- 

»»»■«' 7ft+ ft 
34 -73¥t »ft Oft- ft. 
10 : *2% 2 2 - ft 

< 123 35ft 35ft 35%+ ft 

8 79 11% lift lift. 

at S7 39ft am a?ft+ w 

... G TO* 9% ‘ 9ft+ ft 
17 130' 25% 74ft 35ft+ ft 
7 133 ' 6ft 6 6ft + ft 

7 aa 39ft a% 29%+ ft 

... 1 45 45 45 +2 

• 808 41 69ft -61 +»% 
W 9 ,40 « + i 

I1«3M»t KH- ft 
45 80% 79 • +2 

8 57 12% 12ft, TZ%^.- 

5? *■« , 1» Wh- % 

13 TO Sflb 23ft 2M+ ft 
T3 67,-13% Oft U%+ ft 

6 38 2M 26% 28% + 1% 
ft 87- 23% -23% »%+ Hfc 
... ft 13 • 13- '13 „hh 

ij 172 -13ft 17 17%+ ft 

13 123 26 25% 2* + ft 

13 « 23ft 2ffl 22%...... 

A 19 23ft ZZ% 23%- ft 

9 SS2 TOO TOb M%+ % 

7 2? 15% 15% l5Hr- ft 
Z30 112ft T12ft 112%+ ft 

m z) T3 12% m MIH . 
A 20 17 16% 16ft- ft 

10 *58 32 33ft 3Z + Tft 
^ ir» 75v» 78 +-m 
w 8 28 27% SO * %- 

39 1(5 71ft 70 70%+ TO 

... Wl 5ft 5% -5%- ft 
16 127 SPA ZS* 2m* ft 
... 7 4ft 4ft 4ft-.... 

9 67 mr ^ w%+ r 

10 141 50% 19ft 19%+ % 
M B9 Z»h 27ft 2TO+ % 

4 2B 26ft 2S» 26%+ ft 
«3 22 23% 20ft 21 — 

5 3DB 47% 45ft 47%+ % 

9 371 Sft 7% ■%+ % 

80 A 8% 8 St 

m US 26ft. 25% 2* - ft 
S 254 22% 21%' 


54 mt d 1*3 2C MM* 

7 41 12% Oft W+W 
XTO* ft 
4B9+ % 
4 +‘ft 
42%+ ft 

ITft+l*' 
g-+ ft 

S*JT- 

754+ ft 


8 

16 


9 


1 110% TQ2 P0G pf 11 JO ...«50 100ft 109 


Baidas of tho above bomb rimuld p ra a m it and aurrendor them far radamptun 
or after Mhy 15. 1976 with tho Kovoribcr 15. 1976 and anlweqamtaKieoas 
ached at Tho la* of Tokyo Tree* Coro pony, 100 Bnmdaray. Now York. Hew 
it 10005. Coupons payable May 15, 1976 aboold bo detached and collected fa 


York 10005, Coupons payable ' 

£b* iriwl xotmutr* 

Interest on tha bonds so called far redemption wfll 
redemption date, to wit. May 15, 1976. 


to accrae after fbe 


April ?,M 78. 


THE BANK OF TOKYO TRUST COMPANY 
as Fiscal Agent 


100 + % 

48ft PW l T tf l 130 U 20 60% 60 60ft 

lift PatmEI L16 II 200 12ft 12% 12%+ ft 

53% PotEI B6J0 .-2470 58 58 SB + % 

43 PtttEI pMJO -.2270 40ft 48 48ft- % 

40 Pot El pCLM ... z20 43V* 43% 43% 

3S_ PPG ind 2 9 500 50ft 48ft 50 + 1% 

10% Premier JO » 14 13 12ft 13 ...... 

IS Prtmr pf.90 ... 8 17 17 17 ...... 

81% PfaCtrG 220 21 450 90ft 00% 89ft + ft 

8% PrudRsft J0 22 12 lift 11% 11%+ ft 

27 Prater 1.40 A ID 44ft 43ft 44ft + % 

5%PS*lnc ... m 770 Mk 7% + ft 
15 PSvCri 130 7 248 14 15ft 1* + ft 

_ 17ftP5vEGlJ2 8 156 1+ 18ft 18%+ ft 

1819% 111% PSE Of 1Z2S ... 2(30 117ft 117ft 177ft- ft 

[103 94ft P5EG PI9J3 ... 210 701ft 101ft J01ft+ ft 

76ft PSEG pfB.08 ...2400 86% 85% 85%- ft 

76 PSEG Bf ? M ..ZUO0 SSft 85ft 85ft + lft 

71ft PSEG pf7J2 ...2100 81 81 81 + ft 

68ft PSE G pt7JO ...am 79ft 7S 79ft + Ift 
52 PSEGpSSO ...gun 56 56 56 -1 

40 PSEG pf4,18 ... ztO 44% 44ft 44%+ I 
25 PSEG t*2vQ ... 15 26 25ft 26 + % 

74ft PSEG pfl^O ... 2 15ft 75% 75% 

» PSvlnd 2J2 12 111 41% 41 41% - ft 

27 PutoSvIn Wi ... 2 27ft 27ft 27ft— 

12 PSind pfl.08 -.2300 13 13 13 - ft 

lift PSInd (>njJ4 -zUMO 12% 12% 12ft- ft 
18% PSvNH 1A8 7 31 21 20% 21 * ft 

25% PSNH pf2.7S ...ZfaO 28% 28% 28ft + % 
5*0% 18% PSvNM 1 J6 8 63 19% 19% 19%+ ft 

6 4ft PUttfefcr tod ... 23 4ft 4% 4fto ft 

4ft 2ft Pueblo Int ... 25 3Vs 3 3ft— 

,5ft 2ft PuertU cere 5 4ft 4ft «%+ ft 
»fePUBSPL226 A 77 30% 20ft 29ft— 
37 27% Pultmn 130 9 07 34% 33% 34+1% 

17 14% ParexCo M 9 46 1S% 14ft 15%+ ft 

6% Sft Purlin FWi 2? 31 5ft 5% 5% 


65 
13% 
58 - 
49 

: 45 
so 
15 
18Vil 

12% 

1 47% 

. 944 
17% 
* 20 % 


!»% 

•s 

58% 

47 

Z7ft 

7+ 

43% 

:27% 

13% 

n% 

ss 


5ft 

2 ? 

6ft 

16 

10 % 

.18% 


67 41% 43 

20 12ft 12 

78 32* 3Tft 

« ti* n% 

TS SOS 41% 42ft 

7 a 0 7ft 

14 61 13ft 13% J3ft- ft 

19 an KRk 9% 10%+ TO 
A 1 7ft 7ft 7ft....- 

9 421 37% 36ft 37ft + ft 

19 .10% ,<ft -10.. +.-ft 
470 29 27ft* 2Bft+ Ift 

49 H% 71 71 - % 

... 40 35% 3ft- 3ft- ft 

5 ID 9ft 9% 9ft+.ft 

... M 12% 1»k 72% - ft 
75 87 Aft 5ft 6 - ft 

10 18 «% Sft 8 %+ % 

... 43 11% 11. ,11ft+ ft 

11 229 6ft 5ft 6*+ ft 

M . 3 2ft 2ft 2ft- ft 

78 5ft Sft S%+ ft 

26 -STD » 58% .60 + Ift 

19 256 20- 19ft -20 +- ft 
20-400 78% 77 78%+ TO 

A 166 Hft 16% 16%+ .ft 

A 51 15ft 14ft .15%+ ft 
A II 6% 6% Aft+ % 

10 62 26 24% 25%+Tft 

A 11 15ft 15% 15% - % 

11 M 2tft 21% 2lft+ ft 

22 12 9ft 9ft- 9ft...... 

... HI 17ft 17% 17ft— 
... 20 43ft 423 42ft + % 

13 42 Aft Aft 6ft 

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Wi Set Cent JO 3 32 19ft Hft 19% + 1% 

8 t33 26ft 26 2TO+ M 
... .52 4ft Ak..4ft...— . 
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9 65 19ft 18% 18%+ ft 

W 866 15% 14ft 15 

23 778 75ft 74ft 75ft+ lft 
... 820 5ft 5% 5ft+ ft 

7 234 29ft 28% 29 + ft 

4 9 5% 5% 5%.., 

9 25 14ft 14ft 14ft+ ft 

15 TO 9% 9% 9%+. ft 
10 43 16ft M% T6ft+ ft 

7 131 S5ft 51 STO+1% 

5 53 73* 72ft 13 + % 

... 3 45% 45ft 45ft- % 

... Tl 21 21 21 + % 

19 35 36 35% 35ft.._ 

9 .57 ltlft l«h 18ft+ ft 

111S41 19ft. 19% 19ft ^ 

... - 10 45* 44ft 44ft— 

... 20 79% 19 ^ Wfc. L f . 
17 43 39% 38ft- 3*fe+ 1ft 
9 26 7% 7ft 7ft- ft 

16 13 » 24 24 - ft 

16 280 17 M% 76ft + % 
... SO 19% 18% 19%+ ft 
... 39 38% 37% 38%+ 1ft 
12 122 23ft 23 23%..-.. 

9 2 66 66 66 

38 6 11 10% 11 + ft 

4? 4S2 20% 19 20%+ 1 

... 130 15% Uft 15%+ T% 

t 214 32% 31ft 32%+ 1ft 
16 449 70% 70 70ft+ ft 

7 » 78* 77ft 17ft- ft 

8 35 16ft M 16 - ft 

7 9 14% 14 Hft+ ft 

2 8 4ft 4% 4ft w ._ 

3*1215 9 8 % 8ft..— 

8 58 32% 31 32%+ 1% 

8 Cl 12ft 11% I2%+ ft 
8 95 17ft 17ft 17%.,—.. 

8 13 15% 15ft 15ft- % 

5 » W% I0ft>.Wft*.ft 

-. A 22% 22% 22% MM 

9 3* .Wft Wft re%+ % 

W . 21 5% 5% 5*+, ft 

6 331 19% Wft 19%+ ft 

- TWO 15% 14% MkM- 
8 A 35% 34% 35%+ ft 

8 PD 51% 40% ;51%+ 2 

9 22 36% 35% 36*+ ft 

— 2 45* 45% 45*+ ft* 

...1480 SS% S*% 55%+ ft 
13.152 36% 36 36ft- ft 

12 25? 60ft 57ft 59%+ 2ft 
M . 10 A - 6 • A .... 

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12 142 22ft Mft 22ft+ % 

US S3 7 TO reft 77%+ ft 

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5 S »-;T* TZ.* 

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50% 38% SperrvR .76 U 558 47ft 46ft 47% 

... 5 D lift 12 + % 

20 128.15% Uft 15 + ft 
19 398 28% 27ft 28%+ 1ft 
15 259 32% 31% 32 

6 a 27% 27ft 27*+ ft 


11% 

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27% 

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24% 

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27% 20ft SeaOCL tJO 
6% 3»j SetbWA J2t 

3i% 26ft Seagram JO 
7% 45b Seagravt •• 
19ft 14 SwMPw JO 
18 13% SeftrleG J2 

39% 63ft Sears ljoa 
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51% 30%-ShellGI Pf3 

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41% 33%. SherwW 220 
lift 9% SierrPK J2 
19% 15ft Signal .90b 
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89 45 US SM 2.80 

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77ft 66 SteHvMOo 
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38% 98% Sntfthtot Jfi 
70 5Bft Smnwdioe z 
18% 13 SmfitiTr JO 
90 16% Smucter JO 

Hft 11 SotaBas JO 
6% 3* Soneste im 
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32ft 97ft SooUn 2J50 
11* 8ft EOS C« JO 
18 l5ftSOrEGU2 
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21% 18% SOCsIE 1 j 68 
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SSV, 48* SON Re5 745 
38* 32ft SoNwEpTI 3 
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17* a Vtefnn JO .14 330 15* 1 - 

23* 15ft Veeder JO 2S TO 23V* 2 -- 

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101% HTO VaEP IK9J5 ,K ZSO 701ft 7W 

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17% 17ft VSI con* JB > 7 1TO 16 

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49% 37* St 8 Pa W 40 
34% 29%StdOUCal 2 
48% 40ft Stoillnd 2J30 
79% 6ift sionoh 1J6 
9% TOShfiOress J0 
7 5* StoPrud J6 

16 - 9* Standex JO 
32* 21 SlteiWk 1.64 

9>A TO Sfsnrov JO 
2D* 1TO Starrett 1 
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12 10% SlUASe 145 

84 SfautCh ZM 
6ft StarcW M 
16ft SterDrug JO 
4ft SterlPre.m 

12* stomdnr ad 

26% 18% StevenJ 1 JD 
30ft 23* SteWWl 156 
a TO 18* StskVC 1J0 
62ft 48* StoneW 2J0 
25% IS StoneConjO 

21 . ITOStcpShop 1 
73% 9 stores Tech 
Uft 15ft StorerBdg 1 
IS ’ 10* StrWRIte J0 
48ft 39% Stuwor 1JZ 
36 30ft SfW BtAlJO 
TO TO Suave 9m 
20 Uft SubProGS 1 

22 11* Sun Cbm JO 

31% 26ft StaOO 142r 
35% 31* SunO pOJS 
a* 20ft Sunbeam l 
3D* 17 Sundstrd JO 
46 35* Sunds PfLSD 


26% 18ft Wadwra .76 H TO. STO 26 
57% SBftWacbpOJB «, 46 S7ft S5 
5% 2* Wadi Rtty ... 27 3% 3 
16* UftVWgreeBl 10 3? 16* 15 
3D* 2Bft WkrA IJDa 9 99 30%. S? 
24% 18% WaHBus JO 10 12 22 3f 
19% 11% WbBMOl JOB f«> :. 
32;. ZZ* VMM pfun — 2 33 

17% .12% W^Mart JT, 19 34 .15% 

10% TO^SFdRJ .47f U_W ttte 

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25% 17%WnCotn ^ 4s 3tD 34% 

SI 35 ttfrtlC pfl2 . JT 3V.48 
38% 30% Watneri. .9Z 17 506 Uft 
38% iro Warns U0 U M as 2P 
SO 18% WwhGs X88 10 24 18%. HI 
15% 70% WasbNaf jo 7 J )« lfl 
Jlft 25* WasN rtijo ... 1 30%. 
18%.12*W0Sb5llFv U *,W. 
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9* TO Waste Mo*-. ** 99 t 7% 
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7ft 9ft Webb Del E 

17* TO WeflMcL M 

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21 Hft WeUFoo AS,.. « SO; 27* 

8% TOVMIFM.iar '... 5b- 7ft 

75* 70 WasaoFJV t 0 .3. Uft 

21 23 32% 22%. 56 47% WTPPpUJO -SO 

15 174 35ft 35% 35%+ 1 42% 35 WMTO» 2.^ t ‘32 r 9’' 

26 a 4TO 45% .46 - ft 11ft- TO WbAJrl. J0a" 39 92 9* 

81724 35ft 34% 35*+ ft 2Jft. 17* WrS»C L40 '7 199 92% 

9 964 49ft 4Eft 49%* 1ft' -15% 71* WuNflAJOT^ 4 CD Hft 

2123871 69 71 +2% 13* 6 Wn Pac Ind 11 38 12* 

91 20 7* 7% 7* 18* 72* WnPuM JOb 7 15 17ft 17 

13 M M 6*...... 19ft UftWUnion 1J0 9 214 18* 18% 

5 Uft 14* U%+ ft 64% 54 WnUilOfA H , 2 <5 M% 

SB 44 WWtortim ... C 49 . 48% 

as 45 HYiUn Ptt5j ... 3 53% 53 

IM 13 WestgEJ .97 69068 15* 15% 

48% 43% waste P*3J0 - - 



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24 lift lift -lift— 


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6 32 TO 5* 5*- ft 

8 30 13* 13% T3%- * 
II 319 23ft 23* 23ft + % 
IQ 68 31* 30% 31 + ft 
8 85 24% 23% 34U- ft, 
8 37 STO 55* 56*- ft 
A 17 21* 21* 27*+ * 
5 3 20% 19% T0%- % 

8 30 Tift n U%+ ft 

9 MO 24ft 23* 24%+ 1% 

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9 88 45 44* 45 + ft 

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70 62 Sft 5% S*+ ft 

7 9 16* Uft 16*+ * 

... 3 19% 19ft 19ft...... 

7 « Wi 30% 3Ift+ lft 

... 219 as* 34ft as + % 

n an 27* av, 27*+ % 

a 302 28ft 27* 27*- * 

_. . __ ... C 45 45 45 

13% 9* SurOtlMg J6. IS 104 11* Tl 11%+ * 

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W W 17 16* 17 + ft 

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9 37* 37% 37*+ * 

TO TO 6ft 6ft+ * 
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5* 5% 5%... 


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7ft Sft StvmfcG M 
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22* u* S vbron J4 
42% 33% Sybm pliAO 
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5* 1% Tfciatt Nat 
10 TO Talley M 


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ta IM 12% 11% 72% 6 7* 


27ft 13% Tandvdt 

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7 5 TariinleMr 

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47% 32% WsJvoq 1J0 
24ft ITO Wtybra MB 
40ft 37 Weyertr JO 
66* 55% WbvtdOJO 
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98 TO TO * 

26 184 36* 35% 3£ 

TI C TO TO O' 


II 





'-'^‘MIDWEST 


U.S. and Foreign Stock Exchanges 

Tuesd «y, April 20, 1978 & 


yQJ?JC TTMES, WEDNESDAY. A PRTL Si, 2976 



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High Law Gom of 
SB 3*9 344 + i 

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J2MV4 28 28VJ+ 21 

*!0 754 9K— 


HWi Low don &5! 

43 43 43 1 

5271ft 271ft 27b— 16 
$175% 17* 17* " 

JliJft U 14-1* 
«2ft <756- M 


$51 % 514 5*4— & 

OS>% 25Vi 2Sa 



to 

-T.- -ll':! io 


-, ; r-its 

r. : •>, .‘n 

— * . i 


i ana* ' 

>***« ■■ 

as?^ 


•rf.: 


. PBW 
UP* 10T »l 101 +2 
3'4 31% 314V .. 

V?.**!* ** *» *»%.. 

V.-^r 7 7 7 

'VSSjf »» |» 25%.. . 

, Co T7a 77% 175%+ i% 

^ -■^■MWXJO sham. 



BOSTON 

f- =^«t 1314 IS 1316— 1% 

-f fldl 416 414 416 
:;t-v na h i> 

y* ~5s MV s 5 5 

-V-C.-te 215-14 2% 215-16 

-..■■.tin 91 IS 911 


;•■*£»* 21V 21V 2IV+ld 
-'ir. 1M4 21% 29-74 +1-14 

•f 


’f 


lJ&ONTO 


i <- 


_ -. idba funds, 
r - O* uniasslnarksil S 

.•=: Utah- Low Closo dS? 

- HMlan Funds. 1 
", ^<i unloss narked t ■ 

• :,*■ ■ sn% 516 54% -i- a 

• $1256 121% 12V + a 

. ’ 114 14 14 

T oa 430 430 

.-ft 112V 12V 17*+ H 

.-•: 114 t4 14 + a 


*733 Coitss Gas 
W80 Con Fantv 
100 Csnwosl 
2*50 Cralgint 
2346 Crush loti 
1200 Cnm 
2545 Denison 
3000 Dlckasn 
2222 Dofasco A 
5450 Oom Store 
17MD Toxtlo I 
2000 Du Pont 
KP* Dytex L a 
1880 East Mai 
450 Electro A 
IS Emco 
SMB Falcon C 
2872 Falcon 
400 Fad tnd A 
700 Franca no 
a??G Dish* A 
10075 Gnl Mascf 
*450 Gibraltar 
350 Goody oar 
225 Graft G 
200 Gt Oil Ids 
13898 GL Paper 
4M Grorhnd 
400 Ouar Tnt 
1895 Hambro C 
120 Harleoulii 
ISaOHawkor S 
1100 Ham D A 
1484 H Bar Co 
200 Hur Erl A 
3700 I AC 

2 Indutmln * 

300 Inland Gas 
1423 Int Mmol 
3575 Infpr Pipe 
2175 Inv Grp A 
4000 Jannodc 
13755 Kaiser Re 
750 Kan Tran 
225 Kelsey H 
3421 Kerr A A 
2325 Koffhr A 
400 La bait A 
2300 Leona 
1825 Loot Gan 
2000 LL Uc 
3*5 Lab Cn A 
350 Lob C» I 
345 Loeb M 
432 Mdon H A 
12290 MB. LM 


4750 Beyls Cor 
‘M»|™tor Rh 
>00 Bramelia 
Bramwte 
21“ Jmtea m 
2*30 Brldeer 
IMIfC Forest 
4434 BC plrmr 
8450 BrunS?" 

}*}■«“ Auln 
1310 Burni Fds 
UtCvTF?* 

*®C.I Pow A 
4000 CjRiflo 

iiZJ? %%% t 

TgLte s»nvn»* ? 
JSSn B h n ^ Sk %2 5v+ 
laS &nte-‘. Hi ** 5oo* eJi* * 

sssssl 

3000 CUeftan D $1B 9J% !** + 

2000 COch Will 27 24 24 Z. £ 

1700 C Holiday I 300 295 300 + 

500CM Bide 25D 2S0 So +10 

1300 Con Dlstib 375 370 173' 1 

«»* J1V 11V+- a 

410 400 405 + J 

M 3» ffi +10 
S6a s* oa+ a 
sioa ioa ina-a 
Sink 1016 W*A 
»V 54V S6V 
4*5 485 490 —5 
$27* Z7* 27V+ S% 

SJ5V 05V I5« * 

$aa aa aa 
tuv, ua iia+ a 

,«•«%+* 
200 1*8 200 

400 1*5 400 '+ 5 

a > > - a 

»a bv sa-a 

1394% 39* 39*7 £ 
MV 5V SV+ a 
ga 7v 7a+ a 

$7* 7f% 7 V— * 

-129 I2S - 127 +1 
W 7Vt 7V+ a 
$13 13 13 - a 

$32 32 32 

$5 5 5 

$30* 29V 30V+ia 
$17 47 17 

soa oa $a 

240 241 250+20 

$sv av >v- a 
M V 4% 4V — a 
s$a 4 sa+ a 
$i*a I** »a+ a 

$23 23 23 

9181% it* i>a— a 
Stfft I* 81ft- v 
5*a *14 91ft 
240 232 238 — 2 

$134% 13V 13V+ V 
$7V 7V 71%- a 

$4 5* 4 + a 

311V 11V 1IV+ V 
787 185 185 

siBi% iaa wa 
siiv iiv n*+ a 

440 445 440 +15 

$lf* 14* T6%+ a 

F3I0 345 380 +15 
390 390 3*0 

150 . 145 145 

475 475 475 
475 479 479 —5 
310 310 31* — 5 
$8* 8* IV- V 

$ 2 oa aa 20 a + v 


Slock 

1200 Madsen 
J»M 14 Mills 
3M Maleni a 
, i“«« Star A 
S530 Meer* 
lWM»n*r 

a» Netes Die 

»03 Nerende A S34* 54i 34V + V. 

* w w 5 i! 8S B8tiS 

If®™** 7 gaSS2g=,S 

siSE iB S ,,r A 245 240 S$ +» 

liS45 PinCin p vn 21 K> %*+-»» 

35 Piiibd N y $13% U% Jl 

*» Pembln a MO ju MO^ " 

400 PetrotiiMi $19* 19* jin * 

SSP" ? J 5 fE 

'» SS . £ £* 2 

TURnd Oslr A $4* A* 4* 

K3V 23V 2304 
P 73 73 73 —1 

$11 18 1$ + V 

$7* 7* 

$14 15V 

$4* 4* 

siiv na 

SIB* tia 
S6V 6a 
$** 9V 

2^ * v - 

$7V 7* 

$2316 a _„. , 

3oa+ * 

210 207 207 

$ria »v ua+ v 

A 390 390 390 -5 

* 300 300. 300 — M 

$2i a a 


Foreign Exchange 


HEW YORK (API — Tuesday Foruteu 
‘J 11 *" ■«* decimals of**" 
•oner. New York prices at 2 p-m. 


425 Reich bold 
m Revnu pn 
458 Rothman 
2900 Softs 
■5552 5 hell Can 
ua sntrrin a 
14» Slebens 
1100 SIMM 
45283 Slmaient 
M97 Slnptan S 
500 Slater stl 
914 Telcorp 
47548 Seulte A 
9905 Stolen A 
2500 Sleep R 
40450 5imdala O 
229 Tech Cor 
44 Tack Cor 
100 Tee Can 


AipeMlne (oesel 

Australia (dollar) 

Austria {sctiHllns I 
. Bafalwn (Irancl 
Bruit (cnoelroi 
Britaie (eotuid) 

30 Day Futures 
40 Day Futures 
90 Day Futures 
Canada I dollar) 
Colombia (peso) 
Danmark (krone) 
France (franc] 

Hollaed launder) 

Hone Kane (doll or) 
Israel (pound) 

Italy (lira) 

Japan (yen) 

Mexico (pose) 

Norway | krone) 
Parfoeal (escudo) 
South Africa (rend) 
Spain (peseta) 

S w ed en (buna) 
Switzerland (franc) 
Venezuela (bolivar) 
W.6armeny (ddmart) 


Tuesday A 
•0140 J140 

1.2500 1.2475 

.0540 JBS5 . 
.025700 JI2SM0 
-IBS) .tOSO 

1.4445 1.8545 

1.1400 14 

1A330 1.8400 

1 J 250 1.8225 

1 41140 1A145 

.0335 .0335 

.1475 .1455 

.2145 2150 

473 S 4735 
-»» -2030 

.1325 .1400 . 

JtIJU .0011*0 
403350 .003350 
4801 4M1 

.1830 .1848 

4340 ams 

1.I53S 1.1519 

4>m JH55 
4275 42M 

4975 4970 

4335 4335 

4950 3TS> 


If you still 

want a bank 


7*+ V 
14 + V 
4V+ V 
II*- V% 
18!%- !% 
4V+ * 
*V— V 
«%- * 
7V+ V 

231%+ V 


LONDON 
(In Iriltsh pence uniass otbenrlse sxedffedl 
Kloof 4«o 


8250 Thom N 
12522 Tor Dm 
1007 Tor Star 
0344 Traders A 
3725 Trans Mt 
7201 TrGut PL 
1115 Un Carhld 
4281 U6as A 
3900 Unfan Oil 
350 U Kano 
13050 U Sisco* 
1300 Upp Can 
100 Van Off 
HOOVestiroe 
150 Varner P 
500 Wridwod 
500 WsHnene 
17750 West Mine 
340 Wustnhs* 

110 Wrston 
1400 Wlllrw 
350 Weodwd A 
400 Y* Bear 


A S13V< 12V 
Bk $18* IS* 


1316+ * 
1«V% 


$11 11V IS + v 

$13 13 13 — V 

S1U6 101ft <10* 

S11V 11V 11V 

. $23 a 23 

17V 7V 7V+ * 
$10* 10* 18* 

$7* 7* 7* 

MV lt% IV- V 
■105 184 104 —3 
375 375 375 —18 

$14V% 14* 14* 

$12 11V 11V— * 

$12* I7U 1216+ * 
$10* 10* 10* 

42$ 400 420 

$22* 22* 22* 

S14V 14V 14V 
115 115 115 + 2 
$19* 19* 19*— * 
228 221 228 -2 


Total sales 3.790.430 shares 


MONTREAL 


Quotations In Canadian funds. 
Quotations Ifl cents unless marked $. 


Sales 


Stock 


HMi Low Dose Cta. 

^ft'wma $ 24V324* 24V+1V 
100 Asbestos S 28V 28V 28V— * 
*239 B8k Ment $ 16 15V IS*.. .. 

14S® Basic Res $ 10* 70w3 io%_ * 
2045 Bombard 240 240 2® 

iracan Cament s It 11 11 .. 

10® Can™ ( w2 22 22 + V 

WJCod Bath . $ 37V 37 37* + {? 

,2W Don Bridn $ 34V 34V 34V- V 
«?ao Fnd Col 210 205 210 +10 
471 MLW-Wrih $ 14 14 14 

, A $17* 17* 1$*^-'* 

0 $$V *T 9V— * 

, Price Co $ 15V IS* 15V+ * 

'293? 5°”' , B,nk *»* W6 

3575 Roy Trust A $ 22* 22V 22* . 
Total sa| H 404.001 shares. 


AAC 

AAI 

Alld Bonn 
Anno Id 
AP Cmsoat 
Bebcndc 
Barctan 
Barlow 
Bats 

Bacchants 
■ IOC 
BhFveors 
Boc inlt 
■oofs 
Botswana 
Bowatar 
Bracken 
Br Pat 
Brown (J> 
Burma It Oil 
BuHtis 
Cad Sdtarp 
Cawpiam 
Ourinr Cm 
OMB Ub 
Q ms Gold 
Cboriaulds 
Dt Boars Def. 
DeLaRuo 
D1 sillier* 
□oerns 
Dunlop 
EMI 

East Dries 
Ruun 

F S Gcduld 
GEC 

Gen. Bee 
Geo Minina 
SFSa 
G laxo 
GKN 

Grand Met 

Guard 

Gux (A) 

Harmony 

Harfles 

Hawkar 

Hoover (A) 

Hso Fraser 

ICI 

inut 

ICI 




Leslie 47* 

Uovds 232* 

f-dn Bride SIV 

U be non 45D 

Locals 224* 

Marks *4 

Mehl Box 281* 

Midland 292* 

Miner! 8 Resours 198 


Nat West 

P 8 D 

Phillips 

Ptossev 

Pots Plat 

Pres Brand 

Pros Store 

Pro 

Rank 

RD 

KCM 

ReddH 

Reed luff 

Royal Ins 

RTZ 

Sal Trust 

Shall 

SI Hoi 

Slalar 

Sulllere 

Stand Bk 

SNlfbntein 

Tanks 

Tate 

Thorn 

Tubes 

Turner New) 
UDS 

Ultramar 
Unllevar 
Union Oirp 
Vaals 
Vkkers 
Wl nkals 
Woohnrtb 
Wblkon 
W Dries 
W Deep 
W. Hold 
Zandpaa 
ZCI 


manage your 


payrol 


come to Chemical* 


(Bends In pounds) 


Trans 78/M 
Consols 2*t 
War Loan 


£50* 

CIS* 

£27* 


Treat M/12 
Trees 80/8J 
Trees 1997 


£42* 

m* 

£ 100 * 


Foreign Stock Index 


. -T Baflwi ->('•> 


...fi 

1T.B 

; # 


Maandi M pf 490 
Mfra Lana 29.211 
Mont Edhon 
fflivem 
Ptrein Spa 
Rlnascenfc 
Sda Vlscosa 
5W 
APK 


'.i 


'. -(TERDAM 

-i --IWksS-Bulldwi) 
-itorPMHea 


Wfl 


;$ •«' 


h- .-> 


-r* - *■- 

8’ . 


1 


«»M Dutch 

UnHeva- 

— cVan (Hwaarai 227 JO 
'JOjlCLM ‘ 1K.4D 

ijtoljwinrf io2jn 

lso I Albert Hafln 118.80 
’■BO 

."JUMlOlt Mot. 



PARK 

(la French francs) 

Omnium Pet 280 
itochinev 107.40 
RadlotBdmlouo 401 
Rhone Poulenc 96.70 
Saint Gobain 131 JO 
Schneider 175 

Cto Bantalra 312 
Rn Suez 


FRANKFURT 


(to German maria) 

Jffe .E-Sl "helnWestuh 

S ASF !®- M Scherlnu 

Barer Mutoren 2S9JD SIboims 298 

uunmrrz2unk 204 I Suddeui Zucter 240—. 

Thyssen Hurite 137 Joi 


Yester- 
day 

Aouterflam .. 102.1 
Brussel* .... 7»J3 
Frankfort .. 1S52S 1 
(London (30) .414.8 
(London (500) 179 JO 1 
i) {Milan 78.9* 


ZURICH 


. fcVsW 


*•' & 




MNESBURG 

i. Ahtqw Rands) 

38 1 Stllhnrtaln 
65 I Walkmu 

I W. Drietadeln 
» W. Holdings 
H|w. Deee 


(In Swiss Francs) 
, Aluminium 427 
Brown Boweri 1.450 
aba-Gilgy Rae 490 
Citw-Gelgy BR 1JB5 
Scftweitt Kredtt ZMO 
Etodruwatt 1,770 
Fischer 690 

Mot Columbus 980 
Battle Ord 341c 
Raessurmoe 2M:- 
SdNrz Bfcvrn 431 i 


Conti Gum mi 105 
Daimler Bent 1SS 
Deutsche Bank 31IJD 
Dresdner Bank 242JD 
FarhM Barer 144 
Farben liouls 3.90 
Hoedister Farb 170.70 
Mannesnnnn 374JD 
Met GcMisctifl 245 
Rhein StaW iiojo 


Sodec 9 % 

Sutler 2J80 

Swiss Air Ree' 475 
Uniall Winter 1,850 
SdnezBokeesell 3,120 
Zurich Vers 6J500I 
Huff La Roche MOJOfl - 

xjr*” ij H.B-W 

SanAu Ft Certs 4400 


Voikwann 

vena 

Allianz Vere 
Barer Vereiia 
Munck Rck Br 
Munck Rck Hm 
Ericsson 
Karstedt 


149 JD 
116 
421 


. 188^1 107.5 11IJ) 101.2 

3WJS 310.15 413J2 379,15 
334.10 33143 344J1 32628 
<-5M80 4477.42 44I4J5 4^03.06 
19tlD 190.18 192.10 173.00 
- 2«J 2*5.1 2984 20.2 


, , — 1974 , 

HToh Lew 
lasj 
86.76 
159.64 1. 
4174 S 
179 JO 1, 
91.1/ " 
1114) 

413J2 
344J1 


'Paris 

ISrdnty .. 

IdTokyo (n| 

JdTekre (e) 

SwjTeronto .. 
dWjsZoridl .. 

liol f-FtnaiKlal Times. I-II Sole. d-Dow Jonas 

^ (Ji* CorBOT,ti[m - Tww.’ 


Chemical Bank has 
the largest bank-run payroll 
management system in New York. 
Which figures, because a major 
bank should know more 
about handling and transferring 
money than anyone else. 

So if you want a bank to 
handle your payroll management, 
get in touch with Chemical. 

We believe we can do a more 
efficient job than any outside 
payroll service. Or for 
that matter, any other bank. 

You’ll find we’re faster and more 
flexible because we’re more 
responsive to your needs. 


And we’ll keep on doing 
. the job, Even though some banks 
have been dropping out of the 
payroll management business, 
we’re proud of being the biggest 
and we intend staying the biggest 
-We’ll be glad to answer 
your questions and we’II show 
you how Chemical’s Payroll 
Management System is better 
for your company. 

Call Ken LaMotte at 

( 212 ) 952-2711 


CfemicalBaak 


When business needs are financial 
the reaction is Chemical. 


TOKYO 


(to JepiiMw yen) 


2 jo 


38SELS 

titan francs) 

B , PelreHiM 
» | Ptafo Gevaeri 
JB SMro 
D i solid* 

4> | Unkui Mlniere 


»?■ 


SJ 


?iS 

730 

3.220 

1.278 


4 Kuril I 
Amwrt Pgt 
AC I 
Ansett 
APM 

Bank NSW 
Beni 
BMP 
Coles 
|C5R 
Idem 
IAC 


Set Gen Banque 2^78 ■ Ph Morrli 


SYDNEY 

Un Auilrallmi doners end cents) 

2-12 
145 
1.15 
L42 
JD 
.99 
1-20 
2J4 

— 142 

3.82 W/Bunnah (30c) .92 

1.72 Daieetv ADD 

1.® J Marl* Vales .lof Altonr 

Bank of Adelaide 1 .(7 1 Celt] lou Are 


Myer 
Hews 
Rmco 
R othman 
HC SWWi 
WiHum 
W oohMorffas 
HIM 
WMC 


Foil PbotB 494 
Hltecfll 201 

Kawasaki Sled 118 
Mahuslrtte El Ind 419 
MttuUstU Chore 150 
MKsoUsbl Elec 114 
Mitsubishi Hvy Ip 141 
Milsul MIiKSimR 134 
Mitsui Co. 410 


T16 1 Nippon Oil 323 


Nippon Steel dare 134 


Sony Carp 

Sumitomo Cham 

Tokyo MarAFIrp 
Toshiba Elite 
Tony 

Toyota Motor 
Tore Koere 


Report from Number One Wall Street 


BUENOS AIRE6 


Act rater "8" 
Alporeafas 
Astra Pot 


(to Anantiw poses) 


20.8O 
1440 
3740 
440 | 
TZJS 


Gwrfabfil Flo 
Ika-Ranault 
MoHnos Rio 
Slam 

TanreDlWV 


19.® 

MS 

18® 


A 


;• % ... _ 

-bi-M/l ties with leading financial and industrial 
W'i "S^w* 0 "*. <*»«v*s <te Rochefort. 

i..»‘ ••- . ’•* .Li.-.iY'- Iricnncm;... i 


.V. 






y 


i :*• . 


iaa 


-c'y 


I -- • 
i ' V J 



u. 7.** 


K ■> 



-End 






m 








_Ir is our unique intemarionai 
relanonsKips builr up over the years— 
the floating plane was built by Swiss and 
oelgian firms— chat enable countries 
like Indonesia ro move ahead. 


«*■(. 


* •# 


jT 




-Y 

-7a 


•-» 




Bank fur 

Gemeinwirtschaft 


; ' ^■rraeffTwrtrtschaft's 1975 performance reflected the confidence' . 
• bank s basic P hitos °P h y : 10 work on behalf of 

• , ' ^.benefit For BfG, 1975 was a year of satisfactoiy earnings. 

: 2 ®.bank anticipates a continuation of the upward trend that 
. : rv3 an end to the recession. 



: >:\Uiaudfted balance sheet as of December 31, 1975, 
- Wig to a press announcement by the President-of 
• l\ -'riTein wirtschaft, Dr. Walter Hesselbach: " 


A 


t 
' •• 


. v- . win be contained in Bank fur Gemeinwirtschaffs complete 
• ft to be released in micl-1976. 


'Jeon ek Roche fern, Vice Pr««fcnr 
Intemoional Corresponds Banking Division 

Floating a fertilizer 
islant for Indonesia. 

Jean deRocheforr, who supervises 
Irvir^’s coiTespondent tanking opera- 
Qons in Asia and 'the Middle East, has 
built-up relationships with many devel- 

** ina 'es- And he’s anxious to 
erable them to expand their economies 
with investment ties thar can originare 
wuri any company or country ready to 
do business. 

Take Indonesia, which is currendy 
dependent on costly imported urea. 

The Irving participated in a worldwide 
syndicate to bring a shipbome fertiliser 
plant there to shore up Indonesia^ ability 
60 I Jf et ? ts own fertilizer needs and even 
enable the country tq export a iitde 

It should bring Indonesia an 
annual foreign exchange benefit of $600 
million. 

. . The floating plant has mobile effi- 
ciency. Its raw material is natural gas 
^wbeing flared or wasted at offshore 
ijp. When rhe gas at one site is gone, 
the ship moves oh ro another of he 
country’s ample offshore sources. 

T “The Irving's relationships with 
Jwonesia go back to pre-Worid War II 
days, and today we work closely with the 
central bank and all five of the scare com- 
nKrdal banks, and we have many cl ose 


T Carter Hagaman. Vice President 
CoTpi /rau Financial Counseling Doptironenj 

A profitable dialogue. 

l . C-aner Hagaman heads rhe Irvings 

l Jimnraw F~V. 1: ° 


"" 1 - =.!-4to.< mtbu— ■ . . ■ 

\iflnTiejmo, Federal Funds Broker 
ttondand Money Market Division 

Wednesdays are 

ChaotlC. Every day, Suzanne 
Zoigo brokers hundreds of millions in 
overnight Federal Funds. It’s a demand- 
ing job that requites a headset insread of 
a reguter telephone. But no day is ever as 
busy as wfednesday-setdement day. 
j i im ov , er country, money 
dMks call her to buy or sell, or just to get 
a teel of the marker. “It’s a demanding 
and sensitive job; says Suzanne, “because ■ 
youte constandy talking to professionals 
who knowhow to make their banks 
money work. You have to build and gain 
their confidence by the way you conduct 
the market" 

And Suzanne does. Her desk, 
which is part of the Irving’s Bond and 
Money Market Division, makes the 
Irving the only bank in the U.S. that 
brokets Federal Ftinds. Which keeps Ms. 
A)igo on the telephone for most of the 
day. raraculariyon Wednesdays. 


*- ‘■ci ndgaman neads the lr\ 
Corporace Financial Counseling 
Department. With 15 full-time profes- 
sionals, ore department is apd'y named. 
We work closely with clients on a con- 
nnumD individual and confidential basis. 
We re here ro advise. To assist. To offer 
informed objectivity," say's Hagaman. 

The Irving's counseling covers ■ 
two major areas: 

. Tirsr, there’s finance- die aggrega- 

tion of corporate capital at reasonable 
rates, for one client, the dialogue may 
concern the advantages and drawbacks 
or equity. lor another, the various alter- 

nahlw in n -I . £ . ... T- .1, 


— - "i — oiwmci, uic vanous i 
natives in a debt financing. lor still 
' livide; 


miaiiuiK. X Ul SUll 

another, a review of dividend policy. 

Second, there’s capital manage- 
•ment— the use of capital as a resource. 
Here, we help dienes answer such ques- • 
tions as: Can ROI performance stan- 
dards work in my company? How can we 
best allocate limited investment capital? 
ohould each division have the same goal 
in retunron investments? 

More and more companies have 
come to rea lire that a dialogue with our 
Loiporare Financial specialists is a profit 
h 0n ti ran you scajT toeing with 


wiiii me irving as a pre 
retainer to call on our services and tna 
unique. For financial dialogue, call usJ 


Irving TrustCompany. Unique. Worldwide, 

A CHAR71R NEW YORK BANK © 


VfanberFDIC 









. r» 


,, .it- 
~f'< I 


V 






THE HEW YORK TUXES, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, im 


Bell Issue Sells Well; Sears Yield 8.02 


New Bond Issues 


in* thttm w attjvn i securities dealer remarked as 

By JOHN H. AttAN j surveyed the fixed-income 

■me Southern Bell Triepbonfti^jj^,^ afternoon ad- 
and Telegraph Company's bigj vance _ 


Credit 

Markets 


$450 million debenture issue 
yielding 8.293 percent — the 
lowest rate for such an issue 
in more than two years — sold 
relatively rapidly 
yesterday despite 
the lower interest 
rate, and a spokes- 
man for Salomon 
Brothers, the lead- 
ing underwriter in the sale, es- 
timated that the issue was 
“probably 90 percent sold” by 
late afternoon. 

The Southern Bell bond issue 
had sold slowly at first, and 
the offering was only “in me- 
diocre shape” yesterday morn- 
ing. Consequently, when sales 
picked up, the entire corporate 
bond market responded and 
jenerallv moved upward. 


Besides the Southern Bell and 
Sears issues, there were these 
notable developments is the, 
credit markets yesterday: 

§The BankAm erica Corpora- 
tion disclosed plans to sell $200 
million of 25-year debentures 
through a four-manager group 
led by Blyth Eastman Dillon, 
& Company. 

fThe Department of Housing 
and Urban Development, an- 
nounced the sale of $700 mil- 
lion of Government-backed tax- 
exempt notes at a slightly high- 
er average interest rate than 
a similar (but much smaller) 
note issue marketed last week. 
One-year projects were priced 
to yield 3.10 percent, 15 basis 
points more than last week, 
cthe Treasury announced 


prices _ 

Then the S2o0 million issuej . * . 7 j , Kfiiinn 

of Sears. Roebuck & Company wWdd Mn ^.l bflbon 

debentures scheduled for sale bl ^ s ne ^ Mon day, $200mil - 
today was priced to yield 8 .Q 2 |h°n less than is scheduled to 
nercent, and it seemed likelv to;* 11 * 1 ) 11- ® a Ppl 29- In the money 
'sell quickly after it is formally! market, the Federal Reserve 
offered. 9 purchased Treasury bills and 

The reception for these twol ne S oti * ted repurchase, agree- 
kev corporate bond issues in- for some off the intern*, 
dicated clearly that the under-; &<mal accounts it handles, 
lying trend in the long-term I In the corporate bond mark- 
bond market is still toward! et’s offering of Southern Bell 
lower yields, credit market" Telephone debentures, the $450 
analysts* concluded late vesLer-i million issue was offered with 
day." * !an S ! 4 percent interest rate 

'“The market's getting backiand a price of 99.50 percent 
on the track.” one Government! of face value to produce the 


yield of 8.293 percent to matur- - 


ity bn April 15, 2016. The de- 
bentures are rated triple- A by 
both Moody's and Standard & 
Poor’s. 

The Sears Roebuck debenture 
issue, also rated Aaa/AAA, will 
be offered this morning with 
an 8 percent interest rate at 
a price of 99% percent to pro- 
duce their 8.02 percent yield 
to maturity on April 1, 2006. 
Goldman, Sachs & Company 
heads the underwriters: 

While the 8.02 percent yield 
on the Sears securities was 
as much as 7 basis points high- 
er than some dealers had ex- 
pected, the issue may have 
been priced the way it was 
because a $250 million issue 
of 7% percent notes due in 
1985 that was marketed in 
March, 1975, had sold slowly 
and had dropped from 100 to 
95 when it was freed to trade, 
producing some sour memories 
among investment bankers. 

A $75 million issue of deben- 
tures of Beneficial Finance 
Company of New Jersey (gua- 
ranteed by the Beneficial Cor- 
poration) was sold yesterday 
at a yield of 7.835 percent by 
a Blyth Eastman Dillon Group. 
The eight-year issue is rated 
Aa AA, 

Today, a Kidder, Peabody 
& Company underwriting net- 
work is expected to offer Si 00 
million of eight-year of Avco 
Financial Services, Inc., notes 
at a yield of S.5S7 percent 



UTILITIES . 

Orfs. Asked nice Ybrid 
Price QuoteOiM. 

SttWfi MO TOH4 +% U7 
KfcBfi 98JT 98% — % MB 
SV»16 99J75 lilS +% US 
A S» TOU10 103% — % L» 

jjteofi ion tom -lit 9 jr 
bGot 101% -an 
INDUSTRIALS 
“ wjs wy* .. M2 
109 +% LS9 

mu +% an 

Wft .. 9-22 
102 +%L32 

lin’A +% U7 

loin +i4 aaa 

101 +% LI7 



i *» 


73S 


3MCF 


**rM vusasmik +% sjk 

9J0SM 100 TOD* — % 9S3 

Mdi in ions +% lss 

MO I PO 101* .. 7J2 

INTERNATIONAL 
‘ ' 9935 99* .. MS 


The securities are rated A by 
Moody's and A£ by S. & p. 

In the tax-exempt note mark- 
et the Government reported 
that its $700,299,000 of housing 
project notes were sold at an 
average interest rate of 2.999 
percent up from 2 .9 IS percent 
in a sale of urban renewal 
project notes on April 13 but 
down slightly from the 3.059 
percent in a housing note sale 
in March.' 



* « * i i > 

s , - 


TUESDAY, APRIL. 20, 197+ 


INTER-AMERICAN 

DEVELOPMENT 

BANK 


OfrTont Sales In Net 

Sends Yield sUBOHtofa Lw Last Owe- 


!AmB%395 
8 2 


iK&avwwuK +ut4 


WORLD BANK 


IntBk mK L4 TO TO2 UQ U2 - .14 
InBkUSSO 

_ BA 25 10L24 TO4JJ* HVC24 + J 
IntBk B.&S&5 

02 W1D4.WT0O6W.16 

InIBK L3S80 

<w tokos loss ms +i 

- JS 

- -2 


IntBk 5*>s9l 73 

10 

74 

»- 

H 

IntBk 4%STO 6.4 

5 

70 

70 

70 

IntBk 4’tiSTO 4-5 
IntBk 4PJ079 

2 

94 

94 

w 


+5 2 92.18 92.11 92.18 + 3 


CORPORATION BONDS 


Truck Rate Rise Approved 
The Interstate Commerce! 
Commission said yetsterday it 
had approved an average 6 per 
cent freight rate increase for 
the nation's common carrier 
trucking lines, effective April 
12. The commission’s order 
affects all freight moved across 
state lines by regulated car- 
riers, except for raw agricul- 
tural products. 


This announcement is not an offer to purchase or a solicitation of an offer to sell these securities. The Invitation is 
made only by the Invitation for Tenders and is not being made to, nor will tenders be accepted from, holders of 
Debentures in any jurisdiction in which the Invitation or acceptance thereof would not' be in compliance 
with the securities or blue sky laws of such jurisdiction. 


NJB Prime Investors 


Has Invited Tenders Of All Outstanding 


7% Subordinated Debentures 

due" March 31, 1980 


and 


6%% Convertible Subordinated Debentures 

due November 1, 1991 


for 


$22 Cash Net 


Per $100 Principal Amount 

(without payment for accrued interest) 


The Invitation expires at 5:00 PJVL New York Time on 
April 30, 1976, unless extended. 


NJB Prime Investors (the “Trust*’) has invited tenders of all outstanding 7 % Subordinated Debentures due March 
31, 1980 (the “7% Debentures”) and 6 3 AFo Convertible Subordinated ‘Debentures due November 1, 1991 (the 
“6 YaTc Debentures”) in exchange for $22 cash net per $100 principal amount without payment for accrued 
interest upon the terms and conditions set forth in the Invitation for Tenders (the “Invitation") and in the related 
Letter oE Transmittal. Debentures tendered may be withdrawn at any time prior .to 5:00 EM., New York Time, 
April 24, 1976. 


The Trust will pay to any broker or dealer who Is a member of any national securities exchange, the National 
Association of Securities Dealers. Inc. (“NASD”) or any foreign dealer who has agreed to conform to the Rifles 
of Fair Practice of such. Association, or any commercial bank or trust company in the United States, whose name 
appears in the appropriate space in the Letter of Transmittal (“Soliciting Dealers"), a commission of $.75 for 
each $.100 principal amount of Debentures purchased hereunder. 


Management of the Trust believes a successful restructuring of the Trust’s subordinated Debentures is critical 
to the Trust’s viability. 


The Trust’s obligation to purchase Debentures tendered is conditioned on its ability to borrow funds for the 
tender under its Revolving Credit Agreement There is no assurance the Trust’s senior secured lenders will agree 
to make funds available to purchase “junior” Debentures pursuant to the Invitation although they have indicated 
a willingness to consider funding a tender at the same price as previously offered to Debentureholders, $20 net per 
$100 principal amount without payment for accrued interest. 


As of March 1;' 1976, the Trust had a negative net worth of $6,203,702. The Trust’s purchases of Debentures 
pursuant to the Invitation will increase its net worth. 


The Trust failed to pay interest aggregating $450,065 due March 31, 1976 on its 7% Debentures. 


The Trust does not* make any recomnfendation as to whether Debentureholders should tender or refrain from 
tendering. Each holder must make his own decision as to whether or not to tender and should carefully evaluate 
the information in the Invitation in light of his own Investment objectives. 


Copies of tibe Invitation and Letters of Transmittal may be obtained from the Trad. Debentures acpflnt p*" 11 ^ 
by Letters of Transmittal should not be sent to the Trust but to the Depositary. If you have Questions, von may the 
Trust’s Chairman or President, collect, at 201-778-3322. 




AMfc-' -tSISR 
-r ;:;**&&»**' 



Depositary for Tendered Debentures with Letters of Transmittal 


By Ajfiil: 

Fidelity Union Trust Company 
EO. Box 1309 
Newark, New Jersey 07101 


St? 



By Hand: 

Fidelity Union Trust Company 
Corporate Trust Department 
765 Broad Street 
Newark, New Jersey 
(201) 621-8600 


NJB PRIME INVESTORS 




- X 


ACan 6S97 7 A 

ACan 4^s90<64i 
ACeM6%91 cv 
AC van r-W 73 
AExC 9.0 

AFcrP SsSO 9* 
AGnin $■_-« «U 
AHa'sr S' . -93 CV 


ACdMWVS W. 11 OTi » 89U-*. *i 

Air Re 3 r i37 cv 15 85 85 8S +! 

AlaB 5.90599 5.9 TOO 9£U Wi 99*i+ Vi, 

ATOP KTsOS 9.8 I ITOfc 1104 Ufl%+ 

AlaPSJisM 9.4 16 IBPfcTBJi;, KG'.t- 9. 
AlaPS'asGl (LI 10 971 ; 97 97 -tti 

AlaPB'aOl 8.9 7 VS 95 *5 -IV. 

AlaP 8’ .503 pjj 7 .pjifa fl'i- 

AlaPr^B a.B 10 89 0 B9 ...» 

Alaska 65% cv 3 81', BUi Si's...:. 

AlexnS'A cv 5 S T* STi 57“^ 

AflnG 11 ’*394 cv 22 125 H3 125 *3ri 

AldCh t>J&l 7.5 7 87 87 87 + V- 

AkJCh S.2S91 4.7 « 7 Tm 7Ti ' TT.-l 

MdPtt 7884 8.9 *8 28 77 » *1 

AIW5T 4 ; i92 cv 5 117=. UTVi tl^+2 1 ., 
AldSu 5- JEJ CV 5 S3 53 53 f 9*. 

Alcoa 9S95 87 15 WCi leT-j 10T;+ 4* 
Alcos 6592 74 2 D El 81-3 

Alcoa 4 : «s82 5.0 6 ES . 8S 85 + 

ATOM 5*4591 CV 52 HQ JgJp* HQ +.? 
AluCa V-M 9 JO 10 10a 1 ', too 1 : ItCT-:... 
fiSJAX !>■ U 10 1D5V, HBW HHm+ 31* 
AfilAX B 1 :96 8J 10 100 100 TOO - 'j 
AT.AX8S86 13 35 97=, 96 % -Pj 

AAirFil 6s9Q cv 12 W 88 90 +2 

AAirln 11-88 ID. H DM’. UMV. HU'i... . 
AAirl HTiSa 1ft, 7 104 TOT KK *r s 

AAirl -'.?S2 cv 52 XV': 47 

ABmd 9V 09 8.9 TO l® 1 ^ IfflV. +1V* 

ABrnd i’’r90 L8 2 B<m {ffV, ET.. 

5 81 [ i 81V« 81’i+U* 

8 71 : i 71*i 7Vm+ '1 

5 Vi JEt 39'*- '.'* 

4 9S'->. VITv W s+3’a 

5 105 US 105 +■* 

36 SI** SI SI” - : i 

3 vr.i JOE’S TO2’:- ; 

_ . 15 8?.i JT : 

AHosp 5=499 cv 54 126' 2 121 1I6--+J - : 

A tAF 4* .SSI cv 1 8 Fj aSj sHi 

A7Jl«I 9- .-98 10,150 86' J. |fir*. 2 g&’-z 

AMedcp 5s97 cv 4* a.; gpu sr-it- 

Amr.nat &ses cv 33 6g*.v ta 68 -1 

ASvv 5.3593 7J 2 67T’«.,-67vm 67V> - 1 ?, 
ASu5Js93r .. 1 67* STH mk.... 

ATT fteOsOS B.4 fit 104=4 lot 104=4+ < 
ATT ffLZOOO 87273 WP.v 104 *4 10(98- >_ 

ATT B.79S3 6.4 21 1ffi3=i 100'A KC*k 

ATT S=«s07 8L3 59 103% 103''. MS’ft- 
ATT 7=4582 7 A 87 702 101 Vi TO? + ifc 

ATT 7.75577 7j 6 94 TO2 Wl*e 102 - 

ATT 7\is03 7.9 31 W.8 B9'a 87'8-V.^ 

ATT 7s01 71 58 BJ 88=i 88U 

ATT6 rt79 6A 92 W T a 98 '■'i 98”i- =, 

ATT 4=%s85 54 B 774 7P4 79?»+ V s 

ATT4>(S85r .. 7 79W JW5 79=n 

ATT 3'eKO 5.7 S 67Vs 6T, 

ATT 3>.s84 4J 5 7*H 74= • 

ATT 2 r fcS87 4.4 5 64 64 

ATT 7=is*7 12 2S f9? BPi 

ATT fta86 19 « 6F. 66=4 

ATTttfctt r .. TO 68 68 

Amfec y-.W Cv 10 66 66 

Amu* y ^74 cv 77 54’1 54 

AocoO 5588 cv 78 HO*-.- TO2 1 : 

APL 5=4588 cv 2? IDJPa UW=« 

ApoP IP *63 10. 2 109=o lOTt 10(Ti+l-i 
Anofi. llsE 10. TO I03’.a 10a’ j loff i+l 
AcoP 8=1576 9 6 17 IDO'. 100 1 . 100’.- «. 

ARA 4**596 cv 30 78 TVt 7i 

Area B.7D58I 8.4 30 HE 1 - IDS’* 1C 1 *- 1 7 * 

ArcoKisU 8.1 35 W3‘. lC-j IDS'-. 

Aral 8582 72 TO TO2*.» 102 1 * 102'*+ =* 

Area E284 7.8 15 lC. 1IF< 102>. 

Aristr 9i289 10. IJ 88* * 88't 88'.* 

ArirP hmdoo 9.9 10 nn tori 1 or-.- 

ArilP 9.BSBQ 9J 118 ID4M 104'* 104=*- s t 
ArlTP 9'.rs82 9.1 52 104^* lOT * 104 - -i 

A rmr 5sS4 5.9 9 84'* 84'* &r-» 

ArCk 8.45584 81 SIC. 102‘* ia3‘i 

ASh LI5s9? 74 10 KP-a 82' 4 82»i 

Ash© 4:493 cv ei 74 73'* 74 *} 

Aslnv 5 1 *79 55 TO 92 V2 72 *■ -. 

AHCO 6=482 11 10 OF-k 4?5* 48'*.r* 
AtlCEl 9‘ *83 8.9 12 103'. 102'* 102's-l . 
AIRch 7=J13 #.4 20 9IH 9r- 91'-*- 
At! Rich 7576 

6-9 42 100’. 103 5-32 TOO 5-E-3-2 

Ava»C T: 93 10. IS 71 78 71 

AvcoC rs93 cv 32 60 . BT.* 60 + 

AvcoF 11s90 10. 23 106'* 104 10*'.+ 7* 
AvcoF «'.W 92 2 WtTi 100't ICT4+ 
AvcoF 9*v90 9J 5 100'* 100’ * 1C3’.- 'i 
AvcoF 8->i77 8.7 7 102* s 101 ! ! 101--.+ 
Avery 91*01 8.8 5 TOTi MQ'.- Uu't+1'; 
BalGE 10582 92 E lOF* lOT.s 107't+ =* 
BalGE <593 6.7 12 *81* 59 59 - '? 

B&OHS77 TO. 7 104 ICi IfQti'f ’i 

1 51'* 51* ■ 51 Mi 

2 B3V4* 831* 83!*+ =. 

II 71'!! 71 71+^4 

2 68 60 68 -2 

S 77'*, 77 77 - 

7 93'* 92'i 93’.-+ *« 

Banka e-’sOS 25 30 102=4 103=* 103=(+ »j 

&*Tr O’.-T? 8.i i U 95 94 

BacL 4=4-01 cv 72 102 lOI'i 102 * • j 
B*xL A-xS»l cv 25 Wi 716’.- lie’:*:'! 
BedD 5539 cv 15 B«'« 34 : t ?4=.+ A: 

BeecA A'JVJ cv 3 78 77 78 -I s 

Belco 4=.5« cv 37 «'s « : M’=r 

Bel den ?s90 cv 1 ft'. KF. ?* 

BellPa 9 : *14 3.8 6 10T, 10S : 4 

BeOPa 7550 6.9 26 ltd 1 , «>. IW.- ’r? 

B«nax 9’.ai 8.8 5 105 105 105 ! 

Bene* 4= *92 7i 5 !7 37 87 - ■ , I 

Bencp B'47E 9.1 IS 102 s » 102'* 102: s j 

BenCp 8> :7b 

S.4 n 100 25-32 100 25-32 100 ^32.. 
BenflF 5s77 5.1 10 97 .tfi- 

BrrVri 5=*86 cv 9 57 Si's 37 +1 
BelSt 8.45 OS 8.2 1 ID2 1 * 102' 4 102’ * . . . 

Belh5t4!rt0t3 n 71F4 70=, 70--... 
Bff.0 8.45585 12 30 1UZ'. TO?'* 

BoOfaB S’*B1 cv 3 69!? 6?’* 

BOTW 9' *581 9.2 IS 107 107 
vIBftM 6sW .. 20 68' r 68'-. 

BP NA 9s£0 8.6 1 104 104 

BrkUn VxW.O.l 10 99'.i 99' * 

TP 2 76>t 
55’s SPi 


Day's Sales. 
Umtiav.. 


u.s.G<»vf. offly | gjiwv 

....... asunm 1 

62MU4SOO 




.Total All 
’ Bonds 


Year to DattiUSLOOB «U0U31«e0 

1975 ; — -38,958400 . al.72UU.QM 

*— inctuks internattawl Bank Bond* ‘ 


’ S34ft000 

mm 
u mm 

4.9WJ0B 


SSK44WIOO 
2H3OO.0OO 
1^25.142^00 
1,739,136,380 . . 


BOND ISSUES TRADED. 


AnrH 20 

Aom 19- __ 
Aorit IS 


Emm Advances OecfTmt 
412 265. 

496 376 281 

m as* 2« 


New 
KWhs. 
■ ’ IS* . 
, 130 . 

»* 


NOW 
Lows 
2 
.1 
. S 


Cunretf Sales in . Net 

Bomb vwd sumo Hioh Lon Last 


CnwrE K405 tJS 21 1D2Vj WNk U2SA- 9* 
CmwE moo *2 18 1E79* 10376 103%+ 9* 
QCWE 0503 L2 M 97»i 97- 97-4% 
CrnwE TWlh 

7.7 10 IW.i lOffi 100*6+3^32 
Cm*E 7! , %70 7.1 3 100?* IDO IMPAA K 

OrmO 4V*92 cv 24 50 - 47% 50 

OnoSdftMCV 29 99 5BVi 59 

ConEd **5 9.7. 46 9S»S 95V% «5K- 4% 

COnEd 94*01 92 64 931? 92% 92»%- % 

CnEdSAOS 93 44 8St% B6M1+ « 

Coed 7.9501 93 37 8T> 81 814*- W 

OsEd 7.9502 92 5 8IV1 811% 8!!*- ’.i 


8ft* 

0 

63 

57 


74 

624', 


79*,i 79%%— 

67 67 +3% 

63 63 - % 

S6W 57 +r.% 
S9** 594%+ ■% 
74 7# + 'a 

62V, fiFt+Ri 
70**1 79A- 9% 


ConEd 7*40} 9 J 29 
CtnEd Seat 7. A 5 
Coned 5s90 7.9 S 
C£4=WKtf 72 II 
CaaEd 4s88 6 J 3 
COnEd 39S82 AS 1 
Ccc£<S 3rhOS S3 t 
COnEd M2 3.9 B 
Caned P*77 

2.7 18 94 1-S W 1-32 96 1-32 

CanEd3%83r.. 10 70 70 TO 

anEd3%85r.. 3 63 A3 <3 

CFn ,.Ks96 9.9 4. TV, 79ft>.77*+ 
CnNG »W 8.7 IS 98~i 90%. 90?%- 
Capw ITVaOO 1ft 5 111'? 111% ril>*- 
CAPw T^vSO 93 30.106 104** WW.-1' 

COPvOaK 0.7 5 100 TOO M0 -7-14 
CnPw 7?*99 9 A 49 64V* Ul* S4'A+2H 

CRPw r »! 9.1 5 82 82 82 

Cnp P JSO 93 30 JU*t JI'.S 871s- it? 

OP»-S<iK BJ5 1 69 69 0-1 

CnPtf-l'.tBS 6-9 7 645% A4>* 64=%- 

CtiAir 3!s92 cv 79 JZHt 41 41 - 

CtliC 5JE9B9 5JI 31 9V* 9T-. 99°w>... 

CmilR 7*619 11. 29 M'A 69 69*%.... 

areal U582 9-5 6 IBTj 104'A 184*4 + 
CooL4'.s92 ev 25 47 46 , /i 46*.%... 

CmPd 43683 54 10 82 81 82 +1 

Coro S45580 8-3 5 «OU TO' ■ 103>«. .. 
CSmO 7=:-9B 8.1 5 95 95 95 +}i% 

32 xn»+ V* 

9PA 9*PA 94\i... 

7* TO 78 


current sate* in ’• 

Bonds . rWdst^aoHWB Lew Leaf ChgeJ 


Caus&5s82t 19. 42 
Craw 8585 U 3 
Crane 7574 8.9 . 8 


crane b.v , s to to to + 

CrocN 6.1S94 B.1 38 WU V9>* 99*%... 


CracN S=5S6 cv 1 
DerT - <6 84 12 

Oert ='.97 cv 25 
□ayco 6SW cv 23 


78 78 

w * wr /4 
85?* 8»* 
75V* 75 


78 

w>'*+ro 

8Ki— -« 
75 + Vi 


CP : — \i 

CiGtar 5*W1 88 .3 65 65 65 

,4+i- >« 

Qillino Vft*99 Cv 3 107 K>7 187 - % 

64 -Ta 

Dining fftM cv -1 63 «3 63 +1 

85 s :. 

Divers roi 13. H 74 74 74 + U 

66- *+ ** 

Dtveri P.V3 cv 1 48 48 40 .... 


Daw 6.9 2000 83 6 103»'« MQft'* 103%.. .. 

66 + '+ 

Daw 8:«20Cg 87 TO KO'i 102 102 -!<>* 

Si 

DawruOS 82 5 lCSSe 102T# 10B?i+ % 

102": 

Dot I’.ftsOO 82 15 102*4 HU*i 102**+ % 

I84*i- ’* 

OPF 7:17 CV 45 M 64 64 - % 


B&O 8.3 

B80 4SEO 4.8 
BanoP 8'.*W cv 

SanoP 5=«92 8.4 
BkCal i ci 
BTNY 6'.94 cv 


DavlH 9=495 9.4 7 lCUVz TOY, TO% 

OaP Ift?sSS 9.7 25 lU*b 110 7» - 4% 
DaytP VLSI A3 7 76V* 76Vs 7SV%+3 
Deere 7.9sS7 72 5 101 101 101 -T 

Deere 5*i01 cv 54 TOK ions WW?+ *6 
DeeCr 81*82 8-4 41 10* Taj=* 104 
DeerCr UK.. <9 WBfc T0U% TORS 
Del Mo 5*+94 CV 81 7I*A 77*% TE’i+lV, 
Derm a’*9& 8-9 10 92'% 92'% 9P%+ V* 
DelE 12* +82 IV. 2D llfi 114H 114=++ Vk 
DetE 12* ,79 11. Z 111 'm lll'A 111V<... 
DetE 1I'*» Ift 2T m III III ... 
DctEd 9*%04 92 78 100*.% TOP? 

DetEd 9s99 94' 2 93*. ■ 97% 93Li-1%% 

DetEd 8.15s 94 > 84-% IT* SJPA- 44 

DetEd r,%01 9-5 * 85 844% ES 

DetEd 7VTO 94 TO J9*i 791% 7M- V« 


duPt 045sW S.J 7 tOF* TO3V; KQ^+I** 
OiPcal 858! 7.7 20. 103*% TO7« TO'.*+ *% 
DukeP IjsTO TJ. 8 113 s * 1)3** liy 
LXAeP 9-*0l 9-2 I US'* TO5*i TOS>«- 
DL%eP 3 - jC 3 a_5 10 M-1* 9* a 94’,%... 


DukeP T- JO LA 

1 

» 

90 

90 +1 

DiA. 6.85578 7JJ 

4 

97f* 

97*4 

97"i- % 

Duo In T :74 cv 

32 

45 

44% 

45 +1 

Did 8 : «2EO 8.7 

15 |G> 

100% 

100’:+ Vj 

OftXJLTSsMIO.. 

5 

60 

60 

60 

E SVS 4'W92 CV 

20 

68% 

68 

48ft* + ft* 

EoSA:r 5 592 CV 

26 

45% 

45% 

<5*3 

EaAir i-LH cv 

36 

45 

44 

45 +1% 

ElPa 8'S»SA cv 

45 102% 

102% 102*4 

Englii 5*157 cv 

28 105 

104 

105 +2% 

EnS 9-*!95 9J 

1 

104 

104 

HM - > • 

ETtLt b**S0 cv 

1 

SI 

81 

81 - 

E«nk S.4sS2 L2 

1 

terft ior. 

TO2% 

Evans 6! *94 cv 

40 

73 

,11% 

73 +2% 

E* urn 6- .-50 12 

7 

86% 

86% 

86%..... 


Exjtoi 4sS7 73 afl ai'« 8T. 81 
Ex*nP 8 'b 00 8.4 TO IDS'; 105*5 W5 I >+ -i 
EjrxnP 8*101 8.1 41 IHF* MO*? WPt+ 
E*P 8.QS5G0 7.8 40 TO’* ID?.* 107%- *■» 
E*P 7.65583 74 45 lOF* KXPi UXF*- I* 
Fairch 4-^2 cv 65 54 54 54 

FairFd 9s96 ev 49 US 
Faralv £s8l U 6 63 
58 
81 

534 
88 
99 

IS 


Farafi ss« cv I 
Feddr 8*VM 10 . 14 
Feddrs Ss76 cv 57 
FedN 4*%sfl4 cv 57 
FedST 6495 8.4 5 
Fiber S=i*98 CV 14 
Finen 10 *90 97 U TO* 
F5K0r 6*- *80 6.9 3 97 
F5MB08 BES3 7.9. 40 101 1 
FN30 7A501 74 5 100 
FsNBo6*430 74 
FsPenn 7593 cj 
Fsrtec 7s79 12 
HUnRl 7591 cv 
Ffflis 3‘ *b 9.6 
F-V.fi 6.es80 73 
FiesiV 4- *97 cv 


112 

61 

58 

81 

S3 

79 

99 

84>? 


96 

67*. 

96*: 

86 

89 

94 

63 


115 
61 

58 

81 +T?% 

99 -2Mi 

85 + Vt 
WVt MDJb 

97 W +2«A 
101 l '-- «j 

100 - 
96 -1 
te 3 * - r* 
96’ 1- 

86 * +1* 
a**--.** 

«4 ... 

63 +2 


101 

TOO 

96 

64F* 

V; 

86 

38'*. 

W 

o-l 


V9 


Budd 5**9* 

Budgtt 6588 1ft 8 
Bui Ova 6590 CV 48 
Burilnti 5591 cv 5 
Bur No 8 v j 96 8.9 2 
Burrio 51*92 cv 28 


5Ts* 

as 1 * 

95 1 ., 

S9 


ST: 

85'* 

TS 1 ; 

87*^ 


1K'* + 
69'* + 

107 + 
68 ’: + 

TO* ... 

W'4-l 

7Pz + V, 
55’.- + 


S T- 
25'' 

95* :-H* 
87 +1 


Burro 7*1*31 7J 15 TOO 3 '* 100*, UKPi- '? 


56*s + 

91 +1 
48' j +2 
BPi-l 
91 1 r- 1 

an*-*.... 

67*% 

7T*+ !* 


CabCF B' -fft 11 20 561* 56 
caesr 1 »'j9B 13. 22 92 90 

CPC4S perp B 3 1 48' i 48*; 

CarPL 7V02 6.8 5 87’.; 87 1 .- 
CaroT 7^*01 84 10 91' , 91'..- 
Carr 5v*s89 cv 24 a>'< W, 

Case 5!>S?G 4.1 9 iT', tn, 

CastlC SV»M CV 25 IT* 76'- 
CatTr 8**99 8J 70 TO*** TOfij 104^+1?% 
CatTr mta B.0 32 lKft* 103', TO 3 * - 
CatTr M%92 7J 13 93’v 93’i 93’%+ *4 
Carr 51^2000 CV 65 126 123\% 126 +3 
CatTr 5*77 11 13 971% TO* 9TL,- 5% 

Cave 1I'%00 12. 65 95 94V 2 94*, 

CeTOnie 4S90 CV 3 6B'A 68 Vi 68'.*+ 'ft 

CeTei 9'.*95 9.2 7 100'A 100'.% 100'A-IV* 
CTIUf 8. 1 STS 8.7 10 9ZV5 TZVz 92K+I<% 

ChSBk 4-:«rt*3 cv 14 68 68 68 + V. 

ChsC &J6599 04 TO 995% 995%. 995% 

OrsC 4VM% cv 135 7AM 76TO 744%+ *1 

O1AM0 7?%78 12.135 63V> 63 6TV%+ <4 

ChMfs 7V%83 18. W7 416% MAh 
ChMtg 6UM cv 21 36V% 36 
Oirntm few 9J 3S 100 99 >/i 

CUNY 7.882 M t 91 99 

OlWY 6H80 6.9 10 951% 95'ft 

CheNY Ss93 CV 23 SPfa 67 

CA0 4WVJ 7.1 3 63 63 

CPoM M79 6.8 10 98U 

CPoWas m B.4 8 9VA 


40*%- V, 
36'^ +11% 
99 V, + 'ft 
99 - 'ft 
9S’i+ i* 
67%%+ H 
63 - 'ft 

Wi 98>4+l 

9 m .am 


17 

29'ij+ 4% 
15*/* 

38 +1*b 

2av% 

5P‘ s+ 'A 

m +1 
82*.%+ 


CPWV 7V.13 8.3 10 861+ 86U 86*-. + 

cGtw 4ssa 10. i yph mi vr\ 

CMStP 5sS5f .. IIP I7V1 17 

CMS4V,19T .. 10 29?h 29*% 

CMSPSsSSf r .. 5 13% 15% 

CMStP 4594 10. 3 38 38 

CTH rf2%W 9^ 5 M'ft 28Vi 

ChrCft <889 Cv 19 571% 57 V, 

Chrysl B'ftPS 92 S3 90 89'* 

Orvslr 8598 9.7 54 83 BOfe 

ClrysF 9s76 

93 22 TOO 1-16 100 100 -1-32 

CfaF 8-35x91 9.9 5 34 84 84 + 'ft 

ChrF 7.7S72 93 20 82% 82Vi 82V; +1% 
ChrsF TV%86 9.1 30 life 80%. 81 + 1% 

OWSF 7s79 74 14 93% 93 93V, 

ClT 8JS582 S3 12 1055ft TOW. 10R*+7ft 
OTF 75*81 7J 30 IOC.? 100 100V++1 

ClT F 61ft 77 

6.3 58 100 M6 TOO 100 -1-16 
Cltia> 6.6589 6.6 379 100 100 100 

CJtlcrp 6U>79 62 69 96% 96 ” 96M + "ft 
Cltlerp 6H80 6.1 50 96'ft 96'1 9V i+ 
Cnios 5U00 cv 2M 100*/: 99 K)0*.%+Iift 
CltSvc 7*78 7.0 12 99% 99!ft 99*>j - 'ft 
Ctvlnv 8'ftPl 10. 11 76A* 76*., 76%, + 3 *> 
Citylnv 8s91 10. 2B TS".-* 75 75*% ♦ % 

Ctvlnv TWO cv 88 81% 81 E1*% 

ClkEtJ 8.BS76 B-> 22 101<ft 101 101 -1 

vJCSL 45917 .. II » I® 20 

ClevEI 9V*09 8.9 TO 1031* 103** 1034*-!%% 
OvE IA5S80 ft4 8 103 TO 103 

GevElSfeffl 8-3 1 100V, lOOVr lOOVi 

ClevEI 71ft 90 8J) 9 W-j 89 89 - 1 

CM1 44W92 CV 27 491ft 49 40ift + V* 

CNA 8^95 ID. 5 83 83 83 

CSISta 7%91 92 24 80»* m . 80%+ ** 
CWonSt Bs96 93 1 86+. 86% 86%+ '% 

ColuG 9%95 8.8 6 1021% 102 10Zl*+l-4 
ColuG 9594 8.9 14 101<ft 1006, ]0M*- % 
ColuG 8*.%96 t.6 3 93F* 95** 95?%+ »% 
861* 86'- 86V* + r* 

87 1 /* ETi* 87 1 *...., 

77% 77M 77 Xt* H 

834% B3fti 83*%- 1% 

96 96 96 + '% 

a 58 58 

1 103*/* 103*% TOT* 

" ,99'ft 99V«r 99>ft+l 
46*14 451ft 46%+1'ft 


CGs 7W97M 8.6 
ColG T.VJTO 8.6 
CUuG 5**85 6-5 
ColuG 44s41 5-6 
ColuG 3*ft77 15 
CduPJ 5*494 cv 
ColSO V'a 83 8.9 
Co ISO 71*80 7.6 22 
C0M8J58O 17. 21 


CmlCr 87*84 8.7 3 102 T02 102 + (ft 

CmlCr 8SW1 9.1 6 96% «6Vft 961% -2% 
ComlCr 8a81 7.8 63 101% TOO 101V* +2% 
CmlCr 7n*7a 12 27 us* 100 % wD&+n* 
CmlCr 7%92 8.6 8 90 90 90 +7V» 

CmlCr (Ml 6.9 55 99% 991% 991* +3-32 

CmlCr 41,79 7.0 15 97 97 97 

GnJSo 4V%9I cv 10 6C4 64V, 64V, - Vft 

CrnwE 9s79 B-6 15 lMVft 1W% 101% 

OnwE fesa 8.5 H iiMift 1041* ior*+ % 
CmwE #3*81 8.4 I IWfe IS4'.* 104!* 


FIPL! IQ'aSl 9.8 39 I09>* 109 *t TOP.;.... 
FlaPL 9’dE4 8.6 4) UUP. TU5 1 * 10S*i+ 4 
FiJPL S'22 BJ 30 104 [CTi 104 + 

F.V.C 4‘*92 cv 24 79, 74!: 74* i- 

Fct^F JS79 4.3 6 ST.* E2‘ i 82’ %- 

Pert) 9%W 3.7 40 IBS^a M'3 TOiF%- 

Fcrd T-iOiMJ ■».« 3 IM 100 100 .. 

Ferd7’*77 7.2 2 lUF* INF* ‘lOO 3 '*..,. 
Ford 4';79 0.5 19 99 Wa 99 .. 

"rtlC 9:*31 9.1 16 I Del* 106* : 106'* + 

FrdC 5.7sQ0 9.1 5 104’. 106% 106’*.. 

FrdC e.S5s!5e.S 5 103 5 * 1G3 4 * TO3»* + 
FrdC B.TsW 8 A T2 100'. TOP* 100* * + 
FrdCftf: 8J 10 TO'.* TO'.* TO'*.. 
FrtiCS'rll 3 5 S 100 100 100 +T'* 

FrdC S' ,76 

t3 1 1G0 11-32 100 11-32 100 11-32 + 5- 
FrdC T *93 8.4 8 94'; 9T; OS'ft- -1 

FrdCr,:93 8.2 10 «!** 71!. 91!. - 1» 

FordCr 7s80 7.1 10 98*% Pa’s 981*- Vk 

FrdC 6" j7S 6.9 10 99 1 ■ 

FrdC <:*» cv 98 90 

FrdC 4’. .-96 cv 16 8l=ft 

FOjYiCK cv 10 76 

FIVJor 4**83 6.0 10 72' ■« 

Frueti 5**94 cv 105 66ft: 

FruF 9.1SS83 8.8 7 104 
Fuoua 9**i98 11. 

Fuoua 7sS8 9.7 


99*. e 
89’.; 

81*. 

75’ft 
72'* 

66 

TOl; 104 
3 B5!'i 85'% 85' *+ 

S 71V, 71=ft 71';- V* 


99* 

90 

8P*+ ** 
75’t 
72% + *i 
66 - ft. 


GnATr 5**99 cv 42 72L 72=* 721* +W 

GnEl 6'*79 6.3 5 97% 97% 97H 

GfiEi 53S92 .AS 2 8f*a 8I*i 814% + 'ft 
GEICr 8?*82 AS IS 104 \OF* 103%*+ Vt 
GEIC Bj 55H5 8.3 I TO TO TO - Vi 
GEIO- 8%S6 0.0 20 1021% 102Vft 102?*+ V* 
GEICr 7500 7.0 ID 981 m 9GV* 98U+ '.ft 
GEIGr 7ft79 7.0.38 100 99 99 - Ift 

GEICr 65*77 AS MOD 100 TOO 

Grood B'»90 8.4 3 105’% 105V, \05Vft 

GFood T’ftW 7.4 SO lOOftft lOOftj 100'A- ftft 
GFood n%76 3.4 10 99 99 99 .. 

GHost 7594 10. 37 64 63!* 64 .. 

Gntln 1D%96 cv 6 TOO TOO loo - ftft 

Gnlnstr 5s92 cv 10 55Vj 55V, BVft 

GA1III* **«9S 0J 3 103% TOU I0]U 

GMA 8!*99 8J5 10 100'A 103% 103%+ 8% 
GMA 81*77 8J 158 103 102% 102*% -.1% 
GMA 8.79583 93 2 TO* 103% TO%+ 1ft 
GMA8HC85 83 11 185% 103% 103V4-IVS 
GMA BftftsM 7.9 18 102% 102% 102%+ 8% 
GMA 8593 a 1 67 98?% 97 981ft 

GMA7AS598 8J 28 95% 95% 95% -4% 

GMA 7V* 95 80 5 90'/, 90Vft 90% - 1ft 

7.9 9 90 90 90 -1 

7.1 30 86?i 86t% 06?.+ Vk 

5.1 68 98% 98 98%* V% 

S3 32 91V* 911% 91V.+ ft% 

S3 8 90% 89% 90% +11% 

.. S 89% 89% 89% 

63 X 76% 7«i 76% - V% 

W S IS as 85 - % 

SA 30 84% 841% 841%- % 

5.7 20 79% 78 78 -1 

4J 38 92 91% 918ft- 8% 

.. 10 84ftft 84 ftft B4Vft...r. 
.. 30 TO TOT* 102%..,.. 

7A 24 TO 102% 102% 

33 l 91 91 91 * % 

7 105% 104% K4%-1% 
18 86% B6% 86%- ftft 


GMA 7V492 
GMA 6 r *8S 
GMA SS77 
GMA5S80 
GMA 5S8I 
GMA5s8lr 
GMA 4%87 
GMA4%B2 
GMA 4ft%83 
GMA 4 1 OS 
GMA 4s79 
GMA4%82r 
gma awn 

GM aosrtS 
GM 3’.i79 
GPU1 10%80 9.8 
GTelE 6%96 cv 


GTelE 5S92 cv 71 69!% 69*4 69V»+ % 

GTelE 4s90 cv 7 64 63% 63%- Yj 

Gene 10%84 ia SB 101% 101 101%.,... 

GPC 6U2000 cv 97 121% 120% T21%+ % 
GaPac 5 T 496 cv 62 114% 114 114 + % 

Gap 1I%0S ia 10 in no no -i% 
GaP 111*00 10. 2Q 110 110 110 -1 

G+Pw 11579 in. I 107% 1071ft »7!ft 

GPw 8%2D0Q 9.2 S 96 96 , 96 * ’.a 

GaPw a%B4 9.1 97 94% 92 94%+1'ft 

GaPwrftOI 9J 3 87% B7V, B7<',+ % 

GaPw 7%D1 19 28 84»i 84 BFiilt. 

GaPw 7*WJ1 9.0 2 8T% 81% + % 

GKU.W 4%87 CV IS 61 61 61 

Odrcll 94*82 93 17 106 >051* 106 +1% 

Gdricn 7697 9A 16 77 76- 77 

5 74% 74% 74%. -3% 
1 100 100 100 ..... 
82 99% 97%. 99% +1%. 

4 66 66 66 

4 100 100 100 

1 72>4 JPi 72’A 

Greyti WftOl 92 12 101% 181% Wife* % 
Grev 6%90 CV 34 90 89U 90 + %i 

Groler 9%91 IS. J9 62% 62 62% + ftft 

Groter cv IS 36% 3SW 364»+H% 

Grumm 8s«9 cv 68 964ft M'A wu 

Grurn 4'492 cv 3 53% S3 53%+ <A 

GTE lasaooo 9-5 10 >05% IQS ins 

6tNor3ftW0r 5 52% 52% 52% 


Gdrdi 4H85 6.1 
Gdvr L6S95 L6 
Grace 4'-^6 cv 
Grace 4'*90 cv . 
GratiU 4% 73 4.1 
Granc 4%o* cv 


GUAM 7%49 24. 58 
GIIMO Ss 15 ia 10 
GlfMO 4a 44 ia 7 
GltWn 7 sUa 9 A 33 
GltWn 7S03B 9J 26 
GWWn 6*87 8. j 2 
Ginvnas88 8.1 13 


31% 

SO 

38% 

74 

74 

73M 

73% 


30 

50 

38% 

74 

73* 

73U 

73% 


30*4 - *4 
50 +2' ft 
38%+ Va 
74 + % 

73%+ % 
73'A* Vi 
73% - % 


G«W 5%93 cv 64 100 98% |9*ft+l. 

| TOMRl 81*81 7.9 10 103% W% JW%+ !ft 
HartW B’ftW 10. 5 85 85 • 8S - T 

Hejjr 9ftft89 9J 5 TO 103 TO +3% 

Heifer 11 22 99% 99% 9«4- % 

Hercul O'-ftW CV a 108% 100% 108% +1% 

HeutjntHSSBJ 5 100 100 100 »+% 

Het*n V.Y» cv 10 18% 88% B8%- %. 
HiflriN JJftSS cv 2 74% 74fe 74%...,, 


HOSAJM0S99H. 3 899* 89% Wft+tft 
HosMn 5ftft94.cv .16 57 57 57 - % 

HQUSCF 9575 8J 20 101 1»K-|0OK+ 1ft 

HouSF Bs84 79 32 BXAi WOftft 100%+ % 

tttUOL 5VWS CV 36 85 .04 84 .- ftft 

IIIBeilT |304 ai 35 98% «% 98%- ft 

IIIBel,71tQ6 8.1 . 10 94 931ft 93*- Vt 

liCen 11%99 1«. 12 1048ft 104: 104 : +1 

lUPowTTOin aa i. n a a +s 

.Imffiej WsU S3 K» m Wfa HWft+ Vk 
WWC 11S83 NL 10 108% 108% 108%+ %. 
inMiC 10%82 9 J a low. 1069ft IOHk+1%. 

(nMPlOnu ia 12 KIFU 107% M7%- U 

larm 7Asa • jo 3 92- n ■ 92 

imdStf 4(ftS9 63 1 70% IW* W%+ % 

IntHrv MM 9,8 H W ^99%'..;..' 

IHvC 9.15S82 aa 14 TO 100 TO *:..c 

inHrvC 9584 69 14 TOl TOl TOl - .% 

InHvC 88681 BJ 20 TO2~ 102 K2' + % 

at S 97 97 ' 97 

InMInC 4s91 cv 62 95 94% 9416+ Vt 

IrtPao 4U96 cv 2» 67’.', 65‘ 65 -1; 

wnrrnsffi 9j ipija m m -i- 

InTT B%2000.cv117 114 113% IM +1 : . 

intTT 4.9587 6J S 75 .15 75 

IpcoH 5*419 cv 3 60% «0% ~60%...ft.. 
ltd *596 cv 63 99 98 . 98 -1 

net -MS . CV 10 81 81 81- -3% 

ITT F U%85 TO ■« 108 105% 106 +1 

JimYYal *598 9A 4 8S 85 SS r .1 

JimV9-7%W 9.0 4 87 87 87 +7% 

JimW. S*W1 CV 25 TO6 185% TO5%4 % 
.JoneL Plus 9J SB ism TOO WO 
JoocL 6US4 93 14 731. 717* 73W+ 1* 
KdbTO 8%8S BJ IS 106 105% 106 '+ % 

KorCMc 8*83 73 IS 102% 102% 

KlnoSt 10)90 TO. SB 99 98% 99 .. 

Kraft 83104 LI 3 10Z% llfftt rara,..-. 
Kresae 6999 cv 1.17 H6 117 .-91 , 
vJUS 3 VOt ... I IS - 15 -It +1 - 

Lears TOSU 10. 3 93 93 9# + % 

viLVal5s84t ... TO TO ■■ 3S . .30 ... 
WLV4'.ft74f .. . 5 »% )«> .16% + r* 
Listen K*76 L7 88 lOOfti HKP-S 188% - ftft 
Litton 3VJB CV TO 54%- 54V, 54>.ft^ 
Lockh 4TO92 CV 9 40 !% 

Loew 67*93" M 50 n 71% 71W- % 
LomN SW1 cv 21 6**1 MVt 

LorrSI 4%90 A7 l 72% 72% ^TPfti'% 
LOlSU 99184 92 S 10684 1064ft iOMft . .... 
LoriHd 4%» 7.1 18 48% 60V<- 68V*+1 
LooGs 9%00 M V IQS 105 105 +1% 
LTV 7%977 cv 25 >28 127 - 128 +lVx 

LTV SsH 9 A 137 52% S2* 57% + 
LvK 1192000 10. 30 102% 1023 )02 > % 
LyheY 7%94 93 77 76% 75% » — -ftft 
LVkY 7VW40 93 31 77 7» .3M+ ftft 

MKD 6S87 CV 1 .68% 68% «%- % 
MdftF W9\ 92 11 101 m%TO%T.3ft 
MCVCT 9*488 Li 10105 105" 1» + % 

McvCr 8sS2 L0 5 99% 99% 99%...., 
Mods 6**87 cv 2 65% 65% ,65%+ % 
AAeYk 9.1(02 9.1 26 «9% 99 99 * Vt 

MsYlc 8VM2 Lt 1 95% 95% «%..... 
MOa8VtfW9L6 TO 98*A W4 W..... 
Mann 7.7 U 83% -’Mm..:.: 

Manor SSM cvlw 91 90 -90%+lVii 

0Aar8A 71M3 9.7 12 »% 71' » - % 
MarMa Saw cv » 86% 86% 16%.,... 
MalEl 6*490 cv 2S TOS% 108 lMft+l 
McCro 7**95 13. 7 SBftl SB. S -.TO 
Mccro 78*97 n. 1 savft sn 
McCro 7ftftf4 12. T9 SB 38 38 ., 

UCZt 7%94n 1L 3 58V* 58** 38%’-T% 
MCOro 6Vj92 cv 2 51 . 51 51 +1% 

McOe Lfe84 LS 2 M4U IM% 184% +1% 
AAcDntd 9s85 8J?- 5 105 105 105 + Vz 

MC DO 4*191 Cv TO 70 69 .70 -fcUa 

MCOE 7MW 8.1 6 92 92 92 +5 

MCGH 3" *92 cv 10 57% 57% 57%..;.. 
Mel In 6.6S89 62 48 99-1 99% 99%..:.. 
Mefln 7JU2 7.3 8 108 10D 100 - ._ 

Melvl 4%SM cv 1 83 (ft 83*'* 13V. 

Merck 7?*BS 7.7 39 101*4 MH% 101%- % 
rAGM 10593 10. 23 91 91 " 91 .. 

MGM 10594 TOL 5 91** 91% 91%. 1 
MGlC f-«88 9 A 32 88% .88 88% + 

MGIC 5593 CV 24 59 ‘ 58% 58%- ftv 
MichB UHU 37 MB 107% Ml .. 
Miens 7*411 83 23 94 ■ 94 94~_ 

MiCWB»+s93L» 1 9FA 97’. 97fti+ % 
Micr 1052000 ML IS 97 9Vk «%+ H 

MidMtMtt 13. 25 58ft, 57% 5T~t~ ft, 

/■•lie L S’ 194 cv I 79** 70*. 70%-** 

M5PS5 4J917 9.7 2 40% 40*4 

MRvCO 8s«4 cv 80 132 129 130% 

MRvCo 8595 cv- 3 154 154 154 -IV, 

6 163 IBS 103 
20 8*4 8 8 ..... 

51 46 1 '* 45 " 46fti +H* 

32 46% 45>k 46\s + 

3 63 1 , 63", 63’% 

6 51% %%% 51%+ % 

53 52% 53 + ft!: 

54 54 54 +1 


tfIRvT 9-J90 9A 
MKT 5’;33f .. 
SAoPac 5s45r .. 
MPaC4Y,20f .. 

M Pac 4' 498 62 
M Pac4'«0SL3 
Mott D SftiW CV 42 
Monan 68074 .. B 


Monsan 85BS 74. 2102 KB U2 

MonW 9%00 9.0 14 HM 104 M4 

0torTO4%«a7 7 71% 71% 71%-ni 
WWW 92*5 9JS TO 100% TOM 100%+ % 


MtttW.9'i90 M. »_l(& .MB _lltt .+I%isu«h6%» cv-U-91% 


MntW4%8TW7fl 86% 85% SJ%+ % 
MWWM 7890 CV S- 86% 86% I6%+ % 
6AQroan%86 7.8 2 102% 102% 102*/*- ftfc 
Moron cv 45 91% 91 •*»%+! 

MIS T1 9%12 L9" 7 108% UM% 108%+ % 

MISTI 9%15 M IB 101% M«% 108% 

MISTI feTO LA 18 104% 104 MM - % 
MIS Tl Rill H 22 WVi 89*2 90%+m 
MfS Tt 4%77 6j ■ 12 TOO 100 TOO *•% 

N Bisc 4*487 6^ 37 Wa 76 76*ft-; ft". 

N Cash teftS'cv 24 : T# 75", .- 7S%- % 

N City 6VW1 cv TO 56% 56% 56%-2%J 
N DiSt 4%92 cv 140 MWa 9«Fi 100'*(+3tr 
NHom 4;*96 cv I 45 45 45 

N ind 10399 11. 4 Off* 89+. 89 *, b- !• 

N Ind 5*488 cv 23 63 63 63 +2% 

N.VtdE 6itM ev 15 70% 71K* 70%+ IT* 
NRUt VteSS L7 1 104% 104' i MMftftt- I 
Not Stl 8s9S 8.2 20 98*i 9 P, 97%+5 

MelTea 5s77 5.2 4 fe TO TO 

N EnT 9* a0 L9 
N EnT 8%09 L5 


NEnqT 8^03 8.4 


N EnT 6%79 6.6 
NEnTT 3s82 3.9 


NJBI 9J5510 8.7 


NJBTt r*413 LI 
NJBTI 7’All LI 


v|NYC Sa13f .. 
vjNYC4ft",!3 .. 
v|NYC4s98f .. 
v(NYMC 98f . 
NYCh.4%89 73 
VjNYH 4ft‘,5/ .. 
ViNYH 45071 .. 
NYEG 9%B5 93 


NYTH9S14 L7 


NY Td 8509 8,2 
NY Tl 7%06 L2 
NY Tl 7%11 L2 


NIM I2.&S&1 10. 
Nl MP TaW 3.5 


NqNG VH90 9.0 
NoNGSSsK 8.7 


No Pac 4197 7J 


NoPac 3s47r .. 
No St P 5*50 7.1 


Nwit I 


10 106 

106 

106 + % 

4 10ff% IW% H»%- % 

13 97 

97 

97 

10 95 

94*4 

95 -1 

20 88% 

87*i 

87** -l>4 

1 97% 

97% 

97% 

2 77 

77 

77 

30 77 

77 

77 

5 107 

107. 

107 + 

15 100% KXfi* HM% 

62 95*, 

95 

95*1- % 

50 09 

89 

80 - 

22 HH» i 

102'.* 

T02'4+ U 

16 5 

S 

5 

33 S'i 

5 

S - •* 

23 5% 

5% 

5>tt- *4 

8 24% 

24% 

24% -Hi 

5 62% 

62% 

«% 

1 3% 

3fti 

3(4- '* 

16 ra% 

7% 

B%+1% 

5 104 

104 

104 

15 104 

MM 

104 +1 

20 105% 105% 105% 

2 lOJVz MOVs 10314- % 

25 183 

103 

«o - % 

86 ' 99Vi 

98% 

99ftS 

S 96% 

9Aftft 

96%+ % 

2 94 

93 

94 +1 

9 mi 

89% 

89%- % 

15 63 

« 

O 

S 1lS% HS».% 115%- Vt 

2 81 

01 

81 +1% 

10 104 

10* 

104 + ftft 

19 69 

6B 

69 +2% 

2 10S 

105 

MB 

2 103 

m 

MD + % 

10 95% 

95% 

95%+lV, 

1 54% 

54% 

54%+ 46 

17 34% 

34 ftft 

34%+ % 

7 33 

33 

33 

S 69% 

69% 

«9%- % 

32 100% 

97% M0%+3% 

30 » 

00 

00 - % 


\ ‘ Cttrrenl 3alM In . ’ 

B&Kta-i Yf«Ww3S)Hfdh 


PetHiC 8'ft8S LI 5 TOlftt . ' 
Pfizer 8 r iM L5 TO 104% " , 
Pfizer *07 CV 56 76% - 

PfiliE 12*^11 11. 31 113% •• 
PWEIITOWOIL 40 116%' 

PfiflEl lh» 1L 1 109 
proa 9%08 9.1 26 100% • 
PhDEI 8%04 L9 4 94% 
PMSBVWttiJ M'92» ' 
PDHa.7%01 L8 15 83% 

PMia 6%*3 83 15 78% . . 

PftDS 6V497 M 1, 72% . 

Phil El AW6 63 25 W 
PtlM a*5s& AS IB 103% " 
Pttflto 10s77 9J> 7-100% 

Pttttti 4s97 C» 34 57 
Ptaa 6fttsK or I 130% .. . 
PorG 11H05 1L 3 110 
PtrG 1WM.9J.IS 107% 

PorG 10*82 93 1 VS 
POrG W*s8S 9A 2B MHVt 
PotS T.SstS 93 10 >04% 
iProcG 8U05.LO. S 102% 

Ptw eftumo a* m tow* 

P5EG 12s04 10: 10.110. / - 

PSEGs 9s95 84. 6 102. 

PSEG 8%04'IS 10 99 
PSEG4%77 f . 

. 4.7 W 97** 97 7? . 

PS Hi 96885 L9 5 187 
Port* <%94 CV 8 TVz 
RCA 6%s92 CV O JO 
Rail SWOOO Cv J0119 
ftamln te95 CV 25 RXJ . 
Ramin » cv.13. 53 
RaoA 7Va*S Tt. TO 63 
P.SOPM 7s84 IX - 5 51% 
RapA777j94 U. 21 *5U>, 

, RapAm 6 sB8 >1 110 47%' ‘ “ 

RdSfl 5%588 CV 15 84%- 
ReeveB «91 cv 1« ss 
RelGo 9%98 IX. BS TO - . 
RdGo WW9 IX 64 81 • 

Ravin 7%9i Kjo-.A '^l 
RevM 4%9l cv. 9 7a : 

Reyn, 7 %m lo 2l « 
WCML8S99 L5 35 103 
Rodn .S8Wl 73 1 76% 

Roan a%87 cv n njk 
Rocin 4*191 ev 31 71. . 

Bohr sum n a- S4V= ' 
Rydr 11WP0 TOl 5106% 

Ryder: 1QS94 to. 4 99% 

Ryder WU 4S .2 101% 
StLSFSsOOT.^ • l 32 - 
SiLSaFAaSV 8.0 1 50:- ". - 
SIRPa <Ti97 CV11142" 

SanD 10 J. 8Z 9.9 5 108. 
Mrt£K9JsJ9-'!U> 35 TO3V5 . 
Sandrs I2s92 cv 43 122 
SaFin 4V.98 cvl14 TI6 
SaFUd *ft601 cv 107 Tlfi ’ . 
SaolRI DAW 1ft. 19 Mfth . 
SavE,12ftMl 11. -22 UO - ' 
SCAfrffUaSO 9J 5 99“" - 
SCMSYaM cv' S' 70%. 
SeBC.8J5s#SM 5 98. 

Seagr 716578 7*4 ‘ 3100% . 
5earTO‘l88l 7JT 3S TOFU’ 

Searfe 7%» 1A "15 mm. 

SeerR 8W5 8J 53 103% 

5e» R 7%8S 56 H»%- 

Sear R TOU3 73 4 «7 
Sear R 4U83LSJS 10 85% 

Scar AMK.L3 SlOMr.'k 
Sew A At77 4J 20 .98%' . 
-Seatrtn brlU '« - . 

SMIO 0*0273 -5 U/lT ’ 
Steft5$0HX£B ‘5 27* .+ ■■ 
SMIO 6H86 S3 TO 79% 

Signl L89SM9J 6 _97% - 

Sindr-ffft* CV n «8% 

Singer 8199 .9.7 36 II -" " 

5kO'Qv5s92 cv -3 -57 
Smttb 101695 9^ 5 IBS ' 

StnK 8358867.9 12102% 1 
5dMoRn>«3U 5m ‘ 
SoCBM 10S14L9 43118% 

50CBI BUM L2 -5 9*%-: 
SoCSIHUU L3 5 99Y* . ' 

SoCW7%07L1.3 90% 

SOerfa 10*3 9.5 5 MB 
SBIT9JSSD3 L4 36 187% ... 
SaBtiT-ttU L2 7B 97 
SoflefT 3s7P 33 W 87% ' 
SoCEd 3%BQ ev 1 841.9 . - 
SoGG WVLI1 S3 TO 101 
. SoNGs 6%79 1J7 5 97%.' 
SPadO.4%77 

. -42 ,6 98ft* 97 

5 Pac 7ft*sM 62 ) 41% " 
SvvB 935815 8-6 5 107' 
SWBT8U07L5 75 103% 

LS-nHT IU14 X3 10 98*^ - 
SwBT *3M 7.9 U 103*1. 

SwBT 7**09 22 TO 93% . . 
SwBT 7*tl3 LI 12 93U 
Sw BT Bill? Lt 2 
Sw BT 6%U LI S 
SwBT6%70 64 3 
5proQ 41592 cv ' 5 
510 Cal TWO 7.6 30 
SOCal 4*083 5.1 20 
StOJnd 0*005 1.2 6 101 W 
SOIn 6.I5S89 6,1 50 100% 

SIO Ind 4*91 7.0 12 85" 

5tO In 4'683 S3 79 U 
StOtt 8 '63000 84 45 100% 


90 s : 
04ft. 
97fti 
48*. 
9Km 
04 ft’* 


S» Pack 6590 ML 1 
stPtar 51*90 ev 28 
StPru 6*90 cv 10 
5taMut9ti» 17. S 
StarBr 4%86 cv l 
Suave 5597 cv to 


39 
54 . 
65 

sm 

75% 

S3 


Sun8VH»»L* 5MWU- 


Sufro 64462 9J 1169 

Tatctt 9*76 9L7 30 TOO waamm 
TakNtl 6594 CV S3 
Tandy 1IWN 9 J 25 W3 
Tapo 5V«W cv 8 62 
Tetedy 10504 TO. 27 99 
Tcfedy 7S99 « M 76 
Tele* 9S96 . IX » 69% 
ttmCo 9s78 L7 11 W4% 
TennQj 7WJ C7. a 8T. . 

TaiCo 61492. cv 99 ' 98 
Tentnc 9sM L7 5 IttH* 

Ten Inc 3'L9lS2 5 180 
Tenlnc 6s39 62 17 96>„ 

TVA 9!'*a9S M 9 109 
TVA-8.J0S79 7.8 5 100 
TVA 8-05x99 L0 <8 99^1 
TV8.B5599T .. 5 99*., 

TV /**S98C L0 12 96 
TV7U98C r .. » TO 
TVA7.4S97T .. 10 92‘a 

TV 7.35S97B 7.9 34 92‘i 
TV 7.35597C 7.9 5 92ft; 



V' _• 


NvmBl Mlsl4 L9 55 111% 110% 111%+ % 
NMHBJ 7WJ 80 5 974k mk 97»- % 
N*nBI7ftM5U 1 90% 90% 90%+% 

NwnBf 6U79 88 I 99 99 99 

NortSMTO L4 10 70% 70% 70%+ % 
OcdP 11)82 ML TO »6% >06 MB + % 
OtclP 7Vi96 W 65 92% 92% 92%+ % 

Ogden 5)93 Cv 5 64% 64% 64%+ % 

OftBIT 7%T3 L3 16 94% 93% 94% 

Ott BIT 79,11 L8 IS 93% 93% 93%+3% 

Oh El 11583 10. S HM 108% TO8%+lVt 

OttP !2%» IX 5 112% 112% 112%.. . 
Ott Pw 7*476 73 4 M0% M0% 100%... 
Ondd 5Vd8 cv 10 65 6S 65+1 

OttsEI 6W5 cv 74 Mtt% 99 101% +3% 

OwnlH 4%92 cv 31 1069, MS ' W6%+2% 


ESI 15 M S vna/k ,on * »W4- % 

9%M6 93 52 TO4% UU% 104%-% 

ESI £55 H S ,07V * ! wvs ’OTVi- % 

PGE9%)06 U 12 103 .102% HQ +% 

ESI * 102% 101% 10216+ % 

PGE 8)2003 0 3 TO 94 94 *4 ♦ % 

PGE 7%s04 LS » 88 88 ft - % 

ESIES 03 H J 88 ww-S -i^ 

PGE 5»89 6.7 TO 74 74 24 - % 

ESI 5” *- 9 1 •"* a%- % 

ESI £?*2 «** «6%+ % 

PGE Rasa <0 » 92% 92% 92%- % 

PGE 3%s87 14 TO 62 U 42 ..... 

PGE 3579 X4 13 86% 16% l6%+ Vr 

PGE 3%78 r . . 10.03 92 92 

PG£3%s84r .. S 49 0 49 ..... 

gGgajgr ".. 5 86% 86% 86% 

PSEG4%77r.. . 9 97% 97% 97% 

PacLS 93 95 9 jB 4 18314 103% tQ3%.. 

PNwT 9512 L5 S 105% 105% 105%..... 

Ptt»T 8%08 L5 3 W2% 102% TO2V, 

PNwT 8%10 *A 15 101% 101% !«%-. U 
p *gT 9%11 9JJ 13 106% 105% 105IA+ % 
PaCTT 9VftM L8 10 103 . HD MD + Vt 
PacTI9.1lS4.L6 <7 WW 105% 105%- Vft 
PacTT SM06 8L5 21 10?% 101% 101%.,.!. 
PTT MSSM gj 25 KIWft 100% 1(11%+ V, 
PacTl 7-8507 L3 2D 95% 93 93 -T 

PecTT 7*480 12 14 100% 100 100%+ % 

?S22H TO 89% 88% 89%+2% 
PaeTT 4%88 i.0 5 71% 71 71%+lfc 

MW] 5-9 16 41 « 61+2% 

PaeTT 2%B6 4J 5 66 66 66 +2 

£5^ lUSS 6 11 " « 99% 99%+ % 

PAA 7Yfi98 -cv 122 87 85>A 16 +1 

PAA 5>.ftTO9 CV 320 49% 48% 49V. + U 
PAA 4%s77 cv 3 89% 

PAA 4%sS4 CV 3 58 
PAA 4%S86 CV IS 46% 

ParfcrH 4i9Z cv 2 66% 
vJPC 6%93t .. 25 62 
Penney 9*99 X6 U 104 
Penv 9.«S8J 9.1 8 (04 
PtaiyF 7TWI L2 3 9S 
PaPL 10VU2 93 i 109 
v)PR3%857 .. 1 IJ 

Penwi 9%9S u 2 102% 102% 102%+ ’* 
Pend 10%C3 9.8 19 107% 107 M7%+ % 
Pcnnzl 8%M U TO 95 NV5 94%,.... 
Pennzt 7%C8 8,2 31. 89V, 89% 89*6+1 % 


89 

19 

- V» 

SB 

58 

-1 

46 

46%+ % 

66% 

66% 


62 

A2 

+2% 

104 

TO* 

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10346 

WJ46 

95 

9S 

+2% 

109 

W 


11 

11 

+ %. 


TVA 71*576 7.2 
TVA 7S97 7.9 

TVA 759 IT .. 

Tesoro 5* *89 cv 
Texco 81*05 BJ 
Texco 73.101 L0 
Texco S-"*97 7J 
Texaco 8'«6.. 

Tx Co 3*W3 4J 
Tx Ind 7*492 10. 

TxOG I0' *95 9.9 
TxOG 7%92 83 JO 89V, 
TX P 552000 8.4 9 59 
Textl 4*496 cv 35 
TrlmF TViTtt U j D 
TWA M»85 10. 19 97’.', 
[TWA 6*',7W .. 124 86 
TWA 5594 cv 82 43 
TWA 4s92 cv 31 36 
TranF 10577 92 15 MM 1 
TucsG JCaQI 9.1 17 .«?i 


5 100t*I 
b 89 
5 88'-* 
17 875a 
5 105 
5 TO* * 
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1 79*'» 

2 75 

3 103!: 


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Un Q} 7s39 cv 1 96 
UnEl 7%80 X5 5 » 

U one 8%06 L4 25 1(0% I 
U OIIC 8%8S LI 35 HSU 1 
U OIIC 8%82 8-0 5 103% 1 
UOnC*%98 7.7 5 8516 
UP Q) M 81 U 3 100 T 
UP CP 4%99 CV a 150 1 
UPRR «*rL85 L3 TO TU'A V 
UPRR 2%9t 5.0 TO 50 . 

Urtrvl 5%96 cv 54 62% 1 
UnAirL 5891 cv 11 68% ■ 
UoAL *%92 CV 7 55% : 
UBrnd 9 % 98 IT. 17 80 
UBrad 6%« 10. 1 66% 1 
UBrttd 51W4 cv 59 54ft: l 
U GsCO 5aE0L5 1 89% 1 
UGSP 9%84 9J 45 102% K 
UGSP 8%89 9J0 6 92% 9 
UnG* P Sin 5J 1 
Un Mer4s90 cv 4 
UnNud SsR cv 215 
US In r%97 TO. 2 
US Rlt 5V4 1 cv 2S 
US SH 4%96 6.8 23 
US Stt 41486 5-7 7 
US Sit 4389 4 3 I 
UnTec S%91 cv 51 
UnTec 4%92 cv 39 
UnTel 9 Am 93 
Un UHT5S93 CV 


W 4 
57V,- 5 
84 I 
77 7 

<3% 4 
67% 6 
79 7 

82 .8 
96% 9 
85% 8 
5 HIV* TO 
2 69% a 


USLIF 9%85 9jB 33 MB TO 
UVInd 5%93 CV 37 74% 7i 
UVlIMf 5*495 9 J 30 57% St 


VeTP 9%M 93 14 TOP/* 10C 
ver P BfeM 9J1 5 94 W 
VB EP 3%B6 CV 25 66% 66 


WaIMt 6%9S CV . 27 145 143 

WaiMA 6ftW ev 10 92 92 

Wart. SJsSS LI SS 103% 182 1 
W**n S%93 Cv li 54% S3 
WSP1P 7*100 cv 101 107% MW 
Wfinc 7%82 7J 18 99 99 

WEIccjnH5L2 40 102 
WEIee 7% 96 7 2 30 95 
VfrttM 3% 79 aa 10 78 
WUC 1D%97 11.17I 94 
WUC 5*197 cv 15 52 
WUT 12%8I 11. 36 110 


HH* 
9+ 
TO 
9 T 
5H 
109ft 


WUTL45SMW. 72 84 8P 
WUT L 10)98 TO. 4 By 80 
WUT 7.90S97 TO. 21 79V* 78ft 
Wfl UT( 5592. M 5 59 59 

WStQC Vtm 9.2 9 92 91 V 

W5IC 7JS7I 73 104 TOO - 99 
WSTOE 0%95 8 2 43 97% 77V. 
WM9E 5*4M 73 IS 73% 73 
Weytt 8.9)04 8J 5 105% 105ft! 
.Weyhr 8)85 72 52 102 102 

wey 72S*4 73 5 97% 97V>. 
White 5W92 CV121 19 Sbftft 
Wtt Ml 5ftW3 cv 33 
WMM MM8 10. 9 


50% 

n 


sou 

50 


93 93 

60% 60 
74% 74% 


wickes 9S99 cv 5 
Witte 5ftftM ev 10 
WRl R 51689 cv IT 
Wms 12S8I II. 46 104% MOU 
Wms TOUtS 9-S 75 106ft 1 , 186 
WmC09A096 . . 30.W1% 101 
WISC 4S2M4 84 9 46% 44% 
Wltco 4HM cv 2 71 69% 

WOolwtt 9S99 9.0 33 99% 98% 
Want 5%W cv 5 84% 84% 
Wyfy 2%s93T cv HZ 44 43% 


9646 


Xerox 6995 evat 9616 
Z6Mt .4%88 cv. 30 67 66% 

Zaot 4%|8C CV 1 67% 4016 
ZaoOII 8%96L4 SieMHBft, 
zavre ff«94 or to * st 


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i ?■.* *v 
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Ml 


THEJfEWYORK TIMES, WEDNESDAY. APRIL 21,1976 


|Sof47.9!00iPutorf r 
^.Currency Imports 1 


; t. T. - i ;; 

VT*-. -* • '* „ 


f. . 


*Cm TK Sew York Tin** 

April 20— Switzer- 
'■ - 'i v limited' to the coun^ 
?.;■ ::?.«f $7,90Q the amount 
*. , * ‘ ;3 Jazrrency that anyone 
*■■ ’ ' ! v f into Jfhe. country 

e •:*: - I- r three-month period 

. *. •: >;?;td bolster the weaJci 

* a!' * v. ■ :— 

' > Option' op the import- 

banknotes into 
:■ n ”1 applies' to all 
;■ \-\reacies. However, its 
Van is to discourage 
’ ‘ iS'roin contravening 
~ ' laws by smuggling 

■: " ■ '-jots in lira banknq'es 
■ t ; neighboring Switz- 
• .-ay Swiss francs. 
-'Jess, the : measure 
- / . ■ j please the French 

. . H Paris sees the 
i. ' . the Swiss franc 

.. -Verful magnet for 
-''■whenever they' wish 
. : • . : ■ inds from the tax 

. . ■ fear that their own 

' ' ; ng to drop in value. 
.• -s a long common 
ii Switzerland. ' 
w anyone illegally 
. . urrency from France] 

' as a smuggler only 
"1 creased into Swjtz- 
. ?re the traveler was 
■mg in as much as 
■ ny. 

'• •j.. * traveler is .-now 

• z ■ iiaging into Switzer- 
': r- 1 - than the limit fixed 
/. *■: ! \>.'w decree r he ' risks 

‘ ■ •• -tilth jail sentence or 

d V ; to. $39,500. In 
'•: * ,«he smuggled' notes 
~ , *;■ i.iscated. r ' 


People arid Business 

Study on Product Impacts Urged 




Ku 


‘.I*' * • 


L’.** 





r 






J :* 7 , 

i* jasr-' ~ 

> -r- 



Margaret Mead urged busi- 
ness yesterday to assess the 
impact its products and serv- 
ices “have on society before' 
they are marketed." 

The anthropologist, who is 
curator emeritus of ethnology 
at the American' Museum of ' 
Natural History, suggested 
■that businessmen “find out 
what you are doing before 
you do it," which she said 
was "a revolutionary idea.” 
She was the keynote speak- 
er at a Conference Board 
meeting at the Waldorf-As- 
toria Hotel. 

“Incalculable costs are be- 
ing put on industry to correct 
product defects.” she said. 
Citing the detergent industry 
as an example she said that 
the industry would have been 
more than willing to produce 
biodegradable detergents “if 
somebody bad thought to ask 
them — but nobody did." 


of the entertainer, disclosed 
yesterday that Presley Cen- 
ter Courts Inc. broke ground 
in Memphis yesterday for its 
first facility. 

The singer will be chair- 
man and Dr. Nichopouios 
president However, Mr. Pres- 
ley will not -take an active 
part in day-to-day manage- 
ment. It will be his first 
business venture outside the 
entertainment Held. 

An avid racquetbal! player. 
Mr. Presley has bis own court 
at his estate in Memphis. 


WAITY B$1T 
IMS MEETING 


1 i i The life* yofeTtttec 

April - 20 — For the 
l #e.. in less' tha/i . a 
---annual meeting of- 
> Manhattan Mortgage 
Trust had-3o.be} 
because of Indufft- 
-jholder voting * OB 
=»ement proposals -to] 
the ' financially 
ading organization 
. Heck, president b 
called the meeting 
bund a small table 
meeting auditorium 
.'.State Street Bank* 
gain the two-thirds 

■ . vote’ on the rropo- 

wt been obtained, 

! lithaii a minute ad- 
; meeting until May. 
■n : -aide interrupted 
. ItatM© space , was 
ir that '.date, the ses 
' ^scheduled for May 

■ ■«. ■ ■./ . ' 

TOiV which, is advised 

.whea.b£lbe Chase 
, • Bank in New York, 
''•on's largest real es~ 
■menlpust. . • ' . . :J 


Elvis Presley likes racquet- 
bail, so much that he plans 
to get into the racquetball 
business by developing facil- 
ities for the sport in Mem- 
phis, Nashville and other 
cities. Racquetbal! is a new 
fast-growing American game, 

• with rules very*, closely re- 
lated to handball, but played 
with a specially designed 
racquet. 

Dr. George C. Nichopouios, 
a physician and close friend 


The central concern of 
economic policy in all devel- 
oped countries from now on 
will have to be the growing 
burden of support for people 
past working age, Peter 
Drucker, the prominent- man- 
agement consultant, told an 
audience of top businessmen 
yesterday. 

With an eveT greater pro- 
portion of the population in 
retirement, the United States 
faces a shortage of manual 
labor by the early 1980’s, 
continuing pressure oir wage 
rates, and consequent infla- 
tion, regardless of govern- 
ment policies. Mr. Drucker 
said at a New York Univer- 
sity Graduate School of Busi- 
ness Administration sympo- 
sium. 

In contrast, population in 
the developing countries is 
growing ' steadily younger, 


and Mr. Drucker predicted 
that the poorer nations would 
experience at least a decade 
of youth rebellion similar to 
that in this country In the 
late 1960's. 

Businessmen should pre- 
pare for the coming labor 
shortage within the .United 
States by considering more 
flexible retirement policies 
and by structuring more part- 
time jobs that could be filled 
by middle-aged women whose 
families have grown — ijae 
greatest pool or available 
labor in the country, accord- 
ing to Mr. Drucker. As one 
approach, he urged the crea- 
tion of full-time jobs perma- 
nently staffed by two people. 


GMmLEABDE 
INTAHKER FRAUD 


Stock Prirp* Rt tn ** caunter maritet - 1he 

tJLVLK / rices AI5t?l NASDA Q industrial j n dex ad- 


Tidal Marine Ex-Chairman 
Misled S.E.C. in Report 


Paul Luftig, the former 
president of - the defunct 
Franklin National Bank, has 
been appointed executive vice 
president and director of 
Commercial Funding Inc., a 
diversified financial services 
company. Mr. Luftig was also 
elected president of CFI Leas- 
ing Inc. an affiliate. 

Mr. Luftig was dismissed 
as president of Franklin Na- 
tional on May 14. 1974, after 
it was disclosed that the bank 
had incurred large foreign- 
exchange trading Josses. The 
bank was later declared in- 
solvent and was acquired by 
the European American Bank 
and Trust Company. 

ALEXANDER R. HAMMER 


KODAK DISPLAYS 
INSTANT PHOTOS 


Continued ’From Page 49 


film and has a list price of $66. 

The new cameras use the 
eight-bulb . '."flip-flash” units 
that were developed for the 
Kodak: pocket Instamatic cam- 
eras, introduced in 1972. 


while the emergence time of 
the final print was no 'shorter 
than that of the SX-70. 

. She -said a disadvantage was 
that the batteries powering the 
Kodak cameras’ .shutters and 
the motor of the EK-6 were 
placed in the camera instead 
of being supplied with each 
film pack. 

Early in the introduction of 
the SX-70 system, the film- 
pack batteries were the most 
frequently mentioned difficul- 
ty. Packs with dead batteries 
reached many customers. A 


duced Pronto camera, which 
uses SX-70 film and. has' a list! hoped-for film-pack shelf life 
price of $66. 'of a year was shortened to a 

The cameras , use the eight- ^ ew mon ^ s - 


Profit Taking Cuts 
Strong Early Gains 
For Commodities I 


By ARNOLD TL LUBASCH 
■Stanley Farber, former board 
chairman of the Tidal Marine 
International Corporation, 
pleaded guilty yesterday to a 
Federal charge' that be had 
Fraudulently overstated the 
company's earnings in a report 
to the Securities and Exchange 
Commission. 

His case grew out of charges 
against two major Greek ship- 
owners, five of their business 
associates and four former 
bank officials who were indict- 
ed last year as a result of an 
alleged scheme that was said 
to have obtained more than $60 
million in bank loans from 1970 
to 1972. 

The two shipowners, Cha- 
ralambos Harry Amanatides 
and Arailcas Ion Liyas, now 
fugitives living abroad, were 
top officers of Tidal Marine, 
a defunct company that had 
bought and operated oil tankers. 


0nAmexand0-T-C; 

Trading Volume Up 


Buoyed by an optimistic eco- 
nomic outlook, prices, cn the! down. Turnover increased 


vsneed 1.16 to 97.91 while the 

composite index added 1.02 to 
99.C1. Winners outnumbered lo- 
sers by morethan a 2-to-l ratio 
v/ith 602 issues up and 247 

to 


Money 


l APJ — Money rites for 


NEW YORK 
Timuy. 

Prims rets 6V. 

DIscohv rats SVi- 

Fdcrai fmdt marker rati *7t high, 4V, 
low close. 

Coaler's cemmerclel Mger 30-180 rim 
4%-5Va. 

Commercial sapor Placed by flnanca 


American Stock Exchange and j 7-28 million saares from 5.85|ӣX!^*iSqto , n5 4 raSSssisr io- 


bulb ' "flip-flash” units that 
were developed for the Kodak 
pocket -Instamatic cameras, in- 
troduced in 1972. 

The hew instant prints, whose 
front surface resembles a white 
card when' ejected from the 
camera, appear in a bluish 
square about 3 by 4. inches 
after a minute or so. Their de- 
velopment is about 90 percent 
complete in three minutes, al- 


though emergence of the image 
continues for ■ another five! 


Before yesterday’s exhibition 
of the Kodak-, instant-picture 
system, some stock market an- 
alysts had urged caution, in 
judging Eastman Kodak stock 
on the basis of its long-awaited 


CHICAGO, April 20 (A?) — ! 
Profit taking m the closing 
minutes on the Chicago Board 
of Trade caused heavy trims 
in strong, early • gains lo Jay. 

Before the selling set in, 
wheat and soybeans had been 
up about 6 cents, com 3>A 
and oats 3. Oats dosed with 
its best gain in. the nearby 
months, but the soybeans gain 
was halved while corn closed 
mixed and wheat was down 
3 cents. Soybean oil gained 
about 20 points, but meal iu- 


entry into the instant-picture: tures were down just a shade 


field. 

The analysts said 'that even 
a very successful Kodark prod- 
uct would add only about 2 
percent to earnings In the first! 


minutes. 


■Brenda Landry,, an analyst! stead 
with "White. Weld & Company ' 
said that the list price of the 
film was higher than Polaroid’s! 

$6.90- Jist price for 10 pictures,! 


year, and only a few percentage 
points more in succeeding 
years. They urged attention in 


over $1 a ton. Iced broiler 
prices were about steady at 
the final bell. 

The early demand moved .:n 
after a rather weak opening 


Right to Indictment Waived 

Mr. Farber, who was board 
chairman until the beginning of 
1972, waived . his right to a 
grand jury indictment and 
pleaded guilty to a prosecutor’s 
charge, called an information, 
which was submitted yesterday 
by United States Attorney Rob- 
ert B. Fiske Jr. 

The one-count information 
charged Mr. Farber with having 
made "a false, fictitious and 
fraudulent statement” that 
overstated Tidal Marine's earn- 
ings by $435,000 for 1970, 
when the company’s real earn- 
ings were only $961,000. 

Mr. Farber, who. is 44 years 
old and lives at 5395 Nether- 
land Avenue in the Bronx, will 
be sentenced by Judge Milton 
Pollack in Federal District 
Court here on July 16. 

John D. Gordan 3d, the 
prosecutor in' charge of the 
case, said that Mr. Farber was 
the fourth defendant to plead 
guilty, that another defendant 
was convicted recently in 
trial and that the others were 
awaiting trial or being sought 
as fugitives. 

The defendant convicted in 
the trial is Joseph Metzger, 
a former nee president of the 
National Bank of North Ameri- 
ca. which was the principal 
victim of the fraudulent bank 
loans. 


in the over-the-counter market 
yesterday made abroad ad 
vance in accelerated trading. 

Analysts attributed the up- 
swing to the Commerce Depart- 
ment’s report on Monday of a 
sharp 7.5 percent rise in the 
gross national product in the 
first quarter and to improved 
corporate earnings reports. 

At the end of the trading, 
the Am ex market-value index 
was up 0.97 to 103.06 with 
advances outscoring declines 
by 480 to 230. The price of 
an average share climbed 11 
cents. Turnover surged to 2.62 
million shares from 1.84 million 
shares on Monday. 

Trading in Amex issues, in- 
cluding transactions on region- 
al exchanges and the counter 
market, increased to 2.83 mil- 
lion shares from 2.05 million 
shares on Monday. 


million shares the day before. 

Option trading cn the Amex 
climbed to 39.S32 contracts 
from -28,603 on Monday. Open 
inteiest amounted to 648,648 
un expired or un exercised con- 
racts. On the Chicago Board 
Options Exchange, 86,944 con- 
tracts traded, against 63,724 on 
Monday, open 'interest totaled 
1,046,530 contracts. 

Several issues on the Amex 
posted impressiye gains. Mego 
International rose 1% to 13^, 
Pittsburgb-DesMoines Steel 2 
to 24 and Ecodyne 1%. to 9 
after announcing it cleared 42 
cents a share in the first quar- 
ter against 9 cents in the year- 
before period. 

Hampton Industries added 
1% to 814- The company said 
that its first-quarter profits 
rose to 70 cents a share from 
13 cents a share a year ago. 


dlnlloiu 30-59 davi 4.HM.8& «0-89 «tm 
*.9Sr*jBS, 50-H9 Cars 5.MM.90, 120-179 dm 
5. 10-5.00, 1S0.Z70 den 5.25-5.15. 

CetfHkatm of dm&lt 30-59 days 4 %• 
4%. 50-89 d in 4*r5v 90-119 dav* 

120-179 days S-Sli, 190-340 days 5tt-5%. 

TeteratB money market Index 4J0. ue 
-01 Iran Momur. 


Open Interest 


Tuesday, April 20, 197S 


. (In bushels, 

0C0 omined] 

Mon. 


TWO. 

Opm 




Wheat 

. . 71.390 

191 ,535 

Com 

. .. 96.035 

403J0O 

Sals 

2^25 

12.715 

Soybeans ... 

. .113^45 

3F7M 

Soybean meal 

... 2^72 

18.152 

Soybean oil . . . ■ . 

5A» 

36^23 

(In coni rad) 

Mon. 

Si nn (No. II mn'rad) 



Sowr (No. 12 rant rod) 


30S 

Coca® . 


9MO 

Conte 


54KU 

Conner . . 


37,642 

Shed ooos 


2,105 

Uve hog-, 


11,591 

dranoo tolcr . 


3JJ1 

Lhi* beef caHle . . 



=*1 at mum 


6,132 

Pork bellies 


8,162 

*Ol«tOti . . . 


10,193 

Sliver ... 


175^59 

Wop! 


48 


in the major trading pits. Com- 
mercial interests led t>y export- 
ers. were good early buyers 


to instant pictures as^and when their activities eased 


merely one sign of Kodak’s [Commission house buyers 

intention to broaden its techno- 1 moved in. Covering by shorts 
logical base and seek newjadded to the advances at tfcei 
markets. 1 - . '(time. . . 1 


White Stag Pleads Guilty 

PORTLAND. Ore., April 20 
(AP) — White Stag Manufactur- 
ing Company pleaded guilty 
in Federal District Court yester- 
day to 150 counts of failure 
to report the entire cost of 
its imported clothing from the 
Far East to the United States 
Customs Bureau. 



Republic National Bank of New York 


Consolidated Statement of Condition 

MARCH 31 




ASSETS 

Cash anddu&from banks $ 

Interest bearing deposits with banks :... 

Precious jnetals* * 

Investment securities: 

U.S. Government obligations 

. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies%.... 

Obligations of states and political subdivisions : — 1 03.326.304 

Other - 

• Total investment securities 

Federal funds sold - * 

> Loans, net of unearned income 

. . Less allowance for possible loan losses - 


* 


i easterners’ liability under acceptances 

. Bank premises and equipment - 

.% Adcrufed interest receivable : - T.’.lz'Sz: 

. Otheriassets : - 

,r: Total assets * •**•’ 


LIABILITIES ‘ C \ . • ’ 

' _ Deposits : 1 

FederaUunds purchased an.cl securities sold Under 

-. agreement to 'repurchase —• »* 

Gthefejiabilitie*; tor borrowed money...-., 

vA'cceptaVices outstanding. - 

. Accrued interest payable ...: — ....... — 

Other.TiabiliUes — : — r ~‘* 

6%%' 8% Notes' - 


STOCKHOLDERS.’ EQUITY! ■■ 

Common stock ; ; 

Surplus :* ................ 

: Surplus representing bonvertibfe note obligation 

assumed by parent corporation — 

■ Undivided profits;......;- : * - 

' -Total stockholders 1 . equity *---■» - c ._ ort1 

v . .Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity Si ,543.801,456 


Letters of credit outstanding 



1976 

1975 

$ 

73,627,446 

$ 93,485,655 


314,082,110 

. . 69.633,927 


39,668,568 

25,274,163 


59,177,816 

8,900,354 


56.704,422 

• 56,850,049 


103.326,304 

132.755.071 


37.124.587 

27.916.752 


256,333,129- 

226,422.226 


18.000.000 

85.000,000 


689,805,568 

535,598,410 


10,864,901 

' • 8,594.274 


678,940,667 

527,004,136 


76,919,708 

82,630,953 


13,332,737 

13,000,509 


28,719,500 

16,352,050 


44.1 77.591 - 

39.261.253 

SI .543,801 ,456 

SI j 78.064.872 

51,253,150,889' . 

$ 932,143,327 


9,400,000 . 

— 


3,921 ,208 

. . '. 6,095,322 


77,891 ^77 

■> 82,848,623 


54,599392 

,. '31,054,730 


17,287,560: 

. . 9,055,511 


808,000 ■ . 

. 808,000 


21 ,482*, 080 ' 

21,482.080 


45,050,511 ;■ 

‘43,602.511 


12,604,000 . 

• * 14.052.000 


47,606.039 

■ ' 36.922.768 


126.742.630 

. 116.059.359 

SI .543.801.456 

$1,178,064,872 

S 

43,145,189 ■ 

■ $ 38,049,155 


\ - Fifth Avenue at 40th Street, New York, Naw York 10018' - 

■ Member Federal Reserve Sysiem/ Member Federal Deposil Insurance Corporation 
NewYork- London* Nassau 


.Beirut Bogo^ 


[ig offices in JManbaitan. .Brooklyn, Queers ■&' Suffolk County) 

-.2 _ a subsidiary REPUBLIC NEW YORK CORPORATION 

V.’ . j Affiliates and Representatives, fn: - 

JBueno^ Aires! Catacas. Chiasso. Frankfuii. Geneva, Luxembourg. Manila, Mexico City, P.anama City. Paris. Rio de Janeiro, 


Sao Paulo 


; ' * T-..«5 , 


■i 


Unilever N.V. 

Rotterdam, The Netherlands 


ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS 

On Wednesday, May 12, 1976 at 10:30 a.m. at the Company's office at 
Burgemecster s’Jacobplein 1, Rotterdam 


. AGENDA 

X. Annual Report for 1975. 

2. Approval and adoption of the Bal- 
ance Sheet and the Profit and Loss 
Account for -1975 and adoption of 
the proposed Profit Appropriation 
for 1975. 

3. Appointment of the Board of Di- 
rectors. 

4. Appointment of Auditors. 

5. Questions. 


notify the Company of their in- 
tention by letter, stating the num- 
bers of the share certificates or of 
the bookings for the shares, which 
must reach Unilever N.V., Af del- 
ing Effecten en Coupons, Rotter- 
dam, by Wednesday, May 5, 1976. 


This agenda, the Annual- Report -for 
1975 including the Balance Sheet, the 
Profit and Loss Account, and the pro- 
posed Profit Appropriation and the 
nominations relating to items S and 4 of 
the agenda are available for inspection 
by shareholders and holders of certifi- 
cates issued by N.V. Nederlandsch Ad- 
ministratie- cn Trustkantoor at the 
Company's office, Rotterdam,' and at 
the offices of the Banks mentioned be- 
low, where copies may be obtained free 
of charge. 


(D) Holders of certificates for shares 
in Unilever N.V. issued by N.V. 
Nederlandsch Administvatie- en 
Trustkantoor of Amsterdam 
(“Nedamtrust certificates”) wish- 
ing to attend the meeting without 
taxing part in the voting must de- 
posit such certificates by Wednes- 
day, May 5, 1976 at any of the 
offices mentioned in lA) above. 
Upon production of the receipt 
then issued to them, such certifi- 
cate holders will he admitted to 
the meeting. 


(A) Holders of bearer shares or sub- 
shares wishing to attendflie meet- 
ing either in person or by proxy 
appointed in writing most deposit 
their share- certificates and sub- 
■ share certificates by Wednesday, 
May 5, 1976, at the Company's Of- 
' fice or at the- offices of the Am- 
sterdam-Rotterdam Bank N.V. in 
Amsterdam, Rotterdam or The 
Hague, of the Kredietbank in Ant- 
werp, the Generale Bankmaat- 
• schappij or Bank Brussel Lambert 
in Brussels, of Midland Bank Lim- 
ited in t Lopdon,/pt< any of its 
branches, " of Basque ' Rothschild ^ 
in Paris, of the Dresdner Bank 
A.G., or the Deutsche Bank. A.G. 
in Hamburg, Dusseldorf,' Frank- ■ 
furt-am-Main, or Munich, of the 
Bank fur Handel und Industrie 
A.G. or the Berliner Disconto Bank 
A.G. in Berlin, of the Creditan- 
stalt-Bankverein, the Oesterreich- 
ische Landerbank Aktiengessell- 
schaft or Schoeller & Co. in Vi- 
enna or any -of their branches, of 
the Schweizerischer Bankverein 
( Swiss Bank Corporation), the 
Schweizerische Kreditanstalt 
(Swiss Credit Bank), in Zurich, 
Geneva, Basle or Lausanne or of 
Morgan Guaranty Trust Company 
of New York in New York City- 
Upon production of the receipt 
then Issued to them such holders 
will be admitted to the meeting. 

(B) Holders of registered shares, cer- 
. tificates for which are counter- 
signed by Morgan Guaranty Trust 
Company of New York, New York, 
wishing to attend the meeting 
either in person or by proxy ap- 
pointed in writing must notify 
the Company of their intention on 
the form provided by the Company 
(or by letter, stating the numbers 
of their share certificates), which 
must reach Morgan Guaranty 
Trust Company of New York, 30 
West Broadway, New York, N.Y. 
10015, by Wednesday, May 5, 
1976. 


(*E) If holders of the certificates men- 
tioned in (D) above wish to exer- 
cise voting rights at the meeting 
cither in person or by proxy ap- 
pointed in writing, N.V. Neder- 
landsch Administrate- en Trust- 
kantoor will exchange such certifi- 
cates free of charge for original 
shares, which it will hold in the 
names of such holders at its own 
. office (such office being the desig- 
nated place of deposit in tiie 
event) and exchange the same 
again after the meeting free of 
charge for Nedamtrust certificates 
to be issued to such holders in 
accordance with the conditions of 
administration. For snch purpose 
holders must by Tuesday, May 4, 
1976: 

surrender their certificates 
.'for FI. 20 or a multiple thereof 
(but. in tlip case of certificates 
for 7'r cumulative preference 
shares, representing a total 
nominal amount of FI. 1,000 or 
a multiple thereof) to N.V. 
Nederland sell Administvatie- cn 
Trustkantoor, Keizersgracht 
558, Amsterdam, and 


_ surrender their sub-share cer- 
tificates for FI. 12 nominal 
amount or multiples thereof, 
representing a total nominal 
amount of at least FI. 60 per 
class (but, in the case of sub- 
share certificates for 7 f .t> cumu- 
lative preference shares, repre- 
senting a total nominal amount , 
of FI. -1,000 or a multiple 
thereof) to Midland Bank Lim- 
ited, Mariner House, Pepys 
Street, London EC3N 4BA or 
any of its branches. 


(C) Holders of registered shares for 
■which certificates have been is- 
sued in another form and holders 
' of booked shares wishing to attend 
the meeting either in person or by 
proxy appointed in writing must 


The certificates so surrendered 
must be accompanied by a request 
in writing as described in the con- 
ditions of administration, forms 
for this purpose being obtainable 
free of charge from N.V. Neder- 
landsch AdriSnistratie- en Trust- 
kantoor, Amsterdam, and Midland 
Bank Limited, London. Upon pro- 
duction of the receipts then issued 
by N.V. Nederlandsch Adminis- 
trate- en Trustkantoor and Mid- 
land Bank Limited respectively the 
holders will be admitted to the 
meeting. 

The receipt issued by Midland 
Bank Limited for sub-share certifi- 
cates so surrendered incorporates 
a two-way proxy form. 


Rotterdam, April 21, 1976- 


THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT 


Dynamic electronics manufacturer seeking manufacturing management expertise for new positions 
in Houston headquarters. We increased sales substantially in fiscal 76. Due to this growth and the 
addition of new products to manufacturing, we need to add technical expertise and professional 
leadership-in the foftowing areas: • , ■ - 

PRODUCT QUALTTY MANAGER 

Rupom&B tar eofpcwte product qusfcty. Ths wfl tadudK de velo pment mptanentataxi and monte ri product rehabAty 
stewards, product lest and acceptance standards, produd lest equpmenl and proesduros, cveommg material inspection 
. .stewards and procedures ... 

ftoMton requfraaBSEE (desire MBA) end mmumm 7 to 10 »ra. ifiversffied experience in me abiw. Heporis la V.P. cl Ml?. 

ADVANCED MANUFACTURING EN(Mffi K MANAGER 

ReuxtasUe lor manUacturmB-engXieenng trtertace. Ths w* mcJude: new product Wrodudwi programs, manufacturing 
process standarte, al nn manufadumg processes, and eqiwmenl and toofcnfl. 

Poaftm’roqores BSEE or S5UE (desire USE, MBA) Wa nnaum ol 5 yrs. diversified experience in (he atop, teuton 
reports to Vee Pres, ol atanutadrrtig. ■ 

MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS AND PROCEDURES MAHAGER 

Ruponsibfe lor Mialioo. evaluator* imptoneniaiian and audit ot aU menutaourina systems and procedtRs to ran ojdinm- 
Uon of the system. Poston returns BSE or B9AE {desire MBA) and mmimom 5 yrs. eipwenca m conreetclal electron* 
aanutocfcimg enrirmnenL. ) ' • 

MANUFACTURING ENGNEER 

■teptnatote tor m pto nertaS on cl new rnanutaduitag processes IP.C. Board insertion, mare soldering, we citing, etc 1 Po- 
- stan requRsBSlE ant ntoimn 3 yrs. experience tn new process eatninnHton In electronics. 

PRODUCTION CONTROL COORDINATOR 

. Resp orttWe for generaSng and maMeinmg prodiKton and Hnennty control Otars. Swemory potcntaL PosUw rewires 
BEE 6BA wto Antrum t yr experience to protiuebon MMdiimii ati mrentory tcrtct tanewn n etechneiiiiJrtdacM- 
: ^etwrortnenLFIeport* to manager ol Uatenal and Production ConuoL 

Please send resume with 
salary history In confidence to: 

Telxon 

Corporation 
. K. L. Polansky 
* Personnel Manager 
3726 Dacoma 
Houston, Tx. 77092 

An Eoual OpoortunBy Employer Mr F 









THE NEW YORK TIMES , WEDNESDAY APRIL 21, 1978 


If you like efficiency.. 



Source. Audits & Surveys. Inc.- 1 975 


_.we could be your 
favorite newsweekly 

Sports Illustrated 


Modern Medicine is honored to accept 
the National Magazine Award 
for “Service to the Individual? 

Modern Medicine was one of only 7 magazines 
selected for a 1 976 National Magazine Award 
for outstanding editorial achievement from 
amwtg such leading 




m ■ 


Presented bytha American Sock 
through the Columbia University 


MODERN MEDONE 


330 Madison Avenue. New fork, N.Y. 10017 


Here 

today 



* nw/nr , rr -.; . 

» WTfbppi y. 
r NEWybqKi ','•••• ^-.23 

■«.:■:*•••<. -di§£ 

i •••: b :i *C»£d 


•••■ 




There 

todav 


Eastern Sprints your small package 

to 85 cities. 


If you’ve got a little package in a Wg 
hurry. Eastern’s Sprint gives you same-day 
service on most of the more than 1000 flights 
to 85 cities in the continental U.S. and 
Puerto Rico. 

Just get your urgent package of 50 lbs. or 
less with up to 90" overall dimensions, to 
Eastern’s ticket counter at the airport half an 
hour before flight time. (For larger or 
heavier pieces, ask about Eastern’s Air 
Express service.) At the destination, your 


package can be picked up 30 minutes after 
arrival in toe baggage service office. 

The cost? $25 per package, $30 coast-to* 
coast and to Puerto Rico, $35 from West 
Coast to Puerto Rko. . 

For pick-up and delivery in the continental 
U.S. call: Air Couriers International toll free 
(800)528-6075. 

For a Sprint credit card or delate of 
downtown drop-off service at selected City 
Ticket Offices, call Eastern reservations. 


EASTERN 


1776-1976 COMMEMORATIVE BELL 

As part of the Bicentennial celebration. Metcast. TJiv. ot Worthington 
Pump Cwp. (U.S AJ. has cast a oommemorallve Gbarty belt io be ore-, 
son led to the Town ol Harnson. Because ot the interest in this project. 
Metcast w» cast, tor special order, a total of 50 beds. 

Thtf Commemorative bell is 34” in diameter: 30" high; 635 lb tin- 
bronze - complete with dapper. Suitable tor mounting on yoke ol your 
design. Front inscribed with 'LIBERTY 1776-1876' in 2" letters below 
the Bicentennial logo. Back can be inscribed with your company name 
and location-3 lines V' letters. Price 53,450.00 F.O.B. Harrison, NJ. 
Delivery 10 weeks or sooner. To place your order, contact 

METCAST 

401 Worthington Ave. 

Harrison, N. J. 07029 
(201)492-5700 


NEED AN— — — * 
ACCOUNTANT TODAY?! 

■Expert Temporary Accountants I 
I <Sc Bookkeepers, 

accounliips 

|CH*r»mn Holxrt Kilt ■ 0 1 

221-6500 


Brochures, presentations, s fetes, 

filmstrips, movies, charts, books, 


Advertising 


By PHILIP H. DOUGHERTY 
The most effective adver- 
tising is the advertising that 
is most precisely tailored to 
the wants, desires, attitudes 
and lifestyles of the target 
audience. 

So Hading and defining 
that audience is high-priority 
work at ad agencies; 

It’s just what William D. 
Wells, with his doctorate in 
psychology, is doing at Need- 
ham. Harper & Steers. Chica- 
go. He is helping to stuff 
the maw of its hungry com: 
puter with data on how na- 
tives in various regions live, 
how they feel about certain 
issues and - what products 
they toid to buy. 

The way he puts it is, 
“We want to identify the 
heavy user [of products] and 
see how be differs from otb- 


of his lifestyle.” 

And he’s done just that. 
He knows for example that 
the Eastern male is more 
likely to want to take a 
trip around the world than 
a Southern, but is less likely 
to use mouthwash or a deo- 
dorant And he also knows 
that the Western male tends 
to consume more cottage 
cheese, vitamin tablets and 
regular coffee than either of 
those two other groups, and 
more likely to read Pent- 
house, too. (Or at least look 
at the pictures.) 

One of the great dangers 
in the advertising business;, 
which is heavily concentrat- 
ed in New York and Chicago, 
is that the people who make 
the advertising think of 
American consumers as one 
big homogeneous mass. Far 
from it. 

A good case in point is 
the Southern male. Mr. 
Well’s computer will tell you 
that, besides being a support- 
er of mouthwash and deo- 
dorants, he tends to also 
be a supporter of all matters 
concerning law and order, 
the traditional role of wom- 
en, and the importance of 
children in the family. He's 
also more apt to be involved 
in community projects, but 
less likely than an easterner 
to unwind at the end of 
the day with a drink. 

• 

There's also less chance 
you’ll find him reading a 
Sunday newspaper than men 
in the rest of the country 
but more chance you'll catch 
him watching "Sanford and 
Son” or “Hawaii Five-O.” 
And when it comes to listen- 
ing to countrv and western 
music, he's the country's top-' 



Tw 


jTOijl 




Wflfiam p. WeBs 
. fan. While 53 percent of the 


said they favor the genre, 
70 percent of. Southerners 
said they dig it. 

In the area of appliance 
ownership the Southerner 
- leads the rest only in home 
freezers, but he ties with 
Easterners for first place in 
air conditioners. 

But if you want to move 
your inventojy of garbage 
disposal units, go West 
young man, go West. While 
only 28 percent of the nation- 
al sample claimed ownership 
of such a device only 8 
percent in the South), 50 per- 
cent of the Western males 
said they had units. 

• 

All of this moderatdy fas- 
cinating information - comes 
from questionnaires sent to 
2,000 housewives and a like 
number of husbands of other 
housewives. The response 
rate was 90 percent for the 
women and 75 percent for 
men. 

While Dr. Wells points out 
that the sample was a good 
one for middle America, 
blacks, singles, transients 
and the very rich and veiy 
poor are under-representedJ 

You say you’ve gotten this 
far and you haven't learned 
anything' practical? How 
wrong you are. You know 
that if you want to sell a 
lot of mouthwash you make 
a TV commercial with a gun- 
toting spokesman singing a 
country-western jingle (while 
accompanied by his domesti- 
cated wife and child) and" 
run it on a Southern regional 
network hookup during 
"Sanford and Son.” 

* 

Liquor Ads Versus Sales 

If you were to read that 
the Scotch whisky category 
spent S25.2 million advertis- 


ing m 10 top magazines last 
year while bourbons spent 
SI 2.8 million and vodkas 
Spent $55 million, would you 
— being the big advertising 
fan that you are — immediate- 
ly assume that spirit sales 
matched the spread? 

Quite the contrary, old 
friend. Vodka is No. 1. bour- 
bon, No. 2 and Scotch, No. 
3. 

The spending figures 
come from a Time magazine 
report reprinted in Pat Ken- 
ne^sOExecutive Newsle tter. 

A voice from the spirits 
world was quick to clarify 
the strange disparity of ad- 
vertising to sales. There has 
never been the kind of adver- 
tising per case ratios in vod- 
ka as there isi n Scotch, 
he said. 

And besides, he went on, 


leins’s Smirnoff, few vodka 
brands make enough profit 
per case to afford much -ad- 
vertising. Another factor, he 
noted, was competition. In 
the Scotch arena, several 
brands are fighting for top 1 
spots while in vodka, Smir- « 
ji off. the first brand to ad- 
vertise heavily, dominates its - 
market. 

* 

Sfdamon-Eristoff Paper 

Constantine Sidamon-Erist- - 
off, who held a number of 
posts during the terms of 
Mayor John V. Lindsay, is 
president of a company that 
will begin to publish a weekly 
neighborhood newspaper to- 
day. It is called the East Side 
Express and 35,000 copies 
will he distributed (at 25 
cents each) between 14th and 
96th Streets. 

Mr. Skiamon-Eristofr, sow 
a member of -ti» Metropolitan - 
Transportation Authorit y, has 
as publisher, Robert Trent- 
lvon, already publisher t» 
Cheb*a-Clinton News and. 
The Westsider. He’ll keep all 
three jobs. . 

CHIC08P KWffi 
-RISE IK EARMM 


A higher percentage of P 
readers bought new cars last year 1 
the readers of Time* Newsweek 
and Playboy. 

1 Fuel for thought 

qnhoi(^TDd^41millioni!e£ 


A2MParcpnWfatii>g. 


Business Briefs 


Japan Payments Surplus Up in March 

TOKYO, April 20 (Reuters)— Japan’s overall balance- 
of-payments surplus rose to $660 million in March from 
5619 million in February and S298 million in March last 
year. Finance Ministry figures showed today. 

The March surplus reduced the payments deficit for 
the whole of the 1975 fiscal year ended in March to 51.77 
billion, only slightly over half the fiscal 1974 deficit of 
53.39 billion, the Ministry said. The improvement in the 
full year’s performance reflected an increase in the visible 
trade surplus within the context of an overall wntraction 
of two-way trade, and a sharp reduction in the. deficit on 
long-term capital movements. 

Nigeria to Get U.S. Lockheed Papers 

WASHINGTON, April 20 (Reuters) — The Justice De- 
partment today signed a formal agreement with Nigeria 
under which it will turn over documents relating to al- 
leged bribes and illicit payoffs by the Lockheed Aircraft 
Corporation to promote sales to the West African country. 

It was the fourth such agreement between the United 
States and another country relating to the Lockheed pay- 
off scandal. The Justice Department has already turned 
over similar material to Japan, Italy and the Netherlands. 
The officials declined to specify the allegations regarding 
Lockheed sales in Nigeria.' Nigeria has ordered six Lock- 
heed C-I30 cargo planes, four of which have so far been 
delivered. Lockheed- has admitted paying at least $22 
million in bribes or kickbacks to foreign officials to pro- 
mote exports. 


Continued From Page 49 j 

trusts, Mr. Wriston said thai : 
' S375 million worth were aotj 
meeting payments, while inter* j 
est rates had been reduced on; 
an additional SI67 million. Tak- J 
en together, REIT loans were 
vieiding- 3.74 percent on an, 
annual basis, as compared^ »i 
the original annua! rate of 7.94: 
■ percent. For 1975, this rate* 
.was 5.82 percent. j 

This deficiency reduced per; 
r share operating earnings by II j 
.’rents to 73 cents. Mr. Wriston. 
; said. In 1975, -bad .real estatel 
I loans lowered per share operat-. 
ling results by 5 cents to RS 
-cents. .* 

In a separate announcement, 

Citicorp said that net income 
ifor the first quarter, including, 
J securities gains and losses, was j 
i SS9.7 million, up 4 percent from 
•SS6.6 million in 1975. For both! 
i operating and net results, the j 
j 1973 figures were lowered to 
[reflect retroactive increases in, 

! state and local taxes. 

I C, Schmidt Brewery Sold 

PHILADELPHIA, April 20 
(UPI)— Officials of C. Schmidt 
and Sons Brewery today can- 
finned the sale of the 116-year- 
old concern to a locai beer 
distributor, WiHiam H. PSau- 
mer, for 515.9 rniUioa. 

The sale, which ended mare 
than a year of efforts by 
Schmidt’s stockholders to sell 
the concern, includes the 'brew- 
ery’s plants here and in Cleve- 
land that employ 1/400 work- " 
ers. 


PUBLIC NOTICE 


TENNIS INSTRUCTIONAL 

OR 

SQUASH COURT FACILITIES 
BRAND CENTRAL TERMINAL 

METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY is 
Interested in leasing to a qualified firm or firms approx- 
1 imately 7,450 square feet of space on the seventh floor 
Of Grand Central Terminal. The premises consist of 
ladles' and men's toilets, showers and locker roams; a 
small lounge area; two offices; a reception area and an 
open court area. The court area is approximately 4,800 
square feet <40 feel in width tay 120 feet in length) with 
a pitched roof with skylights 28 feet high. Six structural 
trasses 15 feet high and 20 feet apart run the width of 
Ihe area. ' 

The leasing of the 'premises fdr its current use or 
other suitable uses (such as squash or racquet ball 
facilities) will be considered. 

Expressions of interest in negotiating such a lease 
wiU be entertained from principals with at least three 
years experience in the type 'of operation proposed or 
who plan to manage the operation through a firm having 
such experience. 

The sole purpose ot this notice is to obtain expres- 
sions of inter est in negotiating or lease as described 
above. METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION AUTHOR- 
ITY makes no commitment by this notice to enter into 
any such lease, reserves the right, in its sole discretion, 
to select those firms, dr firm with which to negotiate, or* 
to elect not to negotiate with any firm. 

Qualifying firms should submit no later than May 24. 
1976, verified financial statements, annual reports Of 
available), a summary of their pertinent experience and 
such other data as may be relevant to: 

STANLEY A. LEWIS 
DIRECTOR OF REAL ESTATE 

METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY 
1700 Broadway 
New York, New York 10019 



VIE BUY docMh. iob Msa 

Scandale NY 



Hie 


oftheOay. 

Driving to tip: station 

WQXR(156ti& 8; 96.SFM); 
7:05 A.M.& 8:05 A.*£ • 

Presented weekday* by 

BusinessWeek 









kjBli 






ThisBeN & Howell overhead projector’s righ .. '£ r *-■% ~ 

on targetfor making ashow of your 10 ff x 10' %m .v 
transparencies. It has a 1 4-inch P3.5 lens for . 
sharpness. 2,000 lumenjighting for bright- r r _^" v 
ness. And a spare bulb that instantly moves . % 

into replacement position at the flick of s : . 

“ • $ 147 58 W 

To order write or phone - ' .-?•£ • ' 

•js- . 


% 


VIP DIVISION 

Visual erds-fndustrial Photographic equipment 

115 West 31st Street, New York City, N.Y. 101 
(212) 564-1600 


THE 

New Jersey 
Broker 

tor Industrial Real Estate 

jtorOoiflmeitMnrapaSM.loo - 

.. Call (212) 349-5250 



■ w. -t- ' . 


Tft* Chartmakar*, If 


LE.D. WATCHES 


3.4. 1> S fond tans m 
didfc dritarv. Anil, 


aflle tar.fmme- 
te only In lira 


46.5% of WQXRk audience buys and V* : 

drinks imported wine. Thaft the second:.:^ 
highest percentage of any station in the 
New York radio audience. 

Markets in Focus 1974 says so. 

That takes money. Which our 
audience has. And spends. On more 
than wine. :' v • 

Think about it Whoever youVe 
selling. If you¥e not reacting the WQXR 'Jm 
audience, you’re missingithe best part of Kj 
the good part of New York. r*? 

Ihe part with money. ^ 

The classic stations fix classical mua > f 


1560 AH EM STEREO 

•VtlttlKISWIOWOFM^maKTfteS. 
















Tg 


\Oj0 





i;*} K3t3^E&% f>" : ' :••#'■ ’ r y ■* , ■#*. , . -■ 
•?' " -1* .mob 

■ : * : **"* fc: • • "' ' •'» 


i&zsmk 




** -. 'visa 

rmsvHum-’its ■;*? 

,1 A1KVW :>f:5 

• .? TOKxyt .-*§e? 


'■ svi ; - #? 


M 







«) ; 


LLEIS 


i ; * 


in tills 



& 



&.-r* 


i 


*&■■'.£ 

: .;.< i®'-" *'■'••' - 


•V>. 



i ?**#&. 




^ ^ V ' W*^- ! 






&&** 

If 


vy." • Si *$ 
FW'-^Cv 





New Jersey 

Broker 

^SS^>1'-*' "*_ £ .. 

i«auW5 


rs 



mmu' 




Srrhan the fastes*$un ?n the Wfest? . 

ve tp be to have fired 8 shots^at Bobby, reload and fire 2 more times before 
tSewit^disarittedhim. 1 

f ihoselObuHets hay© been discovered and even those don’t match Sirhan’s 
ich other. • ; '" ■' ..' . 

Low^stein fhinfe the facts have been covered-up and watered-down. And 
to jcnow “Who Kitted Robert Kennedy?” 






I * C if* S*i v * 


Our Kristel Ball. 


► • < < ; 


g * 





■HailMiilBlH iiiiimm 

.. . jr* •* w v -jf 


L$& . 


Bugging 

Mommy and Daddy’s 
Bedroom. 

In the fallout following Nixon’s folly, 
Watergate has left its mark on all of us. 
. Kids are bugging their parents’ rooms 
for fun and profit. 

Sammy Davis, Jr. hasn’t won an award 
since his 72 embrace with the great 
Richard M. 

Crime shows are showing high-offi- 
cials as low-lifes. 

And California's Richard M. Nixon 
Freeway is quietly being renamed the 
Marina Freeway. 

It just goes to show you, the man may 
be gone but his memory lingers on. 


™ts 

E ~ 



:< •« ' 

• a 







Sylvia Kristel is back and she’s having a 
bah! 6 

She went from secretary to sex-star in 
Emmanuelle. 

Now she's starring in a sequel , The 
Joys of a Woman. 

You're going to be seeing a lot of little 
Sylvie. 

Wfe^firstwitii ' 


What happens in this country happens 
with this crowd first. 

The guys between 18 and 24. 

Not only do they get there first, they’re 
faster to try new things. 

Whether it’s a new idea, a new product, 
or a whole new life-style. 

That’s why the media guys call them 
the choicest segment of the entire mate 
market. 

Because when they get into some- 
thing, it doesn’t just become a success. 

It becomes a national sensation. 

And the book they’re into most right 
now is out, 

OUl is outspoken and outrageous. 
Audacious enough to reopen the Bobby 
Kennedy case. Yet always fresh, topical 
and often irreverent with articles on 
everything from frisbees to Fidel. 
Ifoaybe that’s why oui gets 
1,448,000 male readers 18 to 
24: ^That's more than Rolling 
Stone, New Times or National 
Lampoon. 

With numbers like these, j 
we could say. we own them. 
But nobody owns them. About 

the best you can do is keep J 
up with them. 

And nobody does that] 
better than ouj. - Mi 


• ■ 

-V 8 ’- • ■ ■■■■** 


‘Hd the scenes look Tpi 
liondom industry. ^ ’* 
b million dollar 
ry that doesn’t 
iph . publicity and 
fo keep it that way. 


S TO Midyear Report* 

PubUcattoas 1 ' 




1'^ :• 


Lake Erie isn’t dead. Man isn’t destroy- 
ing the atmosphere. And DDT doesn’t 
cause cancer. 

Ecologist Cy A. Adler exposes many 
of the environmental myths. And main- 
tains that man may -be worrying himself 
sick over nothing. 


Some of his 
torn friends 
are Jewish. 

Idi Amin, the man who once praised 
Hitter's extermination of the Jews says, 
•‘General Dayan, he is my bpst friend. 
We chased Jewish women together in 
Tel Aviv...” . -• 

And you should only hear Idi respond 
to charges. that he is a racist, a.murderer 
and a madman. • 



S® '»W*I 


Sry£ 
















THE NEW YORK TIMES , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1976 


. - " < 7 

/, rX U ' 3 ' 


American Stock Exchange Transactions: Consolidated Summary of Yesterday’s Trading 




W* Stocks and Oiv. Sain Net 

H«h Law In Dollars P/E IM’s High Law Last Chg 

“ • a-b—c-d ~~ 


5 . 4% Abercttn Pet 14 1 

2 1 Acme Haml ... 4 

8% 4% Action . ISe 7 57 
.5% 2 Adam Riml 13 16 
154 11-16 ADM Indus! ... 4 


TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 1974 


1974 Stocks and Dlv. Sales • Net] 1976 Stocks inttDrv Sates Net 1976 Stocks ana Dtv. Seles «er '\m ' stocks and 6tv- Sate 

Hiflh LOW in Dalian P/E I Offs HkJh Low Lalt Choi High low In Dollars P/E ran Mich Low Lattf aw Hiflh LOW in Donors P/E lars Hiflh Low Last. Chfl Hiflh uw tn Daitars , P/€ 100'S Hiflti ppr LBS 


mi* li 1 * Alan wood ... 2 raft 17ft I2U+ u> 

■ A^« a** Alaska Airl i 32 S ir, J * n 

: -9*4 6*» Alcolac .15* 7 II 7H 7k St- II 

To 4'* A/toghv Afrl ... Jf Sft 5 Sft+ % 

7V* 4% Allec CO wt ... 5 Si 5% 5%...... 

2 1 AlldArt Ind ... 14 1% lft 1% 

24 18% AJMThr l.TO 7 17 V'* 24 24V* + to 


1 

9ft 

9ft 

9%.., 


7ft 

7ft 

7ft- 

to 

6 

Mi 

Jft- 

ft 

5 

5 

5 ... 

)Ml 

lft 

ito 

1%.., 


6'A 

Aft 

67,+ 

is 

4% 

4% 

4% + 

ft 

1 

1 

1 ... 


m» 

lift 

IMA... 


7ft 

7% 

7ft +' 

to 

lft 

lft 

1%... 


6<* 

6% 

6ft + 


3'i 

3 

3to + 

•4 

r,-. 

7 

7ft- 

V* 

id to 

9ft 

10ft + 

% 

5 

5 

5 + 

ft 

2'i 

2% 

2>4i... 

4 .r 

4ft 

2ft 

4ft ♦ 

% 

12 

11% 

lift... 


rc% 

12ft 

J2U * 


5 

4ft 

5 + 

ft 

7ft 

7% 

7%- 

ft 

Sto 

5 

5*4 + 


It. 

5ft 

5ft... 


lft 

lft 

1%... 



D4 VS 

Sales Monday Year ado 


Year to Date 

. 1974 1975 


1974 Stocks and Div. Soles 


8 AfthralDUfe ... a 746 V* 754- . VS 

>% to in Core 22 U A to to 

lift Vh Jadyn jm 5 12 8% 8% 

IBM? 844 Jacobs JOr . A 4 Ift W Sto* to 

8V1 4% Jamswy .lit 4 11 7 4to 7 + to 


no m *vj jeonnet job 


9 1154 1154 1154+ 5* 


Hiflh Low in Dollars P/E 1W» Hiflh tow MM Chg 5% 2 JefrorrJc Intf TO At 4to 4% -Rk+ 54 
— ; — 2044 1554 John Pd 11 15 l6to 16 16 - to 


2to 1% DeRose Ind 

2% r Designer Jw 


I 2V4 2V4 2to+ V* 
4 IV4 1% tto- to 


4% 3% Junlocr Pet 11 13 VA 3% 3Vi 


BV» . Jto Oev Co Am 9 57 7 454 7 - to 


S’! 3ft Dletxdd VC 


1 4% 4% 4 to- to 


854 4% AcroFlo .lie 4 3 6% Ato 6% + to 1 85h 4% Diatom Inc 6 15 5to 4to 4%- to 

3ft lft AffflCip .08t ... 00 3ft 3 3ft + >4 20 16to WHerdSt .40 7 4 185* 18to 1854+ to 

«ft 4ft Aflil Had .24 7 3 7ft 7 7 to- Vt < 154 11-16 Otodes Inc ... 3 1V4 1% 144- to 

18'h 65* Affll Pub .48 6 13 10ft 94* 1054+ to j 16 llto DiWsev -56 6 22 1 3to U 13 - to 


4 185* llto . 1854+ to 
3 1V4 lto lto- to 


2 1-16 1-16 1-14 


51* 3ft After six .16 7 1 5 5 5 + to <4 1-16 DNret In wt ... 2 1-16 1-16 1-16 

3 I'iAIC Photo ... J 2'i 2ft 2ft 1 M% *5. Dlxllyn JOe 4 50 8to 814 Ift + to 

4% 3 Aiken ind 9 a i\\ 2ft 4to+ to j7to 32 Dome Petri ll 123. 35to 35 3514- to 

13% 6H AirnxEI .40e 8 20 12 llto llto 24ft 20 Domtar 140 11 2 26% 25% 26%+ to 


10% 6to Dlxllyn JOe 4 50 Bto 814 814+ to 


4to 2to Juoffer ind 


3% 2to KavCo JOa 
7th 4to Ketchm .tor 


S «l 454+ to 


7% 4 MmriBTO .12 7 22 554 Sto Sto- to 

5to 3to McOfiO 22 725 414 4 4 

17 13to MCDonh .70 5 3 1754 1744 1754+ to 

lffto Ok MClITtlb JO .5 17 Wfc Tto 9»+ to 

2*. lift McKean Cn ... 4-2 2 2 

r Sto Medelst Ma i 4 - «% 6% 6%. 

3to 15-16 Medain Gro 77 m lto lto- to 

454 214 Medea Jwfv 7 8 356 356 3to+ to 

Sto 5% Modena* .12 7 TO 7to 75, to 


6 3to Prairi* Oil 12 '7 5 5 5 12to 7% STetlrut J3r S' 8 10to 10> IM 

lato 78 Pratt Lmb I 11 1 1256 1256 12*5- to W4 12 StWW Ch J3 , f. 11 14 ft; 14 - 

Sto 4to prott Rd JO 8 S '4to 4to «h- Vk 2to .l*l«Tsrt Electr 10. 73 2 T<- 1*. } 

*4 21 PTMtHodl' 11 « 22 2lto » + to 3to lto uarl EXt JO S . * -» 2* * 

ft «kSSe^fB ... 2 254 254 »-vi* Sto . 2ft Stevbolodt 7fS n 5to S> 5». 

17to lflfcPrSoTjO I 2 ,14to l«to Uto+. to W * 7Vi STP.Cfr Jtk - 


9ft 8V. PVOwGtt JO ... 1 856 S 

5 3to PrvdSdg SA 6 36 4to * 

356 7\ Prod Grow ... 6 3 ? 


»6+ » Wto 754,StnftW .10e 10 *9 ' Sto t Jto 

416 ♦ to 15* ft Summit Org 7- 4 . T t- 

Sto 2to+ to 454 3ft SuhCltVt J5 8 * 4 4to to- 


6 4to to- 4ft. 


Mft 9ft Oo**nev5 .n 
11 6to Driver Hen- 

14 hr* OroFefr JO 


4 9 1414 14ft I4ft+ ft.i 

... 15 10ft HR4 10to+ % 

6 1 12 12 12 - ft 


2 : 4 1 AloiiB Ind 

5to 3 ft Aitamli -lOe 

7 11-16 Altec Corn 

15-16 > . AltK CO wt 

7 to 4 Af,*« cm Of 

11- t 8ft AII-rFdi .50 


I 13-16 I 5-16 Dunlop J6e 8 2D t 11-16 1 11-161 11-16+1-16 
29ft 17 DWtXPd JO S 4 1954 T9 19 - ft 
9ft FiOurTst J5b 10 26 8ft 7ft 8ft + ft 

6=1 2ft DvnlcTn ,D6e 11 135 5ft 4ft 5ft ♦ ft 

8ft 3ft DvnAmer . 8 31 558 554 Sto- ft 


2 1ft lto lto- ft j Bft 3ft DvnAmer . 8 31 550 554 Sto- ft 

8 5ft 5V, p.,+ ft . 10ft S’.* Dynetl .149 » 23 10 954 956 


T4 38 1ft lto 154+ ft i F F- T H 

... 5 916 ft -9.16+1-16 B-r-y — n 

... 1 5ft Fa 5V»- ft) Pi MEnSCfcebJO 12 39 7ft 7ft 7ft 

7 P. 8:* Bto- ft < 17ft 13U EarthRes 1 6 52 15 14to 15 + to 

12 10ft 10ft 10ft i 34ft 30to EasonO .10r 17 29 34ft 3356 34ft+ ft 

20 3-16 ft ft ; Wft 17 EsfmC 7.40 a 7 3 2254 22ft 22ft- ft 

3 3ft 3ft 3ft + v, 10’ i 6 Eeodyne 10 265 9 8 * 9 + 1ft 

3 9 9 9 | 35ft 2211 Edgltan JQr 6 16 29to 28ft 2Bft- to 

24 9 854 8to- to ; 9-ft Vt Edo CQrp 8 41 854 7ft 8ft + ft 



ft AHessLL Wt 


20 

3-16 

ft 

ft.. 


4-4 

2ft Am Agronci 


3 

Sft 

3ft 

3ft + 

to 

ID 1 , 

B AmBusP .26 

12 

3 

9 

V 



lift 

8*i A GarPrf .34 

6 

24 

9 

8% 

8%- 

% 

4*4 

3ft A Israel .llr 

5 

8 

3% 

Wl 

J’-.. 


16ft. 

lift AMeizcA .40 

4 

26 

12*1 

12 

12ft + 

ft 


Sto lto Kev Co 
9 Sto Keystlnd JO 
2 1ft Kin Ark Crp 
U 7to KlnoRd .15* 
8V* 49, KlnesHp JO 

41 to 19ft Klrtwln 22c 
Sto lto Kit Mffl 
loft 4 Vi Klslrwrts 
lift 10ft KnlCkT .05e 
3ft lto Knott Hotel 
26to 185* Kollmor JO 
15ft 9ft KyhnStr .15 


15to 114a AMalHB *0 
SI to 36 Am Ml 2.70- 


3 IPi 12Vi iy»- to 
1 46 46 46 



Jft AmMol inn 


4 

4% 

A 1 '! 

4ft.. 


34 

X AmPcIrof I 

7 

B 

Eft 

33 

Eft* 

to 

Jft 

15-16 Am plan cp 


4 

lto 

l'k 

l'i.. 


9 

a*. A Pr-xs -20a 

6 

6 


AC. 

A% + 

ft 


3ft A SalEa .Ht 

8 

« 

6*. 

6'i 

6ft + 

to 

15 

10ft AmSci Eng 

19 

30 

12 

lift 

12 + 

Vk 

4% 

Jft AmTcch ind 

400 

2 

4 

4 

4 ... 

. 

10ft-- 

St. Amutlis .72 


2 

9ft 

9% 

9to... 

... 


9ft 4ft EnmhPh .10 5 2D 8 7ft 8 + 56 

9ft, 4>i EleorCh .0!* 10 25 8 Tto 8 + ft 

4’* 4ft El Hose JOr 12 12 5' 5 5 

4ft lto ElAinKJ .211 ... 13 256 2to 256 - ft 

llto 9Vi Electros .80 7 6 lift lift lift 

3to Tto Elect Assist 4 23 2ft 2ft 216- ft 


ir„ 7** AMIC Co 


7ft 3ft Ankcn .12 


S*, 3' s Arrow Elect 
l?’» 7ft A TMXri .«a 


6V* 3' , Ala Ionia 

lft. to Atto Ind 


2ft Aula Bldg 


1«» 12 AVC Co JOe 3 12 1T6 12 12 - to 1 

4 2 AVEMC .07 8 45 3=6 35i 3ft+ to 

95T 4ft AVX Coro 11 29 8ft 7to 8to+ ft 

5ft 35« Avdin Co 11 4 4to 4ft 4ft 

10 6 BWarMtJO II 3 Bft 8ft Bft- ft 

13 . 9to BeldorEl .20 6 10 954 9ft 9ft- ft 

S Baldwj .32a ... 3 6 Fl | 

16ft 12^* BanFd 1.12* ... 3 l4to 1454 l4to....„ 

lft ft Bang Pun wt ... 33 13-16 5i 5i 

11'. 6'i Banstrctl Lf 13 13 9to 9ft 9»+ ft 

57* 3ft Banner ,C6 6 14 5 5 5 + ft 

3 11* Barda/ .04 12 1 2ft 2ft 2ft+ ft 

3ft 2'A BarcoCa .12 7 2 3 3 3 

Sto 2ft Barnes Ena ...14 4 4 + v. 


ll 

IE 

ir. 

ir-. 

17% + 

% 

ll 

6 

Jto 

3% 

3%- 

'i 

a 

6 

1 1 '4 

2to 

2% - 

ft 

12 

47 

6to 

6ft 

6%+ 

V, 

8 

59 

7V| 

7 

7ft + 

ft 

14 

9 

»k 

3% 

2%.. 


73 

3 

as** 

27% 

Ztft - 

ft 

35 

12 

6 

5to 

P/i.. 


5 

66 

13% 

13% 

135S+ 

to 

7 

1 

4 

4 

4 .. 


S 

1 

17% 

17ft 

I2ft + 

ft 

8 

tvs 

11% 

lift 

lift- 

'A 

8 

4 

W, 

9% 

9%.. 


5 

S 

Uk 

lft 

1ft.. 


52 

2? 

3ft 

.1 

3V,+ 

to 

4 

5 

Sft 

5ft 

5ft..« 


100 

5 

1 

1 

1 - 

v. 


3 7I-T6 TI-T6 TI-T6+M6 

... 

52 

1% 

lft 

V.1- 

v« 

14 

715 

6ft 

5% 

6ft + 

ft 


141 

9% 

2ft 

2%+ 

ft 

17 

2 

1.5ft 

75ft 

1PA... 


13 

a 

13ft 

13 

13ft + 

ft 

IS 

34 

lift 

10% 

10%- 

u 

w- - 

1 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft... 


76 

W 

DU 

Sft 

Dft + 

to 

6 

77 

7% 

7% 



15 

1 

43% 

43% 

43*A + 

% 

3 

12 

lTto 

12 

12 - 

to 

8 

45 

.1 % 

34i 

3% + 

ft 

11 

29 

8% 

7% 

8% + 

to 

11 

4 

4% 

4% 

4%... 



145* lov* ELT ,10e 
8 ’j eft ErnstEC 41 
7ft lto Ero Ind 


3 Sto Efc Lav .09* 
fto 7ft EvanAr .lor 


12 12 S' 5 5 Jft ift Le* Naif 

... 13 256 256 254- ft Sto 3’i Le* Pharm 

7 6 llto lift llto 6W 3 Lchlflti Pre* 

4 23 2to 2’A 2ft- ft U Oft Ldflh Pr JO 

T X37 1556 155* 15ft + ft 4 lto LHSure TeC 

13 I 17 17 17 - ft 7ft 5ft L«d»BF Jt 

ll IB 13to 13ft 13to+ ft to 5to Uberfv Fah 

5 7 7ft 7ft 75*+ ft 7ft 4 LtotiWr .08* 

37 3 lto 1ft lft+ to 4ft. -2ft Lincoln Am 

5 37 9ft Oft 9ft + 1ft lift 55* LlowdS Elec 

6 13 7ft 7to 7ft 3 1ft LodflOS JO* 


75% 3ft Executn J3t 19 5 5 


8 2ft 2ft 2ft + ft 19ft 16ft Lotvm JOa 

2 Eft Bft 8ft+ V* Bto -4ft LoewThe wt 


7to a Fab Ind 5 U aft 6ft 6ft + ft 

6ft 4ft Fabien JO 47 1 Sto Sto 5ft+ ft 

llto 70 Fafirfdr .12 8 K 10ft tflft Iflft 


3 1ft FairTex MH 
5to V\ Felrtld Nob 
42 2Bto Falcons .Vt 


... 1 lto ito ito 

.. 8 4 4 4 

6 49 4056 40ft 40ft + ft 


Bto 4ft FamDUr .16 9 12 7V% 7 7 - to 


5 ■ 3 1ft Logistic JB* ... 1 2k M ZW- V* 

lO^fc 9 LoGenSv .74 7 1 fft 91% 9Tfc 

6ft+ ft 4 Zto LSB Ind .141 5 10 3ft 3*6 3ft+ to 

,5ft* ft 256- IftLTVCorpwt ... 5 2 Tto lto- V* 

75* 4 Vi Lundy Elec 15 9 5 4to 5 + to 

'to 45* 1 Lynch com ... 16 -35a 3ft 3ft 

»to+‘"to M-N-O-P 

7 - W 1'i to Macrod Ind ... 38 15-16 ft 1H6...... 

2 - to 15ft 13ft Me PUS LB 6 2 14 Eto M + ft 


13 

35 

7ft 

7ft 

7% + 

ft 

5 295 

lift 

11% 

lift-. 



17 

7ft 

7% 

7»+ 

to 

12 

n 

7ft